35 Burst results for "Robert Wood Johnson Foundation"

How Do You Distribute A Vaccine To Suspicious Citizens?

All Things Considered

06:19 min | 1 d ago

How Do You Distribute A Vaccine To Suspicious Citizens?

"Corona virus vaccine to millions of Americans who may be suspicious of authority or on the fringes of society. Especially when those people are among those most at risk of covert 19. Dr. Julie Morita has been thinking and writing about these problems for months as Chicago's former health commissioner, and now she'll have an opportunity to shape these policies on a national level as part of President elect Biden's covert response, team Doctor Marina Welcome to all things considered. Thanks for having me, Ari. Well, let's start with this question of how you build confidence in a vaccine when there is so much suspicion and disinformation circulating. What do you think needs to be done right now, even before vaccine is widely available to the public. I think it's really important for people to have ah, sense of what's happening and what's been done so far so very clear and concise and consistent messaging about the vaccine development process. Venture manufacturing process. The approval process is So that people have a sense that we're not doing this blindly that The vaccine development that's happened with the co of vaccine has been fast, but it's built on decades and decades of experience in making vaccines and distributing vaccines as well. When you're Chicago's chief medical officer, you were involved in distribution of the H one n one vaccine around the city. What did that experience teach you about how to address hesitation, especially And marginalized communities. And are there lessons there that you think the incoming by the administration can apply nationally? I think we learned a lot of lessons through the H one n one pandemic in 2009. We were working frantically to get vaccine providers lined up to actually make the vaccine available, and we also hosted vaccine clinics and communities that are typically underserved. The weather physician accesses a little bit more challenging. And what we found was that these mass immunization clinics that we hosted in some of our communities of color. The turnout for the vaccines was lower. And so at that point we started reaching out to community organizations, Faith based organizations to have them help us understand what was going on in the community. Why weren't they turning out for the vaccine? Why weren't they getting vaccinated? It would have helped US organizations that are already in touch with members of that community. Right. So we were we had organization that we were already partnering with. We reached out to them and ask them to engage with us again, and it worked to some extent, but without we didn't get the success that we were hoping for, and so building on that experience in non pandemic times, the Health Department and our partners worked established relationships on ongoing time. Between pandemic so that we would actually have these relationships and could really rely on the information from those community groups to inform our planning for future pandemics. The current health department is actually tapping into in relying on those relationships now to really help to get the information to the communities and understand what their questions and their concerns are. Interesting, But let me ask. There are real questions about vaccine safety. I mean yesterday, the CDC Immunization Advisory Committee recommended to give the first round of vaccines to health care workers and residents of long term care facilities. But there has not been a lot of research into the effectiveness of the vaccine and the safety of the vaccine in the nursing home population. How can experts be sure that it is safe for them? So the information is being evaluated, but it will be evaluated by FDA to look at the safety and efficacy to understand who the study populations included. Information that I've seen so far suggested the vaccines how are safe and effective in a wide range of age groups, a wide range of races and ethnicity and someone that information's fully evaluated by the FDA is advisory committee. Next week. We'll have additional information to really inform the recommendations with CDC or the C I. P did yesterday was really make recommendations in anticipation of these results. But they can be refined based on what the FDA and their advisory committee actually determined. Now the CDC is reputation has taken a hit during this pandemic. Guidance on testing and school re openings has sometimes been influenced by political pressure. So how do you think a new administration can restore confidence in the agency? So I think one of these like when I think about the vaccines situation currently, the key thing to keep in mind is that the E C. I P is not. It's the independent group of physicians, scientists, public health officials who come together and really review the data River to review the facts, review The evidence and the makeup, eventually Advisory Committee that's the advisory committee and they make recommendations to CDC. And then CDC that makes recommendations and buy a large those recommendations of the pipe makes the CDC usually fit makes us well. And so we'd be looking for after the recommendations are made by a CFP. What a CDC actually say is their alignment. Is there agreement with what A C I P s saying as well. Now, as you know, distribution of the vaccine is going to be handled by the states. And a couple weeks ago, I spoke with the head of Maine's Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr Nirav Shah, and he told me his state does not have enough money to build the infrastructure required to make sure everybody who needs it gets the vaccine. Here's what he said. We at the state level are ready to receive the baton to have that baton pass to us to begin the vaccination process, but without proper funding. It'll be like putting up a tent poles without having the tent. And he said, This is true of many other states, too. So Dr Marie to do you think the federal government is ready to provide the money that is going to be necessary? I think it's important to provide the adequate resources to public health What I've seen in the past in public health emergencies during my 10 20 years, the Chicago Department of Public Health Was that there would be large Pulis's of funding that would come to public health agencies of the state and local level during a crisis and then shortly after the crisis, But then the funding would actually go away. And so public health infrastructure really has suffered over time, and there is a need There's a strong immunization system that's in place, but it has to be enhanced that it has to be strengthened so that actually, people can actually get the vaccine in an equitable fashion. That's Dr Julie Morita. She is executive vice president of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which is a thunder of NPR. Today. She was speaking with us in her personal capacity as a volunteer for the Biden transition Teams. Coben 19 Advisory board. Dr Morita. Thanks for your time. Thank you. President

Center For Disease Control And Dr. Julie Morita Chicago Cdc Immunization Advisory Comm FDA Biden Marina Health Department Dr Nirav Shah Dr Marie Advisory Committee United States Chicago Department Of Public H Maine Pulis Federal Government Dr Julie Morita Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Coben
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on The 3:59

The 3:59

01:58 min | Last month

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on The 3:59

"It's Kinda ridiculous but it's more importantly on this phone apple did come up with one compelling I think compelling thing which was facetime hd over cellular that might not sound like a big. Thing. But I don't know about you. But I've been using stuff like zoom in base. I'm quite a bit during these last few months at a lot of people have and being able to see that HD image on if five connection I was okay as a that's good. What more than I want more things like that that I don't have to think about it just went into it. I went in and turn off the five g. connectivity and it went back to be non HD version of facetime. So it is neat to see that in action I still hold by this though if you're just getting this phone for five G. Do your homework. Just make sure that your carrier that you're on if you're standing here has five he in your area, what are the speeds like what's the coverage right like because I just don't want people to be going to get this phone being disappointed that they don't have those speeds or that it's not as fast as some of these videos that we put out might hype it to be like millimeter wave But if you're okay with being, you know now they guinea pig but being a early adopter, the five G.. This agreed to do that because another thing they talk to you and I about was the amount of five G. Antennas. Billionaires a lot more coverage bands that they even talked to us about in this phone and the way it's it's made. So that means as things are being updated or rolled out as more spectrums being allocated carriers that hardware is GonNa be there ready to handle all that. So that's pretty exciting but the best part of the IPHONE. Worry about five, thirty this. Support for this podcast comes from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The life of a nurse is riddled with contradictions. We work like saints.

facetime Robert Wood Johnson Foundation apple G. Antennas
NPR Poll: Black, Latino Households Struggle To Pay Rent, Mortgages

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:23 min | 2 months ago

NPR Poll: Black, Latino Households Struggle To Pay Rent, Mortgages

"Some new data from an NPR poll suggests just how badly Americans are suffering economically during the pandemic. Here's NPR's Chris Arnold Gina Lost Her job as a school bus driver in Chicago during the pandemic she was managing. Okay with unemployment money. But then about two weeks ago, she got a desperate call from her adult son his job had laid him off. He wasn't able to pay rate. There was an eviction moratorium in Chicago, but Jean says the landlord wanted her son out anyway a warning what happened next is disturbing and violent. She says the landlord got someone to threaten her son and shoot his dog a German shepherd mix that he'd had for years Economi. His mom they kill my dog. And the GATT told me that he should kill me to. MSA. Said market you come over here. I went over there. I said, okay star packing you gather go. and. Never went back. Gene only wants to use her first name for fear retribution. She says, she was afraid to report what happened to the police, her son and his two kids if now moved in with her. Gene was one of more than three thousand people who took part in a poll from NPR the Robert Wood, Johnson? Foundation. And the Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health. Her. Story is a sad and dramatic example. But the poll found many people reported problems with housing healthcare, unsafe workplaces, and a very high percentage of Americans. Forty six percent said they're having serious financial problems are surprises how large the? Numbers are Robert Blend in is a Harvard public health professor. He says, the poll was done in July after Congress approved an extra six hundred dollars a week in federal and apply benefits, and that was still supposed to be flowing to people and yet. So many people said, they were struggling one in six households even reported missing or delaying major bills just so that they could buy food blending says it's. Like the government sent a hundred FEMA trucks into a disaster zone but a lot of people never saw them or got any help it just like interviewing people in a hurricane area and the people are telling you, there's no relief it should be there could be some people are having trouble accessing the HAL blend says the government should quickly try to discover where the biggest problems are and there could be. Another factor. My name is Linda Neuron who and I was an accounting manager dorato lives in Phoenix Arizona and lost her accounting job at a tow truck company in the pandemic. Once that stay home order was issued if our driving, they're not getting a car accidents if they're not getting in car accidents, we don't have much of a business Dorato said in the poll that she was having serious financial problems when. She was getting that extra six hundred dollars a week and so she was doing. Okay. But she knew that that was about to expire and that she wasn't going to be able to support her four kids on the state benefits alone which for her just two hundred, forty dollars a week in Arizona and she was right. She's now burned through almost all of her savings and she won't able to pay reds after next month it's extremely difficult. To sleep at night I wake up at two or three in the morning and I just have my mind's just racing just constantly racing, and then I'm having to get up in the morning and sit with my two younger children but I'm so focused on you know bills and money and jobs Dorato who's Latina says she's been looking for work with no luck. She says she has no family she can go live with or borrow money from. And Black and Latino households were two times more likely than white families to say that they've fallen behind on their rent or mortgage. It is striking. It's not surprising. David Williams is a Harvard professor who studies race and sociology. He says blacks and Latinos make money than whites and have less savings. So they're more vulnerable Andy says they're less likely to have family members who can afford to loan the money for. Rent or other bills for every dollar of wealth white households have African American households have ten pennies and Latino households have twelfth pennies. So it's really not surprising that they are really been hurt badly in the context of the pandemic

Linda Neuron NPR Gene Chicago Robert Blend Harvard T H Chan School Of Pub Phoenix Arizona Dorato Professor Chris Arnold Gina David Williams Harvard Gatt Fema Economi Robert Wood Andy Jean
Drug Addiction In America

