18 Burst results for "Robert Wise"

Remembering 'Sound Of Music' Star Christopher Plummer

Fresh Air

00:59 sec | 8 months ago

Remembering 'Sound Of Music' Star Christopher Plummer

"Plummer and julie andrews scene from the sound of music people have such strong feelings about that movie the either love it or they hate it and they think it's really insipid. Where do you stand on this issue of our time I'm very fond of julie. That's the nicest thing that came out of that film for me. We we have a true in great friendship. She's an extraordinary woman professional. I'm grateful to the film in many ways because it was such a success. It is not my favorite film. Of course because i do think it's borders on mawkishness but we did our damned best not to make it too. Mawkish and robert wise kept a very tight control on it Much was difficult enough. The the sound of the music is quite wonderful. Christopher plummer speaking with terry gross recorded in two thousand seven plumber died last friday at the age of ninety

Julie Andrews Plummer Julie Robert Wise Christopher Plummer Terry Gross
"robert wise" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"robert wise" Discussed on KGO 810

"I loved it. Go ahead. Yeah, well, you know, it doesn't need really language because it's the visuals are so remarkable in any David Lean's film, even the smaller ones beautiful. What he does is he takes in this film and Lawrence of Arabia Bridge under with a quiet passage to India. He's David Lee takes You know, he was a cinematographer. You know, it's very interesting with ease Doctor directors, they come from different fields. You know some of cinematographers like George Stevens. Semi editors like Robert Wise, you know writers like Joseph Mankiewicz Ah, Billy Wilder. They come from different fields. Spielberg made his own films when he was a kid, you know, so he was an early filmmakers, so everybody comes at it differently. You know, Vincent Minnelli did set decoration for playing. You know, everybody comes out. I will. David Lean was this great cinematographer became a great director on what he would do is he would take and Spielberg does this in shameless list, you would take Big subjects like Chicago, and then he would nail them down. So they became extremely personal. We were always personally involved while having the sweeping saga. It's uh it's a sensational kind of combination and lead. Does it better than anybody that at the same time, he could do a small romance, So I feel like summertime. About the yearning of a woman the first time she ever sees Venice. Oh, I'm telling you, this is a great film It is and in the films are just amazing now are like the music. Now Wait the next film we're doing. I have to tell you. I went to see it with my mother. My mother roared with laughter absolutely adored this film. Let's hear the sound. Me tell you about my client, Michael Dorsey. He was a fine actor. Maybe a great actor. For every role he wanted. There was a reason why it wasn't right. Sorry You're too tall. I could be shorter now. I can use you too short. So I can be taller, too Moody next to old stubborn too much trouble to tough.

David Lean Spielberg David Lee Vincent Minnelli Michael Dorsey George Stevens Arabia Bridge Joseph Mankiewicz India Venice Billy Wilder director Robert Wise Chicago
"robert wise" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"robert wise" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The rebooted one day at a time. On CBS, So West Side story. Of course you're most talked about role you're going to be in the new one. You did a lot of movies before that one that you didn't really like doing it was. It was a lot of definitive Hispanic roles that That you play? Definitely. They were. They were Indian American. Indian Egypt. Show any anybody with a dark skin. And an accent. That's what I did for years and years and years. So in West Side story came along. It was just, you know, just so thrilling for me, even though they got a bunch of things wrong. In terms of Ah, what Hispanics look like and sound like, Never mind. Ah, it was a thrill to do that movie. Then it's more of a third to do it now because Stephen Sondheim. Stephen Sondheim's Steven Spielberg decided along with Tony Kushner that they were going to right some wrongs. They didn't put it that way. So those are my words, and everybody who's supposed to be Hispanic in this movie is very important, right? Absolutely. How did it come along? Like, how did this specific role come along? And how quickly did you jump on it? I did what everybody else did I screen tested and I auditioned. Now. Okay, just like everybody else because I had no Jerry Robin's Jerome Robbins, the choreographer. Who was now going to also co direct with Robert Wise. I had known him from the King and I the film. I was in that, and in fact, I believe it was he who mentioned my name to Robert wife. And he said, We should really audition Rita Moreno. I think she'd be good for the part of a nature in this movie, and that's what I did. I auditioned like everybody else I screen tested Like everybody else. And, ah, that's how it happens. Well, anyone all these awards and it was it was big. I mean, you want not just the after people forget that. I also got the Golden Globe. Yeah, Yeah, You got the Golden Globe too? But then you didn't work for like. On the screen, big screen for, like, seven years. Why did that? Hell it was It was a heartbreak of my life. I thought when the Oscar happened, that I would be, you know. Uh, doing all kind of movies and nothing but nothing came along. Heartbreaking, Absolutely heartbreaking. And ah, I was just offered more of the same on a lesser scale. It is heartbreaking. These girls with accents and all that dark, dark, dark makeup and all that, and Ah, you know, it wasn't even acknowledged in the movie. The original movie that Puerto Rican We're all colors. We are browned we are copper. We are why his milk because French Came to Puerto Rico. The Spaniards came to Puerto Rico. They are very, very fair races, but I mean, you know you were discovered by the Great Louis B. Mayer of MGM. You had a relationship with Elvis encounters with Howard. He was romance with Marlon Brando. You You dealt with so much of Hollywood's racial and sexual barriers along the way. There's a lot of story to tell here. Yeah, Actually, if I would do it to do a real documentary, it would be about four hours long. And you know, I'm really looking forward, of course to this American Masters documentary and in the new season of the rebooted one data time starts airing this Monday. Night at eight Central on CBS, and it is going to be it's going to be also a back to back to episodes back to back. Great, So if you haven't seen it, it's a great way to start digging in and Adam is hilarious. It's a grich. It's a great show. What a pleasure spending some time with you, Rita. Honestly, I'm so glad you took the time. You know what? I love the way you interview? Thank you. It was a pleasure for me. Thank you, Rita. My pleasure..

