19 Burst results for "Robert Towne"

"robert towne" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

08:37 min | Last week

"robert towne" Discussed on WBUR

"Let's get back to my interview with Ronald Brownstein, a senior editor at the Atlantic, where he's been writing about how the Republican Party has become more extreme. He is also a senior analyst at CNN. You have a new book, which must have been a refreshing departure. Writing about today's politics. It's called 1974. The year Los Angeles transformed movies, music, television and politics. And there's there's kind of like an overarching like thesis in the book, which is that, um, real culture is always ahead of pop culture and pop culture is usually ahead of politics. And that the seventies was this turning point in the relationship between those three. So talk about how you see 74 as a turning point. So writing rock me on the water was in one sense, you know, felt like a vacation from all the turmoil of our modern political life the last few years because it's focuses. On the simultaneous renaissance, really in television, movies, music and politics in L. A in the early 19 seventies, but ultimately I felt there was a really strong parallel to what was happening then. And what was happening now, because the story I tell and rock me on the water is how the critique of American life that emerged out of the social movements of the 19 sixties. You know a greater suspicion of authority. Greater autonomy for for women demands for inclusion for previously marginalized groups. Environmental thinking all of these ideas were really brought to the mass is the mass American audience by being cemented into pop culture. And that happened in the early 19 seventies, when shows like all in the family, and Mary Tyler Moore and Mashed went on TV, and we had movies like Chinatown and The Godfather and five Easy Pieces and shampoo and Nashville that brought a more critical lens to American life, and we had the whole Southern California music explosion around Joni Mitchell and Jackson Browne and the Eagles and all of this was happening within a few blocks of each other. And it was all driven by the same underlying force, which was these big cultural industries had to respond to the growing buying power of the baby boom. Which was an increasing part of their audience, and they felt the need in ways that I describe to produce programming the Bruce content That was relevant to the experiences and the values of the baby boom. And this is the moment I argue that these ideas were cemented into American popular culture never to be dislodged now what was happening politically? As this cultural transformation was going on What? Well, you know, to some extent, as I talk about with people like Jerry Brown, these ideas were making their first entrance into the political arena. But the bigger political story was that Richard Nixon won two elections in 1968 1972 by mobilizing the voters who are most unhappy with all of the changes in society that were at that very moment. Triumphing in popular culture, and I think it was a reflection in many ways of a basic truth. That culture is ahead of politics in reflecting the way the country is changing, because culture has to be more attuned to young people, and I think we are in a very similar position today. You know, in the period we're talking about. You also have different levels of popular culture. You have like mainstream pop culture, and I put all in the family in that category. But you also have like alternative newspapers and magazines. You have the beginning of independent film experimental movies. On the one hand, you have the Eagles. On the other hand, you have Lou Reed. You guys you do right. Then. Here in the New York story? Yeah. Exactly. You have punk rock a little later. Yeah, a little bit later. Yeah. Um, So you have all these conflicts within pop culture to, um, tell us about one of the movies that you think really shows. How Hollywood is changing, too, You know, in reaction to what's actually happening in youth culture at the time? Well, the key point about this period. Is not that the avant garde was adapting kind of ideas that were considered insurrectionary in the mainstream, because, as I think you're noting that's always true, right. There's always an avant garde. That is pushing at the accepted boundaries of everything. What was unique about this period was that CBS and Paramount and big record labels were accepting these ideas and advancing these ideas in a way they had. Not before. I mean, you know, during the 19 sixties, while The social movements of the sixties were at their apex. Both TV and movies in particular, did their absolute best to ignore everything that was happening. I mean, the top rated shows in the sixties were Beverly Hillbillies and Petticoat Junction and Gomer Pyle and Green Acres. I mean, and the movies were sound of music and my Fair lady and the longest day in the Great Escape. It was all defiantly deliberately looking away from the the really dramatic stories that were unfolding around them for fear of alienating this older, basically, Nixon silent majority. Um, But, as I say, when you get to the late sixties and early seventies, I tell the story a great length of how all in the family got on the air. And, um, obviously, after easy riders success in 1969, both the T V and the the movie studios Recognized that they couldn't keep putting their head in the sand and that opened the door to the mainstream. Embracing and debating ideas that previously had been limited to the amount garden. And for me, look, the movie that most reflects this above. All, probably is Chinatown. It's such a great movie. It's such a great movie, right? I mean, and I I talked to Robert Towne. Who wrote the movie and and others who were who were involved in it. I had a great time I found the the photographer who took the onset. Um, photos, you know, publicity. Stuff, most of which was never published. And he was showing me shots of the last night of shooting because the last night of shooting is the great ending of Chinatown, you know, Forget it, Jake. It's Chinatown. And you can just see the the chilliness between Faye Dunaway and Roman Polanski, who battle throughout the whole movie, But Chinatown really does, you know Nashville in some ways, as I argue in the book, which is not as great a movie as Chinatown, Nashville, I believe, though, is kind of the Moby Dick of early seventies cinema. The attempt To wrestle into one story all of the themes But Chinatown, I think really captures this period both in American life and in popular culture, where the idea that you can't really trust those who are making decisions in your name. There are wheels within wheels. We don't know as much as we think we do. It's just an incredibly powerful expression of those ideas done in a classic film noir. Ron Brownstein, I want to thank you so much for being on our show. Thank you for talking with us. Thanks for having me always a great time. Ronald Brownstein is a senior editor at the Atlantic and a senior political analyst at CNN. His latest book is called Rock Me On the Water 1974 the Year Los Angeles transform movies, music, television and politics..

Ronald Brownstein Richard Nixon Ron Brownstein Faye Dunaway Roman Polanski Robert Towne CBS Chinatown Jerry Brown Rock Me On the Water 1969 Joni Mitchell Mary Tyler Moore Lou Reed Republican Party The Godfather Southern California 1968 CNN Mashed
"robert towne" Discussed on The Patriot AM 1150

The Patriot AM 1150

08:21 min | Last week

"robert towne" Discussed on The Patriot AM 1150

"With our American stories. We're talking to Harlan Lebo, author of The Godfather Legacy. Now let's get on to the filming of this movie. Because it was quite a show in New York. It turns out when scenes would be shot hundreds and hundreds and possibly even thousands of New Yorkers or rushing to these spots to watch history get made, and I think people knew something really big was happening. I think so. They didn't know Al Pacino at the time, but they certainly knew some of the other characters. But that's one of the fun things about being another New York or Los Angeles to but especially in New York, because it's so much more compact because on a summer Day. There's almost always something going on in the way of a movie being made. Um, which was true for the spring and summer of 1971. The Godfather was filming in all sorts of places, and there's there's one scene when When Al Pacino's character is being is waiting to be picked up, and he's standing in front of what was took Shores Restaurant and he's standing right on the sidewalk all by himself. But what you can't see is 15 ft. Away. There are hundreds of people Milling around watching the film being shot. Let's talk about one. Let's since we're talking about scenes. Let's talk about a scene that Robert Towne wrote, and Robert Towne is a legendary script, doctor. And it's the scene where Michael and his father or in the backyard, talking about life, and it's it's such a beauty, and it's such a sparsely written seen talk about what happened. How Why was town called? How long did he have to write this scene? And it may be one of the great scenes in movie history. It really is one of the great scenes in movie history. There is no question It's too incredible actors facing each other as father and son. Talking about and only a few minutes uh, several key issues, not just the threat of to the life of the youngest son, Michael, and what might happen to him in a plot to overthrow him. But also the father is concerned the dons concerns about why Michael's life had gone the way it did. And the Dons regrets about what had happened there, and that scene was written many times and no one was particularly happy with it. And finally, it got to the point when they were making the film and they couldn't wait any longer to get the scene, right. They had to call in Robert Towne, who has written many scripts of his own, but was also known appetite. I'm and for years after as a great script, doctor, someone who could come in swoop in save the day. And that's exactly what he did. He came to New York He read the script. He talked with those involved and he took a scene, which was only okay and transformed it into an absolute masterpiece. Of cinema. Which it is indeed you know these lines at the end, I'm looking. You actually have a part of the screenplay here and it, says Vito Corleone. I knew that Santino was going to have to go through all this and Fredo. That well. Fredo was that? Well, I never And we all knew without saying anything. He said. Everything right and then he said, I never wanted this for you. I worked my whole life. I don't apologize. I take care of my family. And I refuse to be a fool so on and so forth, and then in the end, he says, Well, there wasn't enough time. Michael. There wasn't enough time and Michael says We'll get there, Pop. We'll get there. It's just so beautiful. It really is. And Robert Towne New and for a long time new the The key to writing any scene is often what you don't say We didn't have to describe Fredo at that point at all, because we knew that Fredo just had that undefinable. He wasn't right for any of this, Um, later in the scene when Badan talks about how he hoped that Michael would wind up being governor or senator Michael doesn't go into a long explanation of why that wasn't necessary. All he says, is another person Avante, which means another big shot, just like you know, it would have been just another big shot. It wouldn't have been anything important. It wouldn't have been for me. Um, what he would have done is left unsaid. But the point is with two words. He he negates any of the possibilities of what he might have wound up being. And that's just beautiful writing. It is and then beautiful acting. We have one last scene We'll talk about There's Brando in the garden scene with his grandson and this orange and this is the actors decision, right? I mean, this isn't Coppola. This isn't the script. This is the actor using in orange. Well, two remarkable effect. Talk about that Last great scene, Marlon Brando and that orange This is the scene When Marlon Brando character dies he's in the he's in the family tomato patch with his grandson, Anthony. It's actually his real name is also Anthony. Uh and The scene was scripted for for Brando's character to die. But a lot of it was left to Brando and Anthony to work out and in well, actually, for Brando to work out and in interacting with Anthony Anthony wasn't young and wasn't old enough. To really act for himself, Um, and one of the things that Brando did with something from his own childhood was he took an orange eat part of it. And then, like many of us, he he put the Grind in his teeth, and it made it look like a funny face. And you actually cut teeth into it. Uh, and it really scared. Anthony genuinely scared him. If you see him on screen, he's actually scared by this. But it plays so beautifully as this tender, intimate scene between grandfather and grandson, and it's a wonderful contrast to it happens a few seconds later, which is that Brando's character, the dawn passes away, falls into the tomato plants and dies. That's absolutely wonderfully shot. And by the way, just a little unsung hero of this film was Gordon Willis is cinematographer who shot every frame. Of the film, as if it was literally a frame from a photograph or painting. It is so physically beautiful, the whole film. It's wonderful. Indeed. Let's talk about the music tool while we're at some of the other attributes. Talk about the music because my goodness, I don't know that the movies the movie without the music, either. Well, one of the things that we haven't really chatted about his Coppola really felt strongly that to convey that sense of family is that there needed to be a lot of issues of legitimate Italian American culture in the film. Uh and you know they had meals and conversations in the film. There were many little touches about Italian American culture and what he felt strongly about. Among many things you felt strongly about was he really wanted to have an Italian composer create the music for the film, so he called on Nino Rota to the composer probably best known for doing many of the best films of Federico Fellini. And wrote to wrote the music for the Godfather. And what a soundtrack it is, And it's not just what we remember. I mean that opening scene in the Godfather we get to see many Americans had never seen a tarantella. They've never seen it. The dance, not just the music, but the dance. Right. Some of that music was not rotors music that was traditional Italian music. But, yeah, the film opens at the wedding of Connie, the youngest, the youngest child in the family and The only daughter in the car Liana family, You see great scenes of partying and festivities. And it's real slice of Italian American culture from the 19 forties, and even the word can only gets thrown in one of the great improvise lines in the movie. Talk about that. You write just to drop about that as well. Yes, it is. That is a great a great line. After one of the family henchman Clemenza kills a traitor to their cause the one who had sold out the dawn and got him set up to be shot. They go into Little Italy in New York. Clemenza gets lunch while his boys wait in the car, and he picks up a package of cannoli. Then on the way home, they stop and the trader is killed. But the box of.

