35 Burst results for "Robert Wood Johnson Foundation"

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

02:20 min | 11 months ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

"Live from news. <Speech_Female> Eighty eight seven in. Houston <Speech_Female> i'm kyra <Speech_Female> buckley. Centerpoint <Speech_Female> says it <Speech_Female> is investigating <Speech_Female> what caused us substation <Speech_Female> to catch fire <Speech_Female> earlier today <Speech_Female> in northwest <Speech_Female> houston. The <Speech_Female> blaze led to a <Speech_Female> shelter in place <Speech_Female> order as videos <Speech_Female> of dark smoke <Speech_Female> near brit. Morin <Speech_Female> kemp would circulate <Speech_Female> it on social <Speech_Female> media. The <Speech_Female> shelter in place <Speech_Female> has been lifted <Speech_Female> but officials are <Speech_Female> still asking people <Speech_Female> to avoid the area. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> A houston. Man <Speech_Female> has been arrested <Speech_Female> for alleged <Speech_Female> illegal <Speech_Female> voting. <Speech_Female> John rice tells us <Speech_Female> the arrest comes as <Speech_Female> the texas. Gop <Speech_Female> is pushing <Speech_Female> to pass tighter <Speech_Female> voting restrictions <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> hervas <Speech_Female> rogers captured <Speech_Female> national attention <Speech_Female> during the twenty <Speech_Female> twenty presidential <Speech_Female> primary when he <Speech_Female> stayed in line <Speech_Female> well past midnight <Speech_Female> at texas southern <Speech_Female> university <Speech_Female> waiting to cast his <Speech_Female> ballot. Now <Speech_Female> state attorney <Speech_Female> general. Ken paxton's <Speech_Female> office is prosecuting <Speech_Female> him. On <Speech_Female> two counts of <Speech_Female> illegal voting. <Speech_Female> Rogers was on <Speech_Female> parole at the time <Speech_Female> he voted making <Speech_Female> him ineligible <Speech_Female> to cast a ballot <Speech_Female> in texas his <Speech_Female> arrest came a <Speech_Female> day before the texas <Speech_Female> legislature convened <Speech_Female> a special session <Speech_Female> where controversial <Speech_Female> voting laws <Speech_Female> are on the agenda. <Speech_Female> Rogers is <Speech_Female> being held in the montgomery <Speech_Female> county jail <Speech_Female> on one hundred thousand <Speech_Female> dollars bail. <Speech_Female> I'm jen <SpeakerChange> raised in houston. <Speech_Female> Large <Speech_Female> in person. Events <Speech_Female> are beginning to return <Speech_Female> to houston <Speech_Female> including next <Speech_Female> weekend's comic <Speech_Female> palooza expected <Speech_Female> to draw thousands. <Speech_Female> Michael <Speech_Female> heckman is the president <Speech_Female> and ceo. Of houston <Speech_Female> i <Speech_Female> which manages city <Speech_Female> owned venues. <Speech_Female> He says the suspension <Speech_Female> of person <Speech_Female> events has been <Speech_Female> a huge blow <Speech_Female> to the city's hospitality <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> industry. <Speech_Male> At some point <Speech_Male> you have to go. <Speech_Male> You have to be able to <Speech_Male> restart things. <Speech_Male> And the convention <Speech_Male> industry <Speech_Male> live of an industry <Speech_Male> has a huge <Speech_Male> ripple effect <Speech_Male> throughout our economy <Speech_Male> for hotels <Speech_Male> and restaurants <Speech_Male> and others and <Speech_Male> those are real jobs. <Speech_Male> That's really <Speech_Male> important to houston <Speech_Male> and <SpeakerChange> really <Speech_Male> part of our recovery. <Speech_Female> Hagman says <Speech_Female> the industry is <Speech_Female> not expected to <Speech_Female> make a full recovery <Speech_Female> for at least <Speech_Female> another year. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> A bit more <Speech_Female> rain expected <Speech_Female> heading into <Speech_Female> the evening also <Speech_Female> a chance of thunderstorms <Speech_Female> overnight with <Speech_Female> lows in the seventies <Speech_Female> then partly <Speech_Female> sunny over the weekend <Speech_Female> a tad less <Speech_Female> rain forecasted <Speech_Female> highs around ninety. <Speech_Female> I'm kyra <SpeakerChange> buckley <Speech_Male> news. Eighty eight seven <Speech_Male> support for. Npr <Speech_Male> comes from <Speech_Male> npr stations. <Speech_Male> Other contributors include the robert wood johnson foundation supporting those.

houston texas Ken paxton kyra John rice Morin buckley Rogers Houston Gop Michael Hagman robert wood johnson foundation
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Right now, we're looking at those questions with former CDC director now Robert Wood Johnson Foundation president and CEO, Dr Richard Besser. Good morning. What an honor. Good morning. It's great to be here before we get into the campaign. We knew at some point the vaccination rates would slow down. But it's only what mid May does it concern you that such a large number of people still have yet to be vaccinated. Well, it concerns me that there's a lot of people who are still making their decisions. But I I expected to slow down there was for super many months. The issue was that there were so many people who want to be vaccinated and it was going to take awhile for the supply to catch up with that demand. Thankfully, that that's happened so that anyone who wants to get vaccinated should be able to find a place not far from where they live to get vaccinated at the time that works for them. Is a troubling doctor. And you, of course, headed the CDC at one time. It's a troubling for you to see in some cases. What is misinformation, whether intentional or otherwise, that is out there sometimes about vaccines, in particular about covert that people think it's been rushed. It's not been vetted. It's got whatever conspiracy theory you throw on top of it is that is that been problematic in the process as well. Well, you know, I think it's really important that people identified sources of trusted information to get their questions answered you. Misinformation is one thing where people you have questions and they're not. They haven't gone to the right type of find the correct information. What concerns me more is it's frank disinformation. Where where people are deliberately spreading information. That's wrong. Tol end confusion and that's a much, much more challenging issue. Tioga rest. I encourage, uh I'm a pediatrician. I encourage all parents to talk to their child. Doctor or nurse. Whoever provides health care to get their questions answered that they're thinking about whether to get their 12 year old or 14 vaccinate against Cove. It One of the statements that's false has to do with the Fizer and Madonna vaccine specifically changing your DNA's A and that especially concerns parents who may want to get those kids. The Pfizer vaccine. What do you say to those parents? Yeah. I mean, that's that, I think is one of those instances of disinformation. There's absolutely no truth to that. Um, these vaccines are not only incredibly safe But what they're showing as they've been given T o hundreds of millions of arms is that these are some of the most effective vaccines that we have her for any infectious agents. I think it Z almost miraculous that this soon after identifying a new virus, a new infectious agent we have in the United States three vaccines that the FDA is authorized. For use. I did not predict that I thought it would be several years before we There were vaccines on Dwyer, seeing the impact of that, as every state across the country is seeing declines in the number of cases whenever possible is a shins and death. I worry a little bit, though about complacency, and and as I look across the world and see the devastating impact in so many countries, I recognize that we are still at risk. From transmission anywhere that's taking place around the globe because very inter mutations could occur that make our vaccine much less effective. Besides your CDC credentials. The fact that you are the pediatrician gives you extra heft. When it comes to vaccinating Children. We keep hearing the term herd immunity. Obviously, you hear and have talked about it is well, how key is a doctor to for us to reach her community by getting these younger people the 12 and up the Tweens and teens vaccinated? Yeah. I mean, the concept of herd immunity means another people are vaccinated or had disease in there in the community so that if someone who's infected comes in, they're not gonna bump into people who are susceptible. They're not gonna bump into people who haven't either had the disease or vaccinated. I'm talk. I talk much less about her immunity right now in the reason for that is I don't think we're going to get there. The thing about herd immunity is that you have to see high levels of coverage across every community and People tend to live with whipping around those who have similar opinions. And so it's very likely that they'll be communities where vaccine coverage rates are 80 90%. And that their communities where that 50% and 50% there's the opportunity for this virus to describe what I like to say that every single person who gets vaccinated Not on. Lee gets protection themselves against disease, but they help to protect their family, their friends and their community. And so instead of focusing on while we get to 70% I would say Let's focus on each individual and each individual is truly come contributing tol protecting the community here here, former CDC director now Robert Wood Johnson Foundation president, CEO, Dr Richard Besser, Thank you so much for the time this morning. It's my pleasure. Take care you as well. We've got the newscast ahead. The driver.

50% United States CDC 80 70% mid May Richard Besser Lee 14 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation 12 this morning FDA 12 year old Cove three vaccines each individual one Madonna hundreds of millions of arms
CDC recommends double masks to protect against COVID-19

Start Here

05:08 min | 1 year ago

CDC recommends double masks to protect against COVID-19

"New cdc report showing that tightly fitted masks. Make a difference and that a tightly fitted with a cloth mask over it. Double masking as it's called is also effective. A new study from the cdc suggested that double masking putting a second mask on you. That fits really tightly actually can protect you from covid better than a single mask. Let's get some info on this. We got someone who ran the cdc at one point. Dr richard besser was the former acting director there. He now leads. The robert wood johnson foundation. Dr beshir can we start with the practical stuff. What is the current recommendation at this point when it comes to wearing masks like how many do we need. What type do we need right. Well brad at the highest level. The recommendation is that everybody should be wearing masks. Glad that we have a reasonable thinking governor who has lifted the mandate. I don't wear a mask unless i am made to. I see so many people. Today who aren't wearing any mask and even wearing a single mask will reduce the likelihood that if you have cohen you'll spread to someone else and will reduce the chances that if someone near you has cova that you will breathing in and get infected date ever used from cdc today underscore the importance the importance of wearing a mask correctly and the cdc's said in their study and this and this was published in the wr which is their journal of record is is that wearing cloth mask on top of a surgical mask or or the procedure massive. They're the same thing will improve the fit. And that's what this is about when when you put a mask on. There are gaps around the side of that masks. There may be gaps around around your nose but if you wear a surgical mask that has a wire at the top and you pinch it on your nose and you put a cloth mask on top of that. It will ensure that there aren't the the leakages sides of that surgical. The surgical does a lot of the work. And then the cloth is there to prosecute against your mouth exactly because if you just put on a surgical mask with with doing anything else. What you're going to find is that it doesn't fit tightly on the sides there big gaps there but that cloth mask fits properly over over. Your ears will will hold that surgical mask in in place and in their studies found that this reduced the amount of particles by by over ninety percent well fitting mast provided the greatest performance Blocking emitted aerosols and exposure of aerosols to the receiver. They cautioned though that. Don't take those numbers and say and assume they're going to try to you because they tested one type of cloth mask and one type of surgical mask but the general principle is a good one. That wearing a cloth mask over surgical mask will help. They give some other alternatives as well. This includes wearing a mask with the most mold. Fire nodding the ear loops on your mass. You cannot decides of a surgical mask and if you go to their website they'll show you what they mean by that so that it will fit better on the sides of your face or you can you can purchase. What's called a mask fitter which is like a plastic or nylon device. That goes over your mask that that helps it fit on. your face. looks the neck gaiter. That were always saying. They're not great mask but this looks like a neck gaiter. It's good for that yes some of our navigators and some are like a plastic frame that holds it on your face but the takeaway from it is is really this that wearing a mask as good but making sure it fits properly is is really important and will increase the benefits that you get well so okay so i understand that scientific conclusions change with more data right. I get that but just so we're clear like can we walk this back early on. Cdc was saying hey. We have no reason to recommend mask. We haven't seen any in july of last year. Data does come in. They they change it to what we do recommend mask. It's really there to protect other. People won't necessarily protect you. Then november comes around like actually does protect you. We started to see that data and now a full year after covid reaches american shores. Say oh actually. I just want us to masks are actually really good. Like is that counterproductive at one point when when we feel like the guidance shifts month after month well you know one of the advantages. We have now that we didn't have last year is that we're having cd scientists out front explaining what they're learning. How someone who are tired of hearing about masks as well as tired about of wearing masks can be cumbersome they can be inconvenient mass growing is not to make your life mess comfortable and we're seeing our political leaders stand up and say the exact same thing next few months masks not vaccines are the best defense against cove nineteen and hopefully that will allow people to take this in and say you know. I've been hearing a lot about these. These strains of the virus these mutants that can spread more easily. There's actually something i can do until you get vaccinated. Hopefully that will help people you know not feel like no one knows what they're doing but i feel like people providing answers as this is changing and that is a good thing. We can adapt ever ever so slightly if we need to.

