18 Burst results for "Robert Sternberg"

"robert sternberg" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

07:25 min | Last month

"robert sternberg" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"This is the doctor Wendy Walsh show I am America's relationship expert and I am taking your calls. Number is 1 800. 5 to 01 KF five. That's 1 805 201534 producer. Kayla, Who do we have on the line? We have Veronica with the question high, Veronica. Hi, Dr. Wendy. How are you? I'm fine. Thank you for taking my call. What's your question? Okay, It's it's a question. Uh, flashes statement. I am 61 years old. Been married once long now divorced. I have a degenerative eye disorder that is rendering me progressively blind. Um, Over the last five years, I met a wonderful man. Highly educated, sensitive, good guy. Um, basic going along nicely. But there is there is always a hiccup in our relationship due to my vision. Um, I have been a responsible adult. My whole Life. You know, I worked very, very hard, um, achieved Excellent, you know, degree and successful orc history. Pretty pleased with myself. My my concern and to get to the point of this all is that as wonderful as a person he is I get very frustrated at his frustration over my visual limitations, and I think you have good reason to feel that And if you're using you said a hiccup, so give me an example. Oh, let's just say we're going to the grocery story in the way we navigate the grocery stores that I push the cart. He steers it and then, um, when things might go awry, and you know, he says, over there, the other columns you want to get to and I can't be with the other cargoes are There's just stations bristling this here on the back of the next sort of response, And I just think that's ridiculous. I do. I'm honest with my sight. I've always been honest with me. Quit responding in this attitude well, and I would also think that You know you'd be worried about the future, right? Because if this is a progressive disease that you want to have a partner who not only has more compassion but is willing to really step up. When your needs justifiable needs for care increase. Um right. And in all of that, I'm single. I'm sorry. Incredibly independent. I mean, I feel birthday parties for friends and family and events. I'm highly self efficient and self sufficient. But it's just I feel as though you know this is an unfair response because there's no smoking. If you're looking for confirmation of that, I'm going to confirm it for you. I mean, he knew what he was signing up for your very honest with him, And I would say this if I'm just talking to you now, So Veronica When you self proclaimed that you're very independent, And when I hear you tell me about your accomplishments. What? I don't hear Is the feeling of loss by losing your sight and dealing with that, you know, In other words, it's really easy to focus on him, not giving you care. But I'm wondering if you can work to give yourself more care and not worry about having to be so independent because it sounds like You're trying so hard. And maybe you don't need to. I I, you know, outside of him and my immediate, great wonderful friends and family. I do live alone and I live in independent life and I cherish that and I protect it. I just don't want to be in a situation where someone doesn't respected in the same level. I I do. I don't want somebody bristling every time, you know. Well, I bump into something. Your question is, Are you right to feel that my answer is? Yes. I'm so sorry. Because of the time gets traits of radio. We have to go other people are waiting. But, Veronica, I endorse your feelings. You have every right to feel that way. Thank you for calling. I really appreciate it. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Okay. Breaks my heart. Who do we have next? Producer? Kayla, we have Beth with the question. Okay. Hello, Beth. It's Dr Wendy. Hi. I have a question Sure didn't married. I've been married about 40 years. Um and I no longer interested in a sexual relationship. My husband takes testosterone when when is a couple on the same page? Well, every couple is different, You know. Robert Sternberg came up with his fabulous triangular theory of love that said that love progresses from a lustful stage to an intellectual commitment stage and may evolve into mature companion it love. We do know that meant there more medical, um, treatments for male erectile dysfunction and male sexual dysfunction. Then there are for females. And so you know, I will say this Every couple is different, and there's no one right way to have a marriage. But the way to deal with this is to talk about it. And even if you need to enter therapy together, so you have an impartial third party listening. To you know each side but I also want to remind you that not having sex doesn't mean you should stop affection. Because physical touch is so important to the health of a relationship, and I have seen a therapist about three times and each of them say You have the right to the side. If he doesn't want to stay in the marriage, that's his choice. Um, And so that's that. That's sort of your big question right is and I would. I wouldn't bounce around therapists. I'd stick with one for a while because it takes a while to dig a little deeper and figure out Um, your answers to what you're going through. But, yeah, that's it. That's what I hear you saying is I don't want to have sex anymore. But if I stop, he might leave me. What's this is that I'm am I allowed my decision, I guess is the question. Everybody is allowed their autonomous decision for their bodies. Everybody is at any point in the lifespan. Nobody owns your body. Everybody else's rights. Stop at your skin. Yes, Beth. Thank you so much for calling. I appreciate it. Uh, All right. Let me jump back to social media because there's some very interesting questions here. Uh, someone writes I am in love with my married boss. After we had sex once. He said. We can't do it anymore. What do I do?.

Robert Sternberg Wendy Kayla Wendy Walsh Veronica 1 805 201534 Beth each America 1 800. 5 to 01 KF five about 40 years each side single 61 years old about three times third couple Every couple one once
"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

11:16 min | 2 months ago

"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Trainings. Like mindfulness seem to make neural plasticity more systematic so that we can drive. The brain changed brain in desirable ways. And i suspect that with time people will develop more and more methods. Mindfulness being one of many and may be mindless being apart. Many are to help. People develop mental capacities. Just the way you go to a gym and a trainer takes you through or you want to develop your avs or your pecs or something. Do this do that. I suspect the mine training will follow those lines and become more specific to the desired outcome. Is that a development that i think is good in a relative way. I think it's good in another kind of sucks. Because i it distract people. The traditional inner goals are spiritual girls of the traditions. That mind from this another meditation. Line trainings have come from. And i feel that in the future. Those goals things. Like i carry more about the greater good than your own. Self interest will become more and more important for the survival of the species so in a way. It's good and in a way it's not enough. Oh that was a very sophisticated reframing on my question and a very sophisticated answer so thank you. Thank you for doing that I think this relates as well to what you mean by incorrect. Wrong but you you often. You make the distinction between practicing smart versus just practicing ten thousand hours right. Yes so one of the advantages. The people who are in that top category house is that they have a trainer. They have a coach. A teacher boo monitors. How they're doing in gives them correctives which helps them practice. Smart in this is comfortable. Work of young erickson at florida. Cool the silly ten thousand dollars or came from his research. He's miffed about that because he finds herself dose-response relationship between training and outcome and that it varies skill skill. So she doing memory for example to matter of hundreds of hours to ten thousand dollars outta cassie. You have his book right behind you a peek achieving your bookshelf. Right there. yeah he's he's a he was a friend of mine you know. He passed away recently right. No i didn't know that i'm so sorry to hear. Yeah let's along. yeah it was. It was a real loss in any domain was real under full. Yeah yeah he we. He was a friend and a sparring partner. Because i thought he under he'd he neglected the role of talent and anyway he was such a such a delight in in in even just discussing these things like big of an ego. Yeah so how did you get into doing what you're doing. You don't need to put this on the part just interested. Where did you go to undergrad all well. I did my undergrad at carnegie mellon university. Oh you did. But i did my phd at yale with robert sternberg. And and edit that book with them. Yeah we worked on a bunch of other things as well but But yeah i remember. Solvay was there as well. That's you know that he was. He wasn't head of the of the elliott. He was still working in the psychology department. Sure and but even when i was in grad school i thought i really wanna do Popular writing so. I started a blog for psychology today which ended up doing really well and And realized i had had a knack for popular science writing and it was in my in my bones so I've been doing a lot more of that. Now i write regularly for scientific american and i write books. I loved her. Said you might most recent book on transcendence the science of transcendence really the science and transcendence. That sounds intriguing. Can you put my podcast in your show notes. Oh yeah absolutely just started. A podcast called first person plural. Okay and it's emotion and beyond. It's all kinds of things that i'm interested in. Okay in this new podcast are in this new podcast. You talk about eco literacy ecological crisis. Because i'm so curious to your thoughts on that. Yes i just did a podcast on that because one of the things. That troubles me is that at the systems level in the economic system we have complete transparency about value of stocks for example our companies. We have zero transparency about the environmental impacts of things. We buy a news things that are sold to us. And my argument is that since there is now. A methodology to assess range of environmental impacts is called life cycle assessment that consumers and businesses being should be given a third party evaluation of a product or processes impact on the environment. Is it good for the environment. Bad for the bar or terrible for the environment so that we could create a market force. That would move things in a better direction and this is already happening in the investment community. By way my next door neighbor is just becoming head of a two billion dollar fund for sustainable investing at a very large firm. And there's a whole movement in the investment world to put their money particularly investors. Who are interested in long term return like pension funds and so on put their money in companies. That already are paying attention to this. So it's already started. But in my writing i did. A book called ecological intelligence nine make argument. I just summarize for you. And it's something that i i continue to worry about. So i did a podcast. And first person plural talking to someone who is developing a platform where companies can share this data on their impacts and somebody's doing regenerative farming which is a way of doing agriculture. That doesn't destroy soil. And so i'm a little passionate about this. I have grandchildren. But yeah you know. That wasn't ingar howard gardner's you know he did. He didn't have you ecological intelligence. That's when you you added. That one was at you your. They wanted that title for the book. I wanted to call it radical transparency. But it doesn't matter better. Transparency i think ecological intelligence probably better from a marketing perspective. My editor thought. But i mean my gosh you look at your whole career. You know that word intelligence is place such a prominent sort of presence in as a thread in all of your stuff a lot of your stuff. What do what do you think like like. How would you define the word intelligence. It's funny because i'm asking. That is the last question. I should have asked the first question. But if you're gonna if you're gonna use the word intelligence at the end of a lot of these things what makes them all ended in intelligence. You know what i mean. Is that a fair question. I don't know let me see she. Would i come up with. So i guess. Intelligence is a way of referring to a person's capacity or ability to solve problems in a given domain so in the verbal and spatial mathematical domain. Have i q made a personal and interpersonal domain. We have emotional intelligence and why not in the environmental domain ecological intelligence and. I'm sure there are others. What's the difference between us are. What's the difference between emotional and social intelligence people different this their opinions on this social intelligence some say refers to your relationship skills and embassy. Some emotional intelligence refers to your intra personal abilities. Your self awareness in yourself managing skills. I happen to lump them both together under emotional intelligence my colleague. Richard boycotts separates them the to skill sets. There's a long tradition of research on social intelligence and a nations are body of work in what emotional intelligence as define narrowly. But you wrote whole book on social intelligence which i really enjoyed which was separate from from emotional. So yeah So do you see a thread running through all of your work like what would you. What would you say it is. I was trying to put words in your mouth by saying intelligence. But but but what would you say. It is if you if you have to reflect on tie that binds all of it Probably what interests me right now and. That's a moving target all right right. Okay what interests you at that. At that time yeah okay so so. For example. social intelligence is a book that was monitoring the emergence of social neuroscience. And i thought. Hey there's a critical mass of findings about the basis or relationship and interactions geneve toronto book up. I wrote a book interested me. So right now May eleventh two thousand twenty one. what are you most excited about. And what are you kind of looking forward to to working on what projects. Oh so. i'm rethinking emotional. Intelligence really good which not so good. What's missing what Other abilities y turbocharger. I'm interested ongoing interested in meditation. Mostly those. Hey that's good enough to daniel. Hey i wanna thank you so much for. I know it's hard for us to hear each other. We're kind of signed languaging over here. You know lake but we made it through. And i'm really. I'm really happy that we got a chance to finally talk. Thank you so much for.