Vito Corleone Gordon Willis Clemenza Harlan Lebo New York Federico Fellini Robert Towne Los Angeles Connie Anthony Michael Al Pacino hundreds Brando 19 forties Marlon Brando Santino Little Italy Fredo The Godfather Legacy
"robert towne" Discussed on Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

08:21 min | Last month

"robert towne" Discussed on Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

"Trains would be packed and So yeah it was a pretty incredible story to learn about especially having miss the book somehow. Yeah i don't know. I'm i'm with you. I was like wait. What happened and i knew about junction. Boys i knew about the author. And i knew all about this stuff and then you kind of find out and you're right. I mean the element of why this coach that you play decides to leave a pretty prestigious gig and go you know. I'm gonna go ahead and coach this this group orphans. They don't even have shoes. And the football and then you kind of. I don't know how much of the movie you want to give away. But the twist like when you find out about the coaches owned background in his motivation behind it. I mean it's this is this is made to be a movie so it makes sense. Yeah i mean. I think it's fine to say that. Yeah you learn that rusty russell. My character was an orphan himself. And yeah like you're saying. I mean it just does seem like a different era with a different breed of person. That was kind of so kind of quiet dignified and kind of selfless where rusty russell. He'd gone to world war he he was an orphan he'd gone to world war one. He'd lost his brother. They're rusty today we'd consider to be. Ptsd and then you know had gone to become a coach and a teacher at this kind of prestigious School district outside of dallas in temple texas with a good football team and then he left it all behind and took a real chance with his wife. Juanita their baby to take over this. This orphanage and i mean that's what i would remind myself you know while working on the move is to think like you know you know this rusty russell did know. This was feel-good story and then it has kind of a happy ending light. He was taking over. You know a dilapidated school with you know damaged kids and Yeah there was no happy ending on the horizon when he when he got into this. When i was looking at some of the scenes in this can be something. Like whenever i think the revenue. Okay when you saw revenues in the theater you're cold. You felt like you were outside the lighting. The way you're just cold all the time. I just the short clips. I seen to this. It feels like that texas heat. It's the it feels like the attention to detail of what it would be like to be in an orphanage in kids. That had no clue with no resources. It feels like that part of this is absolutely nailed. Did you feel that during those scenes because it feels very jill. Exports can get lost very quickly on a screen. And i think this is very true to probably what that experience was like. Yeah i definitely felt that ryan and i was just kind of breeding about how Robert towne screenwriter had written chinatown. Because he'd written in our he'd read an article about how all these this was in the early seventies. Read an article. About how all these buildings from the nineteen thirties. Were still around in los angeles if you just went to look for them and he thought gosh she could do a detective story. Might you know and shoot it today. Have you know be. The third is using these locations and this is kind of that same idea where the we weren't able to use the original orphanage just because they've kind of changed it modernized it and they'd kind of build stuff around but we found this Orphanage right outside for worth kind of on this windswept hill in it's called the pithy and home and they take care of the children of families that are experiencing different. Hardships are not orphans but there. They've been they've been There while the parents or parent is experiencing some some kind of horror show that their kids can spend time at the pithiest home. And that's what we used as the orphanage in. Yeah when you'd be out there on just a on a hot. You know october afternoon. In the dust and dirt shooting these scenes. And you know there's capitol in the background you know. Pump jackson the background. You really kind of felt like you were back in that era and dumb not sustain thing like i've had it happen on. No the few westerns. I've gotten the chance to do when you get the chance to be out in the country in your on a horse and you can't see anything like it. It's kind of an exciting feeling. I i think that people will respond to just visually our well at works in terms of capturing that kind of dust bowl depression era look. This cast is loaded You get robert divall machine. I don't know clearly how many days of shooting there was. I always like to ask. Is this question and it might be stupid one but even doing this longtime right. You're very successful. And then you know. It's it's robert duvall it's martin sheen. Is there a moment where you're like. Okay whatever seen like. I really wanted to impress the sky or you secure enough where you're like out whatever. I'll just do my thing. I don't i imagine everybody's different with that. It's not cool to say. Hey i was. Maybe a little like i wanted to do something a little extra but what was that like for you. Yeah i mean. I've definitely had that happened where you know. And that's to me. That's been probably the greatest thing for me about careers. Like i've gotten to work with these guys. I grew up loving my dad. Love like nick. Nolte gene hackman or jeff. Bridges james caan like just all these great guys gone to be in scenes with them where i've definitely have had that thing where been doing a scene and i you know they say like the most important thing and actor to do as lesson like to me. It's just like i'm out on the tundra. I'm not hearing anything. I'm just like looking at this site on my nick nolte. This is unbelievable. I wanna face man and as i. Wow he's stopped talking. I mean it's my line now. Like not not the but anyhow i've had that happen a lot and definitely like i wasn't even working today and robert duvall were can. He was just there for one day. Martin sheen's you know he's one of the leads the movie so he was there all the time but the day that robert duvall words it was just incredible to go see him and again. He's the guy where tender mercies you know one of my favorite movies of all time so to get to see someone like that. In person on a set is Yeah just it never gets old Those guys really they re you realize they. They are who they are for a reason. It's the way they look good swimming a sound stir ideas just great ideas and and also just you know hard-working guys. you know. I want to ask you because when you say this is one of the great things in my career I would. I would say it's bottle rocket. It's one of my favorite movies. It'll never be jumped in that group. i remember seeing in college and it wasn't in. It's hard to describe why. I like it so much. I just i love it. I love it and obviously i love all the andersen stuff that he's done with him. I know it was a short nineteen ninety-four make an old movie. Ninety six you would have known about movies. Because i remember being book. Have you heard about this movie bottle regularly. give a check this out you guys. You're in your you know what i think your mid twenties at that point. What was that like. Can you take us back to that time. Line of like this weird little black and white shorts going to be a movie and now like i'm famous and a couple of years. Yeah i mean. I'll try and i'll tell you in a nutshell but it is incredible than it ever got made because you know we had owen and west had a whole script written. We couldn't get the money to do that in the sky. Kit carson said you know there's this place sundance and they show shorts so if you guys can make a self contained short you know maybe ten minutes fifteen.

Martin sheen Juanita Kit carson los angeles Robert towne jeff world war martin sheen nineteen thirties world war one nick robert duvall october afternoon nineteen ninety-four dallas james caan robert divall third nick nolte early seventies
"robert towne" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

03:08 min | 4 months ago

"robert towne" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"You please tell us what's going on? In a recent interview, Chris Evans was asked which of the other Avengers he would have loved to play and he said, Iron Man. But he doesn't believe that anyone else should ever portray Iron man other than Robert Towne, he junior, um, he talks about how the paychecks would have been nice, but he's the engine. He's the life of that character, and there has been talks that they would make it like a James Bond or Batman. Ah Legacy role, and Chris Evans says No, They don't need to do that. It just needs to be Robert Downey Jr. And it's done. He's iron Man. The end. Yeah, I agree. It's done. Yeah, I feel that way about a lot of rules. Sure. Yeah. Once the one person leave it alone, Leave it alone. You don't need to If we want to watch it again, That's the joy of The VHS tape, right, Alexis. Any wine? Be kind and rewind and press play again. Yeah, it's just been announced that Lin Manuel Miranda and Disney's and Kanto will premiere in theaters on November. 24th Miranda told fans last year that he was working on an animated musical with Disney and not much is known about it other than the film is set in Colombia. And he also has the film in the heights coming to HBO, Max and in theaters on June 11th, which was one of his stage plays, which is absolutely amazing. Yeah, it's one of Colin's favorites, and I we just watch the new trailer and the new trailer is stupendous. Yes, well. All right, Zach Alfano caucuses. He was on a podcast on actually Rob Lowe's uncensored podcast, and he talked about that 20 years ago, he had what he called a two week trial as a writer for Saturday Night Live and it didn't go well. He talked about two sketches that he pitched, and they both both flopped. During that week that he pitched Britney Spears was on the show, and, um, he had one. Where will Ferrell was going to be shrunk down to play a security guard inside Britney's belly button? And the reaction was not enthusiastic. Oh, surreal. Oh, he he pitched it, and he felt like in the writer's room. I feel like a tumbleweed went right across the writer's room table and a cricket writing it Woz. He pitched the idea directly to Britney and said, You're being interviewed by entertainment Tonight. There's no jokes and during the middle of the interview, you just start bleeding from the mouth with she was like, Oh, that's funny. But he could tell she really did not mean that she thought it was funny, so he didn't even bother presenting it to anybody else. Oh, I mean, I think I would love to see him as a writer now because I don't feel like that shows that great. So bring him on. Fact is miracle. Yeah, So so I got this idea s so good, so good. All right. That's the latest.

Chris Evans Rob Lowe Robert Towne Miranda Zach Alfano Colombia June 11th November. 24th Britney Robert Downey Jr. Britney Spears Disney Colin Ferrell last year two week Saturday Night Live HBO James Bond Batman
"robert towne" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