Robert Wise Rita Moreno CBS Stephen Sondheim Puerto Rico Golden Globe Robert wife Howard West Side Louis B. Mayer Tony Kushner Oscar Jerome Robbins MGM Jerry Robin Steven Spielberg Marlon Brando Hollywood Adam Elvis
"robert wise" Discussed on Whores Talk Horror

Whores Talk Horror

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"robert wise" Discussed on Whores Talk Horror

"Agree with me, even though I was kind of vague about it, but I was like he gets the alien guy put them in the thing and then he gets better and eat you've obviously dead. Movie a lot. And you knew what you were talking about also directed by Robert Wise who also directed The Haunting in nineteen sixty-three. All right. Stop. I know aren't we supposed to never talk about them? It's not going to happen. But I'm still annoyed about the fact that technically if you do watch the original The Day the Earth Stood Still the bitch says it wrong. So she's lucky Gort didn't blow a hole through her fucking head because she says Claude Barada nikto and like that's not how clot to explains it to her at all. So the moral of the story is pronunciation matters, I guess. Yeah. I'm a good story Mindy. Thanks other Mindy. It was an Archer joke. Anyway, next question something on okay. Well mini got the point for that one. Thank you guys, and we had a fun time doing some research. So the next question is to Sharon in The Conjuring what game do the kids like to play? They like to play God. I don't remember the name of it. But just the if I describe it do I get the point? Maybe it's it's basically the game where one person high school and you get three claps. You could ask more they're at and they have to clap and you have your your eyes closed and you try and find them based on where you hear the clicking sound coming from and if you were a kid, what would you call that game? Collapsed Mindy don't say probably just call it clap. Is there another name that you could possibly call that? I mean hide and seek but with clapping so what would you call that game? If you were a kid clap? Yes god, dammit Spencer off. She already knew it. I know she did but you accept when when we were kids Mindy and I just like the clap now, we just had the class that we would oh, sorry kidding kidding kidding. No, we made a a game. It was like hide-and-seek, but we called it Jason and we would go outside and you could you played it only outside at night at Sharon's house because her backyard we get hop the fence into this huge yard where there was this old folks home, which that's just scary and of itself..

Mindy Robert Wise Sharon Gort Spencer Claude Barada
"robert wise" Discussed on Around the World in 80s Movies