robert sternberg Solvay erickson carnegie mellon university ingar howard gardner elliott florida Richard toronto daniel
"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

06:30 min | 3 months ago

"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Out of science but for other people may come out of religious beliefs. That if you take a lot of seriously then you realize that you know the only person hey destroys yourself in the end. The peter's are you know eating away themselves in that if you take on the notion that instead of trying to destroy others if we all believe it had a rising tide raises all ships if we all tried to embrace each other instead of stab each other in the bag we wouldn't have to deal with haight would have so much of a better world. Ain't that the truth. I remember I'm i remember the for the first year in grad school Karen who is now your wife. But i remember. She was working on the theory of hate around that time. I think she came from germany because she was interested in working on the heat. Work if i remember correctly yes entered dissertation on. Hate the book on hayden and edited book under eight. But i think the add shows this further shows the bankruptcy of her current notion of intelligence that you know as the world has become smarter. It's also we have growing authoritarianism. We have greater you know off. Never seen the country at odds like it is today. I mean this is like getting close to civil wartime and people are using their cues to foment dissension in hatred and unfortunately social media companies have been mostly focused on profit and negative posts. Get spread around more. They're more diffused. And so what's happening. Is that our intelligence. They actually working against us through social media. I mean you know. Very smart people put together to maximize the profits of the social media company. But it shorts hell isn't helpings civilization as we know it so we have to start getting wise. We have to be more creative and we have to realize the importance of love instead of. Hey i'm in i'm in. I love what you're doing. And i'm so glad that you expanded your research to this realm. It's so important. I have to ask a cheeky question though. Why do so many of your theories have three components to it. Do you three reasons for that. I would say that you know it. It has gotten ridiculous. I mean like not only have three reasons. I have triplets. I mean this is something about you and the number three you choose to have trip was just kind of happened. Actually though that's less true in current times the theory of adaptive intelligence new cambridge university. Press book isn't really about it. If it has elements it as creativity analytical skills practice wisdom in as four but. I think that the important thing isn't the number of but rather what we need to be doing is as i said for guessing on whether it's through of or wisdom or daft of intelligence we need to be focusing on making the world a better place and we're not doing and we had of people in the country today seem more. Intent on developing aggression grudges. And whether that would regardless of what. You're studying that that doesn't hold up a good future for humanity or for other species to where we're also killing other species so i think that you know adaptation in a broad sense isn't just about changing yourself to fit. The world is also bad changing the world to be a better place It's about shaping. The world were running at a time to shape the world. I mean you know at some point. Global warming will be so out of control. If there's nothing we can do and the income disparities at some point when people feel totally ripped off you begin to get violence against civil war. In at some point you begin to realize that your unwillingness to use your intelligence wisely is is literally is destructive in the sense that sperm counts like half of what they were. Nine thousand seventy You know why is it. Plastics or other Chemicals in the arraignment. But is that smart. And even if you look at this solely in terms of reproductive success were a species that is self destructive can so if we keep thinking of you know when when the pandemic was at its height while we're people worried about well how can i take the act or this. I mean like is that good in. We're worried about him. Where my testing center. This is the wrong way to go. This is just not where you want to be. I'm so glad that he wrote this book. Adaptive intelligence and i really hope people read it. The subtitle is surviving and thriving in times of uncertainty. Boy are we in times of uncertainty so the times to buy the book for sure. I have to end this by thanking you for your huge huge part of the reason why i'm in this field. Perhaps the biggest part of the reason. I was sitting there sophomore year of college reading Cognitive psychology textbook and got to intelligence chapter. I was like who wrote this. I got this is amazing. And i see robert sternberg gayle. My whole dream in life was to work with robert surgery retail and study intelligence. And i just had the thank you so much for what you've done inspire me and my field and i know a lot of other people in the field so much. Thank you grayson. Students who've done better than you have so our honor to have had you as a student into you know the best thing that can happen to you. Is your students do better than you. Just like your kids. You know you want your kids to do better.

hayden Karen germany cambridge university robert sternberg gayle robert grayson
"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

06:30 min | 3 months ago

"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Out of science but for other people may come out of religious beliefs. That if you take a lot of seriously the only person hey destroys his yourself in the end. The peters are you know eating away themselves in that if you take on the notion that instead of trying to destroy others if we all believed it had a rising tide raises all ships if we all tried to embrace each other instead of stab each other in the bag we wouldn't have to deal with haight would have so much of a better world. Ain't that the truth. I remember I'm i remember the for the first year in grad school Karen who is now your wife. But i remember. She was working on the theory of hate around that time. I think she came from germany because she was interested in working on the heat. Work if i remember correctly yes entered dissertation on hate the book on hayden an edited book under eight but i think the add shows this further shows the bankruptcy of her current notion of intelligence that you know as the world has become smarter. It's also we have growing authoritarianism. We have greater you know off. Never seen the country at odds like it is today. I mean this is like getting close to civil wartime and people are using their cues to foment dissension in hatred and unfortunately social media companies have been mostly focused on profit and negative posts. Get spread around more. They're more diffused. And so what's happening. Is that our intelligence. They actually working against us through social media. I mean you know. Very smart people put together to maximize the profits the social media company but it shorts hell isn't helpings civilization as we know it so we have to start getting wise. We have to be more creative and we have to realize the importance of love instead of. Hey i'm in i'm in. I love what you're doing. And i'm so glad that you expanded your research to this realm. It's so important. I have to ask a cheeky question though. Why do so many of your theories have three components to it. Do you three reasons for that. I would say that you know it. It has gotten ridiculous. I mean like not only have three reasons. I have triplets. I mean this is something about you and the number three you choose to have trip was just kind of happened. Actually though that's less true in current times the theory of adaptive intelligence new cambridge university. Press book isn't really about it. If it has elements it as creativity analytical skills practice wisdom in as four but. I think that the important thing isn't the number of but rather what we need to be doing is as i said for guessing on whether it's through of or wisdom or daft of intelligence we need to be focusing on making the world a better place and we're not doing and we had a lot of people in the country today. Seem more. intent on developing aggression grudges. And whether that would regardless of what. You're studying that that doesn't hold up a good future for humanity or for other species to were killing other species so i think that you know adaptation in a broad sense isn't just about changing yourself to fit. The world is also bad changing the world to be a better place It's about shaping. The world were running at a time to shape the world. I mean you know at some point. Global warming will be so out of control that there's nothing we can do and the income disparities at some point when people feel totally ripped off you beginning to get violence against civil war. In at some point you begin to realize that your unwillingness to use your intelligence wisely is is literally is destructive in the sense that sperm counts like half of what they were. Nine thousand seventy You know why is it. Plastics or other Chemicals in the arraignment. But is that smart. And even if you look at this solely in terms of reproductive success were a species that is self destructive can so if we keep thinking of you know when when the pandemic was at its height why we're people worried about. Well how can i take the act. Or this i mean like is that good for. We're worried about him. Where my testing center. This is the wrong way to go. This is just not where you want to be. I'm so glad that he wrote this book. Adaptive intelligence and i really hope people read it. The subtitle is surviving and thriving in times of uncertainty. Boy are we in times of uncertainty so the times to buy the book for sure. I have to end this by thanking you for your huge huge part of the reason why i'm in this field. Perhaps the biggest part of the reason. I was sitting there sophomore year of college reading Cognitive psychology textbook and got to intelligence chapter. I was like who wrote this. I got this is amazing. And i see robert sternberg gayle. My whole dream in life was to work with robert surgery retail and study intelligence. And i just had the thank you so much for what you've done inspire me and my field and i know a lot of other people in the field so much. Thank you grayson. Students who've done better than you have so our honor to have had you as a student into you know the best thing that can happen to you. Is your students do better than you. Just like your kids. You know you want your kids to do better.