08:01 min | 5 months ago

"robert towne" Discussed on The Big Picture

"And and it's an. I still wonder why one thing that did a lot. In those first ten years as he worked with a lot of really really good directors. He worked with walter hill. He worked with john. Landis york to tony scott worked with michael ritchie. He worked with robert towne. Reginald hudson guys who've made a lot of good films and then if you look at the names attached to the movies that he makes basically from nineteen ninety-three forward not a lotta hall of fame candidates there and i can't figure out why you stop doing that. I have a theory. I was just listening as i said to. The boomerang rewatch bowls and van. I feel about that movie the way you do. I i love that movie. But the watchable talks a lot about the reception that boomerang received and that nine nineteen ninety two and it was not a positive reception. People were very racist about this romcom and also did not like eddies performance. And i you know you can't get into someone saiki but i do always wonder with movies like that where someone try something and it's really not well received they're just like okay screw it. I'll just go do this other thing. That definitely happens especially two big hollywood stars like that because allow those people they let the tail wag the dog. They try something. This is what they wanna do. And if it doesn't work they they definitely we've we can talk about countless actors and actresses who have done that. I think something else happened with eddie to and it's interesting in In his discussions with like a in the talks with john landis because we did Coming to america. And john landis talks about what it was like working with eddie murphy on coming to america versus what it was like working with eddie murphy trading places. Now this isn't. I know dog in the fight. Brea don't kilby. I know dog in the fight. I don't know who's right okay. I don't. I don't know who's right. But there's a chance that the eddie murphy that sort of existed and they worked together again. But there's a chance that the eddie murphy that existed towards the end of that debt cable on simply couldn't be directed that he no longer wanted to because he no longer want to go back and forth with guys like that and there are other actors who have done that and typically comedic actors who have movies that are completely centered around their talent. They gotta give it an every single scene. You know a lot comes with that so that could be another deal to where all of these things are eddie murphy and forget who directed the movie and as a matter. We're gonna put in a guy who wants to let me get off the way i want to get off. Yeah i think. I mean i do think that that is ultimately. What happened is is that eddie would not only had to be the star but the kind of creative focus of the film a lot of times. Obviously the filmmakers usually the create a focus of the movie but even still. I mean even the jim. Carey's the mike myers the will ferrell's these guys do that thing that you talked about. Which is they do the three million dollar movie with an hour and they let them push them emotionally and eddie has done a couple of roles like this like mr church with bruce beresford which i don't think is a good movie or a successful but it seemed like he was trying to do something a little bit in that range and then that does lead to dolemite which had been a passion project for him forever. But even even dolemite. Which i think is like well-made and good amanda and i talked about it when it came out we liked it. But it's like it's craig brewer. That movie isn't made by paul. Thomas anderson or something. It's only going to be so good. And i wonder if that is eddie knowing like hey i've made forty movies. I've been the biggest star in the universe. I know more than anybody about how to do this stuff. Well i need to retain a kind of creative control so the director can have a lot of power now. I'm speculating but that does kind of feel like what's going on here. yes happened. Other guys right happened to kevin costner. You know it it it you know and sometimes you're just fucking awesome enough to pull it off and don't give me eddie murphy. Is the biggest to me competed star of all time despite everything that we're saying but no difference at the time and what. He stepped into the family role for amanda generation. He stayed there. Yeah and that's the thing like you could argue that dreamgirls. Maybe him stepping outside that lane a little bit. I mean the role is him having fun. But he's not in super control of it and he was nominated for an oscar. But then you know. The apocryphal story is that norbert came out. In the beginning of two thousand seven as people were voting for oscars and lost him the award and so again. It's like well. He tries dreamgirls. He almost makes it to the oscar then once again. It's like this isn't worth it and goes back to just doing eddie steph. Yeah on the one hand we can like concern troll about whether or not eddie has done a good job on the other hand like i. I dunno shit. Eddie is dominated culture for a long long time and so he's he is free to run his career as he sees fit. I just think it's interesting. 'cause i would have liked to have seen him. Try the kinds of movies that you're talking about there because he is a singular presence in movies you know. I think he's still will. And i've always thought this. The dreamgirls thing was interesting. Because i remember at that particular time. My roommate brett was really into little miss sunshine. Us we gotta go see little sunshine. We gotta go see a little bit of sunshine so we went over arc light. We saw a little bit of sunshine. And i was like hey is cool out understand not that it was whack. It's cool it's cool. It was cold. It was a fun time at the movies and it was well made and all that stuff like that but eddie was live. He lost yes he was at. If anybody was to be right now go back and watch it for some reason. The like they got the close up on eddie. He thought he was going to win. And he he won the globe and the sag award that year yes and he still lost the oscar. He thought he was going to win. And and sometimes when situations like that happen. Almost expected career lull after that. Because i think that that took the wind out of his sales. You know what's funny though. I think about this all the time. When we talk about oscar's on the show van so allan arkins first nomination for an oscar with nineteen sixty seven and he had to wait. He had to wait forty years into little miss sunshine. A win is a little miss sunshine. Allen arkan's best work in a movie no not even close but he lived long enough and continue to make enough good projects and be a constant presence in our moviegoing life that they were like. It's time it is time for. Alan arkin to be celebrated and at the expense of eddie murphy giving a superior performance in a more interesting movie. Or what have you and eddie. If he keeps it for another twenty years is going to get the same thing. They're just gonna do that when he's seventy five years old going to be like okay. You were oh all right in this fake prestige movie. It's time to give you an oscar because the game. Well i would know anything about that sean. The first short that i produced his on the list right now for the academy awards for best live action short. I had a feeling this was gonna come. We might just get nominated. So i don't i don't i don't know anything about having the weight if you wanna keep moving ahead. I'm i'm not going to. I'm just saying what you're saying is completely right. It's and sometimes. I think it will happen for him but what i wonder now is does. He even have did deceiving care. 'cause as obviously guys like bill murray that they they want that right made a a not not not saying. Bill is thirsty for but he. He's completely shifted his career and it seems like a big a big Sort of notch on the belt. I wonder if eddie murphy still even go for it because the dolemite a doberman might make a little bit more.

kevin costner michael ritchie bruce beresford tony scott john landis Thomas anderson forty years twenty years Allen arkan paul Reginald hudson bill forty movies allan arkins robert towne mike myers first ten years eddie steph dolemite Eddie
"robert towne" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:43 min | 1 year ago

"robert towne" Discussed on KCRW

"I mean, this is about Polanski. This is about the Holocaust. This is about Sharon Tate. This is not the wistful romantic Robert Towne. I've asked you what made you decide to do this book? What Peter interested. It was a combination of Trump winning and me going. What's the movie precedent for this, you know, And instead of asking, what's the myth, you know, I asked. What's the movie being like you a movie person, you know, and no across was the most evil thing I could think of. That sense of futility that we had when Trump was elected, and now forget it, Jake. You know what Can we do that powerlessness? I responded emotionally to that win with a memory of Chinatown and also, you know, Son. I'm angry at what's happened to Hollywood. I'm angry. What's happened to the studios and Chinatown seemed to me to be not just the end of that great era, but also a metaphor for what's happened not just to the country, but two The business that I loved. So there was a political reason there's an artistic reason and finally You know my own emotional Chinatowns, our own personal traumas that own our own sense of futility that I live with all the time And this became a way for me to talk about those feelings that I you know that I live with that We all live with it so funny, too, because it's not only did the Sharon Tate's Life and death end up influencing plastic. But in a way town Tuesday mentioned book because he went and got a police dog and found that vice cop who basically gave him the spine of China town. It was that cop Tony Silas Who came up to town house on Hutton Drive, because Julie wanted a gun. She was freaked out, and he basically said, You know, town was just chit chatting with this guy saying, What do you do? And he says, Well, you know, Chinatowns, my beat and, well, what happens in Chinatown and the guy says, You know, we really can't control what goes on in Chinatown, two different culture. It's a different language. And basically he was saying to town, you know, forget it, Jake, and that's towns, writerly intelligence right there. He got the metaphor and lodged in the back of his mind. It was It took a lot of drafts and a lot of outlines for him to remember that moment that conversation with with Silas and that began to help him organize what this movie was about. It wasn't called Chinatown originally had a bunch of different time and no one's really had to go, right? Yeah. Yeah. Sometimes you know, creativity is largely unconscious, you know? And and you don't always know what you know. And town found Chinatown in his own personal Chinatown, which is his memory of this conversation. So ah, lot of the book is dealing with unconscious material, which is our pasts and also where creativity comes from. For you and all these books. Basically, it's about how these these pivotal moments continued to kind of have ripples throughout these people's lives. And when he had that conversation with Silas and by We should also say two that the pseudonym he takes on Grey. Stoke is the name of that dog. Yes, that's right. That's absolutely right, Hira. But I think was interesting to about that is that These books all about how these moments kind of continued to live on goes I was sort of telling him we're doing what did you do It kind out Nothing. Grand. And then that becomes really the echo that resonates to further the script is well, that's why I think that's exactly right. I think that's why We're here today. Talking about it. Town would later describe that as the futility of good intentions, which I think is a beautiful phrase, and that is a very tough concept for us as Americans to wrap our heads around, you know, we are the dream country. We're supposed to be able to do anything. And here we are in Chinatown, and it's no surprise that it took a European to come up with that idea. Totally alien to us. And one of the reasons why this movie is so unique because it really is not an American feeling movie. In that sense, This is not a Hollywood Ending in any sense of the term. I mean, this has got to be one of the bleakest movies ever to come out of the studio system and and that that speaks to where we are now and in a way where they were then With Nixon and Watergate, which, looking back on it seems like amateur hour, But Roman would go home from set and he would he would listen to the news and he would go. We're making this movie. It was not intended. You know, they were just going on instinct and feeling. But when Roman turned on the news, and he heard that he went Oh, wow, We're we're We're plugging into something bigger than we thought. It's a true we're talking to the very excitable sand Watson. His terrific book is the big Goodbye. Look at the making of Chinatown. And one of the things I like you do is for people don't know explain would tell them about what town's original ending for the script, Wass. Oh, God, you would have to help me with my mean I remember. It was a bittersweet ending. It was basically him helping her. Get away. That's what that's what it was right and no across. She shoots him. And then she gets away with the girl, her daughter, and so then it becomes, it becomes wistful. We don't you know it's it's It's more double Indemnity ish. You know, we lose the girl, but there's a moment of dignity. I don't mean double indemnity in the sense that it ends that way. But there is a moment of integrity at the end of Double Indemnity, you know, closer closer than that, Walter. And that that sort of twinkle of hope and the detective and the audience can hold on to. It wasn't all for not and Roman, of course decimated that he doesn't He doesn't believe that he also knows That, or he also believes that a tragedy is what's going to stay with an audience. If you kill an audience, that is what they're going to hold on to, that's what's going to change their lives. Then they're not going to go out to dinner and talk about the weather. They're going to talk about this horrible experience that they just went through and that that's Roman's idea of life and art. It's so funny, too, because you talked about this. We're talking about Paramount. I mean, really sort of talking about an immigrate to this country's sort of bringing his own bleak worldview tube to the mainstream entertainment. I always sort of connecting an ending of Chinatown with with Sunset Boulevard, which I don't know, the paramount film that's probably also here for when the bleakest studio film Servitude materialized Sunset Boulevard. Well, I mean, there's also a twinkle in that I mean it is bleak, but there's also a twinkle in so far as this movie is being told by a dead man floating in the swimming pool, So you get a little Billy Wilder wink..

Chinatown Tony Silas Sharon Tate Trump Jake Hollywood Robert Towne Roman Paramount Polanski Peter Billy Wilder China Chinatowns Stoke Julie Wass bleakest Walter Nixon
"robert towne" Discussed on Crimes of Passion

Crimes of Passion

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"robert towne" Discussed on Crimes of Passion