Mentally Yours

04:32 min | 2 months ago

Drug Addiction In America

"Woken to Mentally Yours Metro could ikaes weekly podcast about all things mental health. Today we're talking to Dave. Marlon, he was the CEO of crossroads of Southern Nevada, which was the largest addiction and Rehab Center in the area, the psychotherapist drug and alcohol counselor, and he basically knows everything about addiction and mental health issues in the US and beyond. Making me talking tim today about how the pandemic has been affected addiction issues to get help if you're struggling and how to recognize if you might have a problem with drugs or alcohol. Bruce Dave. Thanks so much for joining us on mental yours and welcome from across the pond. My first question was basically because obviously as I mentioned, we're in London. You're in the US, it such different situation in terms of addiction, mental health, and obviously the pandemic to get started. Could you give kind of a brief overview of the reality of addiction in the US? How serious the problem is that how widespread is a? The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation calls addiction the number one health problem in the US. If we look at the the number of prescription opiates that are consumed in the entire world The United States consumes more than eighty percent of them. We. have. You know we've always had an alcohol problem for a percentage of our population. we we developed enough and phetamine mean and a cocaine problem over the last. Twenty years, and in the last five, six years Oh actually even a little longer. An opiate problem has has become. Our most serious addiction challenge. Kind of the most common addiction issue that you see people coming into your center with. It it's interesting. I've run Iran the largest treatment center in Las. Vegas of. Gene. Years. And now as a private center and they're absolutely opiates or over my last three, four years, they're opiates was the number one drug of choice that clients had presented to solutions recovery without the opiate use disorder their primary. Primary substance. Now I work at an indigent facility in in downtown. Las Vegas where. More than half of our clients are homeless. And what's interesting is with this demographic, there's a much higher methamphetamine use. Would say my number one. Substance of for clients is nothin vitamin with opiates and alcohol running for a close second place. That's really interesting I. Think What was interesting that you said kind of opiates have been coming up over the lost six years because for me, it's felt like the coverage has been really recent like only in the last couple of years, we taught it to the opioid crisis this being a sudden kind of unexpected issue but you're saying it's been building for a long time. It has. Interestingly, fourteen years ago I was running the largest health insurance company in the state. And I remember in my last. My last year or two I remember looking at pharmacy reports and we were all scratching our heads saying what is this Oxycontin and why did it not show up two years ago and now I remember when across the ten million dollar mark at the Insurance Company for monthly use so it really begins began spiking. Thirteen fourteen years ago. It became. Newsworthy in fashionable. Six seven years ago, and now we're a were still squarely in an opiate epidemic.

United States Las Vegas Bruce Dave Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Rehab Center Marlon TIM CEO Southern Nevada LAS Cocaine London Methamphetamine Iran
COVID-19 is exposing our racial divides

KNX Evening News

00:47 sec | 3 months ago

COVID-19 is exposing our racial divides

"Picture of just how widespread the economic fallout of this pandemic is on households in Los Angeles. A new poll from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation shows that the pandemic really is hitting communities of color harder than white, black and Latino households were faring much worse off well, and then the other thing. Other factor that we identified was Households with annual incomes of more than $100,000 were actually worse off than those with incomes above. $100,000. Julie Morita, executive vice president of the foundation, tells connects. More than half of households are reporting financial hardship. Individuals who are living on the edge, barely making ends meet and without a pandemic, what a pandemic or a public health emergency arises. They're just pushed over that man's compared only 37% of white households. Robert Sharqiya

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Executive Vice President Julie Morita Los Angeles Robert Sharqiya
Poll: Most Los Angeles Households Facing Serious Financial Issues During Pandemic

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:49 sec | 3 months ago

Poll: Most Los Angeles Households Facing Serious Financial Issues During Pandemic

"Getting a picture of just how widespread the economic fallouts of the pandemic is on households in L. A. A new poll fromthe Robert Wood Johnson Foundation shows that the pandemic really is hitting communities of color harder than white, black and Latino households were faring much worse off well, and then the other thing. Other factor that we identified was Households with annual incomes of more than $100,000 were actually worse, often those with incomes above $100,000 Julie Morita, executive vice president of the foundation, tells connects. More than half of households are reporting financial hardship. Individuals who are living on the edge, barely making ends meet and without a pandemic, what a pandemic or a public health emergency arises. They're just pushed over That man's compared only 37% of white households. Robert Sharqiya Next 10 70 news

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Executive Vice President Julie Morita Robert Sharqiya
Economic Pain From Pandemic Is Much Worse Than Expected, Poll Finds

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:16 min | 3 months ago

Economic Pain From Pandemic Is Much Worse Than Expected, Poll Finds

"A new survey measures the financial pain as the pandemic goes on. Almost half of American households have suffered serious financial losses were told in a new poll, by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Harvard t H. Chan School of Public Health in the country's four largest cities. The situation is even worse especially for Latinos and black-americans fifty to eighty percent of those. Households report serious financial problems. They can't pay their rent or their mortgage or their credit cards, and they've depleted what savings they have had. NPR's Yuki. Noguchi reports on the findings. The pandemic is creating serious financial problems, job loss depleted savings or possible eviction. That's despite hundreds of billions in government stimulus and other support. The survey shows economic stress running higher in the. country's four largest cities, New York, Los Angeles Chicago and Houston. Latino and black families were substantially more likely to face serious economic distress compared to white counterparts. Robert Blend in is a professor of health policy and political analysis at Harvard and Co author of the survey. He says the results show the personal financial challenges run deeper and broader than previously understood. I would've. Expected that all the aid that was coming from various sources would have narrowed not eliminated the differences by race ethnicity the survey conducted. This summer also found distress among households making less than a hundred thousand dollars a year. It's a just a lack of funds creating knock on effects trouble paying for food or medical care, which in turn lead to serious health consequences. The surveys implications could mean everything from a bigger drag on the economy to the nation's mental health outlook and blending says, the prognosis is grim at the time of the survey. The federal government was offering six hundred dollars a week in additional benefits for the unemployed. That was not renewed after July it's going to get worse because there is nothing for the people we serve eight who earn thousand. Dollars a year already communities are not working fulltime to fall back

Robert Blend NPR Harvard T H. Chan School Of Pu Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Federal Government Professor Of Health Policy Noguchi New York Harvard Houston Los Angeles Chicago
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

03:03 min | 5 months ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Getting people back to work with an emphasis on avoiding a surge in Corona virus numbers. Dr Richard Besser heads up the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Talks to Carol the Mitch car and says major issue today is the lack of a unified message or plan. We have to find a way to get on the same page across America. That these measures wearing that peeping six feet away washing hand staying home before six. Making sure people have the resource is they need to protect themselves and their families that these represent American values. And somehow we've gotten off track and these things which should be universal have a political overtones and they work. We've seen these measures work around the world. They can work here in America, and we have to find a way to come together. And speaking of the masks if you go into a store on the sign says no shirt, no shoes, no service. You stay close, and no one starts waving the Constitution. What is it about masks that has made us so divided? There are two narratives going on right now about the pandemic. You know what you're hearing from? Every public health leader across the country and and many of our political leaders. What you're hearing is that this is serious. We're in the early days of this pandemic. What we do can can really make a difference. That's one narrative and the other narrative is there's nothing to worry about. It's overblown. Let's just get back to work and and to our lives. But public health is the road map getting there. I hear people say, Well, the surgeon general several months ago, said masks weren't a good thing, and Dr Fauci several months ago, said that covert 19 was not going to be a big deal. Their opinions have changed. I ran emergency preparedness responsive TBC for four years in every response that we were involved in our guidance would change as we learn more information. And one of the things that was essential to our success was the ability to talk directly to the American people so that the public could understand what we were learning and when guidance changed, they could see it. As ah, step towards progress rather than a foot plot, or, you know, an entity that didn't know what they were doing. That's the situation here with mask you've always known. That masks are very important in the health care setting. What we've learned here is that there's a fair amount of disease that spread before anyone has any symptoms. And in places in countries where people wearing masks, they're able to reduce the spread from people without symptoms to others, and that's driven the change here and it's been an important change. But it's been one that's been difficult to communicate because the CDC doesn't talk to the public every day on their different messages out there that are being raised up as this being an example of foot plopping rather example of learning as we go that is Dr Richard Besser from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Talking to Carol, these Mitch car.

Dr Richard Besser Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Carol America Dr Fauci CDC
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:33 min | 5 months ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The Tobin bridge with some overnight work crews it is a seventy three degrees in Boston right now it's a clear sky jacquard WBZ's traffic on the threes here's the four day WBZ accu weather forecast with areas of low clouds and fog mainly in coastal communities early this morning it'll be mild lows generally in the sixties later today after clouds and fog break up partly sunny hot and humid the high approaching ninety involved in the Cape and the islands mostly in the seventies partly cloudy and mild tonight low sixty nine tomorrow not as warm but still sticky there can be an afternoon shower or thunderstorm especially northwest of four ninety five behind Boston eighty five that'll also be the case inland but the teachers will be stuck in the seventies Monday partly sunny high eighty four I'm accu weather meteorologist car within ski WBZ Boston news radio this is WBZ newsradio ten thirty with the news will never stop good morning I'm done help here's what's happening it was five months ago January nineteenth the first case of gene was detected in the U. S. the country now has more than two million confirmed infections and in some states record daily increases here's ABC's Aaron Katersky Dr Richard Besser who used to run the centers for disease control and now leads the Robert wood Johnson foundation is here so where do we stand on this yeah you know I I think that we are in a situation where many.

