17 Burst results for "Robert Riskin"

"robert riskin" Discussed on Classic Movie Musts

Classic Movie Musts

05:08 min | 3 months ago

"robert riskin" Discussed on Classic Movie Musts

"Don. I mean this this is like cliche to say but it's you know you find if you're like me and you find yourself at the end of Great movies and your choked up it. But it's it's in these musical moments that you find those tears welling up in your in your eyes where you're not entirely sure. What what. What is the exact thing that pulled me to feeling this way. But it's more often than not. It's the music. It is an end for max it. This may sound strange. But i think he saw much of king. Kong is a a story of tragic love And that was. That was one of his specialties of his most famous movies casablanca gone with the wind now. Voyager you have stories of unrequited love and that Max was just. He was married four times and He went a lot of pain in his life. A lot of love affairs that didn't work out and and some the did and happily is his. Fourth wife was perfect partner for him for his last several decades. But i think max was a true european romantic. And that's why if he wasn't drawn to monsters or horror films. The way bernard. Hermann would be later when he worked with harry house and herman's attitude was great. Let's do this. I think that the reason max genuinely loved king kong was he appreciated all of its immagination and he. He loved the story. But i think that he saw it is kind of tragic romance and He brings that to it along with so many other things absolutely. I mean it's at the end of the day. It is such a human story and at the same time you can see how a man who grew up in vienna's amusement park could totally relate to this story because it is it is. There's so much of that as you say. Imagination at play There's there's certainly no question that when you listen to all these music clips you can tell. He poured his heart and soul into that music. Because it's i mean you feel every every note of it exactly and that's why nearly ninety years later it still works i Had the pleasure seeing not too long ago In ed edd the chinese theater in hollywood and fair as daughter victoria riskin. Who is a wonderful lady is terrific writer. She's written a book about her mother and her father robert riskin just she was on the show as of course she was and i went not only to see in support her but to see how the audience would react to the movie and they loved it and i did my thing where i stood outside the door. A little early to your people walk out. And i heard people saying wow. I didn't know that powerful instruments to the sound. The music was incredible. And i thought well. That's working for people in twenty nine teen than max marion c cooper and they're very large teams. Certainly did their jobs right. Absolutely couldn't say it better myself again. The book is music bay. Max steiner the epic life of hollywood's most influential composer stephen. I can't thank you enough for arranging these clips coming on the show. This i think certainly such a treat for me. I'm sure the audience agrees. Tell our audience where they can learn more about you and your work and all those great things. Thank you max. I love your show. I listen to it always end. It's a treat to be on it and yet you can find me online. I have a web page A website www media stephen m. e. d. i a. s. t. v. e. n. dot com. You can contact me there and You know anyone. If anyone has any questions about to bernard hermann max steiner film music or anything else. I'm more than happy to respond out. Thank you so much. Stephen such a pleasure to have you on the show and i hope we get you back on here in the not.

Max bernard hermann stephen m. e. victoria riskin hollywood robert riskin Don. king kong Stephen Kong partner vienna writer herman harry house
"robert riskin" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"robert riskin" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

"I mean, when you think about I mean, you look at TCI, and you see him in some of those old musicals, those sheriff old black and white pictures at our KO and MGM. I mean, he never stopped working recorded more. I think than any other artists, I believe don't isn't that true. Do you guys know that I don't know? But it sounds record. I think he recorded more songs than any other artists, and you know, with his musical career and his style and his nightclub appearances and his. Classic touring around the world for these gigantic concerts. I mean, he was he was amazing. And he was so generous to me and very special very special guy you go. How did you know Jerry Lewis? Why would you ask me that? I Chris, you know, everybody. He's got a Jerry Lewis. I I I knew Jerry Lewis and. I got to tell you. I was never very much Jerry Lewis fan. There you go Gill. Asked. Yeah. I'm sorry, go go to fine. I just I just never I didn't get along with Jerry very much. I thought he was a little bit. Very very difficult. Very hard on his family, very hard on everybody that knew him. And for me. I didn't want to be around that negatively. He was. So I stepped around him. You're not the first one who said that. About him. Yeah. I don't know. I know that he had a lot of people that didn't feel too positive about Jerry interest. Very interesting. This book Robert end, there's the end of the book the end of pieces of my heart is very touching the last chapter which is called the world moves on. And you're looking back, and you're thinking about your thinking about all these giants and all these icons and all these people you took this this what Frank copper would call the magic carpet ride with. And again, I come back to that that gratitude. Let me just stop you for sure. Because have you read? The book about fairway all the Robert Riskin. Yeah. And Robert Riskin. Victoria, haven't read it yet is one of the best books is one of the best books. I've read it. If you have a chance read it. I mean, her the way that she presented this book, and and her family, and how wonderful they were and her love for them. It's a very special book, very at our show. We'll get her hands on that. Yeah. Victoria Riskin wrote. It MO we we should talk about. I was just saying about you. You're looking back in the last chapter. And again, I we really have to recommend this book to people, but you're talking about all the people that are gone all the people that you that you came up with the the friends that you've lost over the years. And you know, the words you use blessed? It's it's yes, it's very touching to read. You know, I I was so moved by the time I got to the end of the book, and Scott, and I were talking about it. And I just was I've just been so fortunate in my life to have met some of these wonderful wonderful people who were just so great to me. And I I feel that that for me and my life at this time in my life. I have been blessed. I've been touched and buy something. I don't know what. But I'm very blessed to have had the opportunity in. And the the life that I've had to be able to be in proximity and to do something that I always wanted to do. And have that happen from me? And it's been very good to me. It's put my children through school. And and, you know, my family's been very successful. You know, I mean, they're they're doing pretty well and. I'm fortunate and I'm blessed, and I meant what I wrote in the book. Yes, it's very movie night. Thank you very much. I well, Scott nice spent a lot of time together. And I admire him so much..

Jerry Lewis Robert end Victoria Riskin Robert Riskin Scott MGM TCI Jerry Gill Chris Frank
"robert riskin" Discussed on Classic Movie Musts

Classic Movie Musts

05:52 min | 2 years ago

"robert riskin" Discussed on Classic Movie Musts

"To marry this other guy and be duped. And and and that he he loves her. But he loves he feels that she she is so special whoever she's with should be an extraordinary person and not this empty headed character. And it's an affection. Not just I love you. 'cause you're attractive. I love you for all your wonderful traits, and you deserve the best. And this guy is in the best. So it's it's. It's what you want someone to say to you. If you're a woman, you deserve someone who will take care of you admire you want to show you the world. I don't have the words quite you have to see the movie, but he's. It's it's a risk and way of romancing question. In fact, slot like romance. My mother. Chapin's right after this movie got him and got him in the right? He was in fact seen her at the time. He was writing this film. Tell us tells more tells more. Well, they they had started to go out. They met at a party. And I think it was the first woman he really fell in love with. And my mother said he he would he was telling her things. And an elliptical way he would say to her. I for example, he sent her a dozen roses. She thought well, that's very nice sent me some roses. And it just the little cards said a dozen roses. That's all it said. Well, what he was saying to her was the line of song that said I'm going to send you a dozen roses to tell you. I love you. Only a writer. It's a Hollywood romance within the Hollywood Romans to her. Why do women wear lipstick? He moved in a little close, and he wanted to kiss her and somehow the lipstick. He didn't want to mess it up. You know, and she's thinking about well, why do women she's going off on some intellectual? Trip of wasn't the purpose of lipstick. That's fantastic. Yeah. You mentioned that dreaming scene. And then I mean, I find it. So heartbreaking the scene when he does when he runs out of db Norton's house, and she's trying he's in the taxi cab or the car, and she just begging him to let him in. And it's you know, you can't heartbreaking and that senior heart aching, and you know, he wishes he could you see it. And again, it's that subtlety of performance -actly. Exactly. So good in this film. And you feel as though he's about to reach for the door at least. I do. Yeah. And just an impulse his hand and the truth is if this were today, and this were real I would join a John Doe club. How could you not how could you not? And and we spend so much time in feeling the tension of the political divide being manipulated in today's world. And so I really love the message to film. Where neighbors we should help. Each other. Listen to each other care about one another it may seem pie in the sky. But I'm hanging onto that pi. It's it's good to be reminded of some of the kind of the humble beginnings, the spirit of the country, the spirit of these people and the words of the film. You can't help it. I feel like resonate unless you're completely jaded. And most people are really good. Yeah. This scene. I mean the end right. I mean, he's going to jump finally to his having the original John Doe club. Come back to him and say, no, we always we always believed in you. And this is it's we need you. And I understand that. There was kind of a struggle over the ending of this film, which some people say they shot five different endings. That's true. But should should he jump shooting? Would that be would he be showing his integrity and commitment to what he said? And if you doesn't how do you talk them out of it? And what does it mean? And. Lots been written about it. It's really hard to know. Exactly. What happened? Whatever I tell in. My book is the best. I could come up with. Because. I think it was those were the conversations between risking and capper. And we don't know fully who said what to whom. How how they came to the final decision. And I think they probably ended it the way the best. They could. Yeah. I mean, I think in in the there's never a perfect way to do it. But it's the right balance of the emotion, we've felt the romance of Barbara Stanwick, but the sentiment really being there and reminding him of kind of the way he felt earlier in this film, and that not all is never lost all his Denver lost. That's right. And that it's a new day and don't give up the struggle. Never never give up struggle to struggle as an easy, but don't give it up. Yeah. Well, I mean, it's it is very much a movie about that about that sentiment and beautifully. So as as I've done already, I encourage everyone to buy this book because it's a it's a fantastic read. I was totally transported back into the golden age of Hollywood fare Ray, and Robert Riskin, and I'm sure you can get every fine bookseller, you could possibly imagine. But I thank you so much for coming on the show. It's been a real pleasure. Thank you. Max's fin great. That