CDC Dr Richard Besser Dr Beshir Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Cohen Brad
How Do You Distribute A Vaccine To Suspicious Citizens?

All Things Considered

06:19 min | 1 year ago

How Do You Distribute A Vaccine To Suspicious Citizens?

"Corona virus vaccine to millions of Americans who may be suspicious of authority or on the fringes of society. Especially when those people are among those most at risk of covert 19. Dr. Julie Morita has been thinking and writing about these problems for months as Chicago's former health commissioner, and now she'll have an opportunity to shape these policies on a national level as part of President elect Biden's covert response, team Doctor Marina Welcome to all things considered. Thanks for having me, Ari. Well, let's start with this question of how you build confidence in a vaccine when there is so much suspicion and disinformation circulating. What do you think needs to be done right now, even before vaccine is widely available to the public. I think it's really important for people to have ah, sense of what's happening and what's been done so far so very clear and concise and consistent messaging about the vaccine development process. Venture manufacturing process. The approval process is So that people have a sense that we're not doing this blindly that The vaccine development that's happened with the co of vaccine has been fast, but it's built on decades and decades of experience in making vaccines and distributing vaccines as well. When you're Chicago's chief medical officer, you were involved in distribution of the H one n one vaccine around the city. What did that experience teach you about how to address hesitation, especially And marginalized communities. And are there lessons there that you think the incoming by the administration can apply nationally? I think we learned a lot of lessons through the H one n one pandemic in 2009. We were working frantically to get vaccine providers lined up to actually make the vaccine available, and we also hosted vaccine clinics and communities that are typically underserved. The weather physician accesses a little bit more challenging. And what we found was that these mass immunization clinics that we hosted in some of our communities of color. The turnout for the vaccines was lower. And so at that point we started reaching out to community organizations, Faith based organizations to have them help us understand what was going on in the community. Why weren't they turning out for the vaccine? Why weren't they getting vaccinated? It would have helped US organizations that are already in touch with members of that community. Right. So we were we had organization that we were already partnering with. We reached out to them and ask them to engage with us again, and it worked to some extent, but without we didn't get the success that we were hoping for, and so building on that experience in non pandemic times, the Health Department and our partners worked established relationships on ongoing time. Between pandemic so that we would actually have these relationships and could really rely on the information from those community groups to inform our planning for future pandemics. The current health department is actually tapping into in relying on those relationships now to really help to get the information to the communities and understand what their questions and their concerns are. Interesting, But let me ask. There are real questions about vaccine safety. I mean yesterday, the CDC Immunization Advisory Committee recommended to give the first round of vaccines to health care workers and residents of long term care facilities. But there has not been a lot of research into the effectiveness of the vaccine and the safety of the vaccine in the nursing home population. How can experts be sure that it is safe for them? So the information is being evaluated, but it will be evaluated by FDA to look at the safety and efficacy to understand who the study populations included. Information that I've seen so far suggested the vaccines how are safe and effective in a wide range of age groups, a wide range of races and ethnicity and someone that information's fully evaluated by the FDA is advisory committee. Next week. We'll have additional information to really inform the recommendations with CDC or the C I. P did yesterday was really make recommendations in anticipation of these results. But they can be refined based on what the FDA and their advisory committee actually determined. Now the CDC is reputation has taken a hit during this pandemic. Guidance on testing and school re openings has sometimes been influenced by political pressure. So how do you think a new administration can restore confidence in the agency? So I think one of these like when I think about the vaccines situation currently, the key thing to keep in mind is that the E C. I P is not. It's the independent group of physicians, scientists, public health officials who come together and really review the data River to review the facts, review The evidence and the makeup, eventually Advisory Committee that's the advisory committee and they make recommendations to CDC. And then CDC that makes recommendations and buy a large those recommendations of the pipe makes the CDC usually fit makes us well. And so we'd be looking for after the recommendations are made by a CFP. What a CDC actually say is their alignment. Is there agreement with what A C I P s saying as well. Now, as you know, distribution of the vaccine is going to be handled by the states. And a couple weeks ago, I spoke with the head of Maine's Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr Nirav Shah, and he told me his state does not have enough money to build the infrastructure required to make sure everybody who needs it gets the vaccine. Here's what he said. We at the state level are ready to receive the baton to have that baton pass to us to begin the vaccination process, but without proper funding. It'll be like putting up a tent poles without having the tent. And he said, This is true of many other states, too. So Dr Marie to do you think the federal government is ready to provide the money that is going to be necessary? I think it's important to provide the adequate resources to public health What I've seen in the past in public health emergencies during my 10 20 years, the Chicago Department of Public Health Was that there would be large Pulis's of funding that would come to public health agencies of the state and local level during a crisis and then shortly after the crisis, But then the funding would actually go away. And so public health infrastructure really has suffered over time, and there is a need There's a strong immunization system that's in place, but it has to be enhanced that it has to be strengthened so that actually, people can actually get the vaccine in an equitable fashion. That's Dr Julie Morita. She is executive vice president of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which is a thunder of NPR. Today. She was speaking with us in her personal capacity as a volunteer for the Biden transition Teams. Coben 19 Advisory board. Dr Morita. Thanks for your time. Thank you. President

Center For Disease Control And Dr. Julie Morita Chicago Cdc Immunization Advisory Comm FDA Biden Marina Health Department Dr Nirav Shah Dr Marie Advisory Committee United States Chicago Department Of Public H Maine Pulis Federal Government Dr Julie Morita Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Coben
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Too scary in the midst of the pandemic, But city officials say outdoor trick or treating is fine as long as Children where face coverings in addition to the masks for their costumes. Partly cloudy skies expected for tonight with allow a low rather of around 43 showers for Sunday afternoon, probably around three o'clock and a high getting up to around 58 degrees. It's 45 degrees. This is WN Y. C at 606 support for NPR comes from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, supporting those working towards the day when no one has to choose between paying rent, putting food on the table and protecting their health and the health of others are w j f dot or GE. The SAGES, mystics, the CIA to travelers, the sailors, charmers scholars all saying praises to the night for who could hurt us whilst the moon above me, Gloans. Recited one sailor. Even as he dug his own grave under the night moves, one conspire, cut and steal and touched. There is magic in the night, even joy. What The old ones remember a special kind of darkest where There is no move. Where night terms where those that have passed a given voice and things that were buried are buried. No more. Holy Curse it haunted on this stamp judgment, we're gonna explore a different type of darkness. You probably present Spooked seven. Pitch black. Stories ripped from the night My name was glad Washington twinkle, Twinkle Little star. I hope I hope I hope Listen. Snap. Way. Start out Pitch Black spooks. Seven special in the land that lives very close to the veil, Ireland or shame, dumpy speak years working with kids as a social worker. He thought he'd seen it all into a little boy. Gregory snap was due. Three extremely sensitive nature of what you are about to hear some names have been changed. Stepped up. There's a small coastal town in Ireland that locals called the most westerly points in Europe. It. It can feel like the last place on Earth to the East. It's cut off by miles and miles of dense woods..

Ireland Gregory snap Robert Wood Johnson Foundation CIA SAGES Europe NPR GE Gloans Washington
NPR Poll: Black, Latino Households Struggle To Pay Rent, Mortgages

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:23 min | 1 year ago

NPR Poll: Black, Latino Households Struggle To Pay Rent, Mortgages

"Some new data from an NPR poll suggests just how badly Americans are suffering economically during the pandemic. Here's NPR's Chris Arnold Gina Lost Her job as a school bus driver in Chicago during the pandemic she was managing. Okay with unemployment money. But then about two weeks ago, she got a desperate call from her adult son his job had laid him off. He wasn't able to pay rate. There was an eviction moratorium in Chicago, but Jean says the landlord wanted her son out anyway a warning what happened next is disturbing and violent. She says the landlord got someone to threaten her son and shoot his dog a German shepherd mix that he'd had for years Economi. His mom they kill my dog. And the GATT told me that he should kill me to. MSA. Said market you come over here. I went over there. I said, okay star packing you gather go. and. Never went back. Gene only wants to use her first name for fear retribution. She says, she was afraid to report what happened to the police, her son and his two kids if now moved in with her. Gene was one of more than three thousand people who took part in a poll from NPR the Robert Wood, Johnson? Foundation. And the Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health. Her. Story is a sad and dramatic example. But the poll found many people reported problems with housing healthcare, unsafe workplaces, and a very high percentage of Americans. Forty six percent said they're having serious financial problems are surprises how large the? Numbers are Robert Blend in is a Harvard public health professor. He says, the poll was done in July after Congress approved an extra six hundred dollars a week in federal and apply benefits, and that was still supposed to be flowing to people and yet. So many people said, they were struggling one in six households even reported missing or delaying major bills just so that they could buy food blending says it's. Like the government sent a hundred FEMA trucks into a disaster zone but a lot of people never saw them or got any help it just like interviewing people in a hurricane area and the people are telling you, there's no relief it should be there could be some people are having trouble accessing the HAL blend says the government should quickly try to discover where the biggest problems are and there could be. Another factor. My name is Linda Neuron who and I was an accounting manager dorato lives in Phoenix Arizona and lost her accounting job at a tow truck company in the pandemic. Once that stay home order was issued if our driving, they're not getting a car accidents if they're not getting in car accidents, we don't have much of a business Dorato said in the poll that she was having serious financial problems when. She was getting that extra six hundred dollars a week and so she was doing. Okay. But she knew that that was about to expire and that she wasn't going to be able to support her four kids on the state benefits alone which for her just two hundred, forty dollars a week in Arizona and she was right. She's now burned through almost all of her savings and she won't able to pay reds after next month it's extremely difficult. To sleep at night I wake up at two or three in the morning and I just have my mind's just racing just constantly racing, and then I'm having to get up in the morning and sit with my two younger children but I'm so focused on you know bills and money and jobs Dorato who's Latina says she's been looking for work with no luck. She says she has no family she can go live with or borrow money from. And Black and Latino households were two times more likely than white families to say that they've fallen behind on their rent or mortgage. It is striking. It's not surprising. David Williams is a Harvard professor who studies race and sociology. He says blacks and Latinos make money than whites and have less savings. So they're more vulnerable Andy says they're less likely to have family members who can afford to loan the money for. Rent or other bills for every dollar of wealth white households have African American households have ten pennies and Latino households have twelfth pennies. So it's really not surprising that they are really been hurt badly in the context of the pandemic

Linda Neuron NPR Gene Chicago Robert Blend Harvard T H Chan School Of Pub Phoenix Arizona Dorato Professor Chris Arnold Gina David Williams Harvard Gatt Fema Economi Robert Wood Andy Jean
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Former CDC acting director Dr Richard Besser, now CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, says infighting and political influence has cost lives when you have political leaders with one message that there's nothing to worry about in every public health leaders, saying that this crisis is severe, and our actions can save lives. It leads to the situation we have in America, where so many people who are dying needlessly GOP Senator Mitt Romney today coming out in support of holding a vote on the next Supreme Court nominee, Romney Says he based his decision on the Constitution in president when there's a nominee of the party that is in the same in the same party as a Senate than typically, they do confirm President Trump says he's quote very close to making his final decision. But we'll wait until Saturday to announce the nominee Democrats. Republicans are not keeping their word about a nominee and a vote and are defying Justice Ginsburg just Justice Ginsburg's last wishes. ABC is Mary Bruce has more. It was reportedly Justice Ginsburg's dying wish that she not be replaced. East until after the election. But President Trump says he doesn't buy that, implying that it was made up by Democrats. But Ginsberg's granddaughter, telling the BBC she recorded that last wish herself, she said. My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed. Now, While Democrats have very little power here, they're going to make this fight all about the issues that are at stake. Justice. Ginsburg's funeral service will be held Friday. Tomorrow. Shal begin Little Lion repose at the Supreme Court and will become the first woman who served in government to lie in state of the U. S. Capitol. You're listening to ABC News. Arizona's.