Around the World in 80s Movies

08:18 min | 1 year ago

"robert wise" Discussed on Around the World in 80s Movies

"Prominence. It wasn't really much Nimoy had hoped for but it was acceptable because roddenberry continued to be a bit intrusive to the rewriting of the film. Tom He had to sign a new contract. Barred him from interfering with revisions in. He ended up ignoring this very often. He butted heads repeatedly with Harold Livingston. In in this way roddenberry could be seen as emulating Admiral Kirk. He was unwilling to accept being kicked upstairs to his executive role and he would push his way into captaining his old ship now Nimoy ended up mediating the script revisions. He met with Livingston after hours to hammer out. The changes revisions still seem to come by the hour. Because Ron Perry you cannot sit idly by they required timestamps so the actors and crew would know which one they were supposed to utilize at any given moment. The situation ended up growing intolerable for everybody. Everybody involved and Livingston ended up quitting in December of nineteen seventy seven but paramount still did not want to go with roddenberry alone. Dennis Lynton Clark was has brought in to handle revisions. They wanted to get spock INC Clark along with Roddenberry even worse than Livingston. They started off on the wrong foot because roddenberry's on berries penchant for playing practical jokes on his crew in his actors. The one that roddenberry played on Clark which was replacing his secretary for this actress that became completely incompetent and obnoxious it resulted in Clark having a meltdown and there was a lot of resentment from which he never recovered after three tenths months of not really getting along. I'm Clark was out Livingston. Return to complete the script which he claims had been rewritten several times. Obviously and none for the better he would get the script back into shape. If only roddenberry was kept away for good now. Roddenberry continued intervening even though he was not being monitored he ended up replacing script pages. That Livingston would submit with his his own revisions pretty sneaky there. Livingston quit Multiple Times. Due to Roddenberry's continued meddling higher ups would still interject. They convinced Livingston to Hugh Return. They gave him a syringe and more money to get him to come back. The two writers though ceased to be on speaking terms by that point and Rod Mira was finally banned I'm from further disruptions but he kinda got revenge in a way he ended up signing on with publishing companies Simon and Shuster the happened to be owned by the same parent company as paramount Gulf and Western. He was going to write the novelization of Star Trek the motion picture. Much to Livingston's consternation. Now this story went through so many revisions that I hesitated it to give you the plot so this is the final plot of the film. I won't go into spoilers though now. Fast approaching Earth is this cloud like alien entity that destroys all that approaches visit with it's nebulous forum. The Not quite fully refitted. Enterprise is the closed vessel available in this space. Clouds approach toward earth. Admiral Kirk pushes his way to take over the mission over the man that he picked as his successor as the captain. Willard Decker Kirk makes every attempt to reason with this living entity who goes by the moniker or a Vija Vija up abducting the enterprises navigator. I- Leah who ends up returning any mechanical form. Giving voice to this entity in the bad news is wants to rid earth of all of the carbon based lifeforms effectively ending life as we know it for everyone on the planet unless Kirk Company can see the day now. The plot does way more complicated to that. But that's kind of the backbone of it now. Production of Star Trek. The motion picture began in August of nineteen. Seventy eight they brought that many of the contributors from the original show. They did have a new costume designer though. His name is Bob Fletcher and he replaced the TV shows uniforms. He brought in Pastel colored new agey versions that he felt was in in keeping with the cerebral nature of this new story. The cast hated the design. They call them space pajamas. They hated the design fiercely. You know they outfitted the crew as if they we're expected to cost play at both a star trek convention and a Renaissance Fair. That's how they kind of look the skin-tight costumes made it difficult for the actress to sit and and they really couldn't use the restroom without accompaniment from someone in the Costume Department because the Zipper that existed for these wardrobes only existed in the back further compounding founding problems beyond the costumes was the Special Effects Team Advertisement Specialist Robert Abel and associates were hired to do the special effects for the film now able estimated that the budget for special effects was going to be about four to six million dollars as they started though they felt that the filmmakers started asking them to make visual the facts that were laughably preposterous so the opted for designs that they felt would work better. They were constructing this on the side. Paramount approved them doing the a new designs despite extending the budget with further delays. But Red flags ended up getting race sometime into the production when Abel's later estimates approached sixteen eighteen million dollars not just six million dollars so paramount was very wary of what was going on there. They brought in special effects adviser. Douglas Trumbull who worked with Robert Wise is on the andromeda strain to oversee Abel's work and they also added John Dykstra who did star Wars Battle Star Galactica to support him. It turns out that Abel able spent much of the initial six million dollars that they were given on a fancy new studio and a lot of new equipment that they used for some of their side work. That paramount was not getting any money on on so they ended up looking at. What actually had me for the movie? And they discovered that they really had not made anything that they consider to be usable so able as fired trumbull would end up having to deliver the visual effects from scratch along with his own crew in a very short time frame which meant very long hours a lot. More money another ten million dollars to fix was broken now as was going on there was also tension developing between paramount and the composer Jerry. Goldsmith paramount wanted the score to emulate more like a John on Williams sound to extend its appeal to what was popular at the time. Roddenberry also made some suggestions to push to incorporate the. TV's shows music into the score much more more. He felt. That fans would be disappointed if they didn't hear Alexander. Courage is legendary theme now. Goldsmith did incorporate that theme whenever the captain's log comes into play but Goldsmith found all of these demands absurd and he ended up walking off. The set. Paramount was under great pressure to complete the picture on time though so the ended up calling Goldsmith back. Acne promised that he would be able to do things his way. After all. And despite all of the quibbling there over what they wanted Goldsmith score to sound like his score with ended up becoming very very iconic in the world of Star Trek in fact it was used as the theme to the television series in one thousand nine hundred seven for Star Trek the next generation in fact there was also brought back for Star Trek. Eric five as well. Now time constraints ended up becoming a really big problem so paramount ended up having to remove a lot of the budget constraints. They started running twenty four hour shifts chiefs. They wanted to deliver the film by the hard deadline of December seventh and that was because they wanted to avoid having to pay back thirty million dollars in guarantees to its exhibitors. His expenses at that point ended up skyrocketing to a massive forty six million dollars overall. That was four times the cost of Star Wars and that put star Trek. The motion picture just is behind Cleopatra most expensive Hollywood production of all time all the signs seemed to be pointing toward impending disaster. Here the last minute completion meant that they had no time time for sneak previews to try to generate the buzz that they normally did and this all for a film based on a cancel. TV show that had no box office stars. This was extremely risky at this point so paramount needed to put something out there. They feel the nine million dollar budget for advertisement but the had to curb national campaigns. There were anti blind bidding laws that prevented the film from being exhibited until December twenty first in fifteen states that had those laws because Star Trek was not quite complete league yet so they didn't get to view the film that they were purchasing as the law required so despite all of these quibbles was bad press at the time fans nevertheless were not dissuaded from seeing what would be the first live action star Trek in ten years they were eagerly anticipating that enough to amass eleven million dollars in its opening weekend. That would break the record that was set by superman just the year before when it ended up opening those fifteen new states on December twenty.

roddenberry Harold Livingston Paramount Goldsmith Dennis Lynton Clark Willard Decker Kirk Livingston Robert Abel Tom He Nimoy paramount Gulf Vija Vija executive Bob Fletcher Kirk Company Douglas Trumbull Ron Perry Multiple Times Costume Department Hollywood
"robert wise" Discussed on Next Question with Katie Couric

Next Question with Katie Couric

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"robert wise" Discussed on Next Question with Katie Couric