Chapin John Doe club Hollywood Barbara Stanwick writer Max Robert Riskin Ray Denver
"robert riskin" Discussed on Classic Movie Musts

Classic Movie Musts

12:20 min | 2 years ago

"robert riskin" Discussed on Classic Movie Musts

"But DB Norton does not he's through and through a bad guy. You mentioned that powerful scene of Connell of confessing this plot to Gary Coopers character. And it's the little details that can't help make you laugh, but I love at the end of this powerful speech that he gives and he ends it with you know, I smoke too much. You know, like, I'm giving up all my vices today. So so it's a real risk and. Thing to to set something up that is very. Sophisticated deep thinking powerful and then throw it away away with a little line. He's got a cigarette. He's been trying to smoke through the whole thing. And. That balance of seriousness, and and lightness and charm is what makes the that's what successful about those films. I think yes, we we were talking earlier if I might say about Walter Brennan's role in that in the film, where he is sort of the voice saying to John Doe. You better be careful you're going to get in trouble. And and he says uses the term he lots word, my dad made up to the people who who will will suck you in and pretty soon, you're gonna wanna house, and you're going to have a mortgage, you're going to have you know, that that greed and acquisitive nece has its dark side. Right. So rather than saying that directly is Walter Brennan, who's the voice of holds up the mirror to us. Yes. And they're his relationship with with John Doe throughout the film is so charming. I mean, you talk about the lightness since we're on the subject to me, some of the most loveable and charming moments of these films. Are are those scenes the two that jump out to me when we talked about earlier is that just the details of them, and they're kind of musical duets. I in in the press office, and then later on the train, and in the in the diner those scenes when they play together are just some of the best at what your dad and Frank Capra known for that kind of just everyday quality of just what whip out the harmonica and start playing the tune. It's so charming. Yeah. It's it's you could almost track their relationship through the moments when they play duets it relieves tension. And so there's a little mute musical into lewd. But it's also there moments when. Gary Cooper says the Walter Brennan, let's play and what he's really saying is still be my friend, right? Yeah. The other one is that it's actually one of my favorite scenes in the entire movie just because it is such a light reprieve early on. But I think it's a fantastic little moment with John Willoughby John does character, which is when he's playing baseball in his hotel room fanny, and they're you know, it's fake. You know, they don't have a ball. It's all acted and you have the bodyguards and they're so into it. And it was at a ball wasn't a strike. What happened? It's such a beautifully realized seen. I think it's kind of perfect Riskin Capra Riskin writing the sane first of all he loved baseball. But Capela realizing, of course, many scenes in the body of work together where I see how they come together perfectly. But that's one of them. And you almost see the ball. Done. And and. It's it's it's it's like a musical. It's almost like a dance, right? Has kind of musical dance feeling to it. There's no music, but it's it has a dance. And it's is sweet. And it's funny. And it's here he is in this beautiful. Sweet. And he's kind of almost a starving bum. And he finds himself in this very elegant environment. And and yet he's playing baseball to relieve the tension and have a good time. Never losing his true self has history. So I just want to say because I've seen the film on big screens lately. As part of my book tour, the film form, New York, and then UCLA film and television archives did wonderful stuff around risk ins work, but seeing on the big screen is thrilling, and Gary Cooper is so good and people think of him as understated actor. But in fact, there's a lot. What going on inside him that you can't quite see on the little screen. The turning points where you see the character thinking something through and then making a new decision. It doesn't just happen. He finds his way one step at a time to the to the new turning point for the character. You're you're so right. And you mentioned in your book that for Robert Riskin, Frank Capra. It was only Gary Cooper only Gary Cooper could play this role probably in part because of his work on Mr. deeds that I I think you're absolutely right. The way he's able to convey such nuance with just the, you know, the subtlest facial expressions as you say so much of this tension of this movie is playing out in his brain a up that that you can only convey it on your face. And he does it. So well, it could be so easy to cross over into over dramatic or overacting, and he doesn't that's the that's the beauty of it. And I think they had to pay Gary Cooper a lot of money, by the way. But you know, he was worth every gotta do you. Gotta do it. Gotta do for the performance. You're absolutely right now, another senior. I mean, we've talked about it, which is the speeches the first speech is so powerful. And then we get. More speeches at the enemy, the very heartfelt speech of kind of when the when the John does come in meet John Doe and tell him how much he means to them. Obviously at the end when they come back and his speech is. But you talk about how. Your father. He put it all out there. Right. He's conveying everything and his heart and soul into this moment. Nothing gets left out. But what he managed to do really make it still a very dynamic seen without going. Too far is that he really wrote in the montage which I found fascinating. Because usually that's kind of something that comes later. But to have the montage written into the script I found. Absolutely fascinating. I was hoping you could talk a little bit about that. Well, I think that's right. I mean, I I think think it's it's. anyone is really a student of scream places. It's good to get his screenplays and read them. They're actually published six of them have been published. But he he he wrote everything in there was including camera shots, which I'm sure he and capper agreed on, but the so there's this very long speech that has been written for John Doe by by Barbara Stanwick. And you see many so much goes on in this. I think it runs maybe two pages, which is unheard of and film in film time. And and he's he's building up to say that we're in a, someway, we're all John DoE's, and we have to work together. And we're the heroes. The little guys who are the heroes. This is the big theme. And so this scene has to go from his being. Terrified to give the speech to finding that. He actually is owning the speech that he is. In fact, John Doe, even though his name is John logged on Willoughby. He's that guy that man and at the same time we see how the audience is now getting excited about him. And that has to take time and cuts back and forth. We see how someone had tried to bribe him not to give the speech, and that has to resolve we see Walter Brennan Trinite tell them to leave to get out. He's getting sucked in more and more. We see Barbara Stanwick falling in love with him. We see db Norton back at his big mansion listening on the radio at first very skeptical until he goes into the kitchen NEC's, how his kitchen staff are falling in love with John Doe all of that is that cut back and forth is in is extrordinary beautifully realised by by Frank Capra. I think but. But the all that cable that whole. Turning point was beautifully laid down in the written screenplay. Yeah. And it's it it really does make the whole thing come across to convey, so many different lines of action and so many different emotions all at once. And obviously, you can't get away from the words themselves. I mean, they are they are inspiring. You can't help it. I love the balance of the common the common everyday guy is good people. But at the same time, he's got that trace of larceny in his heart. And we are the little punks that there is that kind of edge. But at the end of the day, it's good. So and this is so Riskin, you know, and I was a little kid. My father used to call me the little punk, and I didn't use that in the book because because I don't know why. But anyway, you heard it here. First breaking it is. But but yeah, it was it was it was so it's so risk. And this is a he deep. Blay felt that people were basically good. And even later he wrote to my mother during the war when he was overseas. You know, I I think we all have a little larceny in our hearts. He said like the guy who goes to pull a nickel if seeing Negra. That was a great details. Well, but he says that larceny often is the function. He tells my mother of of what people need that they're suffering, and they need a little something extra. They it's not. And he believes that if everybody had a good life. That the the need for larceny would go away. Those behaviors would go way not for everybody. Nobody people wouldn't become suddenly perfect. But having lived through the depression. He he could understand why people would steal a loaf of bread. He could understand why why people felt. Had to do something that was. That they would be that they would become he lots. Yeah. And so this the sensitively to human condition was very baked in for him he'd grown up poor his father was kind of an armchair philosopher who felt that each man had a responsibility to make the world a better place. And I think my dad loved people basically, and he looked at them and saw the best in them. But he also understood how we can go awry, and that's those were the stories that he told it's kind of beautifully summarized in Barbara Stanwick character. Right. I mean, we get I mean, first of all she's this. You know, powerful working woman. And but it's only when she gets fired that she gets a little trace of larceny in her heart and says, I'm gonna write this article and kind of spark a little fire. But it's because as you say it's born out of need, it's born out of Bitta suffering. And then when you know given time and given she comes back around to say, no, what do this was wrong. Right. It's it's that's an interesting character to track because when you learn that she needs this job because there's no other income coming into her home, and she is a mother, and she has a sister to take care of and she's desperate. It's not easy to get jobs in that era..