Justice Ginsburg President Trump Senator Mitt Romney Supreme Court president Dr Richard Besser Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Ginsberg ABC News CDC ABC acting director GOP Mary Bruce CEO Arizona America Senate BBC
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on Mentally Yours

Mentally Yours

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on Mentally Yours

"Woken to Mentally Yours Metro could ikaes weekly podcast about all things mental health. . Today we're talking to Dave. . Marlon, , he was the CEO of crossroads of Southern Nevada, , which was the largest addiction and Rehab Center in the area, , the psychotherapist drug and alcohol counselor, , and he basically knows everything about addiction and mental health issues in the US and beyond. . Making me talking tim today about how the pandemic has been affected addiction issues to get help if you're struggling and how to recognize if you might have a problem with drugs or alcohol. . Bruce Dave. . Thanks so much for joining us on mental yours and welcome from across the pond. . My first question was basically because obviously as I mentioned, , we're in London. . You're in the US, , it such different situation in terms of addiction, , mental health, , and obviously the pandemic to get started. . Could you give kind of a brief overview of the reality of addiction in the US? ? How serious the problem is that how widespread is a? ? The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation calls addiction the number one health problem in the US. . If we look at the the number of prescription opiates that are consumed in the entire world <hes>. . The United States consumes more than eighty percent of them. . <hes>. . We. . have. . <hes>. . You know we've always had an alcohol problem for a percentage of our population. . <hes> we <hes> we developed enough and phetamine mean and a cocaine problem over the last. . Twenty years, , and in the last five, , six years <hes> Oh actually even a little longer. . An opiate problem has has become. . Our most serious addiction challenge. . Kind of the most common addiction issue that you see people coming into your center with. . It it's interesting. . I've run Iran the largest treatment center in Las. . Vegas of. . Gene. Years. . . And now as a private center and they're absolutely opiates or over my last three, , four years, , they're opiates was the number one drug of choice that clients had presented to solutions recovery <hes> without the opiate use disorder their primary. . Primary substance. . Now I work at an indigent facility <hes> in in downtown. Las . Vegas where. . More than half of our clients are homeless. . And what's interesting is with this demographic, , there's a much higher methamphetamine use. . Would say my number one. . Substance of for clients is nothin vitamin with opiates and alcohol running for a close second place. . That's really interesting I. . Think What was interesting that you said kind of opiates have been coming up over the lost six years because for me, it's , felt like the coverage has been really recent like only in the last couple of years, , we taught it to the opioid crisis this being a sudden kind of unexpected issue but you're saying it's been building for a long time. . It has. . Interestingly, , <hes> fourteen years ago I was running the largest health insurance company in the state. . And I remember in my last. . My last year or two I remember looking at pharmacy reports and we were all scratching our heads saying what is this Oxycontin and why did it not show up two years ago and now I remember when across the ten million dollar mark at the Insurance Company <hes> for monthly use so it really begins began spiking. . Thirteen fourteen years ago. . It became. . Newsworthy in fashionable. . Six seven years ago, , and now we're a were still squarely in an opiate epidemic. .

United States Las Vegas Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Bruce Dave London Las cocaine methamphetamine Iran
Drug Addiction In America

Mentally Yours

04:32 min | 1 year ago

Drug Addiction In America

"Woken to Mentally Yours Metro could ikaes weekly podcast about all things mental health. Today we're talking to Dave. Marlon, he was the CEO of crossroads of Southern Nevada, which was the largest addiction and Rehab Center in the area, the psychotherapist drug and alcohol counselor, and he basically knows everything about addiction and mental health issues in the US and beyond. Making me talking tim today about how the pandemic has been affected addiction issues to get help if you're struggling and how to recognize if you might have a problem with drugs or alcohol. Bruce Dave. Thanks so much for joining us on mental yours and welcome from across the pond. My first question was basically because obviously as I mentioned, we're in London. You're in the US, it such different situation in terms of addiction, mental health, and obviously the pandemic to get started. Could you give kind of a brief overview of the reality of addiction in the US? How serious the problem is that how widespread is a? The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation calls addiction the number one health problem in the US. If we look at the the number of prescription opiates that are consumed in the entire world The United States consumes more than eighty percent of them. We. have. You know we've always had an alcohol problem for a percentage of our population. we we developed enough and phetamine mean and a cocaine problem over the last. Twenty years, and in the last five, six years Oh actually even a little longer. An opiate problem has has become. Our most serious addiction challenge. Kind of the most common addiction issue that you see people coming into your center with. It it's interesting. I've run Iran the largest treatment center in Las. Vegas of. Gene. Years. And now as a private center and they're absolutely opiates or over my last three, four years, they're opiates was the number one drug of choice that clients had presented to solutions recovery without the opiate use disorder their primary. Primary substance. Now I work at an indigent facility in in downtown. Las Vegas where. More than half of our clients are homeless. And what's interesting is with this demographic, there's a much higher methamphetamine use. Would say my number one. Substance of for clients is nothin vitamin with opiates and alcohol running for a close second place. That's really interesting I. Think What was interesting that you said kind of opiates have been coming up over the lost six years because for me, it's felt like the coverage has been really recent like only in the last couple of years, we taught it to the opioid crisis this being a sudden kind of unexpected issue but you're saying it's been building for a long time. It has. Interestingly, fourteen years ago I was running the largest health insurance company in the state. And I remember in my last. My last year or two I remember looking at pharmacy reports and we were all scratching our heads saying what is this Oxycontin and why did it not show up two years ago and now I remember when across the ten million dollar mark at the Insurance Company for monthly use so it really begins began spiking. Thirteen fourteen years ago. It became. Newsworthy in fashionable. Six seven years ago, and now we're a were still squarely in an opiate epidemic.

United States Las Vegas Bruce Dave Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Rehab Center Marlon TIM CEO Southern Nevada LAS Cocaine London Methamphetamine Iran
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And sort of put our head in the sand and think it's all about vegetation management, we're not going to succeed together protecting Californians. It'll start getting cooler. I wish you'd just watch. I wish science think Sands knows, actually. For President Trump. This is very on brand he pulled out of the Paris climate accord. He says that efforts to try to address climate change or a mistake that will hurt the economy. And President Trump clearly sees this is a political winner, especially in states like Pennsylvania in Texas that have large fossil fuel industries. What was response from Joe Biden. Well. He went straight to the idea that these fires and other disasters are connected to climate change. In his remarks, he drew those connections to the Hurricanes, the hurricane headed towards Louisiana, and he criticized President Trump for not listening to scientists saying that that's putting Americans at risk. If you give a climate arsonist four more years in the White House, why would anyone be surprised? We have Mohr America Blaze. Viva climate denier four more years in the White House. Why would anyone be surprised when Maura America is underwater? And what Biden knows here is that Democratic voters care a lot about climate change, especially young Democratic voters that he needs to motivate. Major difference between these two men out there. As you said very clearly today. That's NPR's White House correspondent. Tamara Keith. Thank you. You're welcome. The economic fallout of the Corona virus continues for hundreds of millions of Americans. NPR's surveyed people in the biggest U. S cities to find out just how deep the financial wounds go. We found that half or more of American households have experienced a serious financial problems and that those problems are most severe in black and Latino households. One of the city's we focused on is Houston Health reporter Sarah Willow Ernst of Houston. Public Media has the latest from that city, which in recent years has suffered not one but two disasters. The other George Bush Intercontinental Airport. Romel Tamez works at a warehouse helping prepare in flight meals for United Airlines catering. When the airline industry started slashing service this spring, two men saw his hours cut the part time and it's taken a big financial hit on him, mostly worried about making rent light. I'm barely scraping by. Thomas has been struggling to afford food and says he's sleeping more to conserve energy. He feels he's been in freefall financially. Lot of people are looking for second jobs that are probably also part time, so it's not really doing much good, and there's not really that much work right now, Tim, as is one of many Houstonians finding themselves in this position. Over half of Houston household surveyed say someone has lost their job or their business has been furloughed or head ours reduced at their job during the outbreak, about a third report having trouble paying basic expenses like rent, utilities and food. This data comes from a new report by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Harvard's Teach Chan School of Public Health. The survey was conducted in New York, Chicago and Houston in July and August. The report shows that these money struggles fall starkly along racial lines, especially in Houston. Our own 80% off black and Latino household said they're facing serious financial problems compares only 30% of white households. That's because White Houstonians 10 have office jobs in general, white collar workers have been Mohr protected from financial declines. This is Bill Fulton, the director of the Kindred Institute for Urban Research at University. He says office workers have been able to continue their work and stay in business. Service industry jobs, however, that require in person interaction have struggled to stay open. There are simply more black and Hispanic folk who work in those jobs. And so they've been more heavily affected than office workers, who are mostly white and also Asian. Fulton says the financial struggles were already there from the trauma of Hurricane Harvey in 2017. Coronavirus pandemic just piled on top of that. So the two events together that one followed the other so closely that has made this such an extremely difficult situation here in Houston, take what happened to Pierre laws. He's always struggled financially. Working as a contract driver and cook. Then Harvey forced him in the homelessness. Okay, Harvey, and I love my car because I lost everything. And I couldn't get it couldn't get any help. I mean, I could get us I'll pay the fruit. I was living in a tent under the bridge. He was starting to get back on his feet earlier this year with food stamps and a new apartment through a local nonprofit. Then the pandemic it and now he's stuck again. He has underlying conditions that put him at higher risk for covert 19. He has a history of lung disease has trouble walking and he's HIV positive. He says the only jobs available would put him on the front lines. I go back and you two should I try to get a job? I can't get a job working from here because I don't have the Internet. It don't have the money, put it in and it He needs that to go back to school for accounting. He wants a job where you can work from home, but he recently upon his computer for $30, but I mean, I don't want to be like this further and I want to be able to come out of this on top. Not if under but for now, like other hard strapped Houstonians He's weighing the limited options in his head over and over again. I'm Sarah Will Ernst in Houston. Venus is Earth's closest planetary neighbor. And now scientists have found a foul smelling gas in its atmosphere that could indicate the presence of life. Maybe microbes in the planet's hazy yellow clouds. NPR's know. Greenfeld voice reports that scientists already lost to explain what else could have produced this gas..

Houston NPR President Trump White House Joe Biden Bill Fulton White House correspondent George Bush Intercontinental A Sands Tamara Keith President Paris Houston Health Harvey Sarah Will Ernst Romel Tamez Maura America lung disease Pennsylvania
Economic Pain From Pandemic Is Much Worse Than Expected, Poll Finds

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:16 min | 1 year ago

Economic Pain From Pandemic Is Much Worse Than Expected, Poll Finds

"A new survey measures the financial pain as the pandemic goes on. Almost half of American households have suffered serious financial losses were told in a new poll, by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Harvard t H. Chan School of Public Health in the country's four largest cities. The situation is even worse especially for Latinos and black-americans fifty to eighty percent of those. Households report serious financial problems. They can't pay their rent or their mortgage or their credit cards, and they've depleted what savings they have had. NPR's Yuki. Noguchi reports on the findings. The pandemic is creating serious financial problems, job loss depleted savings or possible eviction. That's despite hundreds of billions in government stimulus and other support. The survey shows economic stress running higher in the. country's four largest cities, New York, Los Angeles Chicago and Houston. Latino and black families were substantially more likely to face serious economic distress compared to white counterparts. Robert Blend in is a professor of health policy and political analysis at Harvard and Co author of the survey. He says the results show the personal financial challenges run deeper and broader than previously understood. I would've. Expected that all the aid that was coming from various sources would have narrowed not eliminated the differences by race ethnicity the survey conducted. This summer also found distress among households making less than a hundred thousand dollars a year. It's a just a lack of funds creating knock on effects trouble paying for food or medical care, which in turn lead to serious health consequences. The surveys implications could mean everything from a bigger drag on the economy to the nation's mental health outlook and blending says, the prognosis is grim at the time of the survey. The federal government was offering six hundred dollars a week in additional benefits for the unemployed. That was not renewed after July it's going to get worse because there is nothing for the people we serve eight who earn thousand. Dollars a year already communities are not working fulltime to fall back

Robert Blend NPR Harvard T H. Chan School Of Pu Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Federal Government Professor Of Health Policy Noguchi New York Harvard Houston Los Angeles Chicago
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In point. It's all twisted. My analyst told me that I was right out of my head, he said. Any treatment that easily, he said, I was like that was most inclined, went out of its side to pay out of my mind, and Frost wrote these lyrics when she was 17. Trio later recorded it in 1950. To a decade later, she moved back for a time to the UK, where she'd been born Annabelle McCauley, Allan short at seven years old, She sang in the Art Game Follies of 1938 and later acted in such films as Superman three. Throw Momma from the Train and Shortcuts. Handle it. Del Barco NPR news on Asia Market shares are mixed lower in Tokyo. I'm Shea Stevens, This is NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, supporting those working towards a day when no one has to choose between paying rents, putting food on the table and protecting their health and the health of others are w J f dot or GE. This's w. N. Y. C 93.9 FM and AM a 20 NPR News and the New York conversation. This is all of it and WNYC. See, I'm Alison Stewart..