"At the Golden Globes I did thank him for making it possible by not costing me lady to win the Golden Globe for a Mary poppins finally my thanks to a man who made a wonderful movie. And who made this possible in the first place Mr Jack Warner and to his credit he did get the job could he did off. I thought my career might be at an end when I said said it a year later of course You were in the sound of music. The first three films that I made were not released until I'd finished them so I was eventually just loving making movies and learning on my feet and and almost playing in this delicious sandbox and nothing had been released so I had no idea that they were going to be a successful as they were. I remember going to the sound of music at the Ontario Theater in Washington. DC I was was seven years old and my family. My Mom and dad put us in the station wagon in our Easter Sunday clothes and we went to a matinee and afternoon showing Wing of the sound of music. Oh and I was so upset when the Nazis came knocking ally that was freely traumatic for but I mean just think of towel that movie has endured yes. I think it's probably one of the most classic Liz all right values and it was was one of the great beautiful Hollywood movies that was shot so beautifully. The sound is so great. It was crafted immaculately and directed by Mazda directed by Robert Wise who did west side story and sand pebbles and so many other wonderful movies. I worked with him in two showrooms and he was a darling. I know that you were a little lonely when you were filming that movie you missed your husband. Yeah well He. Because of the success of his work in in Mary poppins he was an instant demand and he did phenomenal shows on Broadway especially and he did films but I mean shows like Chicago and pippen and will rogers follies. I mean phenomenal designs and costumes foot and very new and fresh and original concepts and then wonderful movies too. He did the great. Bob Fosse movie. What was is it co all that jazz all that jazz? Yeah Wow I think he won. He did win the Oscar for that one. Yeah an extraordinary career as well. Yes and and he was so busy so of course we were separated lot and eventually that did take its toll. We'd known each other since we would twelve or your home town. We both came from the same village on the railway line out of London and Met Very early. And he was my childhood sweetheart sweetheart so I think we allowed free job at grow and blossom and didn't take into account. Well neither of US really could. We needed money honey and we had to work and things were happening so rapidly and it took a toll. which was that our marriage failed? I'm happy to say that we are friends friends to this day and of course we share beautiful daughter. Who is the door that helped me write this book? I'm Emma keeps popping up. He does and she she she did and she does. Thank God you ever tire of talking about the sound of music not really. How much fun though was it to perform all all those extraordinary Rogers and Hammerstein phenomenon phenomenal and will first of all singing with the foss? Orchestra is is magical natural. My singing teacher said Katie. That singing with a great orchestra is like being carried aloft in the most comfortable armchair yeah over the orchestra and the sound and she was absolutely right. That was the great joy but then to give you my favorite song. I think it has to be the one that I didn't sing in. That was ill vice because again. Excuse me it speaks to one's homeland. Whoever you are it's not just about Austria? It's about any place that you call home. You know bless my homeland forever is the lyric and it has one of the classic. Dick Richard Rodgers melodies. Think of. Oh what a beautiful morning. It's one of his melodies that simply folds back on itself and it's very simple and edel vice and oh what a beautiful morning and several others have that quality and the timeless. The melody is so clear and clean and simple and lends itself to the most wonderful orchestration. I wish I had the opportunity. To have met Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein no such brilliance. Again I walked.

Mary poppins Mr Jack Warner Richard Rodgers Robert Wise Oscar Hammerstein Golden Globes Emma US Ontario Theater Bob Fosse Mazda Oscar Katie Hollywood Washington edel Liz Chicago pippen
"robert wise" Discussed on Whores Talk Horror

Whores Talk Horror

05:54 min | 2 years ago

"robert wise" Discussed on Whores Talk Horror

"Welcome fours talk for. We're not really whores. We just like word play hello. I'm Sharon Melinda. Welcome welcome back and or thank you for joining us for the first time today. We have a ghost story that was sent into us from a listener shared. We'll share a personal go story of hers and I'm GonNa talk about the real life ghosts inhabiting the House that WHO's used in Robert Wise's nineteen sixty three film the haunting that we discussed in last week's episode all right so this is our very first listener story and this go story comes from David. Hello David thank you so much for sending in your story. Thanks I hope I can do it. Justice and there are some Scottish words slash landmarks in the story story that I hope I pronounce correctly and if I don't I apologize feel free to email us and tell us the right way to pronounce the well know exactly so here we go shortly after graduating from college. One of my I best friend. Tom Moved to Michigan BR offended. Mike a retired professor their friendship developed from mutual enjoyment of the outdoors upon visiting Mike's Property Tom Notice an incredible set of guarding surrounding his house and also several all buildings that were dispersed on his beautiful land. One of those buildings was an original log cabin built by a family of Scottish settlers back in the eighteen fifties surprise at the great shape. The cabin was in Thomas Mike to see the inside of the cabin most everything that the Scottish family had owned remained in pristine condition this included a washboard table and chairs old blankets and even a few old plates forks pots and pans just to clarify. He's looking going to purchase or rent a cabinet in the woods. Really what's happening. No no no he made friends with someone who had who has a cat. Well has a big property that has a cabin in the woods okay so so mike explain that family had lived in that cabin for years but never knew any of the details. Mike also explain that friends nevil friends in even a local history groups had come into the cabin before but didn't I didn't stay long after hearing what sounded like a woman Singye Mike had heard the singing before as well but never wanted to admit to any of the visitors. I'm not sure why but having been intrigued by the story is Tom Asked if he could spend the night in the cabin. Mike obliged and also said he would like to stay there as well to see if they can hear an east singing safety in numbers exactly and so armed with sleeping bags flashlights annotate recorder. Tom and Mike spent the night inside the cabin. Lo and behold around three in the morning both were awoken by the sound of a woman singing an unknown dialect in sounded foreign yet. It was clear as day so of course it's the words cannot be understood but they did record what they seemed like was a minute of the singing shut up. I literally okay good. I can finish on the record recorded on what they did. They did the actually got audio and just as the singing stopped and here's the part when I I read this email gave me shivers and made the hair on the back of my arm stand up in a the`real unreal outline of a woman in a long white dress holding what appeared to be a child wrapped in a blanket walked through the wall and out the main cabin door. Tom and Mike looked at each other in amazement and confirm to each other what they'd both saw the next morning when they played the tape only a few seconds recorded but remember they thought they recorded an entire minute. All they heard was what sounded like a woman singing and I apologize is for <hes> I I. I do not have a good singing voice. I'M NOT GONNA attempt to try and seeing this really an it's Scottish but host anyways I forgive me so bear meal O. so even though they could've sworn they heard more a friend of Mike's who was a music historian listened to the tape a few days later in what some searching and constant replaying of the tape the lyrics were discovered the voice was actually singing and once again nine. I'm going to attempt but I do have actual audio of this so I will play it. Bear meal oho translated as sad I am without the Hong furthermore it was discovered that the tunes she was singing match. The melody of an old Scottish Song called the Ear Ski Love Lilt which was written on an island near the outer Hebrides called ear ski in one thousand nine hundred nine and as Lockwood have it a local acquaintance well in his nineties who heard about Mike Experience called him and finally explain that his grandfather was a close friend of the family who lived in the cabin and at the family who lived in that cabin actually lost a child as a baby and I actually have <hes> some audio recording that I'm going to play now of the e risky love Lilt <hes> which was the <hes> the closest thing to the actual recording. which would they heard yeah? The actual according apparently is has now vanished. They don't have it anymore but it probably sounded something like this.