peters hayden Karen germany cambridge university robert sternberg gayle robert grayson
"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

06:47 min | 3 months ago

"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"I do in. My kid is not re-. I'm pretty sure he's not telling me what he's really doing when he goes out at in doses uh-huh we rarely facing like they don't have abc abcd e. answers high-stakes. They're mostly involving their unstructured problems. Often it's hard to figure out what the problem is. What we try to do is cree problems that are like the problems we really facing life. And the reason that's important is you can get people who are very good at solving this. Highly structured academic browns. And that's what they're good at. You know the joy mentzer you know. They got a good school in. The emphasis are put in my most. Recent work on adaptive intelligence which is like about the fifth iteration as theories. Intelligence is so tell us this has always been defined as the ability to adapt to the environment. It's like you know. How well can you get along. Not on a standardized tests but in dealing with the world in species. That don't adapt disappear right. I mean they're gone in. Somehow that got lost in the intelligence business said what we need is people say. Let's take the real challenges. The world faces. I ca- look at the mess we made with cove. Nineteen i mean you know with all these thirty iq points european union still. Can't get the vaccine things straight in the united states For about a year there was totally at sea. An income disparities are totally like crazy out of hand. And so what's happened is people. Are you know. I q isn't about doing something that helps. The world is about honestly. It's doing something that helps yourself and we have an awful lot of politicians who went to very prestigious schools in all they care about is themselves and getting reelected in. How can they make more money. And it's not just in the united states across the world. We're seeing an increase in authoritarian leadership of authoritarians and people who want to be authoritarian. Some succeeds some note in once you get one of those in power long enough. It tends to be a one way street. And it's pretty clear that i happen very much. Some of the smart. I q people are the ones who are most contributing to it because they can profit for so my argument is we need a notion of intelligence that makes the world a better place that somehow chooses people are going to make a positive meaningful and potentially enduring difference in the world not people who were going to go into congress and like it's one scandal after another whatever their i q may be and i'm not talking about scandals those just of sexual behavior. I'm telling you about ski on those where there's only one person they're looking out for. They're not representing a constituency other than themselves so cool. It's so cool. I love your idea. Emphasizing that intelligence is not just about the individual. I mean. it's actually pretty novel should. It shouldn't be but it is in my book adaptive intelligence which just came out. What i point out is that we need to think of intelligence collectively because we're at risk if global warming continues the way it has been. They'll come a time. when you know. Era cues may continue to go. We may have sky. I is but we won't be here. The only ones that are going to be here teary viruses. The cockroaches in yes someday being from some other planet come here and they discovered bacteria viruses and cockroaches and the pathetic remains of human civilization. Are they going to command human civilization For being so at the top of some kind of lovejoy great chain of being when it's the only species that in record time managed to destroy itself. That's us in. If that's more than i don't know what stupidest that's a great quote quote there may put that at the top of the show notes that quote right there make a note of that okay Fifty two okay. Yeah so how. Does this relate to. Because i see a link here between that land and research and then your work on hate. I mean there's so much heat in the world today right. How can we apply our intelligence to transcend hates and have more love in the world. Well that is a different line of research but it is related. It's not that different related. When i've been asked how you combat hate said there in three things you really can do. One is just have people really get to know each other. You know you often the people. We hate our people. We don't even know it. All fleeing jews never met a jew. Their people hate muslims who never met a muslim. I mean it's you know so just really engaging. Second solution is wisdom. Which is if you syria. If you take seriously the notion of a common good you can't just say it's about me and people like me my tribe. You can't do what the nazis did in world war two or some people are doing today in saying it's my skin color or my religion or the religion i claim a half or People who live in my part of the country are my community. Coming good means. Are you helping other people besides yourself because they kind of situation we have in the united states utterly untenable where they're just is become two countries and that's smart. I mean like you know having to groups of people at war with each other that's what high iq is. So i think the second stations wisdom in the third is the pointed out is love as you know. My wife karen. I actually have a website. I love multi. Verse dot com. Which is all about love. There's something i study and the idea of is that and it comes you know for us. It comes out of science but for other people may come out of religious beliefs. That if you take a lot of seriously then you realize that you know the only person.

mentzer united states browns abc european union congress syria karen
"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

06:48 min | 3 months ago

"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Or what can i do in. My kid is not re-. I'm pretty sure he's not telling me what he's really doing. When he goes out at in doses uh-huh we rarely facing like they don't have abc abcd e. answers Their high stakes. They're mostly involving their unstructured problems. Often it's hard to figure out what the problem is. What we try to do is cree problems. That are like the problems we really face life. And the reason that's important is you can get people who are very good at solving this. Highly structured academic browns. And that's what they're good at. You know the joy mentzer you know. They got a good school in. The emphasis are put in my most. Recent work on adaptive intelligence which is like about the fifth iteration as theories. Intelligence is so tell us this has always been defined as the ability to adapt to the environment. It's like you know. How well can you get along. Not on a standardized tests but in dealing with the world in species. That don't adapt disappear right. I mean they're gone in. Somehow that got lost in the intelligence business said what we need is people say. Let's take the real challenges. The world faces. I ca- look at the mess we made with cove. Nineteen i mean you know with all these thirty iq points european union still. Can't get the vaccine things straight in the united states For about a year there was totally at sea. In income. disparities are totally like crazy out of hand. And so what's happened is people. are you know. I q isn't about doing something that helps. The world is about honestly. It's doing something that helps yourself and we have an awful lot of politicians who went to very prestigious schools in all they care about is themselves and getting reelected in. How can they make more money. And it's not just in the united states across the world we're seeing an increase in leadership of authoritarians and people who want to be authoritarian. Some succeeds some note in once you get one of those in power long enough. It tends to be a one way street. And it's pretty clear that i happen very much. Some of the smart. I q people are the ones who are most contributing to it because they can profit for so my argument is we need a notion of intelligence that makes the world a better place that somehow chooses people are going to make a positive meaningful and potentially enduring difference in the world not people who were going to go into congress and like it's one scandal after another whatever their i q may be and i'm not talking about scandals on those just of sexual behavior. I'm talking about ski on those. Where there's only one person they're looking out for. They're not representing a constituency. Himselves so cool. It's so coy. I love the your This idea emphasizing. That intelligence is not just about the individual. I mean it's actually pretty novel should. It shouldn't be but it is in my book adaptive intelligence which just came out. What i point out is that we need to think of intelligence collectively because we're at risk if global warming continues the way it has been. They'll come a time. when you know. Era cues may continue to go. We may have sky. I is but we won't be here. The only ones that are going to be here teary viruses. The cockroaches in yes someday beings from some other planet come here and they discovered bacteria viruses and cockroaches and the pathetic remains of human civilization. Are they going to command human civilization For being so at the top of some kind of lovejoy great chain of being when it's the only species that in record time managed to destroy itself. That's us in. If that's more than i don't know what stupidest that's a great quote quote there may put that at the top of the show notes that quote right there make a note of that okay Fifty two okay. Yeah so how. Does this relate to. Because i see a link here between that land and research and then your work on hate. I mean there's so much heat in the world today right. How can we apply our intelligence to transcend hates and have more love in the world. Well that is a different line of research but it is related. It's not that different related. When i've been asked how you combat hate said there in three things you really can do. One is just have people really get to know each other. You know you often the people. We hate our people. We don't even know it. All fleeing jews never met a jew. Their people hate muslims who never met a muslim. It's you know so just really engaging. Second solution is wisdom. Which is if you syria. If you take seriously the notion of a common good you can't just say it's about me and people like me my tribe. You can't do what the nazis did in world war two or some people are doing today in saying it's my skin color or my religion or the religion i claim a half or People who live in my part of the country are my community. Coming good means. Are you helping other people besides yourself because they kind of situation we have in the united states utterly untenable where they're just is become two countries and that's smart. I mean like you know having to groups of people at war with each other that's what high iq is. So i think the second stations wisdom in the third is the pointed out is a love as you know. My wife karen. I actually have a website. I love multi-diverse dot com which is all about love. There's something i study and the idea of is that and it comes you know for us. It comes out of science but for other people may come out of religious beliefs. That if you take a lot of seriously the only person.

mentzer united states browns abc european union congress syria karen
"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