NPR News NPR Annabelle McCauley Frost Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Alison Stewart Shea Stevens analyst Barco New York UK GE Asia Tokyo
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The Tobin bridge with some overnight work crews it is a seventy three degrees in Boston right now it's a clear sky jacquard WBZ's traffic on the threes here's the four day WBZ accu weather forecast with areas of low clouds and fog mainly in coastal communities early this morning it'll be mild lows generally in the sixties later today after clouds and fog break up partly sunny hot and humid the high approaching ninety involved in the Cape and the islands mostly in the seventies partly cloudy and mild tonight low sixty nine tomorrow not as warm but still sticky there can be an afternoon shower or thunderstorm especially northwest of four ninety five behind Boston eighty five that'll also be the case inland but the teachers will be stuck in the seventies Monday partly sunny high eighty four I'm accu weather meteorologist car within ski WBZ Boston news radio this is WBZ newsradio ten thirty with the news will never stop good morning I'm done help here's what's happening it was five months ago January nineteenth the first case of gene was detected in the U. S. the country now has more than two million confirmed infections and in some states record daily increases here's ABC's Aaron Katersky Dr Richard Besser who used to run the centers for disease control and now leads the Robert wood Johnson foundation is here so where do we stand on this yeah you know I I think that we are in a situation where many.

Tobin bridge Boston ABC Dr Richard Besser Robert wood Johnson foundation WBZ Aaron Katersky
Many states continue to face record highs in coronavirus cases

News, Traffic and Weather

05:42 min | 2 years ago

Many states continue to face record highs in coronavirus cases

"It was five months ago on January nineteenth the first case of covert nineteen was detected in the United States today the country has more than two million confirmed infections including record daily increases in some states Dr Richard Besser who used to run the centers for disease control and now leads the Robert wood Johnson foundation is here so where do we stand on this yeah you know I I think that we are in in a situation where many people are tired of hearing about the pandemic you're tired of having their lives disrupted by the pandemic and unfortunately we have something in the political there who are reinforcing that sense that this is over but you're here and it's it's really early days in this in this pandemic and your last week follow that road map that's being laid out by public health in terms of how you gradually get people hello in working and interacting socially it in safe ways if we don't follow that road map we're going to see places that are once again seeing their healthcare systems are well slides disrupted and people losing their lives bicycles been saved had people follow the guidance of public health is it the people in states with the pandemic did not initially hit as hard as it did say in New York or New Jersey not internalize the messaging or was the messaging flawed I I think there's a lot comes down to messaging and and the challenge that you faced during a public health crisis when the primary communicator is not the public health community one of the challenges I see with the the way the response was was orchestrated this pandemic was the entire nation was shut down and at the same time and so places that we're not seeing any disease were were were treated the same as places where the health care system is overwhelmed and that's never the approach public health give me the case these kinds of decisions and communicating them should be up to the centers for disease control and in this pandemic that has not been the case you know when when I when I ran emergency preparedness and response at CDC and and let the agency at the start of the swine flu pandemic the most important tool that that we had was our power to communicate and informs public a public that trusts the messenger is critical to success and when you when you have the political there in the public health layer I had aunts and the message being that public health is is a barrier to the economy coming back then then you're in a really dangerous situation because you then see some people following the advice for political reasons and some people not following your and these are not political choices the idea that people will practice different behaviors based on on politics is a dangerous situation you want the country unified Dr Richard Besser at the Robert wood Johnson foundation such unanimity that he references has not prevailed in states like Arizona and Florida which today reported record high numbers of single day cases parts of Texas have also reported their largest one day increases that includes bear county in the city of San Antonio where Ron Nirenberg is the mayor Mister mayor thanks for joining us let me clarify because we've had in three successive days three of our largest increases each day so the cases are increasing which we knew would happen once we are common and businesses and services started opening up further governors and we wanted to make sure we didn't see a corresponding increase in hospitals the severity in cages that's the alarming trend in addition to how fast the cases of accelerated people of let their guard down and I think that what I've said before about the pace at which the economy is opening Texas doesn't allow us the benefit of data to be affected incisions are being met are you worried then that San Antonio and similarly situated cities in Texas are behind the curve you know what I I remain focused on is ensuring that we have the route the the proper measures in place of time we're making the decisions open up out when the state took control of the opening plan we essential you essentially yielded our ability to stay in front of the Kerr because again they're opening faster than the data shows the actor efficacy of each decision so in that sense we are behind the curve in terms of the decision making process but what I will say is that the local communities the urban communities of practice I've been a very very aggressive and proactive the difficulty in our situation knows the state prevents us from mandating some of the best practices that includes wearing masks the governor prohibited cities from mandating masks but you've made a different decision how to arrive at it you know we had been courting again our orders protocols for businesses to follow when the Attorney General sent him a letter a couple of weeks ago and basically re interpreted the state's order that said we weren't allowed to do that anymore we had to adjust course but we've been recommending these thanks for a while now but what what we did our best we was rather than mandate our maps for individuals we use the the path that we had through the business protocols to mandate businesses import mask wearing as part of their safety

United States
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:02 min | 2 years ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KCRW

"The health and economic well being of women in the US and around the world more information is available if you want Donald and from the Robert wood Johnson foundation supporting those working towards a day when no one has to choose between paying rent putting food on the table and protecting their health and the help of others are W. J. F. dont work it's five twenty two it's morning edition from NPR news I'm David Greene in Houston Texas and I'm Rachel Martin in Washington DC New York City is taking its first steps in reopening after an almost three month long locked down because of the corona virus starting today as many as four hundred thousand people will be able to join essential workers in doing their jobs outside their homes it's a big move for a city that seem more than two hundred thousand people confirmed with the virus and more than twenty one thousand people have died from cope with nineteen there and this all comes after more than a week of unrest in New York City all the protests over police brutality NPR's Hansi lo one joins us from New York with the latest on the welcome thank you Richard so New York City I mean the site of another weekend of massive protests against police brutality in the name of George Floyd that combined with the pandemic there I mean it is just been a lot explain what's gonna happen today we're expecting to see more new Yorkers to leave their homes to go to work starting today this is the first phase of New York city's economic re opening and like you said this is a really major moment for city that's been faced with two major crisis right now yeah it's been the national epicenter of this pandemic and over the past week these gatherings of nonviolent protesters have really highlighted longstanding issues with policing and racial injustice in the city you know there seems to be some momentum building for the protesters especially those calling for the defunding of the New York City police department yesterday mayor bill de Blasio after he announced the end of nightly curfews a day earlier than expected the mayor also said that for upcoming negotiations with the city's budget city officials intend to redirect some funding for the police to use programs and social services in communities of color so there are a lot of moving pieces right now in New York so let's talk about the first phase of new York's re opening what kinds of businesses are gonna be allowed to open their doors today yeah only some industries that seem local officials think in social distance more easily that includes retail manufacturing and construction it's gonna be a real test to see if and how the city can come back to life you know it's the largest most densely populated city in the country and it just emptied out after the outbreak and now the numbers of new cover cases in hospitalizations because of governing team have dropped a lot of workers small business owners who cannot work from home they've been really anxious to make money again and put food on the table pay their bills so it's one thing to say okay we're gonna do this phased reopening and now hundreds of thousands of people can go back to work but I mean that's that's sort of dangerous isn't it just just getting to work there all these precautions with people's commutes there are a lot of risks involved and you know big things here in New York is a course public transit which is the lifeblood of the city especially the subway and the number of riders since the outbreak is really plummeted and some essential workers have not had a choice over these past few months and but many people have been avoiding the subway ends question see what they will do now that the city is re opening that new Yorkers have to wear face coverings when they're riding the subway but it's very hard if not impossible social distancing Ramblers hope to stagger workshops we'll see if that works out I talked to one small business owner Josie will dart Dacians this woman's booty calls always and brook lane had to transition to more online ordering but she told me she's not opening her store anytime soon let's listen which is that I don't think it's worth it do you know this government is just more concerned about the economics the money rather than people's house in the city Fishel said they are trying to keep the city safe you know one thing to keep in mind the going back to the protest we're not sure how those gatherings may increase the spread the virus and so the city is urging everyone to get tested so one thing I haven't heard you mention is is the schools right there of course of course closed in places in states around the country where does that leave parents and guardians who have to go back to work now I talked to one small business earlier no at least of BG LH market place she's a single mother of three she's very concerned this push to reopen and I feel like no one is really talking about childcare because I just kind of like what do you expect me to do with my kids and I have been asking around and no one has an answer and I just find that very very confusing because it's the last big piece of the puzzle if for no child care centers and see your friends social workers only for for parents like no at least it's a real big problem right now right NPR's Hansi lo Juan from New York City thank you you're welcome now some people want to join the nationwide protests against racism and police brutality but the risks of the corona virus pandemic keep them from marching one solution caravans from Salt Lake City and Tallahassee to Kentucky and Wisconsin people are demonstrating in cars trucks and mini vans and cars Camilla domonoske heard from protesters during a recent caravan of cars Sudeikis you Grover has taken her six year old to street protests in San Francisco they maintain social distance but her toddlers with an eighteen month old and a two year old they're not following directions that well in this caravan the whole family could pile into the many with signs like Asians for black lives elsewhere in the caravan also recording a protest for NPR was Fran Culp who has medical issues Linda Phan was driving and cheering to her daughter is immuno compromised editor local business owner Erin fair organized as caravan she'd never done that before but she just followed an activist group on Instagram who posted about a zoom call with tips on how to plan a protest she wanted to offer a safer option during this pandemic and after attending protest in downtown San Francisco she also wanted to bring that energy and a quieter neighborhoods like hers to be so close yet lives this is very peaceful kind of unbothered existence was bothering me their plan to seventeen mile loop through San Francisco and inspired by the activist on that soon call she told herself that five or ten cars would be a success a lot more showed up.

US Donald Robert wood Johnson foundation
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That we made that won that award tune in this week tomorrow at Taylor on ninety three point nine FM W. NYC support for WNYC comes from all arts presenting on display arts educator Stephanie Johnson Cunningham discusses how museums and artists highlight issues of immigration incarceration and more in exhibitions streaming now on all arts dot org and the all arts up I'm W. N. Y. C.'s program director Jacquelyn Cincotta we're able to bring you the programs you value because of your donations but on air fundraising interrupts news coverage at a time when W. NYC service is so essential we're limiting our spring pledge drive to just three days next week your donation right now will help us get back to the critical news coverage you can count on from W. NYC and NPR if you can please give at W. NYC dot org thank you support for NPR comes from this station and from the NPR wine club where every bottle tells a story and NPR shows become wines like weekend edition Cabernet Sauvignon available to adults twenty one years or older learn more at NPR wine club dot work from the Christy foundation expanding opportunities in America's cities through grantmaking and social investing more at crazy dot org I'm from the Robert wood Johnson foundation at R. W. J. F. dot org we're back you're listening to it's been a minute from NPR.

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WTVN

"Robert wood Johnson foundation chief exec Dr Richard Besser is former ABC news health and medical editor Richard Cantu ABC stars overnight tonight a low down to thirty six degrees and then on Friday a beautiful afternoon with lots of sunshine the high near sixty three nice day on Saturday the high sixty six with some sun and some clouds and rain overnight I'm A. B. C. six first morning chief meteorologist Marshall McPeek on your severe weather station newsradio six ten WTVN all to talk to George Noory call the wildcard line at eight one eight five zero one four one zero nine the first time caller line is eight one eight five zero one four seven two one to talk tool free from east of the Rockies call eight hundred eight two five five zero three three from west of the Rockies toll free call eight hundred six one eight eight two five five to reach George via Skype user Skype name George nine seven three one three seven Georgia text message anytime at eight one eight two nine eight six five two one from the gateway to the west this is coast to coast AM with George Noory all this month as stress awareness month go figure doctor Lorena del joins us next hour to talk about people under stress and this is going to be a very heavy week for us for.