Thomas Mike Tom Moved Mike Experience Sharon Melinda Hong Robert Wise David Michigan Lo Lockwood professor
"robert wise" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"robert wise" Discussed on KCRW

"Director shooting wisdom versus your first day on this. Oh, lord. I had. Such an ego on wisdom of twenty first film as director of twenty three I had experienced a situation year before two years before a picture that I had written but did not direct and. Is now you said doesn't we're not just making reference. That's the film. And so when I got to make my first film, I was surrounded by an extraordinary team. I had Robert wise was my executive producer Gani elfin was my composer score. I well, I think he did pee wee's big adventure before he's just before. I had stood outside the the theater where he was performing here in Hollywood. And I said, you know, Mr. elephants something I'm going to direct the movie, I want you to do the score. And he's like who who are you? And he was very sweet. And right. So so was Danny often during the score Michael Kahn whose Stevens buildings cutting the film Bernard Williams was my producer who walked on my Linden study cougarettes, right? So so Dennis gassner was our production center. It was incre-. I had this this brain trust of these incredible individ-, Adam Greenberg who just shot. The Terminator was was the was it cinematographer. So again, this this debt my my. Bench was so deep, and I was twenty three and I was absolute. And nobody could tell me anything. And and even though I understood fundamentally that filmmaking is it takes a village filmmaking is a community effort. I had my my my hands. We're so tightly gripped around a particular vision that you know, when you look at it closed hand, what gets in absolutely nothing when you open at hand. You are you're wide open to all sorts of suggestions that ultimately what I've learned. Now is that if somebody has a great idea, I don't care where it comes from. I'm going to get the credit for as a director. So I've learned to to. Yes, you have to have a healthy ego. Yes. You have to there has to be one vision to get everybody down the field and complete the mission. But it is a collective effort. It is a community effort. And so I have a park the ego. And and. Really embraced the village to to to get the job done. I would say that's that's the real difference between now and twenty thirty years ago. I wasn't gonna bring up the time say we're out of it. And I can't thank you enough. Doing please come back will indeed. Thank you. It's such a pleasure to meet you finally have been been following you and the work that you're doing with Jason Reitman and doing it that the Lochner remains, and yeah, it's it's a you're you're real talented cat, and we're we're lucky to have you here in LA. That's very kind you say, my guess, who's a talented cat himself as the star director and writer of the public Amelia says assures recorded here at NPR's pharmacy, a call, well, it's edited and she's going to have a lot of work by Blake.

director Robert wise Gani elfin Dennis gassner Jason Reitman Adam Greenberg executive producer Amelia Bench LA Michael Kahn Hollywood Bernard Williams Danny producer Linden NPR Blake writer twenty thirty years
"robert wise" Discussed on Here's The Thing

Here's The Thing

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"robert wise" Discussed on Here's The Thing

"Know, he was crazy. He was really really so much to play music and drive people nuts. But during during the filming seen just start some use Cameron Cameron Crowe, let them now at what point that you're doing this because you work with some fantastic directors does the directing thing began to dawn on you. Well, I'd written a didn't additition of an SE hit novel. And it was perhaps the least successful of the four that were that were turned into films. It was it was a movie called that was in. This is now and for a lot of different reasons. Picture just didn't work. And so I was very frustrated coming out of that experience. And I was twenty three years old. And I said it's not going to happen. Next time, I'm going to direct and surrounded myself with with the wrote the script that was terrible. And I surrounded myself with an amazing group of technicians. Robert wise was my executive produce. Sir. And ended up being a mentor to me Michael Kahn who Spielberg's editor cut it. Dennis gassner was production designer Danielle Fman wrote the score I was surrounded and supported by the strawberry group of people, and I had a terrible script, and I shot it anyway. And I was convinced that no one was going to tell me what to do, and I should have listened to them. And they should've told me what to do. No, no. This is another movie for called. Anyway. So have firm you've got a couple of river. We'll talk show anyway. And so I came out of that experience bruised and broken. I said what I'm gonna do it again. And that was another film that I did with Charlie which was lighter, and it was met at work, and it was silly. And and my mother pulled me aside, and she's she's sort of been she's the rock of the family, and she's the most practical one in our group, and she just said, you know, you're making movies about things, you don't know anything. About. Make films about what you know. And what do you know about family about people? And so my focus changed I make folk movies. I believe I make folk movies, and it started with this deal with the devil. I agreed to third Mighty Ducks film which with for Disney in exchange for the funding to do a pet project of mine. It was a movie called the war at home where I played a directed in Plato a character who is suffering from PTSD Vietnam veteran, and so do Mighty Ducks and go off to Texas, and I make word home and Kathy Bates is in it and my father plays. My father Kimberly wants to four hander and it's based on James Duff's play homefront, which Carroll O'Connor originated the role that that my father played. So I thought this is I got this in hand. This is four people in a house. This is something I know it's about a dysfunctional family. I know a lot about that. So most of us do so. The movie was released on four screens, and and sort of disappeared in outside of the festival circuit not many people ever heard of it. But but that experience informed moving where I was going to go, and it was to make movies that that mattered. I didn't care what the cost was emotionally to me. I knew that. It was the road that I was gonna take was going to be very difficult, but I wanted to make films and wanted to change the direction of my career. Did you decide a lot in this real that? I'm not proud of. Then this is some fun. See my room. But at that point when you say you make this decision is coupled with that decision side by side with that decision. Do you think and I'm willing to stop not deciding, but you're willing to stop starring in films as an act of you don't wanna make any more. Sure. And you have to say this is a sacrifice I'm willing to make I want to I literally wanna make a right hand turn. And and I think, you know, much to dismay of agents and managers who are making a lot of money off of some of the poor decisions that I was making. They were you know..