"For all the hands that had once clap for Rosemary's baby. They now pointed fingers at its similarities. To Tate's murder. It was clear that his work was being inextricably linked to his personal life while he may have welcomed or even encourage that speculation in earlier years. Polanski was ill prepared for this brutal new reality. His behavior was now being monitored and analyzed. His films were now. Being dissected. For hints of murder conspiracies seeking respite. He fled first to Rome and then to chalet Swiss mountain town of gestalt but even being sequestered from the public I did little to negate Romans in grain desire for relationships that were far from appropriate. He surrounded himself with young teenage women in the Swiss ski town of Sh Todd in his autobiography published in Nineteen eighty-four. He didn't hide his actions. Remembering the finishing school capital of the world with hundreds of fresh faced nubile young girls of all nationalities Kathy Madeline Sylvia and others whose names I forget. Played a fleeting therapeutic role in my life. They were all between sixteen and nineteen years old. They took to visiting my chalet not necessarily to make love though some of them did but to listen to rock music and sit around the fire and talk. This was one of the earliest blatant examples of Roman having no moral issues with WHO? He cast his eye upon notice though that. Polanski underscored even in his book that the girls were at least sixteen. Switzerland's minimum age for consensual sex POLANSKI's grief and feelings of despair likely promoted his next film nineteen seventy one's macbeth which features a grisly portrayal of the murders of lady macduff. And her children. Still the film's watery. Commercial performance left Polanski unsatisfied. But could you expect from a rendition of Shakespeare? That listed playboy's Hugh Hefner as an executive producer his next feature was equally on effecting according to Sam Watson Nineteen seventy. Two's what played out is a raucous absurdist. Sex comedy very title was a blank. Check to critics with no hit films in the pipeline. Polanski was growing strapped for cash and his ego desperately needed another big success. Luckily in Nineteen seventy-three the boon of paramount's Robert Evans would again come for Lansky Evans had another script. He wanted made and it could be Dan good with the right amount of finesse. The film would have to be made in. La Polanski didn't hide his reluctance to return to California. But Robert Evans knew he had a ringer especially if Polanski brought the same touch he did to Rosemary's baby the exact sent the script to Polanski's residents in Rome for a rewrite. It was chinatown a flurry of meetings and transatlantic flights that followed left Polanski with a choice in the summer of nineteen seventy-three with the promise of a Pristine House rental on Sierra Mar. Drive in the hills above West Hollywood and an agreement to keep rewriting chinatown with its original. Scribe Robert Towne Lansky. Knew he should stay and after shoving down the haunting memories from four years prior he did. The choice was one that would yield eleven academy award nominations Polanski's nineteen seventy four film. Chinatown was a sultry neo noir. Critics called it groundbreaking near perfection and one of the greatest movies of all time. Mind you those adulation are still being used. In the present Chinatown carved out the pedestal that Polanski had long dreamed of to mention the film brought his leading man pal. Jack Nicholson to front and center. The hitman of American cinema the accolades and salvation over the film blurred into Polanski's personal life yet again. The artist was no longer separated from his work. Many of those who had speculated about Sharon Tate's murder and Polanski's aptitude for the occult were praising Chinatown it created a turbulent feedback loop which colleagues were friends and parties could be future plotlines in his autobiography Polanski. Claimed the social environment was exhausting to navigate. He turned to intimate relationships for superficial distractions yet. These relationships were more early warning signs. That Polanski wasn't capable of engaging responsibly. At that time the loan with intimate partners is played out unfortunately all too clearly when in nineteen seventy six. Polanski reportedly had an affair with actress. Natasha Kinski she was just fifteen years old. He was forty. Three get Polanski made no indication that he was bothered by the age difference she continues to deny that it was anything more than a flirtation. Truly it was an uncomfortable warning signs of what was to come remember. You can find falls from grace right now in the famous fates feed to finish this episode and hear more follow famous fates and only on spotify..

La Polanski murder Robert Evans Sharon Tate Rosemary Robert Towne Lansky Rome Kathy Madeline Sylvia spotify Natasha Kinski Hugh Hefner Sh Todd Switzerland Jack Nicholson California Swiss mountain Shakespeare lady macduff executive producer Pristine House
"robert towne" Discussed on The Dark Side Of

The Dark Side Of

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"robert towne" Discussed on The Dark Side Of

"Time magazine said. The bloodshed was as grisly as anything depicted in Polanski's film explorations of the dark and melancholy corners of the human character for all the hands that had once clapped for Rosemary's baby. They now pointed fingers at its similarities. To Tate's murder. It was clear that his work was being inextricably linked to his personal life while he may have welcomed or even encourage such speculation in earlier years. Polanski was ill prepared for this brutal new reality. His behavior was now being monitored and analyzed. His films were now. Being dissected. For hints of murder conspiracies seeking respite. He fled first to Rome. And then to a chalet in the Swiss mountain town of Gestalt Code even being sequestered from the public I did little to negate. Romans ingrained desire for relationships that were far from appropriate. He surrounded himself with young teenage women in the Swiss ski town of Gustad in his autobiography published in Nineteen eighty-four. He didn't hide his actions remembering the finishing school. Capital of the world with hundreds of fresh-faced nubile young girls of all nationalities Kathy Madeline Sylvia and others whose names I forget played a fleeting but therapeutic role in my life. They were all between sixteen and nineteen years old. They took to visiting my chalet not necessarily to make love though some of them did but to listen to rock music and sit around the fire and talk. This was one of the earliest blatant examples of Roman. Having no more issue's with WHO? He cast his eye upon notice though that Polanski underscored even in his book that the girls were at least. Sixteen Switzerland's minimum age for consensual sex Polanski's grief and feelings of despair likely promoted his next film nineteen seventy-one Beth which features a grisly portrayal of the murders of Lady macduff. And her children. Still the film's watery. Commercial performance left Polanski unsatisfied. But what could you expect from a rendition of Shakespeare? That listed playboy's Hugh Hefner as an executive producer. His next feature was equally affecting according to Sam Watson Nineteen seventy. Two's what played out as a raucous absurdist sex comedy whose very title was a blank. Check to critics with no hit films in the pipeline. Polanski was growing strapped for cash and his ego desperately needed another big success. Luckily in Nineteen seventy-three the boon of paramount's Robert Evans would again come for Polanski. Evans had another script he wanted made and it could be Dan. Good with the right amount of finesse with the film would have to be made in L. A. Polanski didn't hide his reluctance to return to California. But Robert Evans knew he had a ringer especially. Polanski brought the same touch. He did to Rosemary's baby the exact sent the script Polanski's residents in Rome for a rewrite. It was chinatown a flurry of meetings and transatlantic flights. That followed left Lansky with a choice in the summer of nineteen seventy-three with the promise of a Pristine House rental on Sierra Mar drive in the hills above West Hollywood and an agreement to keep rewriting chinatown with its original scribe. Robert Towne Lansky knew he should stay and after shoving down the hunting memories from four years prior he did. The choice was one that would yield eleven academy award nominations Polanski's nineteen seventy four film. Channel town was a sultry neo. Noir critics called groundbreaking near perfection and one of the greatest movies of all time. Mind you those are still being used. In the present Chinatown carved out the pedestal that Polanski had long dreamed of to mention. The film brought his leading man. How Jack Nicholson to front and center as the Hitman of African cinema the accolades and salvation over the film blurred into Polanski's personal life yet again. The artist was no longer separated from his work. Many of those who had speculated about Sharon Tate's murder and Polanski's aptitude for the occult were praising Chinatown it created a turbulent feedback loop in which colleagues were friends and parties could be future plotlines in his autobiography Polanski. Claimed the social environment was exhausting to navigate. He turned to intimate relationships for superficial distractions yet. These relationships were more early warning signs. That Polanski wasn't capable of engaging responsibly. At that time the loan with intimate partners is played out unfortunately all too clearly win in nineteen seventy six. Polanski reportedly had an affair with actress. Nastassja Kinski she was just fifteen years old. He was forty. Three Polanski made no indication that he was bothered by the age difference. She continues to deny that it was anything more than four tation truly. It was an uncomfortable warning. Sign of what what's to come.

L. A. Polanski murder Sharon Tate Time magazine Rosemary Rome Nastassja Kinski Robert Towne Lansky Robert Evans Swiss mountain Hugh Hefner Kathy Madeline Sylvia Switzerland Jack Nicholson Sam Watson California Shakespeare executive producer Gustad Lady macduff
"robert towne" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

14:00 min | 1 year ago

"robert towne" Discussed on /Film Daily

"Which sort of lake like Chinatown came out right around the time like jaws was coming out and you know movies. You know that assured in the blockbuster agents in the high concept age near the end of the book they start talking about Don Simpson who was a notorious producer. Who did a lot of cocaine eventually died? Because he did so much cocaine and so it's it's kind of depressing but because this is sort of like the end of the era where movies were. Were you know being made by artists who were trying to do something original and different and not really worried about you know big explosions and stuff like that. So I I really enjoyed. I finished it in a week. It's it's a very easy read. So if you're you're interested in you know Hollywood series and books about the makings of movies and This is a pretty good read. It's called the big goodbye. I've never really looked into the history of Of the making of the movie. Chinatown was there any one particular story about the making of that movie? That jumped out to you that you've never heard of before. I mean I honestly didn't know you know I've seen Chinatown but I didn't know a whole lot about the making of it to be honest so pretty much. Everything in the book seemed new to me. And I'm the one thing I found very interesting is a lot of people consider Robert towne script to be like one of the best green plays ever written end. This book makes the very convincing argument that his script was actually kind of bad and it was Roman Polanski. Who made the movie what it is? And there's kind of like a weird irony in it because screen writing books about like what screenplay you should emulate all point to Chinatown is example when in truth that the script was not as great as people thought it was thought it was and it was really Polanski's like reshaping of it that made it what it is today so sorry. Sorry Robert Towne interesting issue. What have you been reading? I will I finished reading. You guys may remember from last week's episode in which I talked about just starting the book and I finished it within span of like a week. I really enjoyed this book. It was real page. Turner as you could tell And Really Breezy read. This is the book by Madeline Miller and it is the revisionist Retelling of the goddess. Sursee who you may remember from the Odyssey as the witch who turns A deceased men into pigs and I really liked the This retelling of the story wasn't didn't take too much of a revisionist brush to the story of this of this goddess But it kind of it. It actually sticks quite closely to the Greek myths. As far as I remember really enjoying especially when I was young Greek myths and general because of how of the soap opera drama of at all. Because it it made a lot of sense to me that a lot of the lights and the unpredictable disasters the world were could be traced back to God's and their petty fights because it just felt like so much more unpredictable and You know felt like yet unpredictable. And like that. The the forces are just based off of some Spats between these petty petty guides so Yeah I I really like Sir. C and It it does you know. Tell the broad strokes of The the goddess as she's known with allergy but it also brings Some lesser known sort of deities into the story and like is allowed to make make more creative like liberties with the story and in doing so Yeah it's great. It has like a really sympathetic Feminist approach to her character. She's kind of like this pure An innocent Goddess who has always sort of Idolized her father. Helius the god of the sun or the Titan of the sun and Is kind of beaten down by life and And by the generation. So it's really interesting how that happens and I. I really enjoyed this book. So that's Sursee by Madeline Miller excellent Let's jump into what we've been watching Jacob and Brad you guys watched the invisible man Jacob what do you think about it outstanding It's exactly I wanted out of a New Take on this material as much as a big fan of the original issue novel much. Love the classics in the Thirties. this is such a modern I'm going to be made now. You cannot have made this version you know back in thirty s for a number of reasons but it feels so modern and relevant and timely it takes Eddie of middleman and transforms into a story about Victims of abuse. Nothing believed of gas lighting about A it's just a really thoughtful scary movie that Replacing the idea of lemon is is not like is a literal tormentor but also as a metaphorical museum of invisible man being a little man but also the abuser who is always hovering in. Someone's mind long after. They think they've escaped them. And it's just a really fun crowd-pleasing tense exciting violent harm movie but also carries a lot of like genuinely thoughtful relevant weight to it and this is what the. Blue House and possibly. What else do you deal with? Universal to make more harbors for them if this is what they want to do with more universal Har- characters going forward Bring them into twentieth century. Twenty first century in this kind of way. I am excited to see I. I'm really happy with how this turned out Bread I know. You're not as much of a fan boy for universal I am so what did you think Yeah that's true. I definitely see I haven't seen all of the universe classic movies but I've seen most of the big ones Invisible man was one of the best and I agree with everything you said. This is such a fantastic modern refreshing way to tell that story and make it relevant to our times and to the issues facing women especially in our society but I I also just love Does as far as his filmmaking down this way he uses negative space and near silence. Lingering shots makes this movie genuinely terrifying and super suspenseful. I honestly can't remember the last time that I was so on the edge of my seat for so long and just listening to you. Know every single sound and painted every single inch of the screen in front of me. It is an absolute like treasurer of a horror movie. And I actually have a conversation with my parents afterwards because they really wanted to see it up. You're hearing how good it was. And they kept talking about it like it was a thriller and I was. I was like no. I'm pretty sure this is just like a horror movie. And so they but like for them. They think of horns such such a traditional way as far as you know slashers and monsters and ghosts in that kind of thing so it's an interesting conversation But yeah I I absolutely loved this movie and the score man is that standing. I definitely want to get it on Vinyl Thankfully Mondo just released it and see. Yeah this was I could not have been more happy with how this movie turned out the thriller hard debate is one of my no no offense. Your Parents Rabbit describes you have a wall. I think people who I feel like people try to justify. Sometimes it came out people because I liked it. We had a very frustrating. But in this case this is quite literally a slasher villain in reincarnation and here so one point Brad Zero Points Bradman. Take that mom and dad all right so I. I watched the pharmacist. Which is a true crime series on Netflix? Chris talked about this. You like this shows quite a bit It's a four episode series like a true crime documentary about this guy named Dan. Schneider who is a pharmacist in a really really small town in Louisiana and it is all about him trying to figure out who killed his son and it basically turns into him like obsessing over a pill mill that is in the area which is like this woman who just writes prescriptions for oxycodone and it turns into this massive thing and the DA gets involved and it the story sort of spirals out of control. I think I watched this show with my wife who went to pharmacy school in like has a doctorate in pharmacy so she really enjoyed this. She said that A lot of the information is like super accurate which is not always the case when people are when movies and TV shows you know depict pharmacies and pills and things like that. The only thing. I think that she was like sort of a little bit. Not turned off by but but thought of as maybe like a slight detriment. Is that a lot of the show. Seems to Make it seem like these revelations that this guy this guy. Dan Schneider are having a our brand new. And that's not necessarily the case like this. This information has been out there for a long time like You know the idea of Of Pill Mills in these doctors who are writing prescriptions. And she's making tons and tons of money at the while sacrificing their morals and releasing these drugs into society and feeding addicts. And all that kind of stuff. The show sort of paints at like this is like he's blowing the roof of this whole thing even though the roof has been blown off like the. Da Actually ended up knowing about the case that he was the doctor that he was trying to investigate for a long time. So anyway I think it's a really good watch If some if you don't know anything about like the the OPIOID epidemic in America This is a great way to dive into the story because it it sort of grounds it in a personal connection like you here because Dan Schneider. His son was murdered. You end because he obsessively records everything you get this really interesting window into a family. In like at their lowest point like he records conversations that he's had with his wife and and daughter like right at the time when when their son When their family member was killed in like it's heartbreaking to listen to like these these It's like this window into grief that I've never experienced before Christie. Do did that impact you as much as it did me. And when you think back to watching the pharmacist Yeah I'm right there with you on that. Yeah definitely man. It's a it's like I said it's only four episodes and if you're even remotely interested in anything that I said I think the the show Does a really good job at sort of a painting the picture for you so it's very good. It's on Netflix. Right now Also watched a rewatch the aristocrats which is a movie that I had not seen in a long time when my wife and I subscribe to Disney plus we went through and just added a bunch of movies to our Q. Like animated classics and stuff that we had not seen for decades. This was one of them. It's a pretty short movie and we were just like you know on a lazy afternoon looking for something to watch and watch the ARISTOCRATS I. It's not really that good of a movie. I don't know if you guys really remember this movie or not but I mostly you remember it from I. I think I saw once or twice when I was a kid and remember thinking that it was very very slow even back then and watching it now. That is definitely confirmed. Like I can't imagine watching this as a kid because it's so slow from one thousand nine hundred seventy and man it just. It moves along at a snail's pace It is so far removed from the sort of like a dynamic plotting of that that I know of from the Nineties Style. Disney movies also. The plot is a little weird. So it's about this woman who has a bunch of cats that she really really loves and the servant in house Over here is that as woman is drawing up her will. She's GonNa leave all of her earthly possessions to these cats and then underneath the cat's like after the cats die then the servant is going to inherit all of her wealth and this drives the servant to insanity basically he was like. I can't believe that these cats are are ahead of me in line at so to speak. So He di basically decides to kidnap and murder the cats which like even if you accomplish that mission the woman who actually has all the wealth is still alive so like theoretically she would just get more cats and maybe you leave it to them also if you wait for the woman to die and then you know the somehow a legal body transfers all this wealth. Two kittens It it doesn't take that long for cats die so maybe just wait it out. I don't know I like the premise of this movie. I found to be pretty baffling as an adult. A lot of over my head as a kid but Yeah that's the aristocrats on Disney. Plus right now the music okay. There's a little bit racist stuff in there too. I think a lot of the Disney movies. Say like cultural depictions are probably outdated on this. But I know that I think we've written an article about like why it would be really nice to have a film historian.