Gary Cooper Barbara Stanwick Frank Capra Walter Brennan baseball John Willoughby John Riskin Capra Riskin Gary Coopers Robert Riskin Connell Walter Brennan Trinite Riskin UCLA New York Capela Bitta Blay Norton
"robert riskin" Discussed on Classic Movie Musts

Classic Movie Musts

05:30 min | 2 years ago

"robert riskin" Discussed on Classic Movie Musts

"Joining us today for today's feature presentation is Victoria, Riskin author of fair Ray, and Robert Riskin the book about in fact, her parents, but to say, she's just an author of this book would be to downplay things significantly your successful psychologist. You are a writer producer. You're the president of the writers guild of America. Do I have all of that? Right. The list goes on and on so far so good. You have it. Right. So what brought you to this show today was in fact, your new book, which is fantastic fair and Robert Riskin about your parents. I recommend it highly. If you're one of those people like myself who loves to imagine what it would have been like to live in the kind of the golden age of Hollywood, this is very much the book for you. And to have it written by the daughter of these two legendary figures, it's imbued with so much love and care. I thank you just for writing the book. Thank you so much. Well, there are many wonderful books out there about Hollywood and the golden age, but I felt that I could maybe make a more intimate story by telling stir of these two people and also discovered in learning more about my parents, although I knew them, but there was so much that I discovered that in some ways they were really remarkable people and exemplary as warm optimistic talented, bright, caring people who who lived a complicated life, but one that's worth reading about. And was certainly worth researching. I can imagine an intimate is exactly the right word for it. I mean, you get essentially to biographies and one here, but they're so I mean, they're beautifully laced together. And it's a it's a fascinating read. So I highly recommend anyone who's interested in reading about these golden era figures, which why wouldn't you be bio means pick it up. And you know, we were so we're going to talk about one of your father's movies today. Meet John Doe. Sadly, we had already talked about it happened one night on this show. Perhaps your father's most most famous celebrated work, but we're not. He was so kind of him to write so many excellent things for us to talk about that. We have you on the show many times he wrote twenty cream plays a twenty-seven screenplays twenty-six were made into films and many of them were nominated for awards. But of course, it happened one night. He won the Oscar, and it was the first film to sweep all the top Oscars. So at it also was one of the films that help put Columbia Pictures on the map. And dig it out of it's poverty row. Status. Right. So, but, but I'm happy that we're going to talk about meet John Doe because I think it's a film that revisited lately, and I think is very meaningful for today for. In the past. When I had seen the film. It's perhaps in some ways a darker film risk Capra film. Certainly some there's some wonderful, romance and char- minute. But, but ultimately, it has a darker thread. But there was a reason for that. And I think it reflects what's going on in the country today. And so in some ways meet John Doe is the most meaningful for what we're going through in the country. Yes, I think we will certainly get into that. Which is I mean, we've talked about on other movies on the show that films can speak so directly to their own historical moment and their own cultural moment, and then we find on. Fortunately, the history often is at least rhyming consistently and that it speaks to us. You know, many many years later decades later in a very similar way. Now, you just mentioned briefly for listeners who are unaware, obviously, your father, partnered with Frank Capra often, and what I found interesting. I didn't fully realize was this was their one and only film under their own production house banner, the Frank Capra productions, and I was wondering if you. Just kind of set the stage for us here that this was really I mean, perhaps more than a lot of other films kind of an authority statement on both of their parts of having complete control. Yes, I think well there was a bit of a lead up if you'd like to kind of set this set the stage for them they had been at Columbia studios, working very successfully as a partnership and by the time they were doing loss to Rizon cap capper saw loss to rise in as great huge epic. And it just went out of control. He he spent enormous amounts of money and shot his first. Draft of the film that he gave to Harry Cohn was six hours long my gosh. And Harry Cohen thought he was gonna lose the studio over the picture and took the film away from Capra, and that initiated sort of the demise of the Capra Cohen Riskin triad. They they worked very effectively together cone and Kappa found themselves in a battle literally legal battles, suits and lawsuits. And so on over lost horizon.

Robert Riskin Frank Capra Capra Cohen Riskin triad Riskin Ray Harry Cohen Hollywood writers guild of America Harry Cohn Columbia studios president writer Oscar producer Kappa six hours
"robert riskin" Discussed on Classic Movie Musts

Classic Movie Musts

04:50 min | 2 years ago

"robert riskin" Discussed on Classic Movie Musts

"Thank you for joining me this week as we discuss Frank Capra's, meet John Doe in this episode during our feature presentation were joined by author Victoria, Riskin, the daughter of meet John Doe writer, Robert Riskin to discuss her father's, inspiring and cautionary film. But first, let's get into this week's opening credits. Our film this week is meet John Doe which was directed by Frank Capra and was released in nineteen forty one meet John Doe stars. Gary Cooper, Barbara Stanwick Edward Arnold N. Walter Brennan infuriated at being told to write one final column after being laid off from her newspaper job and Mitchell played by Barbara Stanwick prince a letter from a fictional unemployed. John Doe threatening suicide on Christmas Eve in protest of society's ills when the letter causes a sensation among readers and the papers competition suspects of fraud and starts to investigate editor. Henry Connell is persuaded to rehire an who schemes to boost the newspaper sales by exploiting the fictional, John. Doe from a number of derelict's who show up at the paper claiming to have written the original letter and. And Henry higher. John willoughby. Played by Gary Cooper, a former baseball player and tramp in need of money to repair his injured arm to play the role of John Doe and starts to pen a series of articles in does name elaborating on the original letters D as of societies disregard for people in need Willoughby gets fifty dollars a new suit of clothes and a plush hotel suite with his tramp friend, the Colonel play by Walter Brennan who launches into an extended diatribe against the he lots lots of heels who increasingly focus on getting money from others proposing to take DOE national via the radio and is given one hundred dollars a week by the newspaper's publisher DB Norton play by Edward Arnold to write radio speeches for Willoughby. Meanwhile, John is offered a five thousand dollar bribe from a rival newspaper to admit the whole thing was a publiz. City stunt, but ultimately turns it down and delivers the speech and has written for him instead afterward feeling conflicted. He runs away riding the rails with the Colonel until they reach mills Ville, John. Doe is recognized at a diner and brought to city hall where he's met by Bert Hansen. Who explains how he was inspired? By does words to start a John Doe club with his neighbors. The John Doe philosophy spreads across the country developing into a broad grassroots movement. Who simple slogan is be a better neighbour. However, Norton secretly plans to channel support for DOE into support for his own national political ambitions when a John Doe rallies scheduled with John Doe clubs from throughout the country. Attendance Norton instructs Mitchell to write a speech for Willoughby in which he announces the foundation of a new political party and endorses Norton as its presidential. Candidate on the night of the rally. John who has come to believe in the John Doe philosophy himself learns of Norton's treachery. From drunken Henry, he denounces Norton and tries to expose the plot at the rally, but Norton speaks first exposing DOE as fake and claiming to have been deceived. Like everyone else by the staff of the newspaper despondent at letting his now angry followers down. John plans to commit suicide by jumping from the roof of the city hall on Christmas Eve as indicated in the original John Doe letter, and who has fallen in love with John desperately tries to talk him out of jumping and Hanson and his neighbors. Tell him of their plan to restart their John Doe club convinced not to kill himself. John leaves carrying a fainted, and in his arms, meet John Doe had a budget of roughly one point three million dollars adjusted for inflation. That's a budget of roughly twenty two and a half. Million meet John Doe was nominated for one Academy Award for best original story. Now, this is for all the little punks out there because it's time for our feature presentation. Joining us.

John John willoughby Barbara Stanwick Edward Arnold Henry Connell Norton Gary Cooper Frank Capra Robert Riskin Riskin city hall Barbara Stanwick Edward Arnold Mitchell Academy Award Victoria writer baseball
"robert riskin" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"robert riskin" Discussed on KPCC

"Rise or perhaps slightly fried Penn to do some stuff church and guaranteed. Everyone will give you a good dip pain. So much of my father in the character. Kind of easy. Breezy wit charm, an elliptical way of romancing a sense of seeking something deeper and himself from my mother, it's a farce. It's called the fares of Chilean mother was always very beautiful in the films. She did even in King Kong while she's kind of impetuous or spiritedness often the emphasis was on her beauty in this one. She plays a complete idiot of Bimbo and she's wonderfully dumb, and I just adore that about her that she was looking to do other kinds of parts. She was so tired of always just being the OJ Dr the beautiful one. She also did a film of Robert Riskin 's called anchor. Covers profession and she plays a very successful attorney whose husband begins to feel neglected. I wonder what it'll be like it'll be like you. And I. Strugging? Do you want to work for I keep busy? I guess I've got a profession. Why not us? You will mind, of course, have to you know, that was very of on guard, right? My father was a great feminist underneath it all he wouldn't have used that word. He would have just said women are fabulous terrific. They are risking is the author of fairway and Robert Riskin a Hollywood memoir, Victoria, greatest. Thanks for coming. Thanks so much for having me. Coming up. One Armenian American, pianist and vocalist. He poachers musical legacy alive by integrated it into her debut album. There are anti vaccine all over the world and across the United States aren't usually visually.