Tobin bridge Boston ABC Dr Richard Besser Robert wood Johnson foundation WBZ Aaron Katersky
Many states continue to face record highs in coronavirus cases

News, Traffic and Weather

05:42 min | 5 months ago

Many states continue to face record highs in coronavirus cases

"It was five months ago on January nineteenth the first case of covert nineteen was detected in the United States today the country has more than two million confirmed infections including record daily increases in some states Dr Richard Besser who used to run the centers for disease control and now leads the Robert wood Johnson foundation is here so where do we stand on this yeah you know I I think that we are in in a situation where many people are tired of hearing about the pandemic you're tired of having their lives disrupted by the pandemic and unfortunately we have something in the political there who are reinforcing that sense that this is over but you're here and it's it's really early days in this in this pandemic and your last week follow that road map that's being laid out by public health in terms of how you gradually get people hello in working and interacting socially it in safe ways if we don't follow that road map we're going to see places that are once again seeing their healthcare systems are well slides disrupted and people losing their lives bicycles been saved had people follow the guidance of public health is it the people in states with the pandemic did not initially hit as hard as it did say in New York or New Jersey not internalize the messaging or was the messaging flawed I I think there's a lot comes down to messaging and and the challenge that you faced during a public health crisis when the primary communicator is not the public health community one of the challenges I see with the the way the response was was orchestrated this pandemic was the entire nation was shut down and at the same time and so places that we're not seeing any disease were were were treated the same as places where the health care system is overwhelmed and that's never the approach public health give me the case these kinds of decisions and communicating them should be up to the centers for disease control and in this pandemic that has not been the case you know when when I when I ran emergency preparedness and response at CDC and and let the agency at the start of the swine flu pandemic the most important tool that that we had was our power to communicate and informs public a public that trusts the messenger is critical to success and when you when you have the political there in the public health layer I had aunts and the message being that public health is is a barrier to the economy coming back then then you're in a really dangerous situation because you then see some people following the advice for political reasons and some people not following your and these are not political choices the idea that people will practice different behaviors based on on politics is a dangerous situation you want the country unified Dr Richard Besser at the Robert wood Johnson foundation such unanimity that he references has not prevailed in states like Arizona and Florida which today reported record high numbers of single day cases parts of Texas have also reported their largest one day increases that includes bear county in the city of San Antonio where Ron Nirenberg is the mayor Mister mayor thanks for joining us let me clarify because we've had in three successive days three of our largest increases each day so the cases are increasing which we knew would happen once we are common and businesses and services started opening up further governors and we wanted to make sure we didn't see a corresponding increase in hospitals the severity in cages that's the alarming trend in addition to how fast the cases of accelerated people of let their guard down and I think that what I've said before about the pace at which the economy is opening Texas doesn't allow us the benefit of data to be affected incisions are being met are you worried then that San Antonio and similarly situated cities in Texas are behind the curve you know what I I remain focused on is ensuring that we have the route the the proper measures in place of time we're making the decisions open up out when the state took control of the opening plan we essential you essentially yielded our ability to stay in front of the Kerr because again they're opening faster than the data shows the actor efficacy of each decision so in that sense we are behind the curve in terms of the decision making process but what I will say is that the local communities the urban communities of practice I've been a very very aggressive and proactive the difficulty in our situation knows the state prevents us from mandating some of the best practices that includes wearing masks the governor prohibited cities from mandating masks but you've made a different decision how to arrive at it you know we had been courting again our orders protocols for businesses to follow when the Attorney General sent him a letter a couple of weeks ago and basically re interpreted the state's order that said we weren't allowed to do that anymore we had to adjust course but we've been recommending these thanks for a while now but what what we did our best we was rather than mandate our maps for individuals we use the the path that we had through the business protocols to mandate businesses import mask wearing as part of their safety

United States
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:34 min | 11 months ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And Catherine T. macarthur foundation supporting creative people and effective institutions committed to building a more just verdant and peaceful world more information is a mac found daughter work from the crazy foundation expanding opportunities in America's cities through grant making in social investing more it crazy daughter work I'm from the Robert wood Johnson foundation at our W. J. F. dot org it's morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king and I'm Steve Inskeep is the UK's deal with while way a security risk the United States says yes reading about the information security for a vital ally the U. K. decided it was safe enough to buy five your Quitman from a Chinese company that offers far cheaper equipment than others as digital networks expand and improve this decision was announced as secretary of state Mike Pompeii prepares to visit prime minister Boris Johnson and other leading UK officials today Alan Woodward has been watching all of this he is a professor at the university of Surrey has consulted with UK internet security officials welcome back to the program Sir morning what is it exactly that Britain's says it is willing to to buyer willing to have its telecom companies buy from one way X. it is limited it's because I think the you can accept that there is a risk nothing's ever zero risk there is a risk so what they're doing is they're saying there's a limit wow equipment to the periphery of the network's effectively the antennas and then they can to limit it to a certain number as well and we're talking here of course about the the wireless network on which were using phones and much for using internet if you're in the U. K. already things may pass through while way equipment and that's going to continue to be on the upgrade network right absolutely I insight psyche has been putting out hits since last may and may stay on ten is that being used already from whole out they got something like twenty percent of the market already now you're saying that Britain is limited while ways use here meaning that there are more vital a more central pieces of infrastructure that they will not be buying from one way is that right the card correct state the the circle course the network the bit that really authenticate see new routes to cold that way you could really destroy if you like that hi then don't they can be restricted on tolls I'm so they can be restricted only to the radio access areas and even then only to about a third of its name on the set do you find this is an outside expert sufficient to contain the risk because it does sound like my phone call my signal my internet search my vital email my text might still be or would still be going through a Huawei antenna could it be spied upon in some way by China which is the U. S. theory here I think that that's I think that's a bit of a red herring I think the bigger risk is potentially disrupting the network because this is not about phone calls and date so this is about looking at ten years to win world very dependent on five G. and is running all calls and all traffic lights not building systems and the sum that could describe to that point that's where it could get really nasty however the big problem from my perspective is the market is broken I'm we have very little choice there are in the U. K. they're ready three Meg bend as of which will always want I'm not if you were to take them out you you'll restricting the diverse city offenders and that's in itself is a security risk because there's nothing to say that one the other band is as good as they might be might not an intensely introducer floor secure site it really is a balancing act and I think what the case saying is it's about mitigating the risk not saying is there's no risk but it's about mitigating noticed in a few seconds to British officials suspect the U. S. is just going after a while way for trade purposes because the US is pushing back on Chinese companies in so many ways I think they have it basically there is a suspicion that this is tied up with geopolitics absolutely and that's why they're basically saying we believe we can do in the house but the long term ambition is to basically line up with what the Americans is that anyway Alan Woodward thanks so much because he's a visiting professor at the university of Surrey when the Kansas City Chiefs play the San Francisco forty Niners in the Super Bowl on Sunday it'll be the chief's first time at the Superbowl in fifty years Frank Morris of member station Casey you are reports on the excitement and the complications cavernous majestic old train station in Kansas city's.

Catherine T. macarthur foundat mac America
When Insurance Won't Cover Drugs, Americans Make 'Tough Choices' About Their Health

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:05 min | 11 months ago

When Insurance Won't Cover Drugs, Americans Make 'Tough Choices' About Their Health

"What happens when insurance companies deny coverage for medications? It doesn't just force people to pay for drugs themselves. A survey finds that for almost half of Americans went. When Insurance Denies Payment? They do not get the drugs at all. The poll comes from NPR. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T H Chan School of Public Public Health. NPR's Patty name reports Sahlin. REDUC- is seventy eight on a fixed income. She has severe acid reflux. I have to eat very small all meals and when I eat sometimes it feels like everything's stuck in my chest and I get really bad pain. And I have to throw up reduces retired on medicare she also pays for supplemental insurance policy to cover the cost of drugs but it will only pay for the generic version of her heartburn medication. Her her doctor prescribed the brand name. She says the generic version just doesn't work for her. No it's not as effective now. Definitely not she can't afford the brand name so now she has extremely painful episodes of acid reflux about three times a month. Our poll shows that like Ridolfi. The vast majority pretty of Americans have health insurance that includes prescription drug coverage but one in three say that in the past year insurance. Didn't cover the cost of medication and for themselves or their household members Robert Blend in with the Harvard Chan School directed our poll. So what you see is insurers are not paying for some drugs that physicians are recommending. The patients think they need when that happened. Most of the highest earners paid for the medication themselves but Glendon says is that was not the case for everyone else. A half of the people who are middle class or or moderate income are not getting him because they can't afford to go out and pay for it themselves batum line. He says it's just not fair. This idea that if we save money we all have to make tough choices together. The tough choices really don't affects the most wealthy people in the United States. They just affect people who are middle and lower

NPR Harvard T H Chan School Of Pub Glendon Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Harvard Chan School Heartburn Ridolfi Robert Blend United States Patty Batum
When Insurance Won't Cover Drugs, Americans Make 'Tough Choices' About Their Health

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:05 min | 11 months ago

When Insurance Won't Cover Drugs, Americans Make 'Tough Choices' About Their Health

"What happens when insurance companies deny coverage for medications? It doesn't just force people to pay for drugs themselves. A survey finds that for almost half of Americans went. When Insurance Denies Payment? They do not get the drugs at all. The poll comes from NPR. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T H Chan School of Public Public Health. NPR's Patty name reports Sahlin. REDUC- is seventy eight on a fixed income. She has severe acid reflux. I have to eat very small all meals and when I eat sometimes it feels like everything's stuck in my chest and I get really bad pain. And I have to throw up reduces retired on medicare she also pays for supplemental insurance policy to cover the cost of drugs but it will only pay for the generic version of her heartburn medication. Her her doctor prescribed the brand name. She says the generic version just doesn't work for her. No it's not as effective now. Definitely not she can't afford the brand name so now she has extremely painful episodes of acid reflux about three times a month. Our poll shows that like Ridolfi. The vast majority pretty of Americans have health insurance that includes prescription drug coverage but one in three say that in the past year insurance. Didn't cover the cost of medication and for themselves or their household members Robert Blend in with the Harvard Chan School directed our poll. So what you see is insurers are not paying for some drugs that physicians are recommending. The patients think they need when that happened. Most of the highest earners paid for the medication themselves but Glendon says is that was not the case for everyone else. A half of the people who are middle class or or moderate income are not getting him because they can't afford to go out and pay for it themselves batum line. He says it's just not fair. This idea that if we save money we all have to make tough choices together. The tough choices really don't affects the most wealthy people in the United States. They just affect people who are middle and lower

NPR Harvard T H Chan School Of Pub Glendon Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Harvard Chan School Heartburn Ridolfi Robert Blend United States Patty Batum
When Insurance Won't Cover Drugs, Americans Make 'Tough Choices' About Their Health

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:34 min | 11 months ago

When Insurance Won't Cover Drugs, Americans Make 'Tough Choices' About Their Health