Chinatown Disney Dan Schneider Madeline Miller Netflix Robert towne cocaine DA Brad Zero Roman Polanski Jacob Don Simpson Hollywood producer Blue House Thirties. murder Turner Of Pill Mills Eddie
"robert towne" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"robert towne" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Prices between three to eleven dollars that's reasonable use said user said hackers were accessing the Disney plus accounts log them out of the devices and then changing the email and password associated with the concept with the account the suspect that it is coming from countries that are we're dizzy plus is unavailable right now does the plus is only available in the US Canada and the Netherlands I would they be worldwide hi not Canada Canada U. as in Canada can the US in the Netherlands not Mexico that's right they're they're rolling it out slowly right in the Netherlands made the cut yeah the thinking and say hello a prequel series to the classic film Chinatown is in early development at Netflix sources have confirmed reports David Fincher and Robert Towne the film's writer art catch to pen the script were poorly focus on the exploits of a young at JJ get is a during his early days as a private investigator of the film was released back in nineteen seventy four star Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway Nicholson plays get is who's originally high to expose an adulterer but becomes embroiled in a much larger plot has seen that movie I haven't seen Chinatown I like I might have in film class button fell asleep I ate Chinese a couple times over the weekend think it's a little different than it's not them make an upstart mom and pop Chinese joint okay and the Doobie brothers will unite with former front man Michael McDonald for a two twenty twenty north American tour celebrating the band's fiftieth anniversary singer guitarist Jim Tom Johnson and Patrick Simmons and a singer keyboardist McDonald and multi instruments John would make feet will tour together for the first time in nearly twenty five years during the track the tour kicks off June ninth in west Palm Beach Florida and concludes October tenth in Houston Texas the closest they're coming to Minnesota guys August eighth at the Hollywood casino amphitheatre in Chicago well I think the staff I love Michael McDonald voice I do too so he slid from the Doobie brothers long time ago I don't know was it where they like only together in the seventies early eighties in any split it was like a brief stint I believe it is the first time they'll all be together and for twenty five years well that's exciting I do love his voice ain't no mountain high enough he that's the latest here from my talk with her stories like these everything entertainment turning that's one without taking to the streets yeah go to my talk with the civil and dot com in the my talk at for more fun like this is this some dirt thank you I talked to alert at the top of every hour and eight twenty twelve twenty and five twenty on my top one of seven one once you no good it could I want to thank you I'm trying to cut you know night you're listening to John and be on my top one oh seven one everything entertainment Brian's here to right you just got a phone call Steve I did yes one we follow up on the Disney plus things so mats.

Disney twenty five years eleven dollars
‘Chinatown’ Prequel Series in Development at Netflix From David Fincher, Robert Towne

Donna and Steve

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

‘Chinatown’ Prequel Series in Development at Netflix From David Fincher, Robert Towne

"A prequel series to the classic film Chinatown is in early development at Netflix sources have confirmed reports David Fincher and Robert Towne the film's writer art catch to pen the script were poorly focus on the exploits of a young at JJ get is a during his early days as a private investigator of the film was released back in nineteen seventy four star Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway Nicholson plays get is who's originally high to expose an adulterer but becomes embroiled in a much

David Fincher Robert Towne Investigator Jack Nicholson Faye Dunaway Nicholson Netflix Writer
"robert towne" Discussed on Shut Up I Love It