07:48 min | 3 months ago

"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"What you know who your social group is so. The idea of testing was to go beyond that. The problem that they didn't recognize him probably couldn't have recognized. Is the test. Scores other tests would be fairly substantially correlated with the old stuff that parents who were higher. Sds socioeconomic status could afford more opportunities further kids they they lived in better school districts often so the kids went to better golf they could buy them has peration books. They could buy some courses. I could buy them tutors. They could give them stuff to do at home because they were better educated. I came from an uneducated home. Pretty much neither. My parents graduated from high school. And so you. I know what. It's like edna. Your parents don't do this kind of test preparation for they wouldn't even know what to do. He's minded in. So so what happened. Is that the traditional tests to some extent ended up laundering socioeconomic status. It's sort of like you know laundering money except it was sds. So now you've created this meritocracy that supposed to be based on mental ability but to a large extent not totally bartolo. Large extent is based on social opportunities. And then you get honestly people in the testing. She held who mostly came from upper middle her middle socioeconomic status as who keep perpetuating assistant and mean we all want the best for our kids and the people in any society who are in power want the next generation of powerful people with high opportunities to be kind of like them. Because that's what their kids are gonna be so my argument has been that. Yeah we do want to create a system where people have opportunities based on their abilities and talents but that the abilities and cowan's with measured or two frigging narrow and their risk of getting rid of to us is that will start paying too much attention to a prestigious school. Do you have college counselor. Create a list of extracurricular activities and so on instead of looking at the kids potentials. But if we're gonna look at potential we always should've looked at broader potentials. Not just narrow ones and you think that psychometric still is important in this process like we. Testing is still valuable to kind of testing. We do doesn't look anything like the kind of testing. That's because if you mean by testing giving kids trivial inconsequential unemotionally arousing artificial academic problems. Well we do. I don't think as much to do with that. I it. I just published recently. I think you started article in the new sides. Chasta's all kinds of test items. But eric kinds of air test to remind for example to countries that are competing for water resource like one is upstream on the river in the others downstream and the one that's downstream on the river claiming the upstream wine is taking too much of the water and leaving them with desert conditions and two countries are ready to go to war and say you might be asked. How would you resolve a problem that. How could you create assistant to resolve or you might get a problem where to friends of yours break up and they both text you and they want to talk to you and you know that they're both gonna tell you that you should take their side and you don't really wanna take sides but you do want to stay friends. So how do you negotiate that. Or i gave an example of a future history What would have happened. If saw the nazis in world war two or what would or pay up. And if the americans lost the american revolution whatever but our tests are very different from. They're like test of creativity are graded by rubrics for how novel and useful. The responses are a test of wisdom are graded for the extent to which our answer helps to promote a common good by balancing your own others than larger interests over the long and short terms through the use of positive ethical values. So we we we. Yeah we do assess. But i think for things that matter in life not stuff. That's easy to assess just because it's cheap and easy to assess. Yeah fair enough. I do ask the who creates these test items are you are you like. Are you good at practical intelligence. Like a you like. It's almost like the person who i wouldn't be surprised. I'm and i'm not questioning and saying doesn't seems like you're not that's not that's not my point but i'm saying you know the test constructors themselves. There's kind of an interesting thing when you kind of. Have this like assumption that like well. How do you even know the answers to the questions. Yeah so in. Terms of my practical intelligence. I was describing my practical intelligence. Were to a senior professor at yale shortly after. I got tenure there. His name was wins or gardiner and he say he interrupted me to say You should know bob that you've got tenure here. Not because of your practical intelligence. Despite it so income model of practice does but in terms of who creates the ed who creates it when i have created some staff have created. Some big problem is not so much i think creating items. It's hattie a score them instead. What we do is we create rubrics for what we're looking for in. We go through a fairly elaborate. Training process for raiders. So with tufts. That would have been for admissions officers. Eddie yale it was for staff. We hired for the sensory But we teach them. What does it mean to be creative. Verano practical we then have them practice on actual essays individually and then they get together as a group and they compare your answers until we can get high reliability in some of the raiders. Some of the raiders. We have to let go because they either can't achieve reliability or they can kind of get the idea of what we're looking for now you might say well the advantage of multiple choice dessus. They have right and wrong answers but my argument would be that. There are very few serious problems. That have just d- right in iran. Answer if you look at what you know how should we. How should we divide cova. Nineteen research resources for vaccines are resources for testing. Or how can we deal with the fact that global warming is out of control. Or how can we deal with increasing income disparities. So those are the real problems the world faces..

Chasta bartolo edna cowan golf eric raiders Eddie yale gardiner bob dessus cova iran
"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

09:09 min | 3 months ago

"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Today. Go to word. Tuned dot com slash psychology. And so we get. There is sitting the results. Who are that. If the analytical test if you add the creative and practical tested the analytical test you could more than double the prediction just a first year college grace not even looking at broader. Think just straight gpa. In other words even for straight gpa adding creative and practical tests matter and not always. Did you double more than double prediction. In terms of percentage of variance academy for you also have substantially decreased ethnic and socially defined racial group differences. So that was a great finding. Because usually you don't get that usually get this kind of increase in prediction together with a decrease in racial ethnic group differences. What that suggested is that the students of diverse racial and ethnic groups brought to the table. Different skills that were performance relevant but that additional tests word measuring so when we got those as a result they were published lead article in what i think is the top journal in the field. They got some publicity. It looked really good. And then the i should have known this. I'd say coming. The organization the destiny organization that was funding cutler funding. And you know i. I don't know why didn't see coming other people had told me you know you better watch in. It's all. I think i mean my opinion but it's a little light drug companies. If your results support their drugs they give you more funding. The results done support their drugs. Good luck to you. Our food companies. If your results they how healthy now rotten ships are for you then they keep funding you and if they show that rotten chips was health. Decreases your so now they. Of course that a difference or predation. They said that are tests could be up. Scaled used on larger samples. So at that point. I was in a career crisis. Because during my years at stanford as a grad student in yellows the factoring always saw myself as a faculty member. I mean i never imagined doing something else and now i felt that reached the dead. No commercial company for testing was going to touch me because these results were not what they wanted to find her. At least that's the way it looked. So so i made this decision to do a career change and go into administration And i went to tough since dean of arts and sciences and we started a project cold the kaleidoscope project which was not just a you know get a low stakes. Let's do this project can see what happens. It was a useful admissions for arts and sciences and engineering at the undergrad level. So wall students. Applying to tusk for undergraduate had the option. It wasn't required Doing essays in that were motivated by what had become a theory of successful intelligence which also included wisdom so ed creative analytical practice based in wisdom based bill the idea being that you need creative skills to come up with ideas you need analytical skills to say. If they're good ideas he need practical skills to be able to apply your ideas in to sell them to other people. Don't like them. And you need wisdom base skills to ensure that they help achieve some kind of common good in. I spent a year sort of trying to pave the way to do this project. I had a great collaborator in. The dean of undergrad admissions. Whose name was kaufman was only cost but it was close to kaufman. I just had to say was coffee. Maybe there's something about that cough part. Anyway james kauffman was another student of your coffins. Love you they love you. i know it just. I was just reading a paper by alan kaufman this morning so it just seems to be the right name. I mean just heights. I could've raised with my last name. Were with And instead it really good. So i just i've been so limited by my. I wonder if i could sell jason anyway. So so we Use these items and they were not multiple choice at all. They were performance-based so they measured creative analytical practical wisdom creator vita might be something like you know write. A short story is such as the end. Mtv or from the mysterious lab or the professor disappeared or suppose that the nazis one world war two. What would the world be like today or you could have analytical questions like analyze their favorite book or you could have practical questions like solving a world problem or how can you convince a friend of an idea that she or he didn't initially believe in and then we had wisdom based problems which lane beasts thing like you know. How could you later in your life. i'll make the world a better place in. We found again that we were able to expand the horizon to increase prediction and decrease quite substantially ethnic so in socially defined racial group differences. And so during the time i was dean there. A week continued with this project it was always optional in a resulted in students being admitted to tops who otherwise wouldn't have been admitted. And the idea was that you know if you had a great record fide if he had a terrible record you probably won't get in but if you're kind of in the middle showing did you excelled in creative or practical or wisdom. Base skills could make a difference. And then i published a book called college admissions for the twenty first century published by harvard. That was based on this. And then i went to oklahoma. State is provost and senior vice president and We did a project there and that was called panorama and we got really great results there too in changing the procedures so what we showed in on contrary to what our testing organization it said. We were able to upscale to very large numbers eventually. Tens you know. Tens of thousands of people were able to upscale and it changed to we admitted and the people were successful in the idea. Was that if colleges. Say as i believe they should that they want people who are going to make the world a better place. You're not gonna find that out by looking at kids. sat scores. I mean that is so not the way to find out who's gonna make the world better place than what we're trying to do is introduce admissions devices that would address that quest. It's heat like the difference that what makes you unique in. The space is that you're still into tests. You're still in the testing though. And it's a subtle difference because so many people right now are talking about you know sat optional. And they're all for it. They're saying down with the system down down down but your tests are still tests your creative and practical. I mean the expand the realm of over testing. But it doesn't sound like you're saying dowd with testing am i right. Yeah that's true. My argument has been there. We should expand testing. And i'll tell you why the from the people who started with testing you know. In the early twentieth century people. I can reach on c. and winquist and conan. They actually had a good goal and the goal was the recognition. That if you don't use tests you risk creating a hierarchy based on seeings that maybe i want to create a hierarchy. Be sound like how much money your parents have or what color your skin is or what you know who your social group is so. The idea of testing was to go beyond that. The problem that they didn't.

kaufman james kauffman alan kaufman cutler stanford cough Mtv jason dean harvard oklahoma winquist dowd conan
"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