Robert Riskin Bimbo Penn King Kong United States attorney Hollywood Victoria
"robert riskin" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

08:49 min | 2 years ago

"robert riskin" Discussed on KPCC

"Robert Riskin is one of the great screen writers of the twentieth century his movies many directed by Frank Capra, included, Mr. deeds goes to town. What puzzles me is why people seem to get so much pleasure out of hurting each other. Why don't they try liking each other once in a while Fay Wray was an actress who starred most famously in the original King Kong? Now risking and raise daughter, Victoria, Riskin has written a memoir she says that for all of their Hollywood endeavors her parents had one memorable collaboration and that was their marriage. Victoria, Riskin is a screenwriter herself. Having started her career as a therapist and both jobs came in handy when writing her book, fair Ray, and Robert Riskin, a Hollywood memoir risk Capra films are known for their humanism insincerity, and those are themes, Victoria, Riskin says that still resonate some eighty years after the movies were made we just did a series of screenings in New York City at film forum and took a group of friends to see meet John Doe, and Gary Cooper, who's playing the role of the common man, not really he's been hired. But in the middle of the speech, he gives he talks about it's time to tear down the walls between us someday. We're going to need. That guy who lives next door. We're going to need him and he's going to need us. And let's start to know one another tear down the fence, and you'll tear down a lot of hates and prejudices tear down all offenses in the country, and you really have it. So meets my motion needs right now. And it did for my friends who had took to see the movie because I think we're being pawns and being divided by the political atmosphere, but Frank Capra like a lot of directors now. And it was starting to be an issue then claimed that there was only one real author of a film, and that was its director. It's a so called autour theory. And I think there's an argument that that is not only poppycock. But certainly when you look at the collaboration that your father and Capra had together Robert Riskin is as much of that is a question as the guy who was directed movies. So what was interesting in my research for this book? I went back and read the reviews of the day, and the reviewers would say, another Robert. Diskin and Frank kept her picture. They were always teamed and the writing was appreciated just as much as the directing. And then over time that changed it change not only because capper wanted to assert himself as a great filmmaker. But also because eventually in time there became an emphasis on the one man one film theory, the auteur theory, there's a story about my father working with Frank Capra. And after a few of these articles where the journalists were interviewing him, and he was talking about Capra esque films, and the Capri touch and capper movies. My father went into his office and put one hundred pieces of blank paper on his desk and said quietly not the sort of way Franquet you put the capita on that without the screenplay. There's nothing there's nothing. When asked about your mom fairway, a lot of people of a certain age would know her from King Kong, she came to town. She got to work pretty quickly and how to great career. What was it about her as an actor that made her as successful as she was? I think she had a self confidence. I don't know when she developed that she came from a very hard scrabble life. And there were times when there wasn't enough to eat in little family of six kids. But there was something about her. And I think she was just gifted with an inside that she felt she had a destiny first time. She saw a movie which was in this little mining town where she grew up and she saw Lillian Gish in Mary Pickford, she she just knew that's where she wanted to be. And she was a survivor I grown to appreciate her deeply I used to just think of her as mom, but I think of her now as a almost as a character in a play or a book, and I so admire her her self confidence and tenacity your father, Robert Riskin wrote a lot of movies wrote some place house around a lot of letters some of them were twenty six pages long, and you're lucky enough to have access to I suspect. A lot of these. I want to read a letter that he wrote your mom in nineteen forty two. She is in a production of a play called, George Washington slept here. It's not going well or to peers not going. Well, and here's what your father writes, your mother my sweetheart what I wouldn't give to be there. At least for the opening. I would know the torture. You're going through the acute first night, nervousness and panic, and I would suffer with you. My heart would beat rapidly. My palms would be moist. And I would have that awful pain in the gut. But despite it the transcendental excitement would compensate for it, all and the nearness to you would be so soothing and warm, how wonderful to be able to share such things with you. Yeah. Is system as ING his letters were amazing. It was a warmth and a joyfulness in his correspondence and humanity that he expressed at I can't imagine what it was like from my mother right here. I mean, I think she loved it. We're talking with Victoria Riskin about her book, fair Ray, and Robert Riskin a Hollywood memoir. What is it like to read those letters about your own parents? It's one thing to read them about a couple. You don't know. It's another thing to read them about your own parents, and maybe see things that you didn't know or come to understand their relationship and a new and different way. Well, it was quite overwhelming to be honest when I would start to read them they were so beautiful. I would just be overwhelmed. I'd be a puddle of tears first of all because one of them to be together. Again. Secondly, I wanted my father to be back, and I just found the letter so touching. Finally, I had a young girl type them up. If I could look at them on black and white paper with typing somebody didn't see his handwriting. And and that gave me a little distance. She had given me these letters. She wanted me to have them. She wanted me to know him and know there. Relationship. And so finally when I was midway through this book. I could do it. He wasn't the only one who wrote your mom wrote as well. If you days after Christmas in nineteen fifty your father has a stroke, and he never really recovered from it. And your mom becomes his caregiver. And there are a lot of issues in terms of health insurance and coverage and what it takes to raise a family. Look after an ailing husband, and I'm gonna ask you to read something that she writes in her journal about this process. Okay. So he's had a stroke and he's in the hospital and she sitting next to him and making these notes you begin to talk. Lots of words, nothing. I can understand then you begin to cry. I hold you. And tell you it's all right. You say it's all right. I hold you and keep talking to you. But my face against yours. You kiss me. You put your arms around me. Pat me keep crying. I keep reassuring. You. What's it like to read? And I mean, so at the time she thought he would be well, and he would be fascinated about his process. But of course, he never did get well, and she was never able to share this with him. This was hard to if the letters were hard. This was even harder because as she describes him having had a stroke like this explosion in the brain almost, you know, his fighting his way through it. He's trying to find words he's trying to do all these things that he can't really do. And it's painful because I think oh my goodness. It must have been so hard for him to feel like he can't find his way back, and it was not for lack of trying to pick a movie that both of them worked on that may not be high on the list of what people recognize what would you recommend a lesser known performance by your mom at a lesser known screenplay that your dad wrote well for my father. There's a little movie called platinum blonde that he made his first picture with Frank Capra. Way. Again, prayed wing got no raw life up here. But.

Robert Riskin Frank Capra Riskin Victoria Riskin Hollywood Victoria Fay Wray Ray King Kong Gary Cooper director New York City Lillian Gish Diskin George Washington wing Mary Pickford
"robert riskin" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