Dr Richard Besser editor Marshall McPeek George Noory Rockies Robert wood Johnson foundation Richard Cantu chief meteorologist Georgia Lorena del
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And Catherine T. macarthur foundation supporting creative people and effective institutions committed to building a more just verdant and peaceful world more information is a mac found daughter work from the crazy foundation expanding opportunities in America's cities through grant making in social investing more it crazy daughter work I'm from the Robert wood Johnson foundation at our W. J. F. dot org it's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king and I'm Steve Inskeep is the UK's deal with while way a security risk the United States says yes reading about the information security for a vital ally the U. K. decided it was safe enough to buy five your Quitman from a Chinese company that offers far cheaper equipment than others as digital networks expand and improve this decision was announced as secretary of state Mike Pompeii prepares to visit prime minister Boris Johnson and other leading UK officials today Alan Woodward has been watching all of this he is a professor at the university of Surrey has consulted with UK internet security officials welcome back to the program Sir morning what is it exactly that Britain's says it is willing to to buyer willing to have its telecom companies buy from one way X. it is limited it's because I think the you can accept that there is a risk nothing's ever zero risk there is a risk so what they're doing is they're saying there's a limit wow equipment to the periphery of the network's effectively the antennas and then they can to limit it to a certain number as well and we're talking here of course about the the wireless network on which were using phones and much for using internet if you're in the U. K. already things may pass through while way equipment and that's going to continue to be on the upgrade network right absolutely I insight psyche has been putting out hits since last may and may stay on ten is that being used already from whole out they got something like twenty percent of the market already now you're saying that Britain is limited while ways use here meaning that there are more vital a more central pieces of infrastructure that they will not be buying from one way is that right the card correct state the the circle course the network the bit that really authenticate see new routes to cold that way you could really destroy if you like that hi then don't they can be restricted on tolls I'm so they can be restricted only to the radio access areas and even then only to about a third of its name on the set do you find this is an outside expert sufficient to contain the risk because it does sound like my phone call my signal my internet search my vital email my text might still be or would still be going through a Huawei antenna could it be spied upon in some way by China which is the U. S. theory here I think that that's I think that's a bit of a red herring I think the bigger risk is potentially disrupting the network because this is not about phone calls and date so this is about looking at ten years to win world very dependent on five G. and is running all calls and all traffic lights not building systems and the sum that could describe to that point that's where it could get really nasty however the big problem from my perspective is the market is broken I'm we have very little choice there are in the U. K. they're ready three Meg bend as of which will always want I'm not if you were to take them out you you'll restricting the diverse city offenders and that's in itself is a security risk because there's nothing to say that one the other band is as good as they might be might not an intensely introducer floor secure site it really is a balancing act and I think what the case saying is it's about mitigating the risk not saying is there's no risk but it's about mitigating noticed in a few seconds to British officials suspect the U. S. is just going after a while way for trade purposes because the US is pushing back on Chinese companies in so many ways I think they have it basically there is a suspicion that this is tied up with geopolitics absolutely and that's why they're basically saying we believe we can do in the house but the long term ambition is to basically line up with what the Americans is that anyway Alan Woodward thanks so much because he's a visiting professor at the university of Surrey when the Kansas City Chiefs play the San Francisco forty Niners in the Super Bowl on Sunday it'll be the chief's first time at the Superbowl in fifty years Frank Morris of member station Casey you are reports on the excitement and the complications cavernous majestic old train station in Kansas city's.

Catherine T. macarthur foundat mac America
When Insurance Won't Cover Drugs, Americans Make 'Tough Choices' About Their Health

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:05 min | 2 years ago

When Insurance Won't Cover Drugs, Americans Make 'Tough Choices' About Their Health

"What happens when insurance companies deny coverage for medications? It doesn't just force people to pay for drugs themselves. A survey finds that for almost half of Americans went. When Insurance Denies Payment? They do not get the drugs at all. The poll comes from NPR. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T H Chan School of Public Public Health. NPR's Patty name reports Sahlin. REDUC- is seventy eight on a fixed income. She has severe acid reflux. I have to eat very small all meals and when I eat sometimes it feels like everything's stuck in my chest and I get really bad pain. And I have to throw up reduces retired on medicare she also pays for supplemental insurance policy to cover the cost of drugs but it will only pay for the generic version of her heartburn medication. Her her doctor prescribed the brand name. She says the generic version just doesn't work for her. No it's not as effective now. Definitely not she can't afford the brand name so now she has extremely painful episodes of acid reflux about three times a month. Our poll shows that like Ridolfi. The vast majority pretty of Americans have health insurance that includes prescription drug coverage but one in three say that in the past year insurance. Didn't cover the cost of medication and for themselves or their household members Robert Blend in with the Harvard Chan School directed our poll. So what you see is insurers are not paying for some drugs that physicians are recommending. The patients think they need when that happened. Most of the highest earners paid for the medication themselves but Glendon says is that was not the case for everyone else. A half of the people who are middle class or or moderate income are not getting him because they can't afford to go out and pay for it themselves batum line. He says it's just not fair. This idea that if we save money we all have to make tough choices together. The tough choices really don't affects the most wealthy people in the United States. They just affect people who are middle and lower

NPR Harvard T H Chan School Of Pub Glendon Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Harvard Chan School Heartburn Ridolfi Robert Blend United States Patty Batum
When Insurance Won't Cover Drugs, Americans Make 'Tough Choices' About Their Health

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:05 min | 2 years ago

When Insurance Won't Cover Drugs, Americans Make 'Tough Choices' About Their Health

"What happens when insurance companies deny coverage for medications? It doesn't just force people to pay for drugs themselves. A survey finds that for almost half of Americans went. When Insurance Denies Payment? They do not get the drugs at all. The poll comes from NPR. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T H Chan School of Public Public Health. NPR's Patty name reports Sahlin. REDUC- is seventy eight on a fixed income. She has severe acid reflux. I have to eat very small all meals and when I eat sometimes it feels like everything's stuck in my chest and I get really bad pain. And I have to throw up reduces retired on medicare she also pays for supplemental insurance policy to cover the cost of drugs but it will only pay for the generic version of her heartburn medication. Her her doctor prescribed the brand name. She says the generic version just doesn't work for her. No it's not as effective now. Definitely not she can't afford the brand name so now she has extremely painful episodes of acid reflux about three times a month. Our poll shows that like Ridolfi. The vast majority pretty of Americans have health insurance that includes prescription drug coverage but one in three say that in the past year insurance. Didn't cover the cost of medication and for themselves or their household members Robert Blend in with the Harvard Chan School directed our poll. So what you see is insurers are not paying for some drugs that physicians are recommending. The patients think they need when that happened. Most of the highest earners paid for the medication themselves but Glendon says is that was not the case for everyone else. A half of the people who are middle class or or moderate income are not getting him because they can't afford to go out and pay for it themselves batum line. He says it's just not fair. This idea that if we save money we all have to make tough choices together. The tough choices really don't affects the most wealthy people in the United States. They just affect people who are middle and lower

NPR Harvard T H Chan School Of Pub Glendon Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Harvard Chan School Heartburn Ridolfi Robert Blend United States Patty Batum
When Insurance Won't Cover Drugs, Americans Make 'Tough Choices' About Their Health

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:34 min | 2 years ago

When Insurance Won't Cover Drugs, Americans Make 'Tough Choices' About Their Health

"What happens when insurance companies deny coverage for medications? It doesn't just force people to pay for drugs themselves. A survey finds that for almost half of Americans went. When Insurance Denies Payment? They do not get the drugs at all. The poll comes from NPR. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T H Chan School of Public Public Health. NPR's Patty name reports Sahlin. REDUC- is seventy eight on a fixed income. She has severe acid reflux. I have to eat very small all meals and when I eat sometimes it feels like everything's stuck in my chest and I get really bad pain. And I have to throw up reduces retired on medicare she also pays for supplemental insurance policy to cover the cost of drugs but it will only pay for the generic version of her heartburn medication. Her her doctor prescribed the brand name. She says the generic version just doesn't work for her. No it's not as effective now. Definitely not she can't afford the brand name so now she has extremely painful episodes of acid reflux about three times a month. Our poll shows that like Ridolfi. The vast majority pretty of Americans have health insurance that includes prescription drug coverage but one in three say that in the past year insurance. Didn't cover the cost of medication and for themselves or their household members Robert Blend in with the Harvard Chan School directed our poll. So what you see is insurers are not paying for some drugs that physicians are recommending. The patients think they need when that happened. Most of the highest earners paid for the medication themselves but Glendon says is that was not the case for everyone else. A half of the people who are middle class or or moderate income are not getting him because they can't afford to go out and pay for it themselves batum line. He says it's just not fair. This idea that if we save money we all have to make tough choices together. The tough choices really don't affects the most wealthy people in the United States. They just affect people who are middle and lower income and this could leave lower and middle income individuals more vulnerable to disease and other health problems for Sally Rideau see one example is her EPI pen. She's allergic to bees and needs the EPI pen to inject life saving medication in case she gets stung and the last time I was stung. The doctor said each time you get stung can be very serious and it can result in death so he's always carry the EPI pen and in my case. I do a lot of gardening and I'm by myself so just felt safe to have my Epi pen with me just in case but this time when she went to the pharmacy to get the pen prescribed by her doctor she was told her insurance wouldn't cover the cost. It was close to six hundred dollars and I said well how about the generic could I get generic and she said well. That's three ninety eight and I said you're kidding. She said no I said okay then. Just forget it so today when we're dosing gardens. She wears as long sleeves and long pants to try to protect yourself against B.'s. The situation she says it's upsetting. I have three insurances. I'm always pay a lot of copays as I pay a lot for my drugs. It's very frustrating. I think when you have insurance I think you should be able to get the drug. You need one unexpected. Finding from our poll on income inequality is that even people who can afford to cover the cost of their medication. Sometimes don't this is one of the first polls to survey the top one percent percent people earning over five hundred thousand dollars a year and eighteen percent of them chose not to fill prescriptions. When insurance wouldn't cover it? Tina Smith is one of them. She runs a technology consulting firm in Minneapolis last year when her doctor prescribed a medication to treat the skin condition rose Patia. She got a shock. When I went to fill the prescription the cost for the prescription was over six hundred dollars? She says for the past seven years. The medication costs about twenty dollars. So this was a huge increase and Smith decided not to get it because I felt that it was fiscally irresponsible and I have no interest in funding big pharma anymore than I absolutely have to. I feel big farmers than rob in the American people for years and they continued to increase. The cost of prescriptions drug. Drug prices have been escalating. Actually four in a significant way at least the last couple decades Frederica saucy is director of the Consumer Advocacy Group families. USA But in the last five. Or six years it's really hit a crescendo. Not surprisingly the smallest increase were in generic drugs but the adjective small small. He says pretty much ends there. You know an average increase for drugs might be fifteen or sixteen percent annually which is much much faster than our paychecks or inflation inflation. But you could see a doubling or tripling of drug cost year every year depending on the ability of that drug company to have no competition he says healthcare caused swallowing up more and more families discretionary income not only in higher drug prices but also in higher deductibles co pays and cost sharing we. We spoke with representatives of both the pharmaceutical and health insurance industries and they point the finger at each other. Insurers say the financial squeeze Americans are are experiencing is because of high drug prices the drug makers say it's High Insurance and hospital costs whatever. The reason Harvard health economist and primary Care Physician Ben Summers says not getting needed. Medication is not good news. There's more and more evidence that having health insurance really does improve people's health and lives and and medications are one of the key parts of that because it is such a mainstay of how we manage a lot of chronic conditions now says not all medications are equal some of the medications occasions we prescribe are really kind of options to a patient. You say look. This medication may help you feel better while you have this infection or while you are having some heartburn but if view feel fine without it that's okay but how there's a critical cholesterol lowering statins for example or insulin to keep blood sugar under control and and sometimes people won't even notice they're not taking it not all these conditions have symptoms. You can be building up dangerous levels of high blood sugar or cholesterol without noticing. It until it's too late. Sadly summer says he's not surprised by the findings of our poll he says at least a quarter of his patients. Don't get new prescriptions filled. Because they say they just don't have the money. Patty named