09:01 min | 3 months ago

"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"The results. Are that if the analytical test if you add the creative and practical tested the analytical test you could more than double the prediction just a first year college grace not even looking at broader. Think just straight gpa. In other words even for straight gpa adding creative and practical tests matter and not always did you double more than double prediction in terms of percentage of variance accounted for you also have substantially decreased ethnic and socially defined racial group differences. So that was a great finding because usually don't get that usually get this kind of increase in prediction together with a decrease in racial ethnic group differences. What that suggested is that the students of diverse racial and ethnic groups brought to the table. Different skills that were performance relevant but that the traditional tests word measuring so when we got those as a result they were published lead article in what i think is the top journal in the field. They got some publicity. It looked really good. And then the i should have known this. I'd say coming the organization the destiny organization that was funding us follow funding. And you know i. I don't know why didn't see coming other people had told me you know you better watch in. It's all. I think i mean my opinion but it's a little light drug companies. If your results support their drugs they give you more funding. There results done support their drugs. Good luck to you. Our food companies. If your results they how healthy now rotten ships are for you then they keep funding you and if they show that rotten chips was health. Decreases your so now they. Of course that a difference or predation. They said that are tests could be up. Scaled used on larger samples. So at that point. I was in a career crisis. Because during my years at stanford as a grad student in yellows factoring. I always saw myself as a faculty member. I mean i never imagined doing something else and now i felt that reached the dead. No commercial company for testing was going to touch me because these results were not what they wanted to find her. At least that's the way it looked. So so i made this decision to do a career change and go into administration And i went to tough since dean of arts and sciences and we started a project cold the kaleidoscope project which was not just a you know get a low stakes. Let's do this project can see what happens. It was a useful admissions for arts and sciences and engineering at the undergrad level. So wall students applying to tusk for undergraduate had the option. It wasn't required doing essays in that were motivated by what had become a theory of successful intelligence which also included wisdom so ed creative analytical practice based in wisdom based bill the idea being that you need creative skills to come up with ideas you need analytical skills to say. If they're good ideas you need practical skills to be able to apply your ideas in to sell them to other people don't like them. And you need wisdom base skills to ensure that they help achieve some kind of common good in. I spent a year of trying to pave the way to do this project. I had a great collaborator in. The dean of undergrad admissions. Whose name was kaufman was only cost but it was close to kaufman. I just had to say was coffee. Maybe there's something about that cough part. Anyway james kauffman was another student of your coffins. Love you they love you. i know it just. I was just reading a paper by alan kaufman this morning so it just seems to be the right name. I mean just heights. I could've raised with my last name. Were tough with And instead it really good. So i just i've been so limited by my. I wonder if i could sell jason anyway. So so we Use these items and they were not multiple choice at all. They were performance-based so they measured creative analytical practical wisdom creator vita might be something like you know write. A short story is such as the end. Mtv or from the mysterious lab or the professor disappeared or suppose that the nazis one world war two. What would the world be like today or you could have analytical questions like analyze their favorite book or you could have practical questions like solving a world problem or how can you convince. A friend of an idea did she. Or he didn't initially believe in. And then we had wisdom based problems which lane beasts thing like you know. How could you later in your life. i'll make the world a better place in. We found again that we were able to expand the horizon to increase prediction and decrease quite substantially ethnic so in socially defined racial group differences. And so during the time i was dean there. A week continued with this project it was always optional in a resulted in students being admitted to tops who otherwise wouldn't have been admitted. And the idea was that you know if you had a great record fide if he had a terrible record you probably won't get in but if you're kind of in the middle showing did you excelled in creative or practical or wisdom. Base skills could make a difference. And then i published a book called college admissions for the twenty first century published by harvard. That was based on this. And then i went to oklahoma. State is provost and senior vice president and We did a project there and that was called panorama and we got really great results there too in changing the procedures so what we showed in on contrary to what our testing organization it said. We were able to upscale to very large numbers eventually. Tens you know. Tens of thousands of people were able to upscale and it changed to we admitted and the people were successful in the idea. Was that if colleges. Say as i believe they should that they want people who are going to make the world a better place. You're not gonna find that out by looking at kids. sat scores. I mean that is so not the way to find out who's gonna make the world better place than what we're trying to do is introduce admissions devices that would address that quest. It's heat like the difference that what makes you unique in. The space is that you're still into tests. You're still into testing though. And it's a subtle difference because so many people right now are talking about you know sat optional. And they're all for it. They're saying down with the system down down down but your tests are still tests your creative and practical. I mean the expand the realm of over testing. But it doesn't sound like you're saying dowd with testing am i right. Yeah that's true. My argument has been there. We should expand testing. And i'll tell you why the from the people who started with testing you know. In the early twentieth century people. I can reach on c. and winquist and conan. They actually had a good goal and the goal was the recognition. That if you don't use tests you risk creating a hierarchy based on seeings that maybe i want to create a hierarchy. Be sound like how much money your parents have or what color your skin is or what you know who your social group is so. The idea of testing was to go beyond that. The problem that they didn't.

kaufman james kauffman alan kaufman stanford cough Mtv jason dean harvard oklahoma winquist dowd conan
"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

05:07 min | 3 months ago

"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Everything's done on the basis of high. Because it's so objected. So the guys and gals go to great schools very tall ones the crummy schools short and then to get into school in law school and medical school and business. You have to be taller l. At least if you wanna get prestigious school so this goes on for years and then over time we noticed that the people who are succeeding very tall and then you do a correlation study. And what are you afraid you find that. There is a high correlation or water correlation between your height in. You're getting into you know prestigious jobs and prestigious colleges and you're having more money and say this proves that height is causal of success. No what it proves is that you actually societally created the correlation so part of the correlation that we're told is so impressive is because society gives more opportunities to people do better on these tests could be test scores. It can be religion in some societies all. The people who succeed are certain religion and the other is more address could be skin. Color can be your whether you're male or female in many opportunities. i mean look at. I used to be president of the american psychological association. If you look at the early years was almost all men and you could say well proves that being male to more women didn't have the chance so yeah so. The correlation started meeting as much as they seem to very interesting thought experiment and it makes me think of Skin bimbo fall Findings you know where they they say like see. You know those with highest scores at age twelve. Look there again patents. They're so creative as adults etc etc. So see this proves that giftedness young age predicts waiter thing. My i think that a lot of that research is is interesting and important but i've you know had the criticism which i think you. This is what you're saying is that where's the control group in that. So this begs the right. That's the that's the question so this begs the question For you can you tell us about this Groundbreaking work you did at colleges. Were you brought in a control. You you expanded our metrics of intelligence any and you asked the question. What would happen if we measured for creative and practical in addition analytical. Would we get crap students you know or what we get even better students or just the same kind of students. Who can you tell us about your findings. Sure i just wanted to say with regard to the clean of work. That's been skiing bimbo into some extent. God for and do. I don't question their findings but if you're identified in the talent search and you're given a lot of extra resources in the talent search and then you as a result of that partially as a result of that you have all these additional opportunities and you go to a better school and then you have an advisor. Who's more connected. Who can get you into a better grad school. I mean you know to some extent. I'm not saying totally. We create those correlations. And then we say voila look at this is nature. It's nature it's the same with tall thing. It would be the same if we did it. By religion you know honestly we decided and they are some people in this society who would rather only give opportunities to members of certain religious groups. We all know that and in some countries they do that. And what a coincidence that is that in those countries off top people are those religions. It's the same with race. If you were black and the eighteen sixties eighteen fifties didn't matter what your iq was. You know you're gonna end up probably if you're in the south on a plantation it didn't. It didn't get out of being a slave on the plantation. So we just have to. We have to look at how the environment affects the coach terms of what we did at college so was at yale as a professor for thirty years and it was a good run in. We did a project that was funded by a testing company And it was called the rainbow projects and it was a national project where we had high school and college students all over the country. Some of them in very selective school summit i collect skulls and we gave him these tests analytical abilities which are like act's recipes but also creative and practice saudis and We collected the data. Had many collaborators. Can when we found. Hey i was one of the collaborators summer two thousand one. Two thousand one. I was your intern in college for. Thank you for being there when i needed you. I.

american psychological associa skiing
"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

05:07 min | 3 months ago

"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Everything's done on the basis of high. Because it's so objected. So the guys and gals go to great schools very tall ones the crummy schools short and then to get into school in law school and medical school and business. You have to be taller l. At least if you wanna get prestigious school so this goes on for years and then over time we noticed that the people who are succeeding very tall and then you do a correlation study. And what are you afraid you find that. There is a high correlation or water correlation between your height in. You're getting into you know prestigious jobs and prestigious colleges and you're having more money and say this proves that height is causal of success. No what it proves is that you actually societally created the correlation so part of the correlation that we're told is so impressive is because society gives more opportunities to people do better on these tests could be test scores. It can be religion in some societies all. The people who succeed are certain religion and the is more address could be skin. Color can be your whether you're male or female in many opportunities. i mean look at. I used to be president of the american psychological association. If you look at the early years was almost all men and you could say well proves that being male makes more women didn't have the chance so yeah so. The correlation started meeting as much as they seem to very interesting thought experiment and it makes me think of Been skiing bimbo fall Findings you know where they they say like see. You know those with highest scores at age twelve. Look there again patents. They're so creative as adults etc etc. So see this proves that giftedness. A young age predicts waiter thing. My i think that a lot of that research is is interesting and important. But i've you know had the criticism which i think you. This is what you're saying is that where's the control group in that. So this begs the right. That's the that's the question so this begs the question For you can you tell us about this Groundbreaking work you did at colleges. Were you brought in a control. You you expanded our metrics of intelligence any and you asked the question. What would happen if we measured for creative and practical in addition analytical. Would we get crap students or what we get even better students or just the same kind of students. Who can you tell us about your findings. Sure i just wanted to say with regard to the clean of work. That's been skiing bimbo into some extent. God for and do. I don't question their findings but if you're identified in the talent search and you're given a lot of extra resources in the talent search and then you as a result of that partially as a result of that you have all these additional opportunities and you go to a better school and then you have an advisor. Who's more connected. Who can get you into a better grad school. I mean you know to some extent. I'm not saying totally. We create those correlations. And then we say voila look at this is nature. It's nature it's the same with tall thing. It would be the same if we did it by religion you know honestly we decided there are some people in this society who would rather only give opportunities to members of certain religious groups. We all know that and in some countries they do that. And what a coincidence that is that in those countries off top people are those religions. It's the same with race. If you were black and the eighteen sixties eighteen fifties didn't matter what your iq was. You know you're gonna end up probably if you're in the south on a plantation it didn't. It didn't get out of being a slave on the plantation. So we just have to. We have to look at how the environment affects the coach terms of what we did at college so was at yale as a professor for thirty years and it was a good run in. We did a project that was funded by a testing company And it was called the rainbow projects and it was a national project where we had high school and college students all over the country. Some of them in very selective school summit i collect skulls and we gave him these tests analytical abilities which are like act's recipes but also creative and practice saudis and We collected the data. Had many collaborators. Can when we found. Hey i was one of the collaborators summer two thousand one. Two thousand one. I was your intern in college for. Thank you for being there when i needed you. I.