05:22 min | 2 years ago

"robert riskin" Discussed on The Frame

"To be able to share such things with you. Yeah. It's just amazing. His letters were amazing. It was a warmth and a joyfulness in his correspondence and humanity that he expressed at I can't imagine what it was like from my mother right here. I mean, I think she loved it. We're talking with Victoria Riskin about her book, fair Ray, and Robert Riskin a Hollywood memoir. What is it like to read those letters about your own parents? It's one thing to read them about a couple. You don't know. It's another thing to read them about your own parents, and maybe see things that you didn't know or come to understand their relationship and a new and different way. Well, it was quite overwhelming to be honest when I would start to read them they were so beautiful. I would just be overwhelmed. I'd be a puddle of tears first of all because I wanted them to be together. Again. Secondly, I wanted my father to be back, and I just found the letter so touching. Finally, I had a young girl type them up. If I could look at them on black and white paper with typing somehow didn't see his handwriting and and that gave me a little distance. She had given me these letters. She wanted me to have them. She wanted me to know him and know their relationship, and so finally when I was midway through this book. I could do it. He wasn't the only one who wrote your mom wrote as well. If you days after Christmas in nineteen fifty your father has a stroke, and he never really recovered from it, and your mom becomes his caregiver. And there are a lot of issues in terms of health insurance and coverage and what it takes to raise a family. Look after an ailing husband, and I'm gonna ask you to read something that she writes in her journal about this process. Okay. So he's had a stroke and he's in the hospital and she sitting next to him and making these notes you begin to talk. Lots of words. Nothing. I can understand then you begin to cry. I hold you and tell you it's all right. You say it's all right. I hold you and keep talking to you. But my face against yours. You kiss me. You put your arms around me. Pat me keep crying. I keep reassuring. You. What's it like to read? And I mean, so at the time she thought he would be well, and he would be fascinated about his process. But of course, he never did get well, and she was never able to share this with him. This was hard to if the letters were hard. This was even harder because as she describes him having had a stroke like this explosion in the brain, almost you know, he's fighting his way through it. He's trying to find words he's trying to do all these things that he can't really do. And it's painful because I think oh my goodness. It must have been so hard for him to feel like he can't find his way back, and it was not for lack of trying to pick a movie that both of them worked on that may not be high on the list of what people recognize what would you recommend a lesser known performance by your mom at a lesser known screenplay that your dad wrote well for my father, there's a little movie. He called platinum blonde that he made his first picture with Frank Capra. We wanted to WALE. Gal prayed wing got no raw life up here. We won't maybe we could interest you in some doing but lies or perhaps some slightly fried pandas are better still some stuff shirts and guaranteed. Everyone of them will give you a good stiff pain in much of my father in the character. A kind of easy. Almost breezy wit, a charm, an elliptical way of romancing a sense of seeking something deeper in himself from my mother, it's a farce it's called the fares of chill Leany. My mother was always very beautiful in the films. She did even in King Kong while she has kind of impressionists or spiritedness often the emphasis was on her beauty in this one. She plays a complete idiot a Bimbo and she's wonderfully dumb, and I just adore that about her that she was looking to do other kinds of parts. She was tired of always being the OJ, Dr the beautiful one. She also did a film of Robert Riskin 's called an car. Vers profession, and she plays a very successful attorney whose husband begins to feel neglected. I wonder what it'll be like or what will remind you. And I struggling Findlay. What do you want to work for? I don't know. Keep busy. I guess I've got a profession. Why not use it? You will mind. What you of course. But you're have to you know. You know, that was very Avangard, right? My father was a great feminist underneath at all. Well, he wouldn't have used that word. He would have just said women are fabulous terrific. Very are risking is the author of fair Ray, and Robert Riskin a Hollywood memoir, Victoria, greatest you. Thanks for coming. Thanks so much for having me done. Coming

Robert Riskin Victoria Riskin Ray Hollywood Frank Capra Gal attorney King Kong Findlay Victoria
"robert riskin" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"robert riskin" Discussed on The Frame

"Robert Riskin is one of the great screen writers of the twentieth century his movies many directed by Frank Capra, included, Mr. deeds goes to town. What puzzles me is why people seem to get so much pleasure out of hurting each other. Why don't they try liking each other once in a while Fay Wray was an actress who starred most famously in the original King Kong? Now risking and raise daughter, Victoria, Riskin has written a memoir she says that for all of their Hollywood endeavors her parents had one memorable collaboration and that was their marriage. Victoria, Riskin is a screenwriter herself. Having started her career as a therapist and both jobs came in handy when writing her book, fair Ray, and Robert Riskin, a Hollywood memoir risk and Capra films are known for their humanism insincerity, and those are themes, Victoria, Riskin says that still resonate some eighty years after the movies were made we just did a series of screenings in New York City at film forum and took a group of friends to see meet John Doe, and Gary Cooper, who's playing the role of the common man, not really he's been hired. But in the middle of the speech, he gives he he talks about it's time to tear down the walls between us someday. We're going to need that. That guy who lives next door. We're going to need him and he's going to need us. And let's start to know one another fair down the fence, and you tear down a lot of hates and prejudices tear down all offenses in the country, and you really have it. So meets my motion needs right now. And it did for my friends who I took to see the movie because I think we're being pawns and being divided by the political atmosphere, but Frank Capra like a lot of directors now. And it was starting to be an issue then claimed that there was only one real author of a film, and that was its director. It's the so called autour theory. And I think there's an argument that that is not only poppycock. But certainly when you look at the collaboration that your father and Capra had together Robert Riskin is as much part of that is a question as the guy who has directed movies. So what was interesting in my research for this book? I went back and read the reviews of the day, and the reviewers would say another Robert risk. Skin and Frank Capra picture. They were always teamed and the writing was appreciated just as much as the directing. And then over time that change to change not only because capper wanted to assert himself as a great filmmaker. But also because eventually in time there became an emphasis on the one man one film theory, the auteur theory, there's a story about my father working with Frank Capra. And after a few of these articles where the journalists were interviewing him, and he was talking about Capra esque films, and the Capri touch and Capra movies. My father went into his office and put one hundred pieces of blank paper on his desk and said quietly not assertively Frank you put the capper touch on that without the screenplay. There's nothing there's nothing when asked about your mom Fay Wray, a lot of people of a certain age would know her from King Kong, she came to. Town. She got to work pretty quickly and had a great career. What was it about her as an actor that made her as successful as she was? I think she had a self confidence. I don't know when she developed that she came from a very hard scrabble life. And there were times when there wasn't enough to eat in this little family of six kids. But there was something about her. And I think she was just gifted with an inside that she felt she had a destiny first time. She saw a movie which was in this little mining town where she grew up and she saw Lillian Gish in Mary Pickford, she she just knew that's where she wanted to be. And she was a survivor I've grown to appreciate her deeply I used to just think of her as mom, but I think of her now as a almost as a character in a play or in a in a book, and I so admire her her self confidence and tenacity your father, Robert Riskin wrote a lot of movies road, some place else around a lot of letters some of them were twenty six pages long, and you're lucky enough to have access to I suspect. A lot of these. I'm gonna read a letter that he wrote your mom in nineteen forty two. She is in a production of a play called, George Washington slept here. It's not going well or appears not going. Well, and here's what your father rights to your mother. My sweetheart what I wouldn't give to be there. At least for the opening. I would know the torture. You are going through the acute first night, nervousness and panic, and I would suffer with you. My heart would beat rapidly. My palms would be moist. And I would have that awful pain in the gut. But despite it the transcendental excitement would compensate for it, all and the nearness to you would be so soothing and warm, how wonderful to

Frank Capra Robert Riskin Fay Wray Victoria Mary Pickford Hollywood King Kong director Gary Cooper New York City Lillian Gish Ray George Washington eighty years
"robert riskin" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