Shut Up I Love It

14:16 min | 2 years ago

"robert towne" Discussed on Shut Up I Love It

"After some head trauma there was a the big crash on the track ahead of them right and so they kind of got in in the smoke and in the chaos of it they got both hit yeah Cole hits into rowdy and their cars flip and they get airlifted to the hospital. They'll happy music underneath all that this is very interesting Lhasa Cons A- At first she does not seem very interested in Tom Cruise until he puts her hand on his Dick Yeah. That's that's an interesting scene gave tell us so a little bit earlier in the movie. After cultural has won his first race the team is travelling in their huge semi to wherever they're going hooters I have no idea somewhere and they get pulled over by. These two squad cars very attractive officer gets out they get everybody out of the semi. Get them them lined up against the truck and she frisks him and when she gets to his member it right there right we see the bolger shirt for. Do you think that was his real asking myself. What do you think game? No I mean it's probably a cop I mean I don't know I mean the panthers certainly tight enough for it to be but double double. I'm going to go penis double classic Hollywood knowledge and she's a woman that has offered herself up to him is kind of the implication says your your friends thought you'd like me and I hope she's a sex worker. Hey all more power to you know she's is not then I feel weirder yeah yeah but also you know maybe she's a big Fan. She seems happy with the situation yeah. She's under no duress. It doesn't seem uh-huh she's making her choices. which is all that we can ask for? No one's making these choices for her now another actor in that scene one of the other cops is a AH name is Nick searcy on he was unjustified. he's like the head of the whatever government agency that is and it just every character actor with a southern accent is in this movie including Margo Martindale who's in one scene at the beginning of the movie. She has no lines. She's just sitting in the background of the scene timing coming Culture Hilas he goes around the abet you. It has to do with the fact that this movie was taking three months longer to shoot than originally planned because the producers Don Simpson Jerry Bruckheimer plus Robert Towne knee town Robert towne fighting the whole time for every shot and some Don Simpson who always wanted to become an actor he like spores the screenwriter to write four page scene for him but it ended up being just a one liner so because the editor showed up on the set and he was like this guy cannot act can he's never going to be in this facility in the final macoute he is he's in the beginning. He says something like Oh. I hope like I win and this guy doesn't make it or something and so but like yeah but like all while he's having crazy parties apparently they they I mean Bruckheimer and Simpson they converted the hotel into a private gym for four hundred thousand dollars and put a sign that said days of thunder at the front and there were having crazy parties would rappers and stuff on the beach and they were giving away designer dresses mostly Don Simpson Design addresses two attractive women to sleep with them and so brought time zone who's actually doing any work done. Simpson was is just partying like crazy apparently so it was simpson and Bruckheimer fighting with each other or was it the two of them fighting with town. Everybody was fighting and because of that production and just got delayed by three months which is insane how much money so from thirty five million dollars ballooned balloon to seventy some million dollars inches double in our money today and a lot of times do crew would just sit there waiting and they said the overtime like made his crew crew guys later take like a four month vacation because they had all this extra money from this weekend spill. So what I'm saying is that because all this crazy stuff was going on they might have had like a decent scenes for Margo Martindale and other people but they just they just cut it out because at the end of the chaos they forgot to shoot Kohl's car car winning Daytona going to the finish line so they had to pull shot like extra production was shut down and like reshoot it anyway. It sounds like a complete nightmare idea that explains why Jerry Bruckheimer then goes on to be the only person in that production company logo no longer Simpson Bruckheimer production right. We'll paramount fires them. After this film a year prior to this film they make a five year contract with them like overall deal. Make whatever you want and then seeing how all of this movie is doing the terror that contract and they're like you both fired so they have to move on and have the second sort of phase of their producing life until nineteen ninety six went went simpson dies. I see how crazy I love the story behind the movie and that's what I'm blaming for why I was confused during the medical montage after after the accident yeah probably medical montage of Rowdy and whole being wheeled into the trauma center we meet Claire which is I just hate that name for but anyway. It's a good name the richest clearly she's not clearly we aren't you looking woman. She's just not but I was able to get past that now anyway and and but I just the for for mood I thought explained everything and and you know even taught us all the lingo and stuff I thought that the actual accident and the medical montage was ah them getting into the hospital and getting to the point where we find out if they're going to be medically cleared or not was just very chaotic so yeah they need to get cleared to get back on track and Claire Says No way she needs to see some improvement in their physical health before issue. Let them race again in this time they become friends which is cute. All everyone becomes friends during this time rowdy and cold become friends. That's the big turn. That's the big sort of mid point turn of descript. Is that Whoa we I thought this was the antagonist of the film but he's not because it become fast friends. Actually the head of NASCAR played by Fred Thompson tells them if they hit each other again he's GonNa kick them out of NASCAR and they decided instead of settling this on the track. Let's settle it it with rental cars on the La River sounds funny but based on the real story. Apparently the racers early on in the fifties would do all the time yeah they beat the hell out of these rental cars and in the end they find common ground as two lovers of speed and chrome thrown. If American cars did anything it was bringing people together make them get over their differences the tourist aluminum you know the peacekeeping cars yes so their friends now Tom Wu's claire by seemingly so you just by sending her a lot of flowers that that is the turning point for her right like she's holy uninterested in him until one day she gets home and there's too many flowers there and that is all of a sudden she used turn on a dime and now she likes him. She wants to fly out because she's too busy right to anybody and he also because her boss to get her time off when you're starting to court with some of what you want is for them to get involved in your career and you know complain your boss about your working hours. Oh we didn't even and finish the fact that because this his friends higher this woman to pretend to be a cop and grope him when he wakes up in the hospital well he thinks they've done the same thing with Nicole Kidman and so he grabs her hand puts it on his Dick and everyone thinks it's hilarious and she handles it pretty pretty well. Yes the joke. Maybe that's a I can montage or she. Does she think before that I was wondering that that scene gene maybe think about like their marriage and the whole thing. That's another layer that I liked about this was it was kind of around the time that they were doing like far and away but I liked. I did like the layer of yeah that of them knowing each other real life. I don't know six months later after the movie was done got married. Wow look at him now. Not Married not speaking it might be maybe they did. Maybe they college phone. You know maybe they have a good friendship Keith all right so that her husband never been country music singer Australian also showed her than her. She's got type. How tall is she eighty? Five ten. I Dunno she's. I'M GONNA go with five eleven. That's just my guess. We'll never know no. There's no way for us to know so they fall in love love. He put Sweden low on her legs rowdy. However is not cleared to get back on the doesn't clear him? Rowdy has a persistent brain injury that he is choosing to ignore. He has a blood clot in his brain hemorrhage that the same thing not a blood clot. It's like there's no blood. Flow hemorrhages like there's lots of blood flow marineland opposite would be like a blockage. Where's the hemorrhages bleed? Hey Hey he's brain needs a fixing yeah. Absolutely wow Cole has been off the track. The team has replaced him with a new driver played by carry. Elway's Dick Right away. You just hate that guy. Hey Tate and once Cole has been cleared to race again. Randy Quaid sets up a second second team so that carry always can also keep racing and we now see oh Kerry elway is the true antagonist of this film later you you know in the film. It's like Oh wait. There isn't a tag but I did like that rowdy. I thought was going to be the antagonists for the entire film and like midway through. It's like Nope we're besties and then there's like a new guy. Mr Princess Bride comes in and hilarity ensues. I don't know I like that. I wasn't expecting it. That's an unusual turn of story. Ren Randy quit also becomes a sort of antagonists to he's become seduced by the sponsorship money and he's wearing nicer suits now and sunglasses his and he has less time for coal more time for carry l. Wes and Cole is is like afraid to race now right. He's Picky as Dean Israel after his accident. He's being very careful on the track and Robert Duvall can see it in and he knows that's no way to win but at this point point Cole trickle can speak he can talk cars really well. He can explain what's going on with his car if it's not doing well while his crew who is in the pit listening to him over the headphones speaking of headphones apparently the we're turning into this lines like for the move there were constantly having rewrite the day off which never happens from like it's very tv sort of situation like having rewrites the day off so times Tom Cruise had to race and look down to see his lines on the dashboard and then speak a mop like half somebody in easy or tell him what the lines are the driving yeah. He started at such a question for you did you had you seen this movie and you ever seen this movie before. Do you have any connection to NASCAR or car racing in any way no to all of it. What about you know I've heard of the movie I think it may be seen some clips who I've never seen it before and yeah? I don't know I didn't know much about NASCAR. This was like a primer for me. Well I know about NASCAR FROM NASCAR car racing. I should say from documentaries center an amazing documentary highly recommended water great film so this is like the one time I learned more more about car racing I ever knew before talking. I don't remember anything about it except that it was great listener. We don't have to do other work for you. Go type it into Google Yourself S. E. N. A. Check it out. It's about a racer who is pretty great and bad shit happens to him. It runs out of sweet and low so he can explain nothing. That's the big turn in his story. Coal is all of the relationships in his life are are kind of going down the drain or Robert Duvall feels like he's not being honest with him. seems Claire. You know feels like He. He's he's not admitting things to himself. Rowdy is hiding his brain injury from himself. Everyone's hiding things from themselves. Anti and Tom just can't race you know and carry out west. It's driving him crazy. 'cause he's Robin on the track and nobody's doing anything about it and eventually Tom Cruise it. Just almost T. bones amount on the track. After carry always wins a race Tom Cruise right post-race rage right. Yeah road rage after the fact road rage is real yeah even in nineteen ninety and that takes him that takes them to his low point of the film and then and we can start the redemption portion of it and how does that Brooklyn breaking down the scripts guys so yeah he gets fired and so where where does it. Where does he turn Gabe? What does he do while he goes and he sees rowdy? Roddy is not taking care of his brain injury. He he comes from a family that does not see doctors is Nicole. Kidman is like why hasn't Tom Cruise been to see him as been to visit him and Robert Duvall a racer doesn't want to go see someone in the hospital doesn't want to go to a funeral general because it's what could be for them..

Don Simpson Tom Cruise Cole Jerry Bruckheimer Claire NASCAR Robert Duvall Margo Martindale Nicole Kidman Simpson Bruckheimer panthers officer Hollywood Nick searcy La River Tom Wu Robert Towne Kerry elway Tom
"robert towne" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

15:08 min | 2 years ago

"robert towne" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Six and one sixty nine and from public radio international better known as P. R. I. so here's a question that requires more nuanced than Twitter is capable up which is to say what makes a rom com at all what actually is a romantic comedy what are the elements does someone need to call off their wedding for the love triangle be saline or I softly scaling and blue that joke also one of those words mean how many millimeters of rain fall during the big dramatic kiss heavy factor climate change into this answer well we've got a guy to break it down Wesley Morris is a self confessed lover of rom coms he's also a Pulitzer Prize winning film critic for The New York Times he's big three rom coms that are important to the genre one that turns thirty this year and two that you might not expect and please be advised of this item contains topics of a sexual nature listener discretion is advised so here he is grab that special someone get some popcorn get ready to cry the Q. gateway to romantic comedies I'm saying is and this is not a come on in any way shape or form is that men and women can't be friends because the sex part always gets in the way it's not true the number of men friends and there is no sex involved yes I do yes I do that is the premise of one of the great romantic comedies when Harry met Sally released in nineteen eighty nine the summer of nineteen eighty nine it's thirty years old this year and in that clip Harry who's played by Billy crystal basically tells Sally who's played by Meg Ryan you know the genders can't get along the street genders do you know man straight men cannot be friends with a straight woman because I or anyone and really because he's just going to be two forty four and it's just going to ruin the friendship and Sally of course she's kind of appalled by the presumption that that that can't happen today spend the next ten years in each other's lives only to realize that hearing might have been right although it's not the sex part the gets in the way although there is a sex be bombed it's it's actually wrote that gets in the way of the friendship but actually there is no there is no romance without the friendship so Sally's right to I love this movie both as a movie and as a great exercise in genre of filmmaking because it seem to understand nor Effron wrote it we should say and rob Reiner directed it and it just really understands how these movies have typically function these do you know this is it this is a movie genre that's almost as old as the movies and this was one of the first to really without putting the whole thing in quotation marks to really think about what what a modern woman any modern man would truly do if they were in a nineteen forties movie so of course when Harry met Sally has lots of great scenes its most iconic scene the scene that probably goes in the movie hall of fame it is the scene in which Harry and Sally go to have lunch at Katz's deli in New York City and has been on a date and he is talking about how good his game is in the bed I think I have an okay time how do you know Ali Khan she doesn't beg to differ about whether Harry's good or not but she does question his certainty that he's never been bad in bed because all the women that he's been within an organ I haven't finished with me how do you help and it just it's the first time that you really get a sense of Sally as a will not only as a woman who has woman is parties but also has another sexual history to understand that of course you could be terrible in bed and not know it Harry because women fake it all the time okay then she takes the orgasm you really have to see Meg Ryan do it is it is just an achievement of of vocal and physical comedy yeah yeah yeah it never fails to be whole areas and then the woman who is sitting to their right who is played by rob Reiner's mother says the famous line I'll have what she's having and I don't know that is just you just you don't get much better at mechanical comedy mechanical structure in comedy than that Columbia Pictures reasons shampoo is the story of a Beverly hills hairdresser named George so in nineteen seventy five there's this movie called shampoo it was written by Robert Towne and directed by hal Ashby and is set on the E. U. in nineteen sixty eight of Richard Nixon's election and it is both a cabbie out for what would happen after sixty eight and like a mile leave the stall Jake thinking about the end of the nineteen sixties and the plot basically centers on a Los Angeles hairdresser played by Warren Beatty and he is trying to figure out what he should do with his life and some aspect of figuring out what he's going to do with his life we'll have something to do with one of the three women in it and one of the beautiful things about the film is that you're watching a heterosexual man you know it's not you know near the height of the sexual revolution really think not so much about sex because he's probably had all of that but really love and what does it mean to actually love one of these women I want to take care of you instead of a baby take care of you I'll make you happiest when I got it it is a great scene that in a typical romantic comedy would be the culmination of the movie in which Lester who's played by Warren Beatty breaks down proposes to to Julie Christie and in a normal movie Julie Christie would say yes god yes I love you too I want to spend the rest of my life with you but no no no no this is happening in nineteen seventy five the height of feminism add the height of the sexual revolution and the idea that a woman is supposed to just fall into the arms of a man because he is willed it to be so or the plot his will to be so doesn't quite work anything I mean it's too late is I mean I guess classically it would be a sex comedy but I think the questions at its heart have everything to do with the with the romantic comedy and it's one of the few films that I would classify immediately is existential about the question of couple hood and romance and commitment home is the message you have no idea so we'll skip ahead to the twenty first century and I I happen to like very much movie by Joel and Ethan Coen called intolerable cruelty it was not a huge hit when it came out it was it was considered at the time a medium Coen brothers movie and the loose plot of this movie is the George Clooney is a divorce attorney and he is representing the husband of Catherine zeta Jones who he despite his professional best interest and probably a motional best interests can't help falling for anyway thank you can one of the elemental aspects of romantic comedy is this idea of chemistry George Clooney's George Clooney is has this reaction to Catherine zeta Jones is Catherine zeta Jones nest and it is just a pleasure to watch I just I don't know I I really like this movie it is an underrated Coen brothers movie it is the last example of two very famous people being very good movie stars with each other in a romantic comedy so here we are it's two thousand nineteen and we are woefully short on romantic comedies and I have to say I remain sad even as the black gay male I am I don't necessarily need to see such people in these movies because they're about people there about human beings they're about the ways that people get along with each other now I'm not he should stay white and straight I think that if they're gonna come back they have to come back with with more options but the beauty of these movies is you could take those same plots and just repopulate them with new people and you still have some version of the same movie that you could tweak a little bit they have to do very little with mechanically because that's how universal and human in the genre so I don't know there's almost and I mean I don't like the sort of intellectual property is ation of all of American culture but I would make a special exception if you just want to take a bunch of old romantic comedies and remake them with new people I would totally support that because that's how much I miss them that is Wesley Morris with his queue gateway to romantic comedies Wesley Morris is an incredible writer incredible critic at the critic at large for The New York Times if you like what you heard you can hear Wesley co host his pop culture podcast with Jenna Wortham it's called still processing I'm Tom how are you listening to Q. this is very exciting this only happens once in a lifetime or so a group that truly might change a genre of music for ever the high women are super group of women country stars some of the best singers performers writers all together in one band you might remember the highwaymen we're all male country supergroup Johnny Cash Kris Kristofferson Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson well the high women are songwriter and fiddler Amanda shires hit writer Natalie him be pop country female Merrin Morris and multiple Grammy winner Brandi Carlile all in one group in the photo shoot for the new album Amanda shires wearing a tee shirt with a lyric from a song her husband wrote about her it says mama wants to change that Nashville sound in an industry where radio stations even in twenty nineteen are reluctant to play two women artists back to back you get the feeling that the high women will definitely change that Nashville sound here's their debut single this is re designing women and there's a read yeah changing some of hello my in that the best that is the high women with the re designing women Brandi Carlile Merrin Morris Amanda shires Natalie him be their self titled album dropped September six I can't wait to get them in the studio to talk a little bit about that coming up at you this music pal discusses the future of number one hits after this WNYC is supported by Kino Lorber presenting the mountain from director Rick Alverson Jeff Goldblum stars as a traveling lobotomized in nineteen fifties America who takes a photographer played by Tye Sheridan under.