NPR Heartburn Patty United States Tina Smith Harvard T H Chan School Of Pub Robert Wood Johnson Foundation High Insurance Harvard Chan School Ridolfi Sally Rideau Glendon Robert Blend Batum Harvard Consumer Advocacy Group
When Insurance Won't Cover Drugs, Americans Make 'Tough Choices' About Their Health

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:35 min | 2 years ago

When Insurance Won't Cover Drugs, Americans Make 'Tough Choices' About Their Health

"What happens when insurance companies deny coverage for medications? It doesn't just force people to pay for drugs themselves. A survey finds that for almost half of Americans went. When Insurance Denies Payment? They do not get the drugs at all. The poll comes from NPR. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T H Chan School of Public Public Health. NPR's Patty name reports Sahlin. REDUC- is seventy eight on a fixed income. She has severe acid reflux. I have to eat very small all meals and when I eat sometimes it feels like everything's stuck in my chest and I get really bad pain. And I have to throw up reduces retired on medicare she also pays for supplemental insurance policy to cover the cost of drugs but it will only pay for the generic version of her heartburn medication. Her her doctor prescribed the brand name. She says the generic version just doesn't work for her. No it's not as effective now. Definitely not she can't afford the brand name so now she has extremely painful episodes of acid reflux about three times a month. Our poll shows that like Ridolfi. The vast majority pretty of Americans have health insurance that includes prescription drug coverage but one in three say that in the past year insurance. Didn't cover the cost of medication and for themselves or their household members Robert Blend in with the Harvard Chan School directed our poll. So what you see is insurers are not paying for some drugs that physicians are recommending. The patients think they need when that happened. Most of the highest earners paid for the medication themselves but Glendon says is that was not the case for everyone else. A half of the people who are middle class or or moderate income are not getting him because they can't afford to go out and pay for it themselves batum line. He says it's just not fair. This idea that if we save money we all have to make tough choices together. The tough choices really don't affects the most wealthy people in the United States. They just affect people who are middle and lower income and this could leave lower and middle income individuals more vulnerable to disease and other health problems for Sally Rideau see one example is her EPI pen. She's allergic to bees and needs the EPI pen to inject life saving medication in case she gets stung and the last time I was stung. The doctor said each time you get stung can be very serious and it can result in death so he's always carry the EPI pen and in my case. I do a lot of gardening and I'm by myself so just felt safe to have my Epi pen with me just in case but this time when she went to the pharmacy to get the pen prescribed by her doctor she was told her insurance wouldn't cover the cost. It was close to six hundred dollars and I said well how about the generic could I get generic and she said well. That's three ninety eight and I said you're kidding. She said no I said okay then. Just forget it so today when we're dosing gardens. She wears as long sleeves and long pants to try to protect yourself against B.'s. The situation she says it's upsetting. I have three insurances. I'm always pay a lot of copays as I pay a lot for my drugs. It's very frustrating. I think when you have insurance I think you should be able to get the drug. You need one unexpected. Finding from our poll on income inequality is that even people who can afford to cover the cost of their medication. Sometimes don't this is one of the first polls to survey the top one percent percent people earning over five hundred thousand dollars a year and eighteen percent of them chose not to fill prescriptions. When insurance wouldn't cover it? Tina Smith is one of them. She runs a technology consulting firm in Minneapolis last year when her doctor prescribed a medication to treat the skin condition rose Patia. She got a shock. When I went to fill the prescription the cost for the prescription was over six hundred dollars? She says for the past seven years. The medication costs about twenty dollars. So this was a huge increase and Smith decided not to get it because I felt that it was fiscally irresponsible and I have no interest in funding big pharma anymore than I absolutely have to. I feel big farmers than rob in the American people for years and they continued to increase. The cost of prescriptions drug. Drug prices have been escalating. Actually four in a significant way at least the last couple decades Frederica saucy is director of the Consumer Advocacy Group families. USA But in the last five. Or six years it's really hit a crescendo. Not surprisingly the smallest increase were in generic drugs but the adjective small small. He says pretty much ends there. You know an average increase for drugs might be fifteen or sixteen percent annually which is much much faster than our paychecks or inflation inflation. But you could see a doubling or tripling of drug cost year every year depending on the ability of that drug company to have no competition he says healthcare caused swallowing up more and more families discretionary income not only in higher drug prices but also in higher deductibles co pays and cost sharing we. We spoke with representatives of both the pharmaceutical and health insurance industries and they point the finger at each other. Insurers say the financial squeeze Americans are are experiencing is because of high drug prices the drug makers say it's High Insurance and hospital costs whatever. The reason Harvard health economist and primary Care Physician Ben Summers says not getting needed. Medication is not good news. There's more and more evidence that having health insurance really does improve people's health and lives and and medications are one of the key parts of that because it is such a mainstay of how we manage a lot of chronic conditions now says not all medications are equal some of the medications occasions we prescribe are really kind of options to a patient. You say look. This medication may help you feel better while you have this infection or while you are having some heartburn but if view feel fine without it that's okay but how there's a critical cholesterol lowering statins for example or insulin to keep blood sugar under control and and sometimes people won't even notice they're not taking it not all these conditions have symptoms. You can be building up dangerous levels of high blood sugar or cholesterol without noticing. It until it's too late. Sadly summer says he's not surprised by the findings of our poll he says at least a quarter of his patients. Don't get new prescriptions filled. Because they say they just don't have the money. Patty named N._p._R. News.

NPR Heartburn Patty United States Tina Smith Harvard T H Chan School Of Pub Robert Wood Johnson Foundation High Insurance Harvard Chan School Ridolfi Sally Rideau Glendon Robert Blend Batum Harvard Consumer Advocacy Group
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Would you pay your doctor a fee to get perks perks like same day appointments snow waits on rushed exams this is sometimes called concierge medicine and here is latest poll with the Robert wood Johnson foundation and the harbor to age chan school of public health found that more than one in five wealthy people do pay for these perks and your health policy reporter Salinas Simmons definite reports that concierge medicine is more affordable than it once was but it's still not widespread listen to this guy talk about his primary care doctor well doctor Dunlap is remarkable physician he's not distracted when you sit down to talk with him you understand you're history that is David west park of Kansas city Missouri talking about his doctor John Dunlap the feeling is mutual he is a wonderful intelligent and very well spoken individual who is highly thought of in the local community so basically it's a love fest with a contract behind it all of Dunlap's patients pay him a monthly fee and for that fee they get along thorough annual physical including lab work home visits services in the hospital same day appointments and all of his patients had his cell phone number we have a certain group of people who only text before six thirty in the morning or six thirty at night there are some so people like that that of course push the limits don't not started out in medicine in nineteen eighty she has a private practice he's not in a physician group or affiliated with the hospital in recent years he says with his patients getting older it felt like he was working harder and making less he became interested in trying to practice medicine in a new way with the emphasis on more comprehensive care for a smaller number the direct primary care model and so little by little I became more interested in it and saw the advantages advantages like knowing his budget at the beginning of the year knowing his patients better being able to pay his staff more and taking insurance claims and billing codes and all the rest off their plates he decided to take the plunge and switches practice to the direct primary care model the whole thing happens outside of health insurance his patients pay their monthly fees.

Robert wood Johnson foundation doctor Dunlap David west park Missouri private practice reporter Salinas Simmons Kansas John Dunlap
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Station and from fidelity investments taking a personalized approach to helping clients grow preserve and manage their wealth learn more at fidelity dot com slash wealth fidelity brokerage services L. L. C. from the John D. and Catherine T. macarthur foundation recognizing exceptionally creative individuals this year's macarthur fellows and more information are at mac found dot org I'm from the Robert wood Johnson foundation at our W. J. F. dot org this is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm ari Shapiro and MOD Cornish wildfires in California have been incredibly costly not just for homeowners but for insurance companies responsible for helping them recover that's led a number of insurance companies to cancel people's policies but as of late last week the state insurance commissioner has declared they can't do that anymore in areas hit hard by fires at least for the next year we're joined now by California insurance commissioner Ricardo Lara welcome to the program I think it's going to be on before we get to the business end of this can you talk about homeowners who have had their policies canceled it's become apparent now that insurance is becoming less and less available for so many Californians in Oakland we've heard from a first time home buyer and his wife have been canceled for insurance three of the four years even though they are in one of the most urban areas in our state and two minutes from a local fire fighter in Jackson California for example near Sacramento we met with the realtor who was helping her client a single mom of four close on a home until they got the insurance quote of close to four thousand dollars a year four times what she expected it pushed the buyer over the landing guidelines and she lost her home and this is happening throughout the entire state so now you decide to is but this one year ban on that cancellation of policies how does it work the governor in October declared several these fires cassava convergences which gives us an opportunity to go over to the legislature and ask for real long lasting solutions are going to be critical as we move forward to trying to address the ongoing wildfire situation that we can to find ourselves every year and then give people an opportunity to better plan and make decisions for themselves and their families.

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Million dollars in grants. between two thousand thirteen and two thousand sixteen according to tax records several of the nonprofit groups financial backers which include Google JP Morgan and prudential have business interests before the house committee on oversight and government reform performed Cummings has served as chairman since January. the largest contributor to the nonprofit organization run by Cummings as wife was the Robert wood Johnson foundation a company regulated by Cummings committee. the foundation the Robert wood Johnson foundation which gave a total of five and a half million to Cummings is wife's consulting firm. and another five point two million to her non profit ten and a half million split between the nonprofit and for profit. run by Cummings wife. supporting. organizations in two thousand seventeen. what is what we call and ten million dollars divvied up half of the for profit half to the non profit run by Cummings wife. so in recent months coming loose has been a vocal opponent of Johnson Johnson targeting the company is part of the house oversight committee's probe of ground. price inflation. so this this is a classic this is always that's a Washington.

JP Morgan Cummings chairman Robert wood Johnson foundation Johnson Johnson house oversight committee Washington Google ten million dollars Million dollars
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