"What happens when insurance companies deny coverage for medications? It doesn't just force people to pay for drugs themselves. A survey finds that for almost half of Americans went. When Insurance Denies Payment? They do not get the drugs at all. The poll comes from NPR. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T H Chan School of Public Public Health. NPR's Patty name reports Sahlin. REDUC- is seventy eight on a fixed income. She has severe acid reflux. I have to eat very small all meals and when I eat sometimes it feels like everything's stuck in my chest and I get really bad pain. And I have to throw up reduces retired on medicare she also pays for supplemental insurance policy to cover the cost of drugs but it will only pay for the generic version of her heartburn medication. Her her doctor prescribed the brand name. She says the generic version just doesn't work for her. No it's not as effective now. Definitely not she can't afford the brand name so now she has extremely painful episodes of acid reflux about three times a month. Our poll shows that like Ridolfi. The vast majority pretty of Americans have health insurance that includes prescription drug coverage but one in three say that in the past year insurance. Didn't cover the cost of medication and for themselves or their household members Robert Blend in with the Harvard Chan School directed our poll. So what you see is insurers are not paying for some drugs that physicians are recommending. The patients think they need when that happened. Most of the highest earners paid for the medication themselves but Glendon says is that was not the case for everyone else. A half of the people who are middle class or or moderate income are not getting him because they can't afford to go out and pay for it themselves batum line. He says it's just not fair. This idea that if we save money we all have to make tough choices together. The tough choices really don't affects the most wealthy people in the United States. They just affect people who are middle and lower income and this could leave lower and middle income individuals more vulnerable to disease and other health problems for Sally Rideau see one example is her EPI pen. She's allergic to bees and needs the EPI pen to inject life saving medication in case she gets stung and the last time I was stung. The doctor said each time you get stung can be very serious and it can result in death so he's always carry the EPI pen and in my case. I do a lot of gardening and I'm by myself so just felt safe to have my Epi pen with me just in case but this time when she went to the pharmacy to get the pen prescribed by her doctor she was told her insurance wouldn't cover the cost. It was close to six hundred dollars and I said well how about the generic could I get generic and she said well. That's three ninety eight and I said you're kidding. She said no I said okay then. Just forget it so today when we're dosing gardens. She wears as long sleeves and long pants to try to protect yourself against B.'s. The situation she says it's upsetting. I have three insurances. I'm always pay a lot of copays as I pay a lot for my drugs. It's very frustrating. I think when you have insurance I think you should be able to get the drug. You need one unexpected. Finding from our poll on income inequality is that even people who can afford to cover the cost of their medication. Sometimes don't this is one of the first polls to survey the top one percent percent people earning over five hundred thousand dollars a year and eighteen percent of them chose not to fill prescriptions. When insurance wouldn't cover it? Tina Smith is one of them. She runs a technology consulting firm in Minneapolis last year when her doctor prescribed a medication to treat the skin condition rose Patia. She got a shock. When I went to fill the prescription the cost for the prescription was over six hundred dollars? She says for the past seven years. The medication costs about twenty dollars. So this was a huge increase and Smith decided not to get it because I felt that it was fiscally irresponsible and I have no interest in funding big pharma anymore than I absolutely have to. I feel big farmers than rob in the American people for years and they continued to increase. The cost of prescriptions drug. Drug prices have been escalating. Actually four in a significant way at least the last couple decades Frederica saucy is director of the Consumer Advocacy Group families. USA But in the last five. Or six years it's really hit a crescendo. Not surprisingly the smallest increase were in generic drugs but the adjective small small. He says pretty much ends there. You know an average increase for drugs might be fifteen or sixteen percent annually which is much much faster than our paychecks or inflation inflation. But you could see a doubling or tripling of drug cost year every year depending on the ability of that drug company to have no competition he says healthcare caused swallowing up more and more families discretionary income not only in higher drug prices but also in higher deductibles co pays and cost sharing we. We spoke with representatives of both the pharmaceutical and health insurance industries and they point the finger at each other. Insurers say the financial squeeze Americans are are experiencing is because of high drug prices the drug makers say it's High Insurance and hospital costs whatever. The reason Harvard health economist and primary Care Physician Ben Summers says not getting needed. Medication is not good news. There's more and more evidence that having health insurance really does improve people's health and lives and and medications are one of the key parts of that because it is such a mainstay of how we manage a lot of chronic conditions now says not all medications are equal some of the medications occasions we prescribe are really kind of options to a patient. You say look. This medication may help you feel better while you have this infection or while you are having some heartburn but if view feel fine without it that's okay but how there's a critical cholesterol lowering statins for example or insulin to keep blood sugar under control and and sometimes people won't even notice they're not taking it not all these conditions have symptoms. You can be building up dangerous levels of high blood sugar or cholesterol without noticing. It until it's too late. Sadly summer says he's not surprised by the findings of our poll he says at least a quarter of his patients. Don't get new prescriptions filled. Because they say they just don't have the money. Patty named

NPR Heartburn Patty United States Tina Smith Harvard T H Chan School Of Pub Robert Wood Johnson Foundation High Insurance Harvard Chan School Ridolfi Sally Rideau Glendon Robert Blend Batum Harvard Consumer Advocacy Group
When Insurance Won't Cover Drugs, Americans Make 'Tough Choices' About Their Health

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:35 min | 11 months ago

When Insurance Won't Cover Drugs, Americans Make 'Tough Choices' About Their Health

"What happens when insurance companies deny coverage for medications? It doesn't just force people to pay for drugs themselves. A survey finds that for almost half of Americans went. When Insurance Denies Payment? They do not get the drugs at all. The poll comes from NPR. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T H Chan School of Public Public Health. NPR's Patty name reports Sahlin. REDUC- is seventy eight on a fixed income. She has severe acid reflux. I have to eat very small all meals and when I eat sometimes it feels like everything's stuck in my chest and I get really bad pain. And I have to throw up reduces retired on medicare she also pays for supplemental insurance policy to cover the cost of drugs but it will only pay for the generic version of her heartburn medication. Her her doctor prescribed the brand name. She says the generic version just doesn't work for her. No it's not as effective now. Definitely not she can't afford the brand name so now she has extremely painful episodes of acid reflux about three times a month. Our poll shows that like Ridolfi. The vast majority pretty of Americans have health insurance that includes prescription drug coverage but one in three say that in the past year insurance. Didn't cover the cost of medication and for themselves or their household members Robert Blend in with the Harvard Chan School directed our poll. So what you see is insurers are not paying for some drugs that physicians are recommending. The patients think they need when that happened. Most of the highest earners paid for the medication themselves but Glendon says is that was not the case for everyone else. A half of the people who are middle class or or moderate income are not getting him because they can't afford to go out and pay for it themselves batum line. He says it's just not fair. This idea that if we save money we all have to make tough choices together. The tough choices really don't affects the most wealthy people in the United States. They just affect people who are middle and lower income and this could leave lower and middle income individuals more vulnerable to disease and other health problems for Sally Rideau see one example is her EPI pen. She's allergic to bees and needs the EPI pen to inject life saving medication in case she gets stung and the last time I was stung. The doctor said each time you get stung can be very serious and it can result in death so he's always carry the EPI pen and in my case. I do a lot of gardening and I'm by myself so just felt safe to have my Epi pen with me just in case but this time when she went to the pharmacy to get the pen prescribed by her doctor she was told her insurance wouldn't cover the cost. It was close to six hundred dollars and I said well how about the generic could I get generic and she said well. That's three ninety eight and I said you're kidding. She said no I said okay then. Just forget it so today when we're dosing gardens. She wears as long sleeves and long pants to try to protect yourself against B.'s. The situation she says it's upsetting. I have three insurances. I'm always pay a lot of copays as I pay a lot for my drugs. It's very frustrating. I think when you have insurance I think you should be able to get the drug. You need one unexpected. Finding from our poll on income inequality is that even people who can afford to cover the cost of their medication. Sometimes don't this is one of the first polls to survey the top one percent percent people earning over five hundred thousand dollars a year and eighteen percent of them chose not to fill prescriptions. When insurance wouldn't cover it? Tina Smith is one of them. She runs a technology consulting firm in Minneapolis last year when her doctor prescribed a medication to treat the skin condition rose Patia. She got a shock. When I went to fill the prescription the cost for the prescription was over six hundred dollars? She says for the past seven years. The medication costs about twenty dollars. So this was a huge increase and Smith decided not to get it because I felt that it was fiscally irresponsible and I have no interest in funding big pharma anymore than I absolutely have to. I feel big farmers than rob in the American people for years and they continued to increase. The cost of prescriptions drug. Drug prices have been escalating. Actually four in a significant way at least the last couple decades Frederica saucy is director of the Consumer Advocacy Group families. USA But in the last five. Or six years it's really hit a crescendo. Not surprisingly the smallest increase were in generic drugs but the adjective small small. He says pretty much ends there. You know an average increase for drugs might be fifteen or sixteen percent annually which is much much faster than our paychecks or inflation inflation. But you could see a doubling or tripling of drug cost year every year depending on the ability of that drug company to have no competition he says healthcare caused swallowing up more and more families discretionary income not only in higher drug prices but also in higher deductibles co pays and cost sharing we. We spoke with representatives of both the pharmaceutical and health insurance industries and they point the finger at each other. Insurers say the financial squeeze Americans are are experiencing is because of high drug prices the drug makers say it's High Insurance and hospital costs whatever. The reason Harvard health economist and primary Care Physician Ben Summers says not getting needed. Medication is not good news. There's more and more evidence that having health insurance really does improve people's health and lives and and medications are one of the key parts of that because it is such a mainstay of how we manage a lot of chronic conditions now says not all medications are equal some of the medications occasions we prescribe are really kind of options to a patient. You say look. This medication may help you feel better while you have this infection or while you are having some heartburn but if view feel fine without it that's okay but how there's a critical cholesterol lowering statins for example or insulin to keep blood sugar under control and and sometimes people won't even notice they're not taking it not all these conditions have symptoms. You can be building up dangerous levels of high blood sugar or cholesterol without noticing. It until it's too late. Sadly summer says he's not surprised by the findings of our poll he says at least a quarter of his patients. Don't get new prescriptions filled. Because they say they just don't have the money. Patty named N._p._R. News.