13:53 min | 2 years ago

"robert riskin" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Maintaining supplies of fresh food and everything else to come into the capital, then company to organizations who do not have the cool to tell your combined will out to clean that to into English word how close they are gonna be crawling berries to baby because you see how many times they going in and out of the area. It's going to happen to that. Call and customers I'll be off to begin to understand that a little bit are refusing to pay to every company. Have to quickly adding to the mix I'll be vehicle and the tabs of Soham. I understand that some company having the fifty million continue as either way for the whole running out and purchasing you out, clean vehicle. Question a lot to work. Healthy he's going to go. There's a lot of skepticism flying around in the air. In London held about Robin is anybody studied only economic consequences of this move. No, no. Had come out with a paper with very crystal clear outline as to what this is all about the only person in the street. He knows when he goes into London of thirteen days is very very unpleasant usually only nothing days where takes high-pressure partake in the summer where the abbey. Leaving the only I can tell you is the level of being monitored. The never are to European standards is aren't we have the highest level of pollution in the European Trump is a travesty, and the only thing you security and did come out a look at the cold and schools will say don't to thirty have to opiates reason the highest levels of pollution around them. Not because people are going back. They outgrow them. All people the children schooled statistic time the question. No Mia, crystal clear covering everything the economic impact policies going to affect people. He has be produced. Good expect up to becoming out very basin. What's been the reaction to all the things that you just mentioned. Well, how old thing I actually went into London on the eighth and no amber hold because much quieter. I huddled there. Cool with allows me to go into the out triclean zone. So I wasn't defect. I didn't have to pay that charge. I did have to pay the congestion charge. Call won't much not Quanta. They will along with my cool white van commercial vehicles into MRIs down to painted white. And there won't quite a long drop in the number of of icy console, discreet, traffic also seem to be slightly light of you. Go to factor into the fact that this week school in our country all hot tub, then maybe that had something to do with it. I have to come strange how whether it is talk. Look cool. Oh, not either know the air did seem to be a little bit. Now, taking record side been actually very the reaction to this whole thing. I'm very stoic. You know, we sort of have to stick upper lip attitude. I mean, wait until things absolutely crashing down. Almost before we start anytime. Andrea. Very much debate. I've not seen you know. People demonstrating. Doc time until the twelve pounds fifty every time he goes in and out to stop to buy stock to get more. Well, herald, Denzel hope you listen carefully. What's your thought process? You know? We've been trying to talk about cleaning up the city and. Here in New York, Robert. Has been has been doing for the last whatever number of years and. And I just sort it has to come in a different way. I think it has to come. Maybe a different types of vehicle, maybe electric, maybe hydrogen, and if we're in such a dire straight. I mean, maybe the kind of do something to to enhance that you know, to make it like you have to have an electric car with no zero pollution. I'm I'm very curious that you have an eleven fifty. Eleven pound fifty. Tax coming in. How many times a day does the taxi driver has to pay that is he goes out of the area? Well, now that's interesting to talk about black cab famous black cats, and I love to have become a metric they are the famous London electric vehicle company will cut companies some people little mix as by Volvo into the new generation of electric powered lumber taxes, which we were the first to on an automotive radio. Bull comes to believe when they came out a year or two ago. Now, they come in and out, and they get Charles in my understand that the other taxi not electric or hybrid days that get charged and you only pay child all the congestion charges go to make it's very. A congestion charge for when you go in and that met go in the now the day become clear as to whether you pay the twelve pounds fifty Altro out for. Or out KOMO emissions zone charge. Every time you go in. I'm not going to get verified. Exempt from the helluva coach Laurie. He does meet your expanded will have to pay. Hundred pounds at a. Two. That you know, how very serious he'd be considered. Then we come into the petro cars, and vans and said, and vans that me I could be yours. What was yours? And you gotta know what you're doing. Because I love the people will be going in and out. I know probably think I to be fine. They'll start taking Brown Blake's. Not a hundred percent clear and people that work on a hate there. Listening to today will be fine. That'd be helping Courtown. Drastic situation be taken because we go into a drastic him. This idea be applied. Elsewhere, then how old almost absolutely one hundred percents. It could be applied throughout the make breakfast. Great green island, major cities like plumbing them, Manchester, Sheffield someone into full the Scotland laws go anything bar. It's coming in. If it hasn't already come in. And then the call. Listen council freedom to stop applying a very similar scheme to that town. Now, hold often interesting question, you know, how is this going to affect people and businesses on and all the rest of it. Well, I think I've ton goes on and we start to find out towns, the implementing this particular ski, I think that's where it's really going to stop problem because question commerce, and business and trade, and like has to go home and people have to get in an out, and they have to make the liveries, and you can't expect overnight and people to just suddenly jump into an expense. He out. Cool and this Christie to the health atop jet, how incentives from the government to entice people to go and buy me called. I understand that the situation with the British government is basically being described as poetry found not putting in significant sums of money to to get into electric vehicle, which is really what it's about. So in a nutshell, we are inching ever flamy, tools, fully electric vehicle or big out out for clean. There's a little bit confusion as the you generation of diesel because consumer to be fed conflicting information about those communities will because the cool which is called the problem. No, that's not the fact that late sixties actually much much cleaner of the Collins. Goscinny counterpart today. The look to do definitely make people think is definitely taking people in in their pockets. And the idea is definitely going to be rolled out to coughing. Note, which really wanna think Robert Erskine for letting us know we may be looking for over a shortly because we're going through the same circumstance in New York City at the moment. I think summarize I think it is expecting everybody everywhere, you know, levels of traffic and congestion leaching unacceptable level, and we really should be about this a long time ago on a we'd be liberal. Jen. London has always had the pollution problem because I said about GS geographic unique setting. I had the great smokes of London which started in nineteen fifty two which cooled modern healthy sheets. Thousands of people died because of the smog which was a mixture of our famous London fog and things so the selfless oxides to mixed in with the fog because people have called five times. And that's when it took the government to really coming about. And we have the Clean Air Act. Now things because we've had all this profit, which we discussing today. I'm sure that in time things. To get cleaner and seems to be much more positive. She be part of this. Right at the end of the charge. You come on in. Where does the money go that they collect? Well, this is very interesting subject congestion Charles cave out at again, we assessed to announce it on radio on the North American pool cost in detail. It was found that the money that was being taken from multiple entry into London into the congestion charges actually to repay you think for structure, which apparently nothing has they that heard me they showed him to be Mateen much with appropriate out of it. Now, I imagine having read some of the press releases. What is being said is it the money that is collected? He's going to be easy to numb nuns transport infrastructure. That's very very bold brush, nobody says being specific if the government had said every penny that's be pushing to this game or math. Has issued a really clear report. Every penny is going to be put into an electric infrastructure to encourage businesses to get into electric vehicles argued set, Pepsi fantastic. But that hasn't actually happened as a hundred percent, Chris. So that's why there is the cynical feeling as I said time, and we saw to see that there's going to be more of every action. Well, on that note, we want to make sure that you keep letting us know what's happening. So we will know what's happening with us. We can help you with sesame will. Thank you. So very much Robert Riskin from BBC and suffocating and we look forward to your next report next week. Next week. Take care have a good night. If you'd like the opportunity to speak to hurl them Bill Tim case. Let me DeMarco Sally, JoAnne. Silly Sherry pestering. Joe? Half a story Nick cancer your calls to us triple eight six nine two seven two three four. That's triple eight six nine two seven two three and we'll return right after these messages. You're listening to the longest running.

London Robert Riskin Robin Sherry Robert Erskine Mia KOMO British government Volvo Denzel Andrea DeMarco Sally Bill Tim Charles sesame Bull petro Laurie
"robert riskin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"robert riskin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Today on fresh air, Terry gross talks with British journalist. Ed Caesar about similarities between Brexit and the election of Donald Trump. That's today at two on ninety three point nine FM. Welcome back to all of it on WNYC. I'm should meet the best sue in nineteen thirty-three Fay Wray was as her daughter writes atop the world, literally the actor was starring in the most famous role of her multi decade career as the wide eyed blond haired screaming damsel in distress in the grip of King Kong on top of the Empire State building. Now that very same year future Oscar winning screenwriter and her future husband, Robert Riskin was writing the screenplay for an Carver's profession. Now fray Ray would go on to star in that movie. And a few years later, she and risking got married. The story of these two Hollywood figures who found success at a time when the industry was going through some very major changes is chronicled in a new book by their daughter, Victoria, Riskin. She's the former president of the writers guild of America West and served on the board of the Human Rights Watch and Victoria risk. Joins me now to talk about her book. Welcome to all of it. Thank you. I'm so happy to be here with you. I'm so happy you're here in sitting across from me. It's always so nice to someone across from. You know, your parents both found success in Hollywood at a relatively young age for both of them. They were both in their teens. Really?.

president Robert Riskin Terry gross Hollywood Donald Trump Fay Wray Ed Caesar Ray Empire State building writers guild of America West Oscar King Kong Victoria Carver
"robert riskin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:29 min | 2 years ago