Cameron Cameron Crowe Danielle Fman Charlie Dennis gassner Disney Robert wise Kathy Bates Carroll O'Connor James Duff Michael Kahn Texas executive Kimberly editor Spielberg twenty three years
"robert wise" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

The Empire Film Podcast

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"robert wise" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

"Wonder sometimes if it suffered from that very early example of what can happen sometimes with every sample comic book movie when you have a director who doesn't necessarily have a connection to the source material or maybe thinks little bit above the source material and maybe try to out think it over intellectualize it. And sometimes that can result in brilliant, you can have you can have a dark night, and sometimes it can result in lease hulk, which is flawed, sometimes brilliant quite like it. But at the same time, it does have the end, Nick Nolte, screaming, other like some terrible off off Broadway play. And I wonder if maybe Robert wise did that little bit, you know, here's the great director of west side story and and so maybe he has to elevate it in some way. I don't really know, but that's just my feeling posts, Star Wars and feel sued lead in the BANESTO posts, Star Wars, funny because of course it was like Star Wars and closing counters originally. So. Nine hundred seventy five. And then we're like, oh wait. No, this just doing UCLA's. And then and then it was stall in place account and I'm like, oh, and I'll hang on. Tony's right, let's do this, but it feels a lot more overreactions two thousand one space OTC than any other film. In fact, Trumbull came on board because the problems with the effects navy Trumbull in when hell pass. We've been a few months to release so it kind of has that feel to it, but it doesn't fit. Yeah, it doesn't. It doesn't feel like a Star Trek film actually to the franchises credits. The others generally do even if they have problems, generally feel Star Trek films, which is not true of every franchise. So in that sense, Juba what's your take on the motion picture off stressful. I don't know what Star Trek phase two would have been. If it had gone ahead and I know that they said they readjusted this to become hippie and a movie than it was show that it was maybe I think, yeah, I think existing in the way it does more..

director Trumbull Robert wise Nick Nolte UCLA Juba Tony
"robert wise" Discussed on The Secret History of Hollywood

The Secret History of Hollywood

05:09 min | 3 years ago

"robert wise" Discussed on The Secret History of Hollywood

"Robert wise. The man who stepped in to save the ailing curse of the cat people. They instantly set to work on devising ways in which the miniscule budget could be used to maximum effect to achieve an authentic portrayal of nineteenth century France. The first win they scored was by securing the large deserted Paris city set built for the nineteen thousand nine, hit The Hunchback of Notre Dom. Another period drama that had incidently caused archaic almost two million dollars to make for several weeks. Luton and wise made an intensive study of paintings by French masters of the time, including Demere to lose the track and della in order to get a sense of the way life looked in the France of the late nineteenth century. These fellows lived in the days of the Franco pushing more Newton said at the time in the days of our story. The painting is so much more superior to a photograph for it does more than reproduce a street or in it gives you an attitude feeling about the place. This indepth study of the way life looked in eighteen seventy was met by bemusement from Jack gross regarded the our spend staring paintings as wasted ones. Jack gross was very nice man himself said Robert wise later, but he was far the other end of the spectrum from Luton in terms of background, education taste, that kind of thing. And though Val had to work with him, he did not have much respect for the man Vall had his own inimitable way of showing how he felt about Jack gross and that was never to call him anything. But Mr. gross, he would never get on a familiar basis with him and call him Jack. It was always Mr. gross. And that was in a sense a way of putting gross down. Star of the film. Looting once again, cast Simone, Simone, Hollywood career seem to have stalled somewhat. Simone was by now becoming bored of Hollywood and has spiky attitude had seen essentially blackballed by many directors. Luton's team was always fun to be a part of and thankful for his faith in she threw herself into the production with relish the fashions of eighteen seventy were inclined to accentuate the bosom Simone was called upon to wear false breasts. So as to give the impression of owning a healthy plump bust that she did not naturally possess. She called this remarkable pair of tach men's her eyes and without fail. First thing in the morning, everyone onset would hear her silvery voice call loudly to her wardrobe assistant. Bring me my eyes. Mademoiselle fee takes place in the small town of clearest Ville in France eighteen seventy whether Prussian armies have invaded the country and our occupying large areas taking delight in bullying and insulting the citizens. The game of wits has developed between the elderly priest who guards the judge bell and the Lieutenant overseeing the district von Eirik known his fellow officers as Mademoiselle fifty, partly because of his effeminate nature and partly due to his adoption of the French phrase fee Don, which roughly translates to for shame. One Iraq has been goading the priest into ringing the charge balance, the symbol of French obedience. The priest, however has vowed not ring the church balance. The first blow is struck against the invading Russians. I will not ring. I have told you tally again. Because it is the only just protests that priest can make against the Prussian invasion of I repeat, you'll kill. It serves no purpose. I want that Baram. Let's ring lettering fifty now. Right? Himself. The film then shifts to a carriage slowly making its way declares fill and the French passengers within. Most of middle to upper class apart from three young priest would be revolutionary and the laundry, Elizabeth who is instantly ignored and ostracised by more well to do travelling companions. It isn't long however, before the passengers in the carriage realize that they've forgotten to bring food and the journeys long. Elizabeth has had the good sense to pack a hamper of chicken and wine, and with no thought of herself generously offers to share with our companions. I would be very clear. It's hard to go without. I cannot refuse. I can stand it no longer in moments like this is good to find. People were obliged. Thank you very. If commerce, some of that. Politics, go hungry..