skiing american psychological associa
"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

08:44 min | 3 months ago

"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Of howard gardner's theory Tells his book comes out. frames of mind comes out. Nineteen eighty four. So so so. So you seven these. Yeah so you're his book comes out and you look at his book and like what do you make. What do you think of it. How does it relate to your multiple intelligences theory. I mean. I know the answers. But i want i want. Our listeners was good you know the answer. You tell me ridge. No impression was the same as that of many people in the field and that is that they were competing modern theories that they were sort based is off. Put it on a different metaphor than that. Is that these. Were more systems theories rather than just the psychometric factor this kind of geographic thing. Then it's over here. In this fact today. I would say that. We dealt with different aspects of intelligence. He was dealing with different domains in other linguistic domain. The quantitative to main to spatial domain the musical there and at that point i was dealing with processes and i actually just published recently Paper on musical intelligence. Where showed that you could actually cross his domains with the processes in my theory disagree on some things like some of his intelligence as i probably wouldn't see as intelligence as he probably has some problems with my theory but i think what we were both trying to do in. Different ways is to expand the way people look at intelligence. I think that was a common goal. I mean it seemed like something was in the air. Then you know. The michael jackson era like you there so there was something in the air then about you know. It's time to go beyond standard metrics of intelligence. I'm not really that to michael jackson. And the i'm thinking about that timeframe eighty four. It was what i was working. I working on this in the early eighties. And then he picked it up to but a lot of people you know. The time then became more conservative. I think in a lot of people in the field when back to g and you know it's i think it's rally a mistake and the reason i think it's a mistake is you can see in the world today would be his bod- if i can change the topic just a little. Can you tell people what she is. I mean our audience might not deligence right. It's it's what you know. It's it's a a large portion of what you get out of an iq tests that you get a few other things that have been iq tests but it's kind of related to what you measure and the problem is that during the twentieth century g general intelligence actually went up. I mean you know. They slightly broader thing. Iq's when our thirty points it wasn't all g it was other things too. but i he's went up thirty points in the twentieth century which is so called splinter fact and the only reason that average cute and go up to under thirty is the test. Publishers kept. We norm ming the test. To make the average hundred so an iq of a hydrate in two thousand meant very different thing from what it meant in one thousand nine hundred and i q one hundred and two thousand would have been about one hundred thirty nine thousand nine hundred incredible difference in what bothers me about our fixation on iq. Is that if you look at the problems facing the world today. Iq shire's and saw him. I mean you know like with god so many different kinds of problems in the world and we have these high. Iq people who go to prestigious colleges and universities and get very impressive degrees and then when it comes to solving roller promptly. Make massive them. So i really wish that. The field would broaden their consideration of what intelligence is because you know high key. People are good at solving multiple choice problems and that are very well-structured. You know they have a beginning middle and end you you you know you read the problem with contains all the information you need. The information is valid. it's not emotionally arousing. It has no real world these just kind of like this area academics think and that's so different from solving problems in the real world and we know that in problem solving the fact that you've got at one kind of problem solving another kind of prior. I mean. Some people are good at work in their terrible in their personal relationships. Some people are getting their personal relationships in their terrible at work. And so we're asking for a level of generalization from iq test sinisi tease sat's gre's and m cast and so on that just doesn't so we're picking the wrong people time and we're getting people who are good as long as give them five choices and emotionally on arousing problem with no real world consequences. But they're not necessarily people are good at solving real bombs. What do you make of like linda. Goffin since arguments. She would disagree with that statement right. She would say that That general intelligence has shows a lot of strong correlations in everyday life Especially in the workplace that The correlations are actually very strong. What would you say well. A few things. One is of never been someone who said that. Iq is worth us. I know some people do. I'm not one of them In fact i q tests mostly measure knowledge then analytical reasoning skills and. That's part of my own theory. So i am not anti accused. That's my problem is that is that. That's not all there is doing is that's part of it So you would expect iq to show some correlation with lots of things in life because you need to do analytical reasoning In your life. So i don't have any disagreement with in terms of fairly strong correlations. I i don't know if you'd say they're strong. A lot of the correlations you read about in the literature are corrected which means that. They're raised to account for unreliability of test in restriction of range of attest that whatever else so they're not the original karoshi some people would say those better. But they're not the actual correlations get from the test but the fact that there's a correlation of iq. With a lot of things. I don't find surprising. And it's not contrary to my theory to the extent i ever complaint is that you know if you get a correlation say of point four. Sometimes do that. Seems like a fairly typical median code. You're talking about accounting for sixteen percent of the variants in the criteria. So if you're predicting i dunno income or you're printing grades in school or you're predicting how quickly a graduate so what brings for sixty percents various. That's that still leaves. Eighty four percent left. that's not real high. Just a second problem. Which is a bigger problem in. The bigger problem is that the correlations don't take into account that the fact that you did well on these tests give you opportunities to succeed. So that the correlation would go off. Let me explain what i mean. This is important. Let's say we selected people in our society to go to college not on the basis of sat's and grades. I mean you know. Those are so subjective but on something really objective height because you can measure objectively. Everyone agrees that you take a tape measure. You don't argue about testses so now to get into harvard yes to be six five sixty five inches talking into yale. Maybe six four to get into dipsy doodle. State may be have to be a three seven..

michael jackson howard gardner norm ming sinisi Goffin linda harvard
"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

06:24 min | 3 months ago

"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"So let's let's get into some of the meat and potatoes here One question i have is you know. What do you see as the What is the relationship between the confidential theory and the arctic theory like at what point did one morph into the other. Well i started off with what. I call confidential theory and what i was doing. Starting in grad school is. I'd take a problem for iq test. Like i started with analogies. Then what do is time you solve the analogies in a decompose the reaction times into the underlying processes used the solid instead of for example in an allergy to encode the terms. And then you have to infer the relation between a and b and then you have to apply to. And i did that because i thought you know the problem with a lot of the items that i q tests. They don't measure what they're supposed to measure so for example verbal analogy which is very common. Mike you know you'd see this. They on the miller. Analogies tests like mitigate is through us wages exacerbate as to what well that's supposed to measure verbal reasoning. But it's pretty much straight for cab yards us and the idea was that there were people who were really smart but it would look like. They're not because they didn't have the opportunities to gain the vocabulary or the math skills or whatever. So that's what i started doing. The research work well in terms of what i was looking for but as time went on i realized there was something wrong with it. And it's been my whole career. I'm out whole career is coming up with theory and then rising certain wrong with it and then i come up with a better. I always a better there. And what was wrong with that. I came to know was that it was all based on iq tests so although it was process models of iq was still iq tests. And then what happened is when i was director of graduate studies in psychology yell i there were some students who applied to our program. One of whom i refer have referred to his allies was very smart company. Intially your analytically or high g or high q. Just real test smart. I mean she had really high scores and test but when it came to coming up with their own idea she wasn't so great and then another students who have called barbara. Who was who. Actually we didn't get in because she was gave better test. Scores were charitable and even though she got breath letters of recommendation. No beside me. Want to admit or so I actually hired her and had her as a research associate for a couple of years and then she got his top pick but she was really creative. It just didn't come out in. Gre's sat's and act's and those tests measure creativity you very creative and taking those tests while here screwed you know you. Can't you just fuss pick. Abc theory and then there was a third student. I called celia who wasn't as good analytically. As alice wasn't as good creatively as barbara but when she went on the job market E- she. She wasn't yeah. She doesn't the greatest grad student in the whole world. But she got every job she applied for so she knew how to do a job interview. I could say that. I mean i never got every job i applied for so when i came to realize is that i realized the mistake i was making the mistake. Was that the reliance on iq tests that. The you know. Barbara was creatively. Intelligent in celia was practically intelligent but the iq tests were only looking alice. smarts which is how analytically smart. You're in so. I expanded the theory to include creative and practice. Mars is an article smarts. I think the pri- if i can save this the problem the field of intelligence is that it narrower kind of move beyond nineteen four which is when spearman road is first famous paper on general intelligence objectively determine measured in. You know. now it's i think it's two thousand twenty one or something like that. I may have iraq. But that's a long time like this over a century and we're still doing nineteen o four stuff and so. I think that it's not that general intelligence in aikido matter. It's that there's more to intelligence then just that and somehow we got stuck in this Very academic notion of intelligence. So i expanded to include these other things but the thing i would. Emphasize is that in science I i've tried not to do what the field of intelligence i mean. You know these theories. They're all wrong. I mean you know eventually you hope you get closer to the truth but it has to be a process where you say look you know. We've had this theory for. Why is it really perfect or is there more we can do. And so that's when it came up with troy arche theory which eventually itself replaced. What year was the track theory. Like what ron. What time was that credit. Let's see it was seventeen sixty. Now the was at the seventies now. The i i started. My dissertation was published in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy seven and the first big paper on the track theory was in one thousand nine hundred eighty four. And then my buck was one thousand nine hundred five beyond thank you. Hey everyone. I'm excited to announce that the eight week online transcend courses back this interruption of the chorus which will run from september fifth. Tuck told her twenty four th of this year. We'll use science to help you live a more fulfilling meaningful creative and self actualized life. There will be a limited slots available so saver spot as soon as possible.

celia arctic barbara allergy alice miller Mike Abc troy arche Barbara iraq ron Tuck
"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