"robert riskin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"North highlands, Sacramento. It's ten thirty one. This is forum. I'm Michael Krasny. We're talking about me to from Hollywood's golden age and its connection to our present age. But also talking about the role of women in Hollywood during that studio era. We have three book authors with us Karina Longworth is the author of seduction sex lies and stardom and Howard Hughes. Hollywood. She's also film critic and podcast and created you must remember this storytelling podcast about the forgotten histories of early Hollywood. And formerly she was an editor. And film critic of the LA weekly and village voice. Jennifer Smith with us as well. Professor history, the university of work, and she is the author of nobody's girl. Friday, the women who ran Hollywood, and we also have Victoria risk inherent studio. The author affair Ray, and Robert Riskin a Hollywood memoir. Former president of the writers guild of America West between two thousand one and two thousand four and she served for twelve years as director of Human Rights Watch. And she'll be appearing the evening at book passage and coordinated excuse me on April thirtieth. Not the incorrect that April thirtieth at book passage in quarter Madeira and ask you, Victoria. Just before we go to our callers. And by the way, let me invite you to join us again wanna talk about the golden age of Hollywood. Are you wanna talk about the metoo would then as opposed to now you can join us at our toll free number eight six six seven three three six seven eight six or Email us forum? kqeDorg your parents were married in the actually in the suite of wild Bill. Donovan who is the founder of the would would later become the CIA. That's right. They were wild Bill. Donovan before he went to work for the government was a lawyer, and he had represented my mother in the divorce from her first husband and had been. Looked after her been been big support. And then when my father was looking for work to do after the war broke out, and they are romance had begun. He was looking for the right job in government. And at that time while Bill Donahue was part of the office of strategic services the precursor to the CIA. So my mother arranged a meeting, and and it went very well. And he went to work for the government making movies to tell the story of America and overseas to people living under fascism and and Donovan helped make that happen. And then they they got married. My mother proposed my father, I think that's an important thing to note that women can propose to. He was he had a relationship with your mother had one with Clifford. Oh debts. And so there's all this fascinating history there, and and I really enjoyed reading about what went on during the difficult period of the blacklist in your book. And then the other books that were featuring here, and also, of course, FDR World War Two and that brings up and let me go to you on this. Jennifer Smythe brings up the name. In fact, I'm looking at listener Noel who wants to ask about Pino? Yes. We'll either Latino was one of the trio of extremely powerful actresses at Warner Brothers. She went on to be director and screenwriter Harold. It is one of the two great directors of the golden age of Hollywood the other colleague of hers Dorothy ours ner worked for Harry Cohn at Columbia. We come back to that name again. And again, but Lupino didn't do quite as well at Warner Brothers because she always got the leavings of Bette Davis and alleviate Haviland and eventually branched out on her own. And it was very fortunate as well to when films started coming out in the forties and early fifties to have an ally in had a hopper who was the gossip Queen of Hollywood and known for her, you know, bad relationship with the Hollywood laughed, but she was interesting because when it came to supporting women in Hollywood, she cross political lines. And so I was really surprised looking. Through her column coming across all kinds of references in support of the Pena who was a democrat and hopper also loved Bette Davis. And it was really the tip of the iceberg. When I was looking back through, you know, the trades and through a lot of the columns and memoirs during this period reconstructing, a real community of women who had each other's back. And of course, we often forget nineteen forties was a period when the equal rights amendment was important to women on in both Republican and democratic camps. And it was something that they both advocated for during this period, unfortunately, didn't get past. But it came pretty close. Karina longworth. Jennifer just mentioned Hella had a hopper, and I it's interesting reading in your book to what extent Howard Hughes tried to use Hedda hopper and Luella Parsons for that matter who were couple of very powerful women. Indeed. Yeah. I mean, he has had relationships with all the gossip columnists, and he kind of played them off of each other. And and would you know as a lot of people did he would trade them a piece of information? So that they wouldn't write about something. He didn't want them to write. But I just like to go back to idle the piano, she was known as a democrat and and a big fan of FDR. But in my book, I my right about her and blacklist, right, right? I I went through her F B I file, and it has evidence that she did. Volunteer information to the FBI that helped them blacklist people because she was worried about her own citizenship. Applications so her legacy as Phil as female filmmaker is is not in doubt. I mean, it's she's absolutely a feminist icon for that. But it's her political history as much more complicated and the same is true Clifford. Oh, that's when we mentioned earlier who was serious suitor affair raise. But let's go to your calls. And let's find out. What's your thoughts and questions? Are we begin Neil with you? You're on the air. Neil. Yeah. I read your book seduction about Howard Hughes. I was surprised but baffled Hughes was widely said to be sexual. And you don't mention that. At all not even asking in the book winning explain much of what he did, especially. But that's his. I do meant. I do mention it actually in the section about Katherine Hepburn. That this is something that has come up and other biographies. I don't think it's widely documented at all. Let me think Neil for the call and go right to another caller. And that's caller, Robert warning. Good morning. I'm interested in in the writing of their research funding, of course, a number of others that were serious transgressive. And. By today's standards with the sexual predators. That s to the view what should happen to their work. Should it be put on the shelf be notation on the introduction to the work? When it shown that these people were in fact, violative of women and women's right? You know, there's a there's a question that comes across as to how far the metoo movement should go. There's a number of celebrities that have been banned from working. And and others that. In the past been boycotted. Happen here. Raising a provocative question in professor Smith, the go to you on this. I mean, should these films be shown in schools, should there'd be a disclaimer, you know, these are real questions in people's minds. Well, the thing that Matt Harvey Weinstein excuse me, made some pretty good films. Do you? I'm sorry. Did Shakespeare in love, of course, you know there. There's a case, for example of David o cells neck who was famous for propositioning women during his career. And I think that one executive who was female used to warn other women when he takes his shoes off, it means that he's gonna make pass it you. But does that discount in any way, the great work? He did with gone with the wind or the first star is born. And I think the more information that is out there in the more research. We do that's all to the good. But do you want to rename all of the Hollywood buildings that bear the names of Louis b Mayer and Daryl zanuck, do you want to strike their names from, you know, these monuments in these records, I don't think that's that's something that we really want to you know, to broach. That's a dangerous precedent something like that slippery slope. If you get into that area, then maybe you should ban showing birth of a nation, which is. Terribly racist film, but his brilliant cinematography and direction. It's it's a complicated and tough question to be sure. And I thank you for bringing it up to our. Attention. Here's a tweet from a listener, maybe to you on this to professor Smith. Why did it take so long to write about sexual violence in the golden age of Hollywood was just not taken seriously? Well, it's a difficult question. Because I mean in the press these days, we hear about big bad Hollywood. And we hear that, you know, things have always been bad for women. They've always been victimized. And I think in a way, it's it's unfortunate. Because even though there were terrible cases. And of course, there's the Patricia Douglas case, which David STAN has written about so extensively which affected an extra. You have all of these horrible cases. But at the same time, you have women who are dealing with sexual harassment not just in Hollywood, but throughout the United States. I mean, people will say Rita Hayworth was a great victim. You know, carry Cohn was chasing her around the desk and trying to put her in compromising positions. But at the same time for years, she was sexually abused by her own father. So I think it's sometimes difficult to place all the blame on Hollywood. And at the same time Hollywood wasn't the originator of the casting couch that honor goes to Broadway into the theater where they actually named up the van. In the producer's office, the casting couch. So very often. I think we tend to demonize that early period. And when we demonize it when we think about these horrific experiences actresses have we tend to distort the picture that there were women who fought back. There were women who worked together to out some of these predators. There were women who succeeded in spite of these difficult isn't women who as Victoria mentioned, we're quite tight lipped about their experience. And just said, well, I'm I'm, you know, going to be an equal partner in this industry. And I'm going to fight for my rights and get on with it. And I'm not going to allow myself to be victimized. So I think it's a pretty complicated. Picture. I I would say that. Because I think I worry that we're painting a picture of this as Hollywood old Hollywood being a place where predators. Right here. Where predator, and it was actually a small town where there were many people who are wonderful descend caring bright people who looked after one another. Or someone like I think about someone like Carole Lombard who used her profanity with great ease. And it was to scare men off at work. My father was. Wrote a picture that she was in. And there's a cute story about her coming in to meet with Harry Cohn to see if she was the right one for the for the picture, and he he just..

Hollywood Howard Hughes Harry Cohn Karina Longworth Donovan FDR LA weekly Neil Robert Riskin Clifford director Jennifer Smith professor Smith North highlands Bill Donahue Michael Krasny Victoria Professor writers guild of America editor
"robert riskin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"robert riskin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I've spent a lot of time thinking about how beautifully photographed movies where I just saw new cleaned up version of it happened one night, and the black and white create that sense of almost a allure glamour. And this was one of your father's screenplays. It was one of his many wonderful screen L. Let's talk for few moments about him. He worked with Capra and produced and work with Harry Collins, you said and produced some of the best known classics of that era. Meet meet John Doe is one of my favorites in sort of timely, but he also did Mr. deeds goes to town. You can't take it with you lost horizon. Lady for a day. This may sound. I think in ten years he was at Columbia nine years. He did about twenty six films, and you have mixed feelings about Frank Capra. I mean, particularly in relation to his maybe not giving your father, his new, well, I have mixed feelings about my feelings aren't so much mixed about Frank Capra. I have clear feelings, but it took a whole book to get to the conclusion, I think Frank Capra was a complicated, man. He was not a liberal or someone who embraced the idea of the common man or populist by nature. He was always always voted Republican. He didn't he'd worked hard to build his career. He didn't want FDR to take his money away from him that was his point of view, but he found a wonderful writer, and Robert Riskin and they worked together. Well, and they worked together extremely well. And I think the tragedy in some ways of the story is that. The happiest I think Frank Capra was in his work is when he was working with my father who was a very, warm and. Generous person, and they had a kind of chemistry that made those films come alive on on film. And he I don't think he ever quite found that again, he struggled hard to find it and other films when they were no longer working together. Well, we're talking about Hollywood during a golden age and particularly about the role of women during a golden age, and we do want to hear from you our listeners and be interested in hearing some of your thoughts about Hollywood then compared to Hollywood now. But also if you have questions or some things you'd like to bring to the fore here about Howard Hughes or about fair Ray, Robert Riskin, we've got certainly a trio of people who can provide answers an important answers who've done the research, and who done in in the case of Victoria Riskin who's here with us in studio live the experiences, but also interested in some of your thoughts listeners about those movies. And what about those women who were behind the scenes and really played important roles. Not only on..

