17 Burst results for "Robert Mcfarland"

"robert mcfarland" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

04:48 min | 6 months ago

"robert mcfarland" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"So the point is there are a lot of places you can love because of Spain's excellent public transportation. When I first went to Spain, no freeways, no fast trains. Now, laced with freeways and laced with poetry. The result was a nice place in the outskirts of Mas reading the mountains called ileus cordial, I really like illegal where you see that massive fortress of Philip the second, the king in Spain in Madrid, 1560, one, and showing to the power of those Habsburgs he is a huge fortress in people are actually quite fascinated by those systems. Is it fair to say back then the king of Spain was the most powerful man in Europe? He was actually, I mean, just think about how the cancer that is far, far, far, far, far away from Spain called the Philippines, the Philips were the islands of Philip named after king Philip. This has traveled through Steves, I've just really enjoyed talking with all of you getting all sorts of ideas and going back to Madrid. Amanda binger, Javier menor, and Federico Garcia Barroso, gracias. 12 years. He grew up above the caves and coal mines of Nottingham in the English Midlands, so it's no wonder Robert mcfarlane has been fascinated by the landscapes that frighten most people. It took him ten years to write his book underland, which one critic called one of the most ambitious works of narrative non fiction of our time. Robert mcfarlane is back with us next on travel with Rick Steves to take us someplace we've never been before on a deep time journey. As a traveler, I'm all about getting beyond the surface of people and places and to better understand our world, but writer Robert mcfarlane, he really takes that mission literally. In his book, underland, a deep time journey, Robert explores the earth's underworlds, its caves, its catacombs, deeply hidden places. He found himself drawn into the sunless sights that may have repulsed other people through the ages. In this subterranean world, he found a world of unbearables, untimely surfacing that can be dazzling and they can be horror shows at the same time. Robert McFarland thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me, Rick. I'm just fascinated by, well, by travel, and then somebody can expose to me the whole nother frontier. And that's this underground journey this fascination with the underland. What bookends your whole approach to this? I mean, you were inspired to write this. Tell me a little bit about the context that you wrote this book in. Yeah, I mean, the first thing is, I love mountains, that they have my heart, and in the first book I ever wrote was about why we climb mountains and 15 years on. Here I am trying to explain the opposite, the gravitational opposite..

Spain Robert mcfarlane Amanda binger Javier menor Federico Garcia Barroso Philip Madrid king Philip English Midlands Steves Philips Rick Steves Philippines Nottingham Europe Robert McFarland cancer Robert Rick
"robert mcfarland" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

05:38 min | 6 months ago

"robert mcfarland" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Americans have long had a reputation for being very good at boasting about themselves. A scratch my head with lightning and perm myself to sleep with thunder, whether it's from a Mark Twain character, sports star or politician, writer Richard grant tells us what kind of American exceptionalism he enjoys best. That's a tradition of bragging that I admire is the funny entertaining clever bragging. Tour guiding friends from Madrid explain what they like most about living in the Spanish capital. Each little neighborhood in Madrid is like its own village. And Robert mcfarlane recommends exploring the underland to provide a deeper perspective for our place in the world. We all try it, don't we? You stand on the Grand Canyon, rim, and you dream back in geological time, and it's dizzying. He suggests that a deep time journey can help us make the most out of the here and now. It's all in the hour ahead on travel with Rick Steves. Come along. My Facebook Friends are a fun community of curious travelers and your invited to join in. To stowaway with me in my work, play politics, philanthropy, and travels, follow me at Rick Steves on Facebook. As a self described Isaac Robert McFarland loves what glaciers can reveal to us over time as well as the surprises the earth hides beneath our feet. He explains how a deep time journey can help us better appreciate the here and now a little later in the hour, and tour guides from Spain, including an American expat, tell us why they love living in Madrid. Let's start today's travel with Rick Steves with author Richard grant. He's lived in Manhattan, the Mississippi delta and the sonoran desert of Tucson to immerse himself in different aspects of the USA. In contrast to the English modesty Richard was brought up on, he finds the crowing of American rappers, blues legends, rodeo cowboys and frontiersmen can be highly entertaining. Richard wrote a short history on American bragging for issued 26 of port magazine, and he joins us now to explain. Hi, Rick good to be here. So this is so fascinating, you're an English man who knows quite intimately American culture because you live here now, and your British take on American, what is the word braggadocio? What is that? If something that struck me hard, coming from London, which, you know, it's all about kind of understatement, self deprecation, ironic, dry wit. Our humor is based on those things, but when I started traveling in America as