Twitter thirty years ten years
"robert towne" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"robert towne" Discussed on WGN Radio

"And come up at five o'clock as the percentage of the opening bell and coming up the stories that matter with thick lawn in the northwestern medicine news room right here on WGN all right we're going state by state here and what movies represent each state sore at California and the website here's fansided by the way and they chose Chinatown which there is is quintessential California movies you can possibly get I know there a lot of films that kind of represent California yeah the Paul Thomas Anderson makes great movies about California including magnolia including boogie nights but to Chinatown I mean that's you know I think that's as good as it that's as good an example you're gonna get its iconic yeah the whole the whole water subplot yeah I mean there's a lot of another date you could that you can choose for those who have never been sick to the Golden State it should be known that California is an even stranger Plaisance reputation suggests yes it is yes it is impossibly vast and is ideal ideologically diverse and as it gets the state feels very different therefore the state can be seen as a microcosm of the United States is Hollywood is in California countless filmmakers have made countless films examining the state's many peculiarities and contradictions however none quite captured as well as Roman Polanski's China town although the classic nineteen seventy four neo noir film is best known for its captivating performances twisty plot devastating ending is also the quintessential Californian story Chinatown follows detective Jake get us played by Jack Nicholson as he investigates what's ends up being the biggest case of his life initially hired to produce evidence of a husband's infidelity Jake winds up in the middle of a sprawling conspiracy that involves water rights and land development specifically how some wealthy Californians are intent on wiping out their entire communities in order to artificially turned southern California to a thriving lucrative community as such Chinatown is representative of three quintessentially American reality is the first is that America is remarkable infrastructure development is not achieved cleanly to that intense class conflict has existed in America long before the term became popular in twenty first century and third that the injustice is that if you buy American progress almost a century ago are still present today then of course you know has been known I mean that that Chinatown is is an example of a perfect screen play like it doesn't it doesn't get better than that like that's Robert Towne's screen play for Chinatown is perfect in in in every possible way it's like you know you wanna learn about screenwriting you want your screen writing one oh one trying to so Colorado the the big dog ville the large one true yeah he yeah I can't really think of any other movies about Colorado his doc feel even better Colorado takes place there it does this does my god I'm trying to think of Colorado there isn't anything in are there any are there any great movies that take place in Denver how about things to do in Denver when you're dead what we're South Park bigger longer uncut right Colorado absolutely South Park bigger longer uncut yeah I love that movie man yeah I would I would pick that over Dogville for sure let's see.

"robert towne" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"robert towne" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"The character. Noah what was cross Noah there was that thing was I guess, that's what is that? Robert towne script. Right. Yeah. So that thing was like loaded up. On all. And then whatever Polanski was thinking. He just loaded it up more. And it was it's one of those movies, everyone talks about it. When people gave a shit about the intellectual, you know component of movies, and how it was really the first film Noir since Ville, nor that like they took that that genre and just went deep. Absolutely. And it just like just even with the place when your father with given his experience with the old film wars in that. You know, what that meant, you know, all of it was all it was all very heady, very. Yeah. It was pretty strong stuff, and you were onset. Sometimes I was set. Sometimes by first day. I went to visit. I ride at lunch, and everyone was they were all sitting outside in an orchard his long kind of refractory table. And and are injured the orange orchard and. There was a silence, you know, an angel past and and suddenly my father turn to Jack. And we were up, but sort of the head of the table and said. I hear you've been sleeping with my daughter. Terrible kind of silence echo. And there's a lot of people there, like the full pack. Yeah. And then he gave it a, you know, a nice a nice moment after that and said, Mr. gates. Everyone laughed broke the is. And it was all good that it was pretty funny. Wow. And then, you know, I never like hanging out on other people sets albeit my boyfriend, whatever I just their dad. If I'm not working. I don't wanna be sure. Yeah. I mean, it's the most extraneous feeling in the world. We're somebody set awful and all that downtime. There's all that downtime but worse than that. There's you know, you don't have a purpose. I will say this like the your performance like I've watched. I I believe that. Like crimes and misdemeanors is one of the great masterpieces of movies. It's a good movie. Yeah. It's it's great. Really great. And you were just so good. And so, you know, vulnerable and broken and scary like, you know, like right there like, you know, but not I don't mean broken in a bad way. But just sort of like. Yeah. And it doesn't it just goes away with it. It's so good. I think it's it's a genius script by Woody. He's he's a master. And. It was scary too. Because I'd never met the man..

Woody Noah Robert towne Polanski Mr. gates Jack
Bill Hader on Barry | Interview

The Big Picture

07:20 min | 2 years ago

Bill Hader on Barry | Interview

"Double sized episode of the big picture. This is a conversation show with filmmakers, and we're talking to a few of them today. The first of which you may have heard of his name is Bill hater he is. Of course, the creator the writer producer, and sometime director of a little show called Barry show on HBO that we love here at the wringer. I talked to Bill about making Barry, but more specifically just about movies because men this guy knows a lot about film, and he's really fun to talk to you. He put me on to a bunch of movies. I think if you're interested in the wider world of movies in the history of the medium, you'll enjoy this chat. And then right after that, we're going to have another interview with two people. I really admire the actress Mary Kay place who you may recall from things like the big chill. She was an EMMY winner in the seventies. She's been steadily working as an actress for the last forty years and the critic turned filmmaker and documentarian Ken Jones. Kent's first film as a narrative film maker is called Diane and Mary Kay. The star of that movie, and it's a really beautiful intimate complex portrait of a person nearing the end of their life. And how things change around them as they approach that stage. So please stick around after Bill to listen to that one. But before that, let's go right to Bill Hader. Joined by actor writer, director producer all kinds of stuff ill hater, hey, buddy. How are you? I'm doing good. So bill. This is a show where we talk about movies, and you made a TV show, but you are like the all-time movie buff. Yeah. And so I wanna talk about berry as kind of a filmmaking property. What do you think? Yeah. It'd be great now. Most people kind of friends who were like, it's kinda just, you know, a four hour movie that we've broken up into eight is that how you can send it as like. Well, the way we write it. I had never written in a in a traditional TD writing room writer's room before the only one had really been in outside of Santa live of south park. And finally kind of knew what those guys did. And it was kind of like their their shows have, you know, a three acts, and so you were kind kinda just it was never really written in order. It was kind of. We know this needs to happen. Then at some point this happens, and then towards the end, maybe this happens, and then you're kind of finding scenes at connect these things, and then it all starts changing. So I kind of did that. But with with eight episodes, I would just put one two to four one through eight up on the bore whiteboard. I would just start plotting, and you know, season one it was like, okay. So, you know, end of episode to be really good. If you know, they had this thing for rhyme Addison embarrassed starting to realize, you know, e- seizes father speak in rhyme. Adam's, father speaking, he realizes. Oh, gosh. You know, he didn't you've never seen that side of it before, you know. And then maybe it's good if you know Vaujour's following them that'd be good. You know in the in the, you know, the the way call it his his friends from Chris in those guys military guys they come in around episode. Owed four or five. So question Mark, you know, more friends years, your puzzle PC, and you're just kind of laying it out, but you laid out as a full things. So, you know, by eight it's like, I just know eight forever just had moss versus berry at the end. And we had no idea where that took place or what happened. But I I've felt and we all kind of felt like they should have she should figure it out. You know? So we knew that was at the end of eight at the end of the last episode, but we didn't know how that would happen is that more similar to the way you'd read a movie, I mean, I don't know. I I mean, I everyone has a different way of doing it some people the idea out of outlining is for bowdoin in people. I think because screen play unlike a novel novel can be as long as you want screenplay should be about under twenty pages. And when you're structuring a story for film or. Television. There has to be like structure to it. You know, now that doesn't mean in asked to be kind of like what we do or you know, that kind of Billy wilder thing. Or I, you know, where it was every everything is set a payoff, everything is super clean, and you know, that what by I love that. It's really hard to pull off in. That's why I enjoy that kind of writing. But you know, I mean, I mean, some of the best movies of Hollywood specially in the seventies were really during didn't know where it was going, but they have a structure there. You know, be too great how Ashby movies being there and last detail fron tense purposely last details just kind of a a road movie quest movie quest movie in about these two guys finding their humanity in in and trying to show this guy a good time before he goes to jail in. Kind of forgetting their jobs is in what they've learned military men and all this and an in kind of shedding their the humanity that they have to repress when I put the uniform on and all that, and it's all very emotional. But when you look at it, it's got a really great structure, you know, has a really tight structure now, I don't know if Robert towne took that book, and you know, outlined it in figured it out. But if feels that way, and so sometimes the first draft is like an outline you're kinda like you're writing I've done it both ways we write a draft to something with no outline in it. It's got a lot inspired stuff in it. But it's kind of cranky, you know. Yeah. So then you kind of go over it you show it to a friend in the gonna will head of it there. You know, this would go here what you know in the new you'd try to because you want it to feel kinda we're Ganic. But when you're doing TD showing you got thirty minutes. It's it's kinda hard to do that. Because you have to keep a tight inside frame. It really tight. Yeah. And I'm also just someone I don't like wasting people's time. And so when we got the TV show actually went back and watch TV. But I would I would read short stories was really good. I would want. I would read like Tobias Wolff for Flannery O'Connor any these people and kind of see just pay attention to the structure, you know, in in not that far off the tone of those writers. I feel like to. Yeah. Yeah. Give me and hard to find. As like totally an incredible berry template as far as gets on this incredibly funding in very disturbing at the same time. But you know, trying to understand where the emotions coming from. I think we're Alec Berg, and I worked so well together as I'm kind of all emotion, and he's all logic. And my strong suit is as weak suit in my weeks at his strong suit. Not that he's not. National is he's he's comes up. I think some