NPR Heartburn Patty United States Tina Smith Harvard T H Chan School Of Pub Robert Wood Johnson Foundation High Insurance Harvard Chan School Ridolfi Sally Rideau Glendon Robert Blend Batum Harvard Consumer Advocacy Group
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:44 min | 11 months ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Differing Senate KCBS editor's desk I health advocacy nonprofit is trying a creative approach to getting people engaged about building a healthier future KCBS is penny rising takes a look at a new free ebook dropping soon involving fiction it's called take us to a better place stories it's a joint project between the Robert wood Johnson foundation in Melcher media the foundation's Dr Michael painter says it's a compilation of short stories by noted fiction writers each of the story is about a better place and it's fascinating to see that painter says they didn't ask for that I also didn't really ask them to necessarily right about up a utopian or better future necessarily although hoping everybody didn't sort of end up in a dystopian place bay area author oxy obey Haas said she was a bit skeptical when first approached my first sort of feeling upload the door was that's great it sounds like a really necessary important books but I'm not sure I'm a girl she says she's happy with the rapper one of ten wide ranging short stories designed to inspire broad conversations about the culture of help available January twenty first Patty rising KCBS is the best news time ten fifty one some recent moves by bay area businesses may be easing concerns that robot so when they take over the service industry his message Jennifer Hodges reports it's the robot sewer getting the boot I pizzeria and three local coffee shops that have been using robots in their business have close their doors it's just not getting to the levels of savings and cost that people were regional envisioning and frankly if they look at it deep enough they would have realized it wasn't going to happen with the plants they had and that's what's happening currently robotic companies that we're talking about here in the bay area spread celebs is the.

editor Robert wood Johnson foundation Melcher media Dr Michael painter Haas Patty Jennifer Hodges
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Million dollars in grants. between two thousand thirteen and two thousand sixteen according to tax records several of the nonprofit groups financial backers which include Google JP Morgan and prudential have business interests before the house committee on oversight and government reform performed Cummings has served as chairman since January. the largest contributor to the nonprofit organization run by Cummings as wife was the Robert wood Johnson foundation a company regulated by Cummings committee. the foundation the Robert wood Johnson foundation which gave a total of five and a half million to Cummings is wife's consulting firm. and another five point two million to her non profit ten and a half million split between the nonprofit and for profit. run by Cummings wife. supporting. organizations in two thousand seventeen. what is what we call and ten million dollars divvied up half of the for profit half to the non profit run by Cummings wife. so in recent months coming loose has been a vocal opponent of Johnson Johnson targeting the company is part of the house oversight committee's probe of ground. price inflation. so this this is a classic this is always that's a Washington.

JP Morgan Cummings chairman Robert wood Johnson foundation Johnson Johnson house oversight committee Washington Google ten million dollars Million dollars
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

10:02 min | 1 year ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"It's the only conservative television show in Baltimore, Maryland. It's the only one folks. So if you don't see that you don't see the conservative news. You don't see the news. It's blacked out of the sun papers. Because they don't tell you that I like them down at the paper's, nice folks, and I talked to them, and I know some of the editors, but there are some stories, they're very shy about printing, and one of them is coming story. They, they did a little bit about it. But my goodness gracious. There's like six there's. Five point two million dollars missing from a nonprofit that my Iraq more Cummings did not report. She has not filed a nonprofit record since nineteen ninety-five not one record. She has a five oh one. She has what's called the center for global policy solutions, and she's not filing any records. So nobody knows where the money went, and there's a gentleman by the name of Robert Wood Johnson. It's a Robert Wood Johnson foundation. That is the Johnson and Johnson company up in Delaware, and they gave miss rock Amore Cummings. Five point two million for her four profit, I'm sorry. Five point six million for her for private five point two million for her nonprofit close to twelve million dollars. That's unaccounted for no records are shown nothing. But let's go back so we can try hopefully understand this. Okay. The money was given to the four profit and nonprofit for what to do whatever I you'd have to ask my rock, more Cummings. I don't know. It's a nonprofit that's supposed to help people, but she'd hasn't filed any records since nineteen ninety-five. So we don't miss his Johnson Johnson like the big company. Yes. Yes, yes. But the, the problem and the National League and policy center, which is a government watchdog group has contacted and filed a complaint with the IRS. So they are looking into it on basis store that was a conflict of interest because total conflict of. Interest because it's not just Johnson Johnson gave her money. It's Google JP Morgan prudential. And every one of those folks every one of those companies has business interests before the house committee on oversight and government reform. And guess who the chairman? How many numbers I is come in maya's husband? So they're giving money to Maya and then they're running to her husband saying, hey, can you help us out a little bit? Come on. I mean how blatant can that be? Why isn't this a story? Why? Now it's been alleged. But they've faxed of the matter is she hasn't bothered any records since nineteen ninety-five, and if you have a nonprofit shift to file every year. Oh, okay. Okay. Oh, that as well as we said we've been on board. Yeah. Yep. Yeah. So you did a story on this. I did do a story on ran on TV ran on TV. It's running now online. It's getting a gazillion hits online. This is this is really really important. And it's really bad because I don't wanna say Baltimore City and Baltimore County run dirty politics. I'm not saying that. I didn't say that, right? But my Cummings is the head of the democrat party in the state of mayor law, non when she was supposed to run for office. She ran for governor governor passed a go. I mean she stopped she she couldn't get go. So as a consolation prize, they made her the head of the democrat party in the state of Maryland. Okay. But when Elijah Cummings was recently, John Hopkins lies. Cummings has a heart problem and he had a valve replaced, and he's a couple months in Johnson. Hopkins. And while he was on what he might and I'm not, I don't know what he thought. But while he was in that hospital bed. He said, if he could not continue his seat as a congressman to give it to his wife. Who is his young wife, who was like twenty years as junior. Now, if you follow this out this woman already had eleven million dollars donations from one person that had been before her husband, and she's going to be taking his place, and he and he gave it directly to her. Well, if I mean, isn't that it considered I've in some countries, I think this goes back to what you were talking to me about before the show started, which is that what many people go to Capitol Hill? They are people of modest means. Fell office for some time leaves. They are people of great means. It's true. The average the average congressman when he comes to Washington. He's not worth the average congressman unless you go as multimillionaire most of them, come, not poverty stricken, but not very wealthy when they leave if they've stayed there for anytime at all. They're worth approximately seven million dollars, seven million dollars. And part of the problem, is this, and here's a problem, every single person that here's my voice tonight should be angry about, they really should be angry about if you work on Wall Street, and you hear something about a stock, and you buy that stock predicated on the information someone told you that and counselor correct me if I'm wrong, right? Is insider trading. It is in such rating, and somehow another, you can go to jail, if I think. Right. Right. Kind of hard to believe. He went to jail. Jameh cider trading Martha Stewart. Now, let me tell you this. And I didn't mean to interrupt but is so hot about this right now. Lanc- Pelosi bought five thousand shares of a visa credit card company while they were building a Bill in Washington, for the purpose of helping credit card companies make money. Right. So she buys five thousand shares in two weeks, her five thousand shares that she bought in now this is alleged, but it's not really because it's all we had all the pack right? She bought for forty dollars a share became worth sixty dollars a share in a couple of weeks after the Bill was written. This was complete total insider, trading done in Washington by congress person in order to make money and it's completely legal. It is until they have some type of legislation that would forbid members of congress both Senate and house from being able to be essentially being it'd be permitted to do insider trading. There's a Bill right now in the house pass. Doc docket. If you ask congressman about this Bill about stopping insider trading, they won't even know what you're talking about because they all not all of them too many of them do it. Well, it it's, it's a as we say in law, it's a loophole something, something that at some point. Legislation should be passed to correct it. So they will be held to the same standards that other Americans are held to. But I think that's the problem even though we're living in this capitalistic society, it would appear to some people, especially those of the political hierarchy or able to do things that the average American cannot do would indicate Mazda Stewart even go to jail for your right? So I mean it's certainly a problem. But I mean at least I mean in the present since that we have everything the economy is at least at thanks. Thank goodness to President Trump and good state. Economy old. And I think that's one of the things that I'll be honest with you, a device media has not talked about that. The economy has roared back from the housing crisis of two thousand eight and that's the other day that nine eleven was a hit and was hit to the economy and then comes to the housing crisis in LA and really ain't get our act together on the Obama administration. And he comes President Trump and whether or not you four against them. One thing that you cannot take away from the fact that the economy got back on track. Unemployment is at all time low for all groups, and we're moving forward housing prices arising. Right. And the train is run again. It's really is. And this is why this is why President Trump is not going to be impeached. You're not gonna teach your president and economy's run and sixty nine percent of the public, do not want Trump to be. And it's five people in congress pushing, Nancy scenario, goes on the investigation, blah, blah, blah Russian collusion. They come out with the report, they come out with his attorney. Turns the to be a government witness who doesn't know anything about it. And to me that was the first time as, as a legal person as an attorney, I said, hey, if his closest person doesn't have any evidence against him, then then is nothing there. And lo and behold, he testified lawyer doesn't know anything about any collusion moolah report comes out, man. No, collusion, basically pretty much. What the report says you just lead me? Let me. And we've got people on the phone lines. I'm sorry, you're going to get to you. I promise if you're there, you're going to be on the air. So it's just let me let me give the number one..

Elijah Cummings Johnson Johnson congressman President Trump Baltimore City Robert Wood Johnson foundation Robert Wood Johnson Washington congress Cummings Maryland Johnson Iraq democrat party Johnson company attorney Google Martha Stewart
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"At the Robert Wood Johnson foundation website are W, J, F dot org. And this week in Texas continues. Did you know your Texas be checkoff supports grape more than twelve hundred loving fitness enthusiasts Texas beef team? Athletes are committed to living acted healthy lifestyles, serving their community and helping others lead healthier lives. I'm Kelly Sullivan from Santa Rosa range, while I'm working on my operation together Texas, beef checkoff in Texas beef team are working towards building a healthier, Texas. To learn more, visit Texas beef checkoff dot com funded by the Texas beat council. Did you know that just one pint of blood can help impact up to three lives? Donating blood is a simple way you can make a difference in your community. I'm David Vollmann, Texas dairy farmer. Join dairy farmers like myself in saving lives across our area during our passion for pints blood drive events throughout the month of June. Visit Derry max dot org to find a blood drive near you. That's dairy max dot org. This week. Find great deals at Walgreens, now all twelve pack soft drinks are three for nine ninety nine with card and skin care products like Neutrogena are by to get third free with card now through six twenty nine nineteen get great deals on the essentials, you need right here at your neighborhood. Walgreens, Walgreens, trusted since nineteen o one while supplies last. Restrictions and exclusions apply. See store for details. But no Napa auto care centers. We'll get a seventy five dollars prepaid card when you spend two hundred fifty bucks on Napa brake parts which is caused a celebrate because normally the sound of screeching. Briggs means your Bank accounts about to take a hit, but getting seventy five bucks back makes that hit. Not so bad quality, parts installed by the pros. That's Napa know how. Participating Napa auto care settings. Exclusions apply. Offer ends six thirty nineteen..