Jack gross Simone Luton Robert wise France Paris Hollywood Notre Dom Mademoiselle fifty Elizabeth Franco Vall Baram Demere Val Iraq von Eirik bell Newton
"robert wise" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"robert wise" Discussed on Kickass News

"It gives me hope yeah but you know there there is a president who wants to trust but verify and that means we should be hopeful and we should look ahead and we should make the right moves to try to get us to that moment in history but at the same time we can't go in blind now what safeguards are in place if we're being played yeah and so we we need to trust but we need to verify yeah you know you have such an interesting career spanning the creative world hollywood graphic novels as well as military strategy what is your dad say when people ask him what you do does he have trouble no no dad says what every parent says with pride my son has a job and we kind of alluded to it earlier but if anyone doesn't know your dad is mel brooks and i was think back to my time at usc film school he came in one day and i remember prior to that you know we had a lot of great directors like robert wise and stanley dawn and stanley kramer come in and speak and they were always kind of the tail end of their career and bidder and angry at hollywood just wanted to bitch about you know movie executives and how there aren't any louis b mayer's left and all that and i know that this was i think toward the end of your dad's film career it was probably after robin hood men in tights and so i was kind of expecting that he was going to be the same situation but he bursts into the room singing and laughing and took a picture of me with cigars and stuff and he's like that every time i see him whether it's just walk into natan house or anywhere what is he like of the dad.

president mel brooks hollywood louis b mayer natan house usc robert wise stanley dawn stanley kramer one day
"robert wise" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

02:04 min | 4 years ago

"robert wise" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"Over the years you've dna only only one or two more things here about that found because there's so many other saga but i just have to say a few times i think you over the years you've jokingly referred to it as down more downward the sound of mucus and i think some people have the misunderstandings i think it's misunderstanding that that's because you dislike the film it's not about the film it's it's something else rate yes it was m my car georgia founded bordering on under number although we had ernest lab who was the famous a screenwriter on to a terrific guy would robert wise put us together in a room and we've tried to work out an analyst rousseau patient trying to make the character have a little humanity and a little sort of sardonic quality which was needed but not very well expressed in the spin the script we were working for from that a and the what was your question again we'll just that you did you know when you when you jokingly kind of called its s enamoured santa mucus is that it's not the they are move no no no not at all briefed because of its danger of being terribly mall cushion sentimental and i i tried everything in my power to steer where and robert wise later wrong said so in public suv are he said i was very grateful to chris because he kept me away from going over the edge into real mawkishness insert which could have been processed a fine line or and so could you believe when this thing that you had been hesitant to even do became sign that people were going to for twelve times at the theater and then it's now lasted for fifty plus years and it's considered one of the great i mean would you ever have fathom that it would have this i am a none of us did either jewelry didn't but we certainly got smell everton towards the beyond when the journalists started to crowd the sir.

georgia robert wise chris analyst rousseau
"robert wise" Discussed on Inside The Exorcist

Inside The Exorcist

02:06 min | 4 years ago

"robert wise" Discussed on Inside The Exorcist

"Without seeing the spectre of ed gain staring back it's blocks agent on the phone hello he has good news really that's great that is great what's the price but his is that a good price she we take it okay all right let's do it and with that the deal was done for the first time robert blocks writing had been option for the movies but who was done by her oh who cares the blind bid was nine thousand dollars that's more than seventy four thousand dollars today for a writer that's a payday what robert bloch didn't know is that another novel the haunting of hill house by shirley jackson was also option that year it would be renamed the haunting and directed by robert wise in 1963 the rights when four sixty seven thousand five hundred dollars more than seven times with block would be paid almost six hundred thousand dollars today black was in a mood to celebrate as he pop the champagne he knew none of this he didn't even know the buyer was at that bargainprice it literally could have been any one but he was not anyone it was one of the most famous directors in hollywood and that director had just acquired the rights to what would become the most important film of his career for next for nothing eventually force bloc would find out and he would always always for presented for his deal with the publisher included no points on any sailed to hollywood.

the deal robert blocks writer shirley jackson robert wise hollywood director publisher robert bloch four sixty seven thousand five seventy four thousand dollars six hundred thousand dollars nine thousand dollars
"robert wise" Discussed on RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"robert wise" Discussed on RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