Frank Capra Robert Riskin Harry Collins Victoria Riskin Mr. deeds Hollywood Howard Hughes FDR Columbia writer Ray nine years ten years
"robert riskin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:36 min | 2 years ago

"robert riskin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And she was really I mean, your parents were really Hollywood royalty. Your father was certainly one of the most successful screenwriters in Hollywood history. But there's a story there too. Exploitation of women and so forth. I mean, first of all. She went to Hollywood sort of the behest of her parents from Canada at for fourteen years old. What was she was actually in Utah? She was at the time. She was a Salt Lake lake she she was fourteen years old and her father had left the family, and there were six children and her her sister had a friend who was in his early twenties. And he was enchanted by Fe and told her mother, I think I can take fade to Hollywood and maybe get her in the movies. She'd won a little movie contests. So she was very excited about this. Because she she fell in love with the movies in Utah. She thought Lillian Gish was the most beautiful thing she'd ever seen. She magic herself very at a very early age being on the screen, but she goes to Hollywood with a at fourteen with a twenty one year old, man. And for the most part. He takes good care of her and helps educator and places are in a family where she's looked after. But it was pretty scary. Because on the train going to Los Angeles. He says to her it's not your sister. I'm in love with its you. I'm in love with. And she said I felt like an old person that David it's just was kind of transformational. But she also had a sense of resilience and destiny. And. She was able to handle herself. It was a great adventure for her. What did you learn from your mother about the way, the casting couch worked and? The way Hollywood particularly the moguls comported himself. Well, she did a lot of work at Columbia with Harry Cohn, and he never approached her. He he had a big closet behind his desk. And he he knew what her favorite perfume was. And he knew everybody's favorite perfume. So he could open the closet and say, here's a bottle of Chanel number five. He, but she did get approached now and then by by zanuck and by. Yeah. And I think which was commonplace for women was commonplace. I I mean, I it didn't happen all the time to her at but it did happen. And I think she so loved what she was doing and the work and hoped that moguls looked at her to castor and parts and not to cast on the couch. And so when it happened it was very it was hurtful to her. It was like a betrayal. Her way of handling it was to to just pretend it didn't happen just to turn around and walk away. She had a kind of denial or defense mechanism. And I think because she was very quickly very successful. Unlike some of the other women that Karenna talked about she didn't need them to advance her career, nor would she have have used that kind of relationship to advance her career, but she did wonder sometimes if she didn't get a part and someone else did. And she wanted it and the star and the two stars the male and female had a relationship whether she was losing out because she wasn't. More flexible. Case curious question for you though because she played opposite. So many leading men I mean, she played opposite Spencer, Tracy. Gary Cooper, Ronald Colman. There is an infatuation after she worked with Cary Grant, write about you had a crush on. So did everybody in the entire universe? Prompts me to ask you a question because. Nowadays, you're talking about leading men. And where are they you hear that kind of plea almost as a lament people say, Bradley Cooper, and okay? But where are those leading men that we saw from yesteryear? I looking for them. I don't know about you. But I'm looking for them. They they're, but Carey grant was probably the first among several but Ronald Colman was just wonderful. So even more so for me than than than Clark Gable? Who who everyone loves, but there was a kind of suave charm that was part of the movie making business in the storytelling of the era that glamour the beautiful photography. I've spent a lot of time thinking about how beautifully photographed movies where I just saw a new cleaned up version of it happened one night, and the black and white s- create that sense of almost a lawyer and glamour, and this was one of your father's screenplays. It was one of his many wonderful screen. Let's talk for a few moments about him. He worked with Capra and produced and work with Harry Cohen as you said and producer some of the best known classics of that era. Meet meet John Doe is one of my favorites and sort of timely, but he also did Mr. deeds goes to town. You can't take it with you lost to rise lady for a day. Larry using that this may sound I think in the ten years he was at Columbia nine years. He did about twenty six films, and you have mixed feelings about Frank Capra. I mean, particularly in relation to his maybe not giving your father who's new, well, I have mixed feelings about my feelings aren't so much mixed about Frank Capra. I have clear feelings, but it took a whole book to get to the conclusion, I think Frank Capra was a complicated, man. He was not a liberal or someone who embraced the idea of the common man or populist by nature. He was always always voted Republican. He didn't he'd worked hard to build his career. He didn't want FDR to take his money away from him. That was his point of view. But he found a wonderful writer, and Robert Riskin and they worked together. Well, they worked together extremely well. And I think the tragedy in some ways of the story is that the happiest I think Frank Capra was and his work is when he was working with my father who was a very, warm and. Generous person, and they had a kind of chemistry that made those films come alive on on film. And I don't think he ever quite found that again, he struggled hard to find it another films when they were no longer working together. Well, we're talking about Hollywood during a golden age and particularly about the role of women during that golden age, and we do want to hear from you our listeners, it'd be interested in hearing some your thoughts about Hollywood then compare it to Hollywood now. But also if you have questions or some things you'd like to bring to the fore here about Howard Hughes or about fair Ray, Robert Riskin, we've got certainly a trio of people who can provide answers an important answers who've done the research and who've done in in the case of Victoria Riskin who's here with us in studio live the experiences, but also interested in some of your thoughts listeners about those movies and whereabout those women who were behind the scenes and really play important roles. Not only on..

Hollywood Frank Capra Utah Ronald Colman Salt Lake lake Robert Riskin Columbia Lillian Gish Canada FDR Los Angeles Cary Grant Harry Cohn Clark Gable Gary Cooper Fe Victoria Riskin Bradley Cooper David Howard Hughes
"robert riskin" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"robert riskin" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"In happened. Tonight, thirty four the Capra film wonderful scene written by Robert Riskin, where car gabled teaches cloud cover how to dunk and he's the working class reporter and shoes the rich heiress and Naff to be together. And they're having breakfast. And she doesn't know how to dunker down properly and the coffee, and he instructs around how to do this very witty, and he says twenty millions, and you don't know how to dunk, you know, it shows that she's out of touch with simple pleasures in life because she's a snob. So this is not factor involved to the you're not supposed to dunk of your rich are putting on airs like the offense character has to do to people. So that's that's again, very clever and oblique, and you kinda have to piece it together in your mind. What's being talked about? It's really about sexuality class, which that film is really full of those two sames, you know. But it's how did you do that you express it through things like food and manners. All right. We're back and we're talking about trouble in paradise. I brought this up to to Joseph and the one thing that really got me all those years ago. I think it's probably ninety three when I watched this. The first time was the dunking and the dunking scenes of the two women dunking their stuff into coffee, and I kinda wanna go back in time. And just look at all of these movies where dunking was thing because I guess I probably saw it happened one night right around the same time and his whole thing. Donkey and then even watching the shop around the corner. And when the one guy is looking in and Jimmy Stewart's date is there at the main street stop. Corner. He's looking on. Shop on main street later this year, check timber. Face you sitting behind closed Ike. As you come of coffee on the table. If you thinking piece of cake. Chronic Chris dunking? Well, why should she doc? And that's the nice thing of of Lillian. And Matt I'm Collette is that they both dunk in this film was probably considered a guilty. Pleasure. Oh, yeah. So low class out dairy. But again, it kind of brings up that comedy of manners in the social roles and the social norms and this whole idea of the one being high class the other being low class, but then that she can. Into port new. I think it's not necessarily the that he necessarily makes fun of them. I think he did proto the sensibility is that if we all can agree on anything. We can all agree on matters. We can all agree that there is a base level that is acceptable for people to treat each other with in society say it's not really the specifics of like, do you crook your little finger when you drink e it's more like do we treat each other? Well, right right here. My good, man. Now, we're both going to be. Many way it may seem archaic with. But I think that the way he does it is kinda like a universal language of manners basic common decency. And that's the way that we can all understand that that way that you treat each other with basic human decency. The most practical way can do that as for manners. Just basically matters. So matters are important, and sometimes people overdo it sometimes people under do it. But I think it's just all in all very important. The one thing that I like about these movies is that we are as far from fart joke as we possibly can be as know. No. That was interesting that you wanted to bring MO Brooks into this. Yeah. It's appropriate to our next conversation. We're going to get those comedies where we have the very well mannered people and then the bull in the China..

Matt Chris dunking Robert Riskin Naff Jimmy Stewart Collette Capra Joseph Lillian China
"robert riskin" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"robert riskin" Discussed on KPCC

"Had 11 here on eighty nine point three kpcc the the aids bemba supported eighty nine point three kpcc unmik roman the long and difficult task of cleaning up after last week's deadly mud slides and montesino continued today at least twenty people have been confirmed killed three others are still missing as search crews sift through the wreckage more heartbreaking stories from month to see to work coming into focus is kpcc's frank stoltz robert riskin slept through the storm and mudslides that followed in the early morning hours of january ninth we had some rain it was very strong he lives in santa barbara just a few miles from odyssey tow but well outside any evacuation zone when he woke up you saw a tax that had come in while he was asleep from his business partner dina landi she was staying in his mother's montesino guest cottage in a voluntary evacuations she was on top of the roof of their guest cottage waiting to be rescued a little later another text came end that landi had been airlifted to safety and it said more that my sister was safe at a nearby middle school that my stepfather as in the hospital with a badly broken leg his stepfather had ended up in a tree in his boxer shorts and a tshirt before he was rescued but there was more ominous news in the tax to that my mom had never been seen nobody knew if sixty one year old rebecca riskin was alive only that she had been swept away from her home by the avalanche of mud robert riskin set out to find his mother but police had already set up roadblocks in the area had so i decided to call my bloody exnavy firefighter ends we put what on and his big truck that kind of looks official with light sent me basically just stormed our way in.

kpcc robert riskin santa barbara dina landi rebecca riskin frank stoltz partner official sixty one year