Texas Walgreens Napa Texas beat council Robert Wood Johnson foundation Kelly Sullivan David Vollmann Santa Rosa Briggs seventy five dollars one pint
For Many Navajos, Getting Hooked Up To The Power Grid Can Be Life-Changing

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:08 min | 1 year ago

For Many Navajos, Getting Hooked Up To The Power Grid Can Be Life-Changing

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from mayo clinic if you're looking for answers no one else has been able to find, you know, where to go mayoclinic. More at mayo clinic dot org slash answers in much of the United States. Thousands of native Americans are living without some basic necessities, like trinity a running water. A new poll shows more than a quarter of native Americans living in rural areas of Ed problems with basic infrastructure, including electrobi-, or water, or high speed internet, which is becoming quite basic, of course, on Navajo lands in the southwestern U S utility crews from around this country are now volunteering their time to install power. Laurel Morello's of member station. K J, Z Z reports need a Billy has been waiting to turn on lights in your home for fifteen years. We've been living off their nose per pain, lanterns, did you ever think this day would come? Not really now, we know have to have Fash lights everywhere, all the kids have Fash light. So when they get up in the middle night, late to use the restroom, they have a Fash light to go to. Yes. Billy her husband and their five kids live in a tiny one room on a traditional Navajo home. There three sheep graze on sagebrush the carpets the rolling hills of Dil Khan era Zona on the largest reservation in the country. We watched two men and a cherry picker hook up the last wire to their home. Billy says they've gone through too many generators to count why two boys. They have really bad allergies and they have asthma. So sometimes they beat the nebulizer. So usually go to my mom's house travel in the middle of the night over there back and forth. The Billy's are not alone about one in ten Navajos live without electricity. And as many as forty percent of the tribe has to haul their water and use outhouses Opole of rural Americans conducted by NPR the Robert Wood Johnson foundation and the Harvard, teach Chan school of public health found more than a quarter of native Americans have experienced problems with electric city water and the internet northern Arizona university professor Manley. Gay is Navajo. Says the numbers are probably even higher became says he recently saw something strange when he pulled into a hotel parking lot in window rock the capital of the Navajo nation. He noticed a bunch of teenage. Gers in their cars. You could tell that they were high school students in so doing their homework outside of this hotel parking lot, and they had to light on their cars and do their homework. And it became quite clear that they didn't have the internet outside the Billy's home the couple waits patiently for the crew to finish the job, Brian Cooper from pm electric has an update. That will energize your power. Can wait to see the real small here. See don't cover it up. I want to see it. That's what joy looks like traveled from New Mexico, along with several other crews from around the country, volunteering their time to connect people like the Belize to the power grid on the Navajo nation. The homes are so spread out. It costs on average forty thousand dollars to hook up one home to the grid and half the tribe is unemployed. So you can't raise rates to energize all those homes. The Navajo tribal utility authority in the nonprofit American public power association, have put a call out to you till ladies across the country to help our no idea that, you know, it was people still in twenty nineteen without power. Finally after waiting for so many years, the Billy's watched the foreman turn on the meter behind their house and snap. The cover shut Nita then runs inside flip the switch to find you have electrobi- here after so many years without it. My kids. Don't be so happy. Keep asking that. We they. We have like finally out white. Now, the family will wait and pray for running water and internet for NPR news. I'm lorrimore Ellis in flagstaff.

Billy Mayo Clinic Navajo Laurel Morello American Public Power Associat NPR Allergies United States ED Flagstaff Lorrimore Ellis New Mexico Brian Cooper Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nita Arizona
Poll: Many Rural Americans Struggle With Financial Insecurity, Access To Health Care

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:30 min | 1 year ago

Poll: Many Rural Americans Struggle With Financial Insecurity, Access To Health Care

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from the university of Maryland where the founders of Google Oculus and squarespace got their started. Find out how you MD can start up your next adventure at you and you MD dot com. That's why. Oh, you and you MD dot com. The economy may be strong but many Americans finances are not. That's especially true in many rural areas in Opole of role. Americans by NPR last fall. Fifty five percent of those surveyed said their local economy was only poor or fair. A follow up poll by NPR the Robert Wood Johnson foundation and the Harvard ta Chan school of public health digs deeper. It finds four out of ten rural Americans struggle with routine bills for housing food and medical care, half of rural Americans say they could not afford it. If they got hit with a surprise one thousand dollar expense. NPR's petty name, and has more. Our new poll was telephone survey of just over fourteen. Nine hundred adults living in rural areas across the country areas like Weitzberg nestled in the mountains of eastern, Kentucky coalfields seventy two year old lethal dollar hide a retired caregiver lives nearby go out of town like you're going toward hazard. And there's a turn off there on nine thirty one south. It's within about four miles of where I was born. So I asked dollar hide the question we asked in our poll, could you afford an unexpected thousand dollar Bill? No, no. There's no way not even a two hundred dollar extra Bill. What about savings, my savings account zero I don't even have a savings account dollar hide worked all her life. But the jobs just didn't pay enough for her to put anything aside. She raised for children today, her income social security and supplemental. Security income adds up to seven hundred ninety dollars a month with that income. You watch every penny even so dollar high. Just couldn't afford to make it on her own. She recently moved into a two bedroom trailer with her daughter, even with the extra money from her daughter. It's still hard. They have no car and the cost of electricity is barely affordable. It was three hundred sixty something and the two hundred dollars rent, there's nothing left. So no movies. No dinners out. The only luxury is cable TV, but dollar Hyde says, she's one of the lucky ones she has Medicare and estate health plan that covers her health costs. That's not the case for many of those in our poll, Harvard professor Robert plantain, one in four reported that they could not get healthcare recently when they needed it, and majority said, it's either, because they couldn't afford it or they had insurance that would not be taken by local health providers a serious. National concern says blend and even with major improvements and health insurance coverage over the last decade, these. Problems are more severe for African American communities and native Americans as well as Latinos, and the future of healthcare, and rural America looks even more grim says Brock sleigh back with the national rural Health Association, one hundred six rural hospitals have closed of the past decade, which he says, can make timely medical care nearly impossible, take the town of China PA in Nevada. It's how spittle closed a few years ago this left the service to deal with all kinds of medical problems that are not situated to do. And so when they get on the road to the next nearest hospital as a three hour trip, one way, the hospital is more than a hundred miles away. We know that distance can be a barrier to timely and appropriate access to services. And so in that context delayed care can often lead to tragic consequences, especially in rural areas where people may not have a car. And public transportation may be unreliable. Bottom line says, sleigh Bach wealth equals health report, and were sicker, d Davis is president of the center for rural strategies in Weitzberg people in this congressional district have the shortest lifespan in the United States. We also are the poorest, but one of our big findings was that rural Americans are also optimistic about their communities, d Davis, people may be living more of a hard scrabble existence than folks in the suburbs, or a lot of the folks in the cities. But then mean they're not leaving decent life. And most people are pretty happy with it. And they've got friends and neighbors that they rely on their where they wanna be community activists. Now field says of the past few weeks when her husband was hospitalized her neighbors were extrordinary my neighbors come in Mohmand grass. And neighbors come and feed our cattle and our neighbors gather the eggs and every day for the last few weeks and says, so much to me makes me feel the emotion now of what it feels like to have such more, wonderful support. And I know that, that's the blessing of living in rural America. And that's what our poll found ninety two percent of those surveyed said they had people nearby. They could rely on in times of need. Penny Neiman, NPR news.

NPR United States National Rural Health Associat Weitzberg Robert Plantain University Of Maryland Davis Squarespace Google Penny Neiman Opole Mohmand Grass Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Congolese Candidate, Asserting Fraud, Seeks Recount From Court

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:55 sec | 2 years ago

Congolese Candidate, Asserting Fraud, Seeks Recount From Court

"New York Senator Kirsten gillibrand is reportedly staffing up for a possible. Twenty twenty presidential bid that is according to the Associated Press. Anonymous, sources told the outlet that you'll brand has hired a former spokeswoman for the democratic congressional campaign committee to lead her communications team and is bringing on several top staffers from her Senate office Jilin brand is also reportedly eyeing a location in her hometown of Troy in upstate New York as a. Potential campaign headquarters right now. Well, it's very cold in New York City. Twenty one degrees. Mostly cloudy skies will just be hitting a high in the low thirty s today wind chill values between ten and twenty degrees. Six minutes after nine o'clock. This is WNYC support for NPR comes from the Robert Wood Johnson foundation working to build a culture of health that ensures everyone in America has a fair and just particularly for health and wellbeing. More at R J, F dot ORG. This weekend. From NPR news. I'm Scott, Simon the longest

Twenty Twenty New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand New York City NPR Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Associated Press Jilin Senate Wnyc Troy Scott R J Simon America Twenty One Degrees Twenty Degrees Six Minutes
Lyudmila Alexeyeva, ‘Grandmother’ of Russia’s Human Rights Movement, Dies at 91

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:58 sec | 2 years ago

Lyudmila Alexeyeva, ‘Grandmother’ of Russia’s Human Rights Movement, Dies at 91

"Joseph Stalin and later joined the dissident movement typing up and distributing forbidden texts and co founding Russia's oldest human rights group. She was threatened with the rest and finally ended up emigrating to the US or she wrote about the dissident movement and became an American citizen after the fall of the Soviet Union Alekseeva returned to Russia to continue her human rights work Russian President, Vladimir Putin often the. Target of criticism personally visited her with a bottle of champagne on her ninetieth birthday and honored her with a government award last year. Lucian Kim NPR news Moscow. This is NPR support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the Robert Wood Johnson foundation, working to build a culture of health that ensures everyone in America has a fair and just opportunity for health and wellbeing. More at our W J, F dot ORG. December

Lucian Kim Npr NPR Russia Vladimir Putin Joseph Stalin Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Soviet Union Alekseeva United States Moscow President Trump America
Americans Getting Fatter: Obesity Rates Over 35 Percent In 7 States

This Morning with Gordon Deal

01:00 min | 2 years ago

Americans Getting Fatter: Obesity Rates Over 35 Percent In 7 States

"Are fat and getting fatter. A new report says for the first time obesity rates top thirty five percent in seven states that's up from five states two years ago. In addition, no state had a notable improvement in its obesity rate over the previous year. The study is by the trust for America's health and the Robert Wood Johnson foundation. Both nonprofit health groups the presidents of trust for America's health says the good news is that there is growing evidence that certain prevention programs can reverse the trends, but he says they're just not fully implemented states with obesity rates of thirty five percent or more now include Iowa and Oklahoma. They had already included Alabama Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and West Virginia. How about this in two thousand twelve no state had an obesity rate of thirty five percent or more. Now, there are seven states. West Virginia is worst with more than thirty eight percent of adults obese Colorado has the lowest adult obesity. The rate in the nation.