06:14 min | 3 months ago

"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"So let's let's get into some of the meat and potatoes here One question i have is you know. What do you see as the What is the relationship between the confidential theory and the arctic theory like at what point did one morph into the other. Well i started off with what. I call confidential theory and what i was doing. Starting in grad school is. I'd take a problem for q. Test like i started with analogies. then what do is time you solve the analogies in a decompose the reaction times into the underlying processes used the solid instead of for example in an allergy to encode the terms. And then you have to infer the relation between a and b and then you have to apply to. And i did that because i thought you know the problem with a lot of the items that i q tests. They don't measure what they're supposed to measure so for example verbal analogy which is very common. Mike you know you'd see this. They on the miller. Analogies tests like mitigate is through us wages exacerbate as to what well that's supposed to measure verbal reasoning. But it's pretty much straight for cab yards us and the idea was that there were people who were really smart but it would look like. They're not because they didn't have the opportunities to gain the vocabulary or the math skills or whatever. So that's what i started doing. The research work well in terms of what i was looking for but as time went on i realized there was something wrong with it. And it's been my whole career. I'm out whole career is coming up with theory and then rising certain wrong with it and then i come up with a better. I always better there. And what was wrong with that. I came to know was that it was all based on iq tests so although it was process models of iq was still iq tests. And then what happened is when i was director of graduate studies in psychology yell i there were some students who applied to our program. One of whom i refer have referred to his allies was very smart company. Intially your analytically or high g or high q. Just real test smart. I mean she had really high scores and test but when it came to coming up with their own idea she wasn't so great and then another another students who have called barbara. Who was who. Actually we didn't get in because she was gave better test. Scores were charitable and even though she got breath letters of recommendation. No beside me. Want to admit matter so I actually hired her in had her as a research associate for a couple of years and then she got his top pick but she was really creative. It just didn't come out in. Gre's sat's and act's and those tests measure creativity you very creative and taking those tests while here screwed you know you. Can't you just pick abc theory. And then there was a third student called celia who wasn't as good analytically as. Alice wasn't as good creatively as barbara but when she went on the job market E- she she wasn't yeah. She doesn't the greatest grad student in the whole world. But she got every job she applied for so she knew how to do a job interview. I could say that. I mean i never got every job i applied for so when i came to realize is that i realized the mistake i was making the mistake. Was that the reliance on iq tests that. The you know. Barbara was creatively. Intelligent in celia was practically intelligent but the iq tests were only looking alice. smarts which is how analytically smart. You're in so so. I expanded the theory to include creative and practice. Mars is then critical smarts. I think the pri- if i can save this the problem the field of intelligence is that narrower kind of move beyond nineteen four which is when spearman road is first famous paper on general intelligence objectively determine measured in. Now it's i think it's two thousand twenty one or something like that. I may have iraq. But that's a long time like this over a century and we're still doing nineteen o four stuff and so. I think that it's not that general intelligence than i khuda matter. It's that there's more to intelligence then just that in somehow we got stuck in this Very academic notion of intelligence. So i expanded to include these other things but the thing i would. Emphasize is that in science I i've tried not to do what the field of intelligence i mean. You know these theories. They're all wrong. I mean you know eventually you hope you get closer to the truth but it has to be a process where you say look know. We've had this theory for. Why is it really perfect or is there more we can do. And so that's when it came up with the arche theory which eventually itself replaced. What year was the traffic theory. Like what ron. What time was that credit. Let's see it was seventeen sixty now the was the seventies now. The i i started. My dissertation was published in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy seven and the first big paper on the track theory was in one thousand nine hundred eighty four and then my buck was one thousand nine hundred five beyond thank you. Hey everyone. I'm excited to announce that the eight week online transcend courses back this interruption of the chorus which will run from september fifth. Tuck.

celia arctic barbara allergy miller Mike abc Alice Barbara alice iraq ron
"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

09:29 min | 3 months ago

"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"When i was in elementary school i didn't created i did poorly on. Iq tests is a young kid. In the late fifties early sixties. They used to give iq tests every year to group iq tests. And i did very poorly on them and you might ask how i know since they didn't give us the scores. But when you get the test and you only finish one or two problems and everyone else's turn the page. It doesn't take a high you to realize that you bombed so when i was in sixth grade i was sent back to a fifth grade classroom to take an easier tests that they thought would be more suitable to my ability level and because it was a fifth grade classroom my was less afraid and i think i did better i in seventh grade. I decided try to figure out why did so much trouble when he just said. I did a project on development of the mental tests and i devised my own. I teach us the very famous thoroughbred test of mental realities stone. Which i'm sure you've heard of in. It's so widely used still haven't gone along with everything else from winners thirteen and i also found these stanford buzney intelligence tasks in the adult section of my town library and gave it to some of my classmates in didn't work out so well it didn't make you too popular well. A kids didn't mind that either. I one i tried was a girl who was romantically interested in. It certainly proves to be an unsuccessful strategy for getting a girl romantically interested in me. And then the Heads school system psychologist got wind of it. call me down from social studies. Class and Balmy out for fifty minutes threatening had burned the buck. If i ever brought into school again really off your there yeah. Yeah so That was the that was you know for a teenager. You never do. They never tell a teenager. He can't do something that makes it really attractive. Storms still Still doing studying. I q and indulges things like that. Not just to show him. Of course but because that's what i became really passionate about. Yeah i know. And when did you start becoming passionate about studying it. Scientifically because when you're in grad school in psychology That wasn't the topic of your dissertation. Was it was the competent theory. Part of your dissertation actually was it was a that was okay proposed the theory. I started off studying of very exciting catholic and graduates. I mean you might have to hold onto your share because it's so exciting. It was negative transfer in part hollin hall part free recall which was just the mind-bending a great thing to study. But after i did that for a year in try to stay a week. I knew that wasn't what i wanted to do. And at the end of my first year my undergraduate adviser guy named tall came around and invited me to meet some people at the center for advanced studying the behavioral sciences. I told them. I want to study intelligence but i want to study at. They elected me like well. It's really sad. When guy is like twenty two years old is already run out of ideas but that summer after my first year i forget how it's gonna study intelligence that did become my dissertation showing fever would say oh you know. That was the best work he ever did. It's been downhill ever since fan. I don't think anyone would say that but it well. Do you remember the moment than what that you decided. You wanted to. Actually scientifically study intelligence. Like who are you reading in grad school along those lines we ring like charles spearman like there wasn't like our garner hadn't even had his theory at right now. I i started saying intelligence after my seventh grade project. I did a project intense grade on the effects of distractions on mental ability test performance. I had people take mental ability. Does that. I created in. They either were in the control condition where they just took it or they had a car heavily up shining in their eyes in the dark room or they listened to a metronome taking or they had the beatles in the background playing. She's got the devil in our heart. And please mr postman. And the only effect got was that people did better listening to the beatles music and then in eleventh grade. I took physics When seventeen. I guess it started off okay but period migrated was going down so i tried to salvage my physics great and i did a physics aptitude test which was actually pretty good The high school later adopted at and it predicted physics grades with. I still remember with a coefficient of sixty four. So i did that. And then i so even in college. I just wasn't that i did a lot of reading. It's just i've always just. I always study things bad at a you know and so that's a lot of things site study. A lot of things studied. Because i seem to have problems. They that's so interesting just fill. It just feels like you're like destined to study this topic and it just it showed up so early these themes. I know i feel that way to doing some of the same stuff and gifted issue so we read. It wasn't gifted it was total loser. And that's how. I got interested so interesting so you're in college. You're at yale undergraduates right. Yeah yeah and you. Did you know that you wanted to major in psychology like your freshman year. What were you like freshman year of college. What was bob sternberg like freshman year of college. I got there. And i definitely wanted to major in psychology. That didn't go so well. We either. I took intro psych and The first test was great in on a ten point scale and the professor handed out our papers. It was the first hand right before thanksgiving vacation. Handed him out. Descending order so was a ten point quiz and he started handing out the tens. And then the nines and then the age and then when you got your papers could leave for thanksgiving vacation. He did to seven when he got to the sixers. They figured well he must have gotten line ad order. Because there's no way could gone below six any actually got to me and i had a three of the top may paper three additive. Any comedy did you know. There's a famous sternberg psychology and it looks like there won't be another one. I still remember. I have a photographic memory of his saying that. So i fear that doesn't look so good for my psychology kerr so i decided to switch to math and then i took a course on real analysis and i still remember in nothing is gonna be a math major and the real announce discourses really hard and we took a mid united no idea where the problems came from and i got a thirty five on out and they figured well that was just because it was such a hard test and there was this really scruffy guy sitting in front of me. I figure well you know he must have done worse than i did. Pay ninety eight. And i realize well it looks like i'm not going to be majoring in math either so i went back to psychology. And that's what i've done since then now when you got your Professorship at yale and started to get a claim. Did you ever go back to that teacher. Like you professor at yale at the same time that he still teaching. Oh yeah he was the head of the search committee that hired me no seriously seriously. That's crazy another classroom is a junior And i got an a in that. And he and i actually became. I think pretty. Good friends He later got sick. When i was at yale as a professor and i went to visit him until he passed away but he was he was a good guy. It's just You know that. I didn't his for his intercourse. Got a c. n. Which any told me while he gave to me as a gift but things got better with him he was he was good was it. What was his name crowder. Oh of course yeah. I didn't know if you had one of those. Like how do you like them. Apples moments you know from like goodwill hunting. So that's why. I asked if you were went back to him in like you know we got along dispatched guy. I really admired him in. We became pretty good friends. That's great. that's great okay..