Bill Hader Writer Mary Kay Director Producer Barry Emmy HBO Ken Jones Alec Berg Berry Billy Wilder Robert Towne Kent Addison Vaujour Hollywood Tobias Wolff Chris Mark
"robert towne" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

04:32 min | 3 years ago

"robert towne" Discussed on Movie Crush

"Yeah, maybe I'm a pessimist, but you saying it was an unsatisfying ending is interesting because, of course it is especially in dark and cinema term for me. I've always struggled with with, especially in trying to make things and you know, TV shows films, whatever that down endings aren't that down ending, can't be satisfied for me. It's a very satisfying ending because. I think it confirms maybe my world view. Yeah, which is I know what you mean. Yeah. I mean, it's, it's that powerful people get away with, you know, with whatever often the ever they want. And so it of artists satisfying? I know what you mean. Yeah, because it is real dark and I don't. I don't need a happy ending on every movie. Right, but it leaves you just dejected as of you're? Yeah. I mean to me, it says, okay, yeah, there there's how the world is, and that's not. I guess there's an irony calling that a satisfying thing, but yeah, but it does. It is. It is at the very least maybe one of the balls used decisions and cinema history to use that ending. Yeah. And they, I'm sure they shot an all. Well, I don't know if they, I don't think they shot all, but did this up. Very famously contentious production in implants in town in Evans, all fought a lot about the script. And apparently there were a couple of months where they locked themselves in a room in fought about the script and. Robert Townsend, this we fought every day over everything names. What's her name? No, it can't be that. It's too ethnic. It's this now it's that. And then they came into conflict on whether apparently there was narration early on very Norrish voiceover that plant ski lost. Right? Which I think is probably the right good call, but the ending apparently was a major bone of contention. Robert towne had written a conclusion where Evelyn survived and killed her father, but plans ski was in a dark place. He had this was just fears after his wife was brutally murdered by the Manson family. Yeah. So he was, you know, he was making movies that reflected that. I think everyone knows that. And Polanski said, I thought it was a serious movie, an adventure story for the kids. He said, where's town said? You know what? Your wife died, beautiful blondes die in Los Angeles. That's just what happens. So he didn't budge. And Roman finally said, I want it written this way and town that I think it would be very bad if I wrote it that way. He said tried anyway. So I did a brought it back to him and said, see it. So melodramatic and Romans said, no, it's perfect, and that was that. So Romans, the one who plants he's the one who wanted to stick to that dark ending. And apparently he, you know, town wanted the other way, which I don't know if it'd be a happy ending, but at least it would be a little more satisfying for the bad guy to get caught. Right. I heard an interesting, funny story. I don't know if it's true, but I get where I heard it, but apparently when they were shooting one of the scenes in the car, they done away like the, you know, it's hurry up and wait onset of course, and they don't away yelled out Roman Polanski. Hey, how many paddled a lot. Yeah. Yeah. So she was like, hey, how much time do I have a need to go pee. Right. And he was like, sit still or we're, we're about the shoot like, and then he's over there doing fifteen things and and forgets. She said that basically he was just like, sit down, shut up, right? It'd be with you in a moment. He goes over the car of intially to give some kind of direction or something like that and the windows down, and she has a Cup full piss nowhere right in the face, throws it on him. Yeah, I hope that story's true. He's like. Wow. All right. So that line I said earlier when Jake in earlier in the movie when they said, what do you do for the put? Did you do for the police force? And he said, as little as possible, that line comes back at the very end, it's y'all must miss it. He's he's looking at Faye Dunaway his eyeball shot out her head shot out speechless. It's just a chaotic scene and he mutters under his breath as little as possible..

Roman Polanski Evelyn Jake Robert towne Evans Robert Townsend Los Angeles Manson family Faye Dunaway
"robert towne" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

04:55 min | 3 years ago

"robert towne" Discussed on Movie Crush

"Yeah, he's just out there, but so connected to the world in like it's hard to to hear his music, which is just haunting and weird and it's not like any kind of it didn't follow any yet. Contemporary musical patterns Ernie share. It's just pure your expression? Yes, pure expression. He does not right or think about what he's going to do before he sits down in the microphones role then plays unbelievable does whatever he's going to do in this is true for his life show to and he never plays it again. Sometime songs, teen minute. Epic called, you know, six-page shuttles on one hundred and forty four thousand elephants. This kind of rally tale that gets back to what's wrong with the world, which is a lot of the themes that lining expresses in many ways. And sometimes it's him banging on a lawnmower with, you know, Bradford from Deerhunter, whatever. Yeah, yeah. And it's a, you know, thirty second little piece of kind of a soundscape thrill. Amazing. I mean, he could have known could have ever known about him and people throw around the word genius. But like he's genius just as much as Salvador Dali or a an. And I know that that Matt kind of horse, the word outsider, art, the what the reason I used it because that is an instant description of people, of course, but it, it's art. It should not be labeled outsider artists just as valid and important as anything else. Absolutely. You know that is trotted out at the the matter the Guggenheim, the high museum here. Yeah, exactly. I don't know when this will come out on tour with animal. Active right now really is the this'll be out in a few weeks. I'm short on interviews, so good. Hopefully. Yeah, man, if you get a chance to see in support lying Holly. Just check it out. Yeah, I love that. He's animal collective that makes it it. It has, at least in my own experience, it has the chance to change your life. I will say that. For sure. I'm glad we got to remember to talk about that. Yeah. On September seven soobee something dangerous and very exciting witnessed a film, stealing the spotlight there in, or you're out. Can I just say how dumb this entire thing is? Critics are calling American animals truly unique. No one's gonna get hurt, outrageously entertaining. Hi story like no other bide stars. American animals do this instrument, September seven rated fifteen. Well, let's get into Chinatown. Oh yeah. Af is number twenty one that was maybe bullshit, but it's number twenty one. I think he got demoted because I remember seeing it. It may have because how does that work? Well, the list was originally nineteen ninety eight. And then I think it ten years in two thousand eight didn't another that version. So probably higher because I was surprised it wasn't a top ten eleven Academy Award nominations. It only one for best screenplay the great Robert town. We'll talk about this kind of fucking perfect script yet all throughout, but lost many of those words to godfather to had the lucky. Release date come out the same years that movie, although Jack loss to Jack Nicholson loss to art Carney for Harriet, tanto fade Dunaway lost. I think rightfully to Ellen Burstyn for Alice doesn't live here anymore. It's hard to deny that one, but releasing seventy four directed by Roman Polanski will unpack that in a minute a written by Robert towne produced by Robert Evans, and it's just one of those movies that that Robert Evans era of the seventies filmmaking was just sort of this iconic period in Hollywood, I think, yeah, even though as immediately with these opening credits when they start rolling, it does not feel at all like a movie made in the nineteen seventies it just smacks of classic forties Neo Noir. Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. I guess Fillmore that point. I mean, when you saw the first time, did you have that context? Did you see at thinking? I did not. I knew I knew it was can't remember my first experience with it. I've definitely seen it a couple of times over the years, but watching it two nights ago, it was just like. Revelatory help. Perfect of film. It is. Yeah. Yeah, I for me, I guess I've heard people say this about it too, that it now it really does sit in the canon of the actual film new our films as sitting, you know. Alongside of rigid bull and back to driver and even godfather. I mean at least a to a great extent..

Robert Evans Jack Nicholson Salvador Dali Academy Award Robert town Ellen Burstyn Robert towne Roman Polanski Matt Holly Fillmore Neo Noir Hollywood Alice Dunaway Carney Harriet forty four thousand elephants thirty second ten years
"robert towne" Discussed on The Rewatchables

The Rewatchables

03:37 min | 3 years ago

"robert towne" Discussed on The Rewatchables

"Every single character who has a speaking part feels very lived in and feels like they're really like going for. They know what movie there. Yeah, especially. And I think that there's a, there's a bittersweet part to the. The Prague sequence because I kinda wouldn't mind. Yeah, seeing two or three movies of the Amelio Estevez. Kristin, Scott Thomas Tom Cruise team, and they kind of set it up like alien where they're like, all these people like actually know each other get along and are busting each other's chops and it's like, oh, don't make fun of my wife's coffee. And that was like that barn and Kiev, and they're kind of like they're really getting along. And then the sort of undiscovered country of this entire movie is that scene when a cruise and Kristen stopped. Scott Thomas are tracking the arms, the arms dealer, the guy is going to steal the NOC list and sell it to max and they have to like make out, yeah, while they're watching and they have like kind of legitimately good chemistry, not as good chemistry as cruise lines of having Vanessa Redgrave mind you, but they have like legitimately good chemistry, and she's an incredible scene partner for him, and it is kind of bitter. Sweet. It's a great great twist to happen. Thirty five minutes into a movie, really? Okay. This is who's in the movie. These are movie stars too. I've seen Kristin Scott Thomas in English Patient and love and Mighty Ducks radiologist go again, it's completely Hitchcock in it's killing Janet Lee after forty minutes. It's like, oh, that's what it is. It's genius and Estevez has what is one of my favorite lines in the movie? ASTA lasagna. Don't get any on you when schilling crews how to use the chewing gum, explosive. Yeah, it's good stuff, but also you know, there's so many little things that stick out to me to red light green light. Yeah, kindred. You've never seen me very upset. Yeah. There's so very specific town, Robert towne style dialogue sprinkled throughout the movie. You can feel almost like who did what right. So David cap is this genius of pl- action sequence plotting and Steve zillion is this genius of dramatic storytelling. And Robert town is the king of memorable lines and they all do all three of those things. Well, but when you put all those commensurate parts, plus Tom Cruise movie starring together, you get like all of these memorable moments that just kinda like ping in the back of your mind over and over and over again. That is only as one of those. Yeah, I love the. I just love diplomas visual flair that at, like I said, under control in this movie, there's the one scene where where. And Don low is basically about to get sent to Siberia. And so Henry journey CIA character is like dressing him down and then, but he's in the foreground in there in the background and both are in focus. And that's the kind of stuff movies, especially summer blockbusters visually all look the same now, and this is a movie that really has a style. When you see it, it just has a look that is charismatic. It's rare to see something that's this stylish. And also this typically you get Villeneuve movie and you're like, oh, man, how? Yeah. So mind blowing. But like do you never laugh once during the entire movie? I don't think I've laughed in like five day, Ville movies out. That's your guy to love. He's my favorite working filmmaker, but if I don't go to him to like be like elated, you know, and and diploma has a very playful style. So let's go with that for what's age the best. The default, the Palme visual style. I'm psyched I let me before we do what as the worst. Let's just break here to do casting what ifs, because they're actually aren't that many. This was a. A movie that was put together largely by cruise and Wagner. It seems like they just moved forward with what they wanted..

Amelio Estevez Kristin Scott Thomas Tom Cruise Scott Thomas partner Robert towne Robert town Kiev Vanessa Redgrave Kristen Henry Janet Lee schilling Wagner Steve zillion David cap Villeneuve Mighty Ducks Don low Siberia