Obesity America Gordon Deal West Virginia Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Jennifer Kushinka Alabama Arkansas Colorado Oklahoma Mississippi Iowa Louisiana Thirty Five Percent Thirty Eight Percent Eight Minutes Two Years
Colorado is the least obese state in the country, study finds

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

Colorado is the least obese state in the country, study finds

"Take a bow Colorado. We know you can because you're the least obese state in the nation. That's the latest report from the Robert Wood Johnson foundation. It shows just over twenty two percent of us are considered obese in Colorado that seems a little high, but it's good enough for number one on the list the most obese state in the country. It's always West Virginia. They've got more than thirty eight percents obese people in their state while Colorado is trending lower the nation as a whole not faring. So well, the US has seven states over the thirty five percent Mark as recently as twenty twelve no state had a rate that high it's altitude. That's what it's gotta be thinner. Keep was thin. That's right. The second oxygen

Colorado Apple Russia Senator Cory Gardner United States Cody Donohue Denver Myer Negligent Homicide Robert Wood Johnson Foundation China Gardner Putin Jerry Newsradio Francis Williams Jewelers Donahue ABC Ruis Tim Cook NBC
Hamas and Israel ceasefire talks

All Things Considered

05:17 min | 2 years ago

Hamas and Israel ceasefire talks

"Not also the dipping unemployment rate has made it harder for some manufacturers to fill open jobs. There are very few employees available to hire right now and those that don't have jobs either don't want them or are not hire those stories after this news. Live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jim hawk in south western. Virginia residents of one hundred fifty homes remain evacuated as thority check out a rain-swollen damn to Mitchell Lindbergh's director. Of water resources says the dam is currently stable but he's asking, people who were evacuated to stay out of their. Homes until there's dry weather we want to get past this weather, system is coming up before we allow people to return to their homes but once we get past. That, and determine the dam is safe we will prevail out of an abundance of caution we will be providing a twenty four hour seven day a week continuous monitoring of the dam just. To. Be sure that it's safe out of an abundance of potion again the college lake dam began overflowing Thursday when heavy rain swept through the region. In Gaza the Islamic group HAMAs says it's holding high level talks about a possible cease fire with Israel NPR's Daniel estrin says it's aimed at ending months of Violence HAMAs says it's holding a major meeting of its. Political leadership in Gaza including some leaders who are based in other parts of the region indicating the seriousness of. The talks a HAMAs website says Egypt has brokered efforts to reach, a ceasefire with Israel it's also attempting a reconciliation. Between HAMAs and the rival Palestinian Authority government in the West Bank, and trying to ease Gaza's humanitarian crisis which includes water and electricity shortages Israeli officials said Prime Minister. Benjamin, Netanyahu cancelled a trip abroad he's reportedly discussing the talks with his cabinet Sunday meanwhile there were renewed Palestinian protests at, the fence separating Gaza and Israel Palestinian health officials say Israeli troops. Killed. At least one Palestinian Daniel estrin NPR news Jerusalem A federal judge in New York. City has dismissed to lawsuits against Fox. News channel over its botched coverage of the death of a young, Democratic Party staffer named Seth, rich as NPR's David. Folkenflik reports, the judge said the plaintiffs failed the state of valid. Legal claim FOX's story alleged that, an FBI, source and a private investigator working on the case had found evidence Richard been linked to the leaking of Democratic Party emails during the two thousand sixteen presidential campaign and suggested his death might. Be related to the, leaks the private investigator is rod Wheeler he'd been hired. By Dallas investment manager intent on rebutting official findings that Russia had the emails hacked to help candidate Donald Trump Wheeler sued saying FOX, put words in his mouth FOX. Withdrew the story, after an, outcry the, judge said Wheeler could. Not avoid his own role in quote perpetuating a. Politically, motivated story not having any basis in fact the judge dismissed the second lawsuit by, Seth, rich parents they intend to appeal David Folkenflik NPR news New, York On Wall Street Friday stocks closed, up after a solid jobs, report the s&p five. Hundred index, gained thirteen points the Dow climbed one hundred thirty six. The NASDAQ composite up nine points, this is, NPR news Houston's police chief says. A man accused of killing one of former President George h.w Bush doctors killed himself when confronted by police, authorities say sixty two year old Joseph James Pappas died from a single self inflicted shot. Friday morning he'd been the subject of an intense manhunt since July twentieth the pro football. Hall of fame in canton Ohio will. Enshrine eight new members on Saturday from member station w. k. SU Kabeer body I reports it's a class that's. Generated interest both on and off the field wide receiver Terrell Owens will not, be in canton for, this year ceremony citing a perceived lack of respect for having to wait till his third year of eligibility Ray Lewis Welby there. Honored for an impressive seventeen seasons with the Baltimore Ravens but during his career he also pleaded guilty to obstruction of Justice in connection with the. Stabbing deaths of two men during a Super Bowl after party the senior committee this year selected. Jerry Kramer who played for the Green. Bay Packers team that won the. First two Super Bowls Robert doctor doom Brazil rounding out this year's class are linebacker Brian. Urlacher receiver Randy moss defensive back Brian. Dawkins and executive Bobby Beth for NPR news I'm Kabeer Bhatia in canton Ohio eight places in Portugal broke local. Temperature records Friday as a wave of heat from North Africa swept across the, Iberian peninsula forecasters are, predicting the scorching temperatures could get even worse over the weekend temperatures built to one hundred thirteen degrees Friday and many inland areas. Of Portugal and we're expected the top one hundred sixteen degrees in some places on Saturday I'm Jim hawk NPR news in Washington Support for. NPR comes from the Lemelson foundation committed to improving lives through invention in the US and in developing countries and working to inspire and enable the next, generation of inventors more information is available at Lemelson dot org and the Robert. Wood Johnson foundation at RWJF dot org.

NPR Gaza Hamas Jim Hawk Israel Washington David Folkenflik Investigator Israel Npr Seth College Lake Dam Democratic Party Virginia Portugal Mitchell Lindbergh President George H.W Bush Canton Ohio FOX
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Plan designed the members and high deductible plans could see a greater impact i know some of your like look when i go to mexico the medicines cheaper if i go to europe the medicine cheaper it is the medicine as keeper you're right more villas supply demand although the pharmacy is going to be more expensive for the tourists identical into the farms in look like how much is your cipro you're at about a come into this summit to this embroidered a creek up the prices sell high deductible plans are increasingly offered by more and more players will thank you for that push towards high deductible plans was hit nearly they say has hit nearly twenty five million american workers thanks to obamacare can i just say as cost shifting at us employer escalates that's a court to analysis left small by the robert wood johnson foundation we'll yeah if employers have to buy your insurance i had the necessary while the care so stupid add and i i know we rip out of all the care level the show wants because it makes you feel better but bomb that's it it's ridiculous oh hold on sandwiches lost an airing sorry about that well i just lost my airing why do i lose my airing man allows the urng backing not nobody'll anyway um okay i got to fix my ears uh the reason why we were on obamacare so much is because it's it's crappy bill but when you mandate insurers or employers to buy insurance right for their employees and the insurance has have a certain amount of requirements at an insurance company goes look all the requirements will be there these are your options option a b and c has low deductible higher premiums c has.

robert wood johnson foundation
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"For all plan members in any example plan designed but members on high deductible plans could see a greater impact i know some of you are like like when i go to mexico the medicines cheaper if i go to europe the medicine cheaper it is the medicine is cheaper you're right it's more of a lot of supply demand although the pharmacies are gonna be more expensive for the tourists i did i go into the farms in look like how much is your cipro you're at about a come into this summit to this employed or they creek up the prices sell high deductible plans are increasingly offered by more and more players will thank you for that the push towards high deductible plans was hit nearly they say has hit nearly twenty five million american workers thanks to obamacare can i just say as cost shifting a us employer escalates that's the court to announce his left small by the robert wood johnson foundation we'll yeah if employers have to buy your insurance i had the while the care so stupid add and i i know we rip on obamacare level the show what's because it makes you feel better but um that's it's ridiculous hold on sandwiches lost an airing sorry about that oh i just lost my airing why don't lose when hearing mom man allows the urng backing none of a deal anyway on okay i got to fix my ears uh the reason why we rip on obamacare so much is because it's it's crappy bill but when you mandate insurers or employers to buy insurance right for their employees and the insurance has have a certain amount of requirements and an insurance company goes look all the requirements will be there these are your options option a b and c a has low to doctoral higher premiums c has a very high deductible below premiums or so it'll the sea will be cheaper for me as an a player yeah does it handle everthing obamacare wants yeah okay they'll get that one that's what everybody's deductible has been going up and you know the site deductible that basically means you're not getting health insurance coverage until you pay that amount might deductible.

us robert wood johnson foundation
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The robert wood johnson foundation at rw jf dot org it's morning edition from npr news i'm david greene and i'm rachel martin it's a new era for shin fame that's the political party that has fought for a united independent ireland sinn vein had close ties to the irish republican army during three decades of violence in northern ireland known as the troubles now the party has elected a new leader here's npr's lauren fair police have now confirmed that the ira gunman 435 years sheen feign was led by gerry adams he frequently refused to condemn shootings and bombings by the irish republican army will not condemn the ira is uh quite legitimate resistance to but eventually adams rejected armed struggle helped broker the good friday peace agreement that ended the violence she maintains new president mary lou mcdonald says she can never replace such an important figure my friends i won't failed jerry shoes but the news is that i brought liaohe and they are very different choose past xinfei leaders have had working class roots in britishruled northern ireland mcdonald is from a middle class family she went to private school and most importantly she's from the south the republic of ireland and that reflects a change in xinfang strategy glucose ocean veins priorities is no longer in belfast it's in the south of ireland it's in dublin pat lahey political editor of the irish times says xinfei in wants to win power on both sides of the uk irish border in order to eventually unite northern ireland with the republic lay he recalls when mcdonald was first elected to the european parliament in two thousand four nobody'd ever heard of her but she was so different southern young female speaking with had kind of distinctive dolan middle class accent that was so so different to the public face of champagne trinity college dublin mcdonald's alma mater is filled with the sort of young educated voters xinfei in hopes to attract but grace farrell the catholic student from the north who has voted for shen fame so she worries the party is trying to.