Heads school hollin hall center for advanced studying t charles spearman mr postman bob sternberg garner fever sixers kerr crowder
"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

09:29 min | 3 months ago

"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"When i was in elementary school i didn't created i did poorly on. Iq tests is a young kid. In the late fifties early sixties. They used to give iq tests every year to group iq tests. And i did very poorly on them and you might ask how i know since they didn't give us the scores. But when you get the test and you only finish one or two problems and everyone else's turn the page. It doesn't take a high. You realize that you bombed so when i was in sixth grade i was sent back to a fifth grade classroom to take an easier tests that they thought would be more suitable to my ability level and because it was a fifth grade classroom my was less afraid and i think i did better i in seventh grade. I decided try to figure out why did so much trouble when he just said. I did a project on development of the mental tests and i devised my own. I teach us the very famous thoroughbred test of mental gallotti's stone. Which i'm sure you've heard of in. It's so widely used still haven't gone along with everything else from winners thirteen and i also found these stanford buzney intelligence tasks in the adult section of my town library and gave it to some of my classmates in didn't work out so well it didn't make you too popular well. A kids didn't mind that either. I one i tried was a girl who was romantically interested in. It certainly proves to be an unsuccessful strategy for getting a girl romantically interested in me. And then the Heads school systems psychologist. Got wind of it. Call me down from social studies. Class and Balmy out for fifty minutes threatening had burned the buck. If i ever brought it into school again really off your there yeah. Yeah so That was that was you know for a teenager. You never do. They never tell a teenager. He can't do something that makes it really attractive. Storms still Still doing studying. I q and indulges things like that. Not just to show him. Of course but because that's what i became really passionate about. Yeah i know. And when did you start becoming passionate about studying it. Scientifically because when you're in grad school in psychology That wasn't the topic of your dissertation. Was it was the competent theory. Part of your dissertation actually was it was a that was. Okay propose the theory. I started off studying of very exciting catholic and graduates. I mean you might have to hold onto your share because it's so exciting. It was negative transfer in part hollin hall part free recall which was just the mind-bending a great thing to study. But after i did that for a year in try to stay a week. I knew that wasn't what i wanted to do. And at the end of my first year my undergraduate adviser guy named tall came around and invited me to meet some people at the center for advanced studying the behavioral sciences and. I told them. I want to study intelligence but i want to study at. They elected me like well. It's really sad. When guy is like twenty two years old is already run out of ideas but that summer after my first year i forget how it's gonna study intelligence that did become my dissertation showing fever would say oh you know. That was the best work he ever didn't. It's been downhill ever since fan. I don't think anyone would say that but it well. Do you remember the moment than what that you decided. You wanted to. Actually scientifically study intelligence. Like who are you reading in grad school along those lines we ring like charles spearman like there wasn't like our garner hadn't even had his theory at right now. I i started saying intelligence after my seventh grade project. I did a project intense grade on the effects of distractions on mental ability test performance. I had people take mental ability to that. I created in they either were in the control condition where they just took it or they had a car heavily up shining in their eyes in the dark room or they listened to a metronome taking or they had the beatles in the background playing. She's got the devil in our heart. And please mr postman. And the only effect got was that people did better listening to the beatles music and then in eleventh grade. I took physics Seventeen i guess. It started off okay but every marking period migrated was going down. So i tried to salvage my physics great and i did a physics aptitude test which was actually pretty good The high school later adopted at and it predicted physics grades with. I still remember with a coefficient of sixty four. So i did that. And then i so even in college. I just wasn't that i did a lot of reading. It's just i've always just. I always study things bad at a you know and so that's a lot of things site study. A lot of things studied. Because i seem to have problems. They that's so interesting. Just feel it just feels like you're like destined to study this topic and it just it showed up so early these themes right now. I feel that way to doing some of the same stuff and gifted issue so we read. It wasn't gifted it was total loser. And that's how. I got interested so interesting so you're in college. You're at yale undergraduates right. Yeah yeah and you. Did you know that you wanted to major in psychology like your freshman year. What were you like freshman year of college. What was bob sternberg like freshman year of college. I got there. And i definitely wanted to major in psychology. That didn't go so well. We either. I took intro psych and The first test was great in on a ten point scale and the professor handed out our papers. It was the first hand right before thanksgiving vacation. Handed him out. Descending order so was a ten point quiz and he started handing out the tens. And then the nines and then the age and then when you got your papers could leave for thanksgiving vacation. He did to seven when he got to the sixers. They figured well he must have gotten line ad order. Because there's no way could gone below six any actually got to me and i had a three of the top may paper three additive. Any comedy did you know. There's a famous sternberg psychology and it looks like there won't be another one. I still remember. I have a photographic memory of his saying that. So i fear that doesn't look so good for my psychology kerr so i decided to switch to math and then i took a course on real analysis and i still remember in nothing is gonna be a math major and the real announce discourses really hard and we took a term united. No idea where the problems came from. And i got a thirty five on out and they figured well that was just because it was such a hard test and there was this really scruffy guy sitting in front of me. I figure well you know he must have done worse than i did. Pay ninety eight. And i realize well it looks like i'm not going to be majoring in math either so i went back to psychology. And that's what i've done since then now when you got your Professorship at yale and started to get a claim. Did you ever go back to that teacher. Like were you professor at yale at the same time that he still teaching. Oh yeah he was the head of the search committee that hired me no seriously seriously. That's crazy another classroom is a junior And i got an a in that. And he and i actually became. I think pretty. Good friends He later got sick. When i was at yale as a professor and i went to visit him until he passed away but he was he was a good guy. It's just You know that. I didn't his for his intercourse. Got a c. n. Which any told me while he gave to me as a gift but things got better with him he was he was good was it. What was his name crowder. Oh of course yeah. I didn't know if you had one of those. Like how do you like them. Apples moments you know from like goodwill hunting. So that's why. I asked if you were went back to him in like you know we got along dispatched guy. I really admired him in. We became pretty good friends. That's great. that's great okay..

gallotti Heads school systems hollin hall center for advanced studying t charles spearman mr postman bob sternberg garner fever sixers kerr crowder
"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

02:30 min | 3 months ago

"robert sternberg" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Great to have robert sternberg on the podcast sturm. Rick is a psychology professor at cornell university among his major contributions to psychology are the arctic theory of intelligence and several influential theories relating to creativity thinking styles love and hate a review of general psychology survey ranked sternberg as the sixtieth most cited psychologist of the twentieth century. And he's authored a co-authored over fifteen hundred publications including articles book chapters and books. And even that bios a huge understatement of all eve accomplished. Hey bob so great to have you in the podcast today. Thanks reeling having me. Thanks for inspiring me to go into the field. So i i is. It seems fair seems fair. No that will thank you. Thank you so much that means a lot to me You know in starting this conversation today. We could obviously talk about the research stuff. But i wanted to start more at your own childhood because i think it's i get a real kick out of every time i read that you created intelligence test when you were in. Maybe even elementary school. Can you kind of tell me about that story. Sure when i was in elementary school i didn't created i did poorly on. Iq tests is a young kid. In the late fifties early sixties. They used to give iq tests every year to group iq tests. And i did very poorly on them and you might ask how i know since they didn't give us the scores. But when you get the test and you only finish one or two problems and everyone else's turn the page. It doesn't take a high. You realize that you bombed so when i was in sixth grade i was sent back to a fifth grade classroom to take an easier tests that they thought would be more suitable to my ability level and because it was a fifth grade classroom my was less afraid and i think i did better i in seventh grade. I decided try to figure out why did so much trouble when he just said. I did a project on development of the mental tests and i devised my own. I teach us the very famous thoroughbred test of mental gallotti's stone. Which i'm sure you've heard of in. It's so widely used still haven't gone along with everything else from winners

cornell university sternberg arctic Rick bob
Behind the Development of the Sternberg Triarchic Abilities Test

The Psychology Podcast

02:30 min | 3 months ago

Behind the Development of the Sternberg Triarchic Abilities Test

"Great to have robert sternberg on the podcast sturm. Rick is a psychology professor at cornell university among his major contributions to psychology are the arctic theory of intelligence and several influential theories relating to creativity thinking styles love and hate a review of general psychology survey ranked sternberg as the sixtieth most cited psychologist of the twentieth century. And he's authored a co-authored over fifteen hundred publications including articles book chapters and books. And even that bios a huge understatement of all eve accomplished. Hey bob so great to have you in the podcast today. Thanks reeling having me. Thanks for inspiring me to go into the field. So i i is. It seems fair seems fair. No that will thank you. Thank you so much that means a lot to me You know in starting this conversation today. We could obviously talk about the research stuff. But i wanted to start more at your own childhood because i think it's i get a real kick out of every time i read that you created intelligence test when you were in. Maybe even elementary school. Can you kind of tell me about that story. Sure when i was in elementary school i didn't created i did poorly on. Iq tests is a young kid. In the late fifties early sixties. They used to give iq tests every year to group iq tests. And i did very poorly on them and you might ask how i know since they didn't give us the scores. But when you get the test and you only finish one or two problems and everyone else's turn the page. It doesn't take a high. You realize that you bombed so when i was in sixth grade i was sent back to a fifth grade classroom to take an easier tests that they thought would be more suitable to my ability level and because it was a fifth grade classroom my was less afraid and i think i did better i in seventh grade. I decided try to figure out why did so much trouble when he just said. I did a project on development of the mental tests and i devised my own. I teach us the very famous thoroughbred test of mental gallotti's stone. Which i'm sure you've heard of in. It's so widely used still haven't gone along with everything else from winners

Robert Sternberg Sternberg Cornell University Arctic Rick BOB Gallotti