10:02 min | 3 years ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"It's the only conservative television show in Baltimore, Maryland. It's the only one folks. So if you don't see that you don't see the conservative news. You don't see the news. It's blacked out of the sun papers. Because they don't tell you that I like them down at the paper's, nice folks, and I talked to them, and I know some of the editors, but there are some stories, they're very shy about printing, and one of them is coming story. They, they did a little bit about it. But my goodness gracious. There's like six there's. Five point two million dollars missing from a nonprofit that my Iraq more Cummings did not report. She has not filed a nonprofit record since nineteen ninety-five not one record. She has a five oh one. She has what's called the center for global policy solutions, and she's not filing any records. So nobody knows where the money went, and there's a gentleman by the name of Robert Wood Johnson. It's a Robert Wood Johnson foundation. That is the Johnson and Johnson company up in Delaware, and they gave miss rock Amore Cummings. Five point two million for her four profit, I'm sorry. Five point six million for her for private five point two million for her nonprofit close to twelve million dollars. That's unaccounted for no records are shown nothing. But let's go back so we can try hopefully understand this. Okay. The money was given to the four profit and nonprofit for what to do whatever I you'd have to ask my rock, more Cummings. I don't know. It's a nonprofit that's supposed to help people, but she'd hasn't filed any records since nineteen ninety-five. So we don't miss his Johnson Johnson like the big company. Yes. Yes, yes. But the, the problem and the National League and policy center, which is a government watchdog group has contacted and filed a complaint with the IRS. So they are looking into it on basis store that was a conflict of interest because total conflict of. Interest because it's not just Johnson Johnson gave her money. It's Google JP Morgan prudential. And every one of those folks every one of those companies has business interests before the house committee on oversight and government reform. And guess who the chairman? How many numbers I is come in maya's husband? So they're giving money to Maya and then they're running to her husband saying, hey, can you help us out a little bit? Come on. I mean how blatant can that be? Why isn't this a story? Why? Now it's been alleged. But they've faxed of the matter is she hasn't bothered any records since nineteen ninety-five, and if you have a nonprofit shift to file every year. Oh, okay. Okay. Oh, that as well as we said we've been on board. Yeah. Yep. Yeah. So you did a story on this. I did do a story on ran on TV ran on TV. It's running now online. It's getting a gazillion hits online. This is this is really really important. And it's really bad because I don't wanna say Baltimore City and Baltimore County run dirty politics. I'm not saying that. I didn't say that, right? But my Cummings is the head of the democrat party in the state of mayor law, non when she was supposed to run for office. She ran for governor governor passed a go. I mean she stopped she she couldn't get go. So as a consolation prize, they made her the head of the democrat party in the state of Maryland. Okay. But when Elijah Cummings was recently, John Hopkins lies. Cummings has a heart problem and he had a valve replaced, and he's a couple months in Johnson. Hopkins. And while he was on what he might and I'm not, I don't know what he thought. But while he was in that hospital bed. He said, if he could not continue his seat as a congressman to give it to his wife. Who is his young wife, who was like twenty years as junior. Now, if you follow this out this woman already had eleven million dollars donations from one person that had been before her husband, and she's going to be taking his place, and he and he gave it directly to her. Well, if I mean, isn't that it considered I've in some countries, I think this goes back to what you were talking to me about before the show started, which is that what many people go to Capitol Hill? They are people of modest means. Fell office for some time leaves. They are people of great means. It's true. The average the average congressman when he comes to Washington. He's not worth the average congressman unless you go as multimillionaire most of them, come, not poverty stricken, but not very wealthy when they leave if they've stayed there for anytime at all. They're worth approximately seven million dollars, seven million dollars. And part of the problem, is this, and here's a problem, every single person that here's my voice tonight should be angry about, they really should be angry about if you work on Wall Street, and you hear something about a stock, and you buy that stock predicated on the information someone told you that and counselor correct me if I'm wrong, right? Is insider trading. It is in such rating, and somehow another, you can go to jail, if I think. Right. Right. Kind of hard to believe. He went to jail. Jameh cider trading Martha Stewart. Now, let me tell you this. And I didn't mean to interrupt but is so hot about this right now. Lanc- Pelosi bought five thousand shares of a visa credit card company while they were building a Bill in Washington, for the purpose of helping credit card companies make money. Right. So she buys five thousand shares in two weeks, her five thousand shares that she bought in now this is alleged, but it's not really because it's all we had all the pack right? She bought for forty dollars a share became worth sixty dollars a share in a couple of weeks after the Bill was written. This was complete total insider, trading done in Washington by congress person in order to make money and it's completely legal. It is until they have some type of legislation that would forbid members of congress both Senate and house from being able to be essentially being it'd be permitted to do insider trading. There's a Bill right now in the house pass. Doc docket. If you ask congressman about this Bill about stopping insider trading, they won't even know what you're talking about because they all not all of them too many of them do it. Well, it it's, it's a as we say in law, it's a loophole something, something that at some point. Legislation should be passed to correct it. So they will be held to the same standards that other Americans are held to. But I think that's the problem even though we're living in this capitalistic society, it would appear to some people, especially those of the political hierarchy or able to do things that the average American cannot do would indicate Mazda Stewart even go to jail for your right? So I mean it's certainly a problem. But I mean at least I mean in the present since that we have everything the economy is at least at thanks. Thank goodness to President Trump and good state. Economy old. And I think that's one of the things that I'll be honest with you, a device media has not talked about that. The economy has roared back from the housing crisis of two thousand eight and that's the other day that nine eleven was a hit and was hit to the economy and then comes to the housing crisis in LA and really ain't get our act together on the Obama administration. And he comes President Trump and whether or not you four against them. One thing that you cannot take away from the fact that the economy got back on track. Unemployment is at all time low for all groups, and we're moving forward housing prices arising. Right. And the train is run again. It's really is. And this is why this is why President Trump is not going to be impeached. You're not gonna teach your president and economy's run and sixty nine percent of the public, do not want Trump to be. And it's five people in congress pushing, Nancy scenario, goes on the investigation, blah, blah, blah Russian collusion. They come out with the report, they come out with his attorney. Turns the to be a government witness who doesn't know anything about it. And to me that was the first time as, as a legal person as an attorney, I said, hey, if his closest person doesn't have any evidence against him, then then is nothing there. And lo and behold, he testified lawyer doesn't know anything about any collusion moolah report comes out, man. No, collusion, basically pretty much. What the report says you just lead me? Let me. And we've got people on the phone lines. I'm sorry, you're going to get to you. I promise if you're there, you're going to be on the air. So it's just let me let me give the number one..

Elijah Cummings Johnson Johnson congressman President Trump Baltimore City Robert Wood Johnson foundation Robert Wood Johnson Washington congress Cummings Maryland Johnson Iraq democrat party Johnson company attorney Google Martha Stewart
For Many Navajos, Getting Hooked Up To The Power Grid Can Be Life-Changing

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:08 min | 3 years ago

For Many Navajos, Getting Hooked Up To The Power Grid Can Be Life-Changing

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from mayo clinic if you're looking for answers no one else has been able to find, you know, where to go mayoclinic. More at mayo clinic dot org slash answers in much of the United States. Thousands of native Americans are living without some basic necessities, like trinity a running water. A new poll shows more than a quarter of native Americans living in rural areas of Ed problems with basic infrastructure, including electrobi-, or water, or high speed internet, which is becoming quite basic, of course, on Navajo lands in the southwestern U S utility crews from around this country are now volunteering their time to install power. Laurel Morello's of member station. K J, Z Z reports need a Billy has been waiting to turn on lights in your home for fifteen years. We've been living off their nose per pain, lanterns, did you ever think this day would come? Not really now, we know have to have Fash lights everywhere, all the kids have Fash light. So when they get up in the middle night, late to use the restroom, they have a Fash light to go to. Yes. Billy her husband and their five kids live in a tiny one room on a traditional Navajo home. There three sheep graze on sagebrush the carpets the rolling hills of Dil Khan era Zona on the largest reservation in the country. We watched two men and a cherry picker hook up the last wire to their home. Billy says they've gone through too many generators to count why two boys. They have really bad allergies and they have asthma. So sometimes they beat the nebulizer. So usually go to my mom's house travel in the middle of the night over there back and forth. The Billy's are not alone about one in ten Navajos live without electricity. And as many as forty percent of the tribe has to haul their water and use outhouses Opole of rural Americans conducted by NPR the Robert Wood Johnson foundation and the Harvard, teach Chan school of public health found more than a quarter of native Americans have experienced problems with electric city water and the internet northern Arizona university professor Manley. Gay is Navajo. Says the numbers are probably even higher became says he recently saw something strange when he pulled into a hotel parking lot in window rock the capital of the Navajo nation. He noticed a bunch of teenage. Gers in their cars. You could tell that they were high school students in so doing their homework outside of this hotel parking lot, and they had to light on their cars and do their homework. And it became quite clear that they didn't have the internet outside the Billy's home the couple waits patiently for the crew to finish the job, Brian Cooper from pm electric has an update. That will energize your power. Can wait to see the real small here. See don't cover it up. I want to see it. That's what joy looks like traveled from New Mexico, along with several other crews from around the country, volunteering their time to connect people like the Belize to the power grid on the Navajo nation. The homes are so spread out. It costs on average forty thousand dollars to hook up one home to the grid and half the tribe is unemployed. So you can't raise rates to energize all those homes. The Navajo tribal utility authority in the nonprofit American public power association, have put a call out to you till ladies across the country to help our no idea that, you know, it was people still in twenty nineteen without power. Finally after waiting for so many years, the Billy's watched the foreman turn on the meter behind their house and snap. The cover shut Nita then runs inside flip the switch to find you have electrobi- here after so many years without it. My kids. Don't be so happy. Keep asking that. We they. We have like finally out white. Now, the family will wait and pray for running water and internet for NPR news. I'm lorrimore Ellis in flagstaff.

Billy Mayo Clinic Navajo Laurel Morello American Public Power Associat NPR Allergies United States ED Flagstaff Lorrimore Ellis New Mexico Brian Cooper Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nita Arizona
Poll: Many Rural Americans Struggle With Financial Insecurity, Access To Health Care

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:30 min | 3 years ago

Poll: Many Rural Americans Struggle With Financial Insecurity, Access To Health Care

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from the university of Maryland where the founders of Google Oculus and squarespace got their started. Find out how you MD can start up your next adventure at you and you MD dot com. That's why. Oh, you and you MD dot com. The economy may be strong but many Americans finances are not. That's especially true in many rural areas in Opole of role. Americans by NPR last fall. Fifty five percent of those surveyed said their local economy was only poor or fair. A follow up poll by NPR the Robert Wood Johnson foundation and the Harvard ta Chan school of public health digs deeper. It finds four out of ten rural Americans struggle with routine bills for housing food and medical care, half of rural Americans say they could not afford it. If they got hit with a surprise one thousand dollar expense. NPR's petty name, and has more. Our new poll was telephone survey of just over fourteen. Nine hundred adults living in rural areas across the country areas like Weitzberg nestled in the mountains of eastern, Kentucky coalfields seventy two year old lethal dollar hide a retired caregiver lives nearby go out of town like you're going toward hazard. And there's a turn off there on nine thirty one south. It's within about four miles of where I was born. So I asked dollar hide the question we asked in our poll, could you afford an unexpected thousand dollar Bill? No, no. There's no way not even a two hundred dollar extra Bill. What about savings, my savings account zero I don't even have a savings account dollar hide worked all her life. But the jobs just didn't pay enough for her to put anything aside. She raised for children today, her income social security and supplemental. Security income adds up to seven hundred ninety dollars a month with that income. You watch every penny even so dollar high. Just couldn't afford to make it on her own. She recently moved into a two bedroom trailer with her daughter, even with the extra money from her daughter. It's still hard. They have no car and the cost of electricity is barely affordable. It was three hundred sixty something and the two hundred dollars rent, there's nothing left. So no movies. No dinners out. The only luxury is cable TV, but dollar Hyde says, she's one of the lucky ones she has Medicare and estate health plan that covers her health costs. That's not the case for many of those in our poll, Harvard professor Robert plantain, one in four reported that they could not get healthcare recently when they needed it, and majority said, it's either, because they couldn't afford it or they had insurance that would not be taken by local health providers a serious. National concern says blend and even with major improvements and health insurance coverage over the last decade, these. Problems are more severe for African American communities and native Americans as well as Latinos, and the future of healthcare, and rural America looks even more grim says Brock sleigh back with the national rural Health Association, one hundred six rural hospitals have closed of the past decade, which he says, can make timely medical care nearly impossible, take the town of China PA in Nevada. It's how spittle closed a few years ago this left the service to deal with all kinds of medical problems that are not situated to do. And so when they get on the road to the next nearest hospital as a three hour trip, one way, the hospital is more than a hundred miles away. We know that distance can be a barrier to timely and appropriate access to services. And so in that context delayed care can often lead to tragic consequences, especially in rural areas where people may not have a car. And public transportation may be unreliable. Bottom line says, sleigh Bach wealth equals health report, and were sicker, d Davis is president of the center for rural strategies in Weitzberg people in this congressional district have the shortest lifespan in the United States. We also are the poorest, but one of our big findings was that rural Americans are also optimistic about their communities, d Davis, people may be living more of a hard scrabble existence than folks in the suburbs, or a lot of the folks in the cities. But then mean they're not leaving decent life. And most people are pretty happy with it. And they've got friends and neighbors that they rely on their where they wanna be community activists. Now field says of the past few weeks when her husband was hospitalized her neighbors were extrordinary my neighbors come in Mohmand grass. And neighbors come and feed our cattle and our neighbors gather the eggs and every day for the last few weeks and says, so much to me makes me feel the emotion now of what it feels like to have such more, wonderful support. And I know that, that's the blessing of living in rural America. And that's what our poll found ninety two percent of those surveyed said they had people nearby. They could rely on in times of need. Penny Neiman, NPR news.