"Planned way way as a matter of fact before i started shooting bruce greece i am met with robert wise who said i shouldn't do it because it in a prep time robert wise of course from out music in west and was had story us his advice was don't do this move don't do haley at all because there is none of prep time how much prep time did you have a probably about but he said you need a couple of years off the right movies yellow he did but any out so we had we were in the middle of shooting in them get the song and it was on a um cassette i didn't i didn't know where it was like how you how you listen to a demo um i said wow it sounds haddock co co son it sounds kind of country west into mariah and uh lives will i love it lesser well i guess will figure place for it and so we thought will where can we put it in and the result will have a happy after look at me i'm sandra de of where she went out into your backyard be and so last day of shooting the quickly build a set the backyard we went and shouted and you tact it onto the um uh the after yeah the app yup exactly it's all replaced and this might seem like a novice question but because the musical has songs at the movie dozen a i feel like hopelessly devoted replace like freddie my love and yes and who chooses that song is not gonna make it to the movie will alan car was very instrumental in them and every aspect of of greece and um you know we had robert stig would and we had bill oakes who was music supervisor and they know is big crowd of people all.

robert wise haley greece robert stig bill oakes supervisor mariah freddie alan car
"robert wise" Discussed on You Must Remember This

You Must Remember This

02:04 min | 4 years ago

"robert wise" Discussed on You Must Remember This

"Karloff would play john gray a gleefully sadistic grave robber who sells corpses to a medical school and kills when he is low on product bela was added to the cast at the last minute in our ko's attempt to ghulam onto the box office power karloff and the go see had wielded as an 'onscreen team a decade earlier bela was happy to have the work but he was not fully up to working director robert wise would later say that bela was obviously not well onset others working on the film suspected he might be on drugs or at least frequently drunk he seemed like he was in another world his wife had left him for a few months between 1944 and 1945 and to though lilian lugosi would soon return bela was still drinking at sad reluctant bachelor levels the body snatcher would be fully karloff s film and his only substantive seen with lugosi would end with boris is character killing balos rko would use lugosi in another couple of minor movies uh zombies on broadway and genius at work but these were not val luton movies or autour efforts of any kind by the fall of forty seven bail i had it made a film in two years he had long ago started using morphine to dull the pain of his sciatica because aspirin bothered has all serves soon but by now he was dependent on the drug which he injected his unemployment and his addiction became a vicious cycle each one feeding the other.

Karloff bela robert wise lilian lugosi boris morphine sciatica aspirin john gray ghulam director val luton two years
"robert wise" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

01:59 min | 4 years ago

"robert wise" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

"I've acted more recently but uh i would like i have a movie that i keep trying to get made but you know we all know that story uh i like the i i loved directing i always did from the very beginning it's what i did it school and stuff but how do you get to do it ran a a you know it's i can i can i can walk in and meet larry pierce and stanley jaffe of the director and producer of goodbye columbus and somehow convince them that they got a cast me in this movie so or i can go read for play and get the job don't get the job and what what are what if i got i've got you know just pair shoes walking in there and the script in my hat but directing who's gonna let you do that uh you know who's gonna give you fifteen or twenty million dollars to make a movie and with a cast and crew of one hundred peope a home so how to get to do that um is really really hard but uh it is what i always wanted wanted to do and i did it at school and uh but when i came out of school i you know i i started to get work as an actor i may took a while but i i i i did and our agent phil gersh who was basically a directors agen asked me so what do you i know you wanna do that what are you doing about that so he helped me get started that he and his son uh david and he handled robert wise and people like that did ask a dead find it interesting that you not only went through to directors for advice put that you you you said that you learn something from a lot of these directors you learned a little bit from pearson a little bit from herbert ross and allows a from mike nichols and yang think beyond clint eastwood yeah tell tell us that front well that's pretty great i mean clan that i directed he in um uh or reynolds a bird reynolds in the city heat and.

director columbus phil gersh david robert wise herbert ross mike nichols larry pierce stanley jaffe producer pearson clint eastwood twenty million dollars
"robert wise" Discussed on Inside Psycho

Inside Psycho

02:26 min | 4 years ago

"robert wise" Discussed on Inside Psycho

"And directed by robert wise in 1963 the rights when four sixty seven thousand five hundred dollars more than seven times with block would be paid almost six hundred thousand dollars today block was in a mood to celebrate as he pop the champagne he knew none of this he didn't even know the buyer was at that bargainprice said literally could have been any one but it was not anyone it was one of the most famous directors in hollywood and that director had just acquired the rights to what would become the most important film of his career for next for nothing eventually force blocked would find out and he would always always presented for his deal with publisher included no points on any sailed a hollywood from the end the publisher and his agent to 25 percent on the top after taxes but figured he wound up with about five thousand dollars and that's when he learned the buyer was alfred hitchcock april twenty nine 1980 belair midnight the witching hour alfred hitchcock can't sleep he's in bed but he did he can't get comfortable hitchcock could never seem to get comfortable anymore maybe the television would captures interest back and forth he went between the same channels and then he stopped this movie on the late late show this one he knew it was his movie the one he bet everything on the one they told him not to make the quick and cheap shocker everybody underestimated during the one that made him rich one that the run for which he would forever be linked in forever be famous he was watching cycle.

robert wise bargainprice hollywood director publisher alfred hitchcock four sixty seven thousand five six hundred thousand dollars five thousand dollars 25 percent