political editor shen champagne trinity college dolan pat lahey belfast jerry sheen rachel martin european parliament the irish times robert wood johnson foundation mary lou mcdonald president ira gerry adams npr ireland irish republican army sinn vein
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The queen's public library will stop giving out plastic bags to customers this summer the libraries president and ceo dennis wolcott says it's been distributing plastic bags for twenty years we have given out roughly eight million bags a year and that's just unacceptable while we can no longer tolerate fat the library plans to redirect the money used to produce bags towards more environmentally friendly things like ebay books the policy will go into effect in june and wnyc is acquiring the local news site gotha missed the purchase which is largely funded by two annonymous donors includes its archives domain name and social media assets it's part of a larger deal involving two other public radio stations k p c c in southern california will get the site la ist and waam you in washington will take over dcni gotha miss was previously owned by billionaire businessman joe ricketts he shut down that site as well as dna info back in november after reporters and editors voted to join a union in a joint statement the three public media organizations say they hope the sites will expand their digital footprints and further their missions to serve local audiences the relaunch of gotha missed is this spring here in new york rain and fog in the forecast for the rest of today continuing into the night it's thirty eight degrees now that 406 support for npr comes from the robert wood johnson foundation working alongside others to build a culture.

president and ceo wnyc california washington joe ricketts gotha npr robert wood johnson foundation dennis wolcott ebay new york thirty eight degrees twenty years
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The robert wood johnson foundation at our w j f dot org it's morning edition from npr news i'm steve inskeep can i make till martin and we're going to spend the next few minutes talking about the devices that have come to rule on our lives yeah we're talking about smartphones this week apple shareholders are meeting and to major shareholders have raised concerns that smartphones are harming our children but what amount us adults than peers mike lindell klaff looks at smartphone addiction and how to cut back right around eighteen hundred russian scientists neat yvonne pavlak ran a landmark experiment he gave dogs a yummy treat but rate before he handed than the treat he played a sound yes a buzzer not a bell the bus are keen to have a special meaning for the dogs food was comey in dogs actually started drooling just when they heard the sound even when no foot was around the buzzer had become pleasurable david greenfield a psychologist at the university of connecticut says smartphone notifications are doing the same thing to our brains his elevating monroe chemical dopamine dopamine is a pleasure chemical so the phone is basically turned us all in the past loves dogs that's exactly what the phone is done we are all power loves dogs a growing number of doctors are concerned about people's relationship with their phones there's a debate about what to call it some say a disorder or problematic behavior others think it could become a behavioral addiction like gambling on a limp key a psychiatrist at stanford university says there's a wide range of severe dis and symptoms it's a spectrum disorder so there's a mild moderate and severe forms and for many people there's no problem at all in this way limped he says the phone is kinda like alcohol so i'm not saying you know everybody get rid of their smartphones they're completely did you have say let's be very thoughtful about how we're using these devices because are we can use them and pathological ways lemke says signs a pathological use our for instance does the phone make you stay up at night and not get enough sleep or does it reduced the time you interact with friends and family or is it making you rude when you're in the middle of having a conversation with someone are you in the middle of that just dropping down and scrolling through your phone and may be doing it totally unaware that you're doing it also heavy usage me squelch your creativity it really deprives.

robert wood johnson foundation steve inskeep martin yvonne pavlak david greenfield dopamine stanford university npr apple mike lindell klaff drooling university of connecticut monroe lemke
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The robert wood johnson foundation at our w j f dot org this is morning edition from npr news i'm david greene then i am rachel martin there were protests yesterday in seoul south korea protests that disrupted a visit by north korean officials the protestors told npr they are skeptical that these new plans for uniting the two korean korean teams at the next month's winter olympics will ease tensions over the north's nuclear program democratic senator tammy duckworth shares that skepticism i spoke with her shortly after she returned from a visit to japan and south korea there's no illusions among our allies and our own military leaders that the north koreans are not continuing to pursue to refind their nuclear capabilities even as who participate in the olympics we spoke with the former us ambassador to a rock ryan crocker just recently on this program and he argued that president trump's strategy on north korea the strong man n approach might eventually end up breaking this long stalemate let's listen to this clip it made sure be duffy difference in tone that president trump has existed may do something down the line there what do you make of that well i the problem is we don't know if the difference if he makes is going to be cut her pad frankly am kim jong owned a leader of north korea is facing a major economic crisis at home and he's telling his own people guess you're going to be starving no you're not getting there the you know medicines in the food that you need but that's important for support our money and this nuclear programme because the rest of the world and especially america's out to get us and we have in donald trump someone who actually provides him with the tweets an actual clips of him saying these things he might as well be working for the north korean propaganda machine so at the same time the trump administration will argue that what has happened in the.

america seoul rachel martin david greene north korea trump administration time donald trump north korean south korea npr japan olympics nuclear program president kim jong tammy duckworth senator robert wood johnson foundation ryan crocker economic crisis people
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Robert wood johnson foundation and the harvard t h chan school of public health that numbers begin to learn more about how he system affects people's health and their longevity reporter rail and bishop l has this next story in our nation's you me and then the day doctor roberto montenegro finished his phd but not for the right reasons i still cranes who when i think about it his colleagues at ucla had taken him and his wife to fancy restaurant they were celebrating his new phd insists geology and he was about to head to medical school he was legit we laughed and we eight end john jeff to pay for this but when they got an line for the valet a really nice car nick herb a woman got out and walk past the other couples in line montenegro says and she gets to me and she hands me her keys she assumed he was a valet if vividly remember turning red and i don't turn said and i remember my hogged bounding i remember feeling really confused end and hurt and angry five minutes later still waiting for his car it happened again and even now reliving that story it's it's uncomfortable this was not the first or the last time heating counter racism at conferences colleagues would accidentally try to order drinks from him as a medical student people at the hospital with sometimes mistake him for a technician or janitor even when he was wearing a white doctor's coat that happens to me so much montenegro's experiences might not sound like a big deal but researchers thinks that being discriminated against over and over again could actually hurt a person's health when you start to worry about some uh whether that's race or something then that initiates a biological stress response that amani new regita a social epidemiologist at the university of california's she and dr montenegro who's now a fellow in child psychiatry at seattle children's hospital are trying to understand what discrimination can actually do to your body that night people assume montenegro's valet turning red and my heart pounding those are scientists body was stressed cranking up the levels of hormones like adrenaline and cortisol this hormones can be really grateful for gearing up to fight or to flee but it's not good if they linger for example one of the things we're finding in my research is set on this process most of racism stress.

Robert wood johnson foundation roberto montenegro ucla john jeff technician cortisol harvard t h chan school of pub reporter amani university of california dr montenegro seattle five minutes
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And from paramount pictures and black bear pictures with a new film suburban con stein that damon julianne moore an oscar isaac directed by george clooney suburban con rated r are now playing in theaters everywhere and c 3 iot providing a software platform that brings artificial intelligence big data cloud computing and iot to industrialscale digital transformations learn more at c3iotcom from npr news this is all things considered i'm kelly mcevers and i'm rob siegel race and our perceptions of it affect what happens in the workplace npr the robert wood johnson foundation and the harvard t h chan school of public health conducted a poll and most african americans who participated said they had experienced discrimination at work in hiring and pay and and getting promotions and pearson areg linton looked into that and he found that when faced with those obstacles many people choose to get out and strike out on their own it's an october heatwave in los angeles and dennis jackson is making the best of it selling solar panels jackson has a sense we always been an entrepreneur he started and landscaping and used to solar pay analysts the leash both rizo's last year ban solar is that many black people and in the city um there's some black guys at our last neighbors and we look at each other's in applause has is that many of us jackson his forty he moved to la in his teens from detroit now there they're only been a few brief times when he's have a boss when i first started i did have a loss and other like having a loss is harder this way jackson has a very small operation five employ and some independent contractors and in many ways he says he's always had the entrepreneurial spirit it's his way of avoiding the glass ceiling it also peace in he says yeah i'm not going to have to go through that because i'm a raimondo amman away mol tickets so that after so face in all discrimination in pr and harvard have published the survey that says fifty six percent of african americans say they've been discriminated against in.

african americans dennis jackson areg linton harvard t h chan school of pub rob siegel npr cloud computing artificial intelligence george clooney julianne moore harvard jackson detroit los angeles robert wood johnson foundation kelly mcevers software platform oscar isaac fifty six percent
"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"robert wood johnson foundation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"In real food and the robert wood johnson foundation at our wjr dot org archaeological evidence shows the first humans in california came one hundred forty thousand years ago historical record show the first european arrived in the steve in fifteen forty in news accounts show guru was founded in 1997 the point b each day history is made in california and every week day the california report follows the evidence the record in the news to bring it to you as it happens i'm john sepulvado listened to the california report right here on kqed first up at five fifty one on kqed public radio here's what's coming up later today on forum with media kim we'll bring you the latest on the situation in me of maher the un says the country's treatment of its muslim row hinge on minority looks like ethnic cleansing than in our second hour san diego state university psychology professor joins us to discuss her latest research on a new generation she calls ign kids born between 1995 and two thousand twelve grown up with smartphones and you'll media that's all coming up later today on forum from 900 eleven am on kqed public radio now to area weather forecast mostly cloudy this morning of their becoming partly cloudy the rest of the day slight chance of thunderstorms two with highs anywhere from the mid 60s headed to around eighty degrees well time now for morning in addition that seven after three this is community supported kqed public radio eighty eight point five fm morning by michael stich it's morning edition from npr news i'm david greene in culver city california and i mary louise kelly in washington dc cleaning up after hurricane erma is going to be a long process the storm left more than half of florida without power recovery is already underway though in the state's biggest metro area that would be miami and that is where npr's martin cast years good morning martin good morning tell us what's left out at you as you watch people out and about in trying to return to something like normal well i think what you see is a city that starting to sort of habits piece of everyday life quicken and you there's more traffic people are tackling the long list of two jews to try to.

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