NPR United States National Rural Health Associat Weitzberg Robert Plantain University Of Maryland Davis Squarespace Google Penny Neiman Opole Mohmand Grass Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Five seventy. Better life with Dr Sanjay Gupta. We are still tipping the scales here in the United States in the right direction. I'm back to Sanjay Gupta. CNN's chief medical correspondent. According to the CDC a full two-thirds of US adults are either overweight or obese the statistic is one third for children. You can guess where this is heading the Robert Wood Johnson foundation. Just put out this new report breaking down the epidemic. State-by-state Mississippi had a rate statistically significantly higher than the national average only eight states had rate significantly lower than the national rating with lower average household. Incomes had the highest rates of overweight, and obesity and obesity is I hope, you know, by now raises your risk of a myriad of health problems, including diabetes, heart disease, broke arthritis, even some types of cancer. Good news is that it's a fixable problem. This is just more evidence that we have to act before it's too late. I'm back to Sanjay Gupta, helping you live a better life. Then now. He's just a really really good guy. The term good egg isn't enough to describe him. He's also certified organic and free range. Rich puts the cap back on everything the toothpaste, the olive oil the shampoo everything. He lets his ten year old nephew beat him at virtual tennis. Even though he can straight up slay his ten year old nephew in virtual when the toilet paper is running low wage replaces the roll on the actual holder. Not just on the back of the toilet breaches texting and driving rich. No. What are you doing rich?.

Dr Sanjay Gupta United States Robert Wood Johnson foundation obesity CNN Rich Mississippi CDC diabetes tennis ten year
Congolese Candidate, Asserting Fraud, Seeks Recount From Court

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:55 sec | 3 years ago

Congolese Candidate, Asserting Fraud, Seeks Recount From Court

"New York Senator Kirsten gillibrand is reportedly staffing up for a possible. Twenty twenty presidential bid that is according to the Associated Press. Anonymous, sources told the outlet that you'll brand has hired a former spokeswoman for the democratic congressional campaign committee to lead her communications team and is bringing on several top staffers from her Senate office Jilin brand is also reportedly eyeing a location in her hometown of Troy in upstate New York as a. Potential campaign headquarters right now. Well, it's very cold in New York City. Twenty one degrees. Mostly cloudy skies will just be hitting a high in the low thirty s today wind chill values between ten and twenty degrees. Six minutes after nine o'clock. This is WNYC support for NPR comes from the Robert Wood Johnson foundation working to build a culture of health that ensures everyone in America has a fair and just particularly for health and wellbeing. More at R J, F dot ORG. This weekend. From NPR news. I'm Scott, Simon the longest

Twenty Twenty New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand New York City NPR Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Associated Press Jilin Senate Wnyc Troy Scott R J Simon America Twenty One Degrees Twenty Degrees Six Minutes
Lyudmila Alexeyeva, ‘Grandmother’ of Russia’s Human Rights Movement, Dies at 91

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:58 sec | 3 years ago

Lyudmila Alexeyeva, ‘Grandmother’ of Russia’s Human Rights Movement, Dies at 91

"Joseph Stalin and later joined the dissident movement typing up and distributing forbidden texts and co founding Russia's oldest human rights group. She was threatened with the rest and finally ended up emigrating to the US or she wrote about the dissident movement and became an American citizen after the fall of the Soviet Union Alekseeva returned to Russia to continue her human rights work Russian President, Vladimir Putin often the. Target of criticism personally visited her with a bottle of champagne on her ninetieth birthday and honored her with a government award last year. Lucian Kim NPR news Moscow. This is NPR support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the Robert Wood Johnson foundation, working to build a culture of health that ensures everyone in America has a fair and just opportunity for health and wellbeing. More at our W J, F dot ORG. December

Lucian Kim Npr NPR Russia Vladimir Putin Joseph Stalin Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Soviet Union Alekseeva United States Moscow President Trump America
Americans Getting Fatter: Obesity Rates Over 35 Percent In 7 States

This Morning with Gordon Deal

01:00 min | 3 years ago

Americans Getting Fatter: Obesity Rates Over 35 Percent In 7 States

"Are fat and getting fatter. A new report says for the first time obesity rates top thirty five percent in seven states that's up from five states two years ago. In addition, no state had a notable improvement in its obesity rate over the previous year. The study is by the trust for America's health and the Robert Wood Johnson foundation. Both nonprofit health groups the presidents of trust for America's health says the good news is that there is growing evidence that certain prevention programs can reverse the trends, but he says they're just not fully implemented states with obesity rates of thirty five percent or more now include Iowa and Oklahoma. They had already included Alabama Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and West Virginia. How about this in two thousand twelve no state had an obesity rate of thirty five percent or more. Now, there are seven states. West Virginia is worst with more than thirty eight percent of adults obese Colorado has the lowest adult obesity. The rate in the nation.

Obesity America Gordon Deal West Virginia Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Jennifer Kushinka Alabama Arkansas Colorado Oklahoma Mississippi Iowa Louisiana Thirty Five Percent Thirty Eight Percent Eight Minutes Two Years
Colorado is the least obese state in the country, study finds

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:37 sec | 4 years ago

Colorado is the least obese state in the country, study finds

"Take a bow Colorado. We know you can because you're the least obese state in the nation. That's the latest report from the Robert Wood Johnson foundation. It shows just over twenty two percent of us are considered obese in Colorado that seems a little high, but it's good enough for number one on the list the most obese state in the country. It's always West Virginia. They've got more than thirty eight percents obese people in their state while Colorado is trending lower the nation as a whole not faring. So well, the US has seven states over the thirty five percent Mark as recently as twenty twelve no state had a rate that high it's altitude. That's what it's gotta be thinner. Keep was thin. That's right. The second oxygen

Colorado Apple Russia Senator Cory Gardner United States Cody Donohue Denver Myer Negligent Homicide Robert Wood Johnson Foundation China Gardner Putin Jerry Newsradio Francis Williams Jewelers Donahue ABC Ruis Tim Cook NBC
Hamas and Israel ceasefire talks

All Things Considered

05:17 min | 4 years ago

Hamas and Israel ceasefire talks

"Not also the dipping unemployment rate has made it harder for some manufacturers to fill open jobs. There are very few employees available to hire right now and those that don't have jobs either don't want them or are not hire those stories after this news. Live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jim hawk in south western. Virginia residents of one hundred fifty homes remain evacuated as thority check out a rain-swollen damn to Mitchell Lindbergh's director. Of water resources says the dam is currently stable but he's asking, people who were evacuated to stay out of their. Homes until there's dry weather we want to get past this weather, system is coming up before we allow people to return to their homes but once we get past. That, and determine the dam is safe we will prevail out of an abundance of caution we will be providing a twenty four hour seven day a week continuous monitoring of the dam just. To. Be sure that it's safe out of an abundance of potion again the college lake dam began overflowing Thursday when heavy rain swept through the region. In Gaza the Islamic group HAMAs says it's holding high level talks about a possible cease fire with Israel NPR's Daniel estrin says it's aimed at ending months of Violence HAMAs says it's holding a major meeting of its. Political leadership in Gaza including some leaders who are based in other parts of the region indicating the seriousness of. The talks a HAMAs website says Egypt has brokered efforts to reach, a ceasefire with Israel it's also attempting a reconciliation. Between HAMAs and the rival Palestinian Authority government in the West Bank, and trying to ease Gaza's humanitarian crisis which includes water and electricity shortages Israeli officials said Prime Minister. Benjamin, Netanyahu cancelled a trip abroad he's reportedly discussing the talks with his cabinet Sunday meanwhile there were renewed Palestinian protests at, the fence separating Gaza and Israel Palestinian health officials say Israeli troops. Killed. At least one Palestinian Daniel estrin NPR news Jerusalem A federal judge in New York. City has dismissed to lawsuits against Fox. News channel over its botched coverage of the death of a young, Democratic Party staffer named Seth, rich as NPR's David. Folkenflik reports, the judge said the plaintiffs failed the state of valid. Legal claim FOX's story alleged that, an FBI, source and a private investigator working on the case had found evidence Richard been linked to the leaking of Democratic Party emails during the two thousand sixteen presidential campaign and suggested his death might. Be related to the, leaks the private investigator is rod Wheeler he'd been hired. By Dallas investment manager intent on rebutting official findings that Russia had the emails hacked to help candidate Donald Trump Wheeler sued saying FOX, put words in his mouth FOX. Withdrew the story, after an, outcry the, judge said Wheeler could. Not avoid his own role in quote perpetuating a. Politically, motivated story not having any basis in fact the judge dismissed the second lawsuit by, Seth, rich parents they intend to appeal David Folkenflik NPR news New, York On Wall Street Friday stocks closed, up after a solid jobs, report the s&p five. Hundred index, gained thirteen points the Dow climbed one hundred thirty six. The NASDAQ composite up nine points, this is, NPR news Houston's police chief says. A man accused of killing one of former President George h.w Bush doctors killed himself when confronted by police, authorities say sixty two year old Joseph James Pappas died from a single self inflicted shot. Friday morning he'd been the subject of an intense manhunt since July twentieth the pro football. Hall of fame in canton Ohio will. Enshrine eight new members on Saturday from member station w. k. SU Kabeer body I reports it's a class that's. Generated interest both on and off the field wide receiver Terrell Owens will not, be in canton for, this year ceremony citing a perceived lack of respect for having to wait till his third year of eligibility Ray Lewis Welby there. Honored for an impressive seventeen seasons with the Baltimore Ravens but during his career he also pleaded guilty to obstruction of Justice in connection with the. Stabbing deaths of two men during a Super Bowl after party the senior committee this year selected. Jerry Kramer who played for the Green. Bay Packers team that won the. First two Super Bowls Robert doctor doom Brazil rounding out this year's class are linebacker Brian. Urlacher receiver Randy moss defensive back Brian. Dawkins and executive Bobby Beth for NPR news I'm Kabeer Bhatia in canton Ohio eight places in Portugal broke local. Temperature records Friday as a wave of heat from North Africa swept across the, Iberian peninsula forecasters are, predicting the scorching temperatures could get even worse over the weekend temperatures built to one hundred thirteen degrees Friday and many inland areas. Of Portugal and we're expected the top one hundred sixteen degrees in some places on Saturday I'm Jim hawk NPR news in Washington Support for. NPR comes from the Lemelson foundation committed to improving lives through invention in the US and in developing countries and working to inspire and enable the next, generation of inventors more information is available at Lemelson dot org and the Robert. Wood Johnson foundation at RWJF dot org.

NPR Gaza Hamas Jim Hawk Israel Washington David Folkenflik Investigator Israel Npr Seth College Lake Dam Democratic Party Virginia Portugal Mitchell Lindbergh President George H.W Bush Canton Ohio FOX
Bill Cosby trial: Cosby paid accuser nearly $3.4M, prosecutor says

Morning Edition

01:50 min | 4 years ago

Bill Cosby trial: Cosby paid accuser nearly $3.4M, prosecutor says

"Say it's only for research studies not doctors and their patients john hamilton npr news bill cosby's defense is scheduled to make opening statements today at cosby sexual assault retrial in pennsylvania cosby's lawyer is expected to highlight nearly three and a half million dollar settlement cosby paid to the woman that he's accused of assaulting at his home in two thousand four district attorney kevin steele revealed the settlement in his opening statement yesterday cosby's first trial last year ended with jurors unable to reach a unanimous verdict i'm dave mattingly npr news in washington support for npr comes from the lemelson foundation committed to improving lives through invention in the us and in developing countries and working to inspire and enable the next generation of inventors more information is available at lemelson dot org and the robert wood johnson foundation at our w j f dot org this is wnyc in new york i'm sean carlson rain and snow early this morning but it'll switch all to rain after eight am otherwise mostly cloudy through the day today high near forty seven degrees tonight partly cloudy with lows in the mid thirties it'll be mostly sunny for tomorrow wednesday high near fifty four by the afternoon and on thursday look even better partly sunny through the day the high reaching about sixty one degrees on thursday afternoon scott pruitt's ethical lapses aired out on fox news have you made mistakes i think this is something needs to be corrected and it was a mistake it was a mistake by my team so you take responsibility to fix us i'm fixing it do you take responsibility on fixing the problem mistakes by the head of the catch up to him but will he keep his job next time on the takeaway weekday afternoons at three on ninety three point nine fm.

Kevin Steele NPR Lemelson Foundation United States Robert Wood Johnson Foundation New York Scott Pruitt John Hamilton Bill Cosby Assault Pennsylvania Dave Mattingly Washington Sean Carlson FOX Forty Seven Degrees Sixty One Degrees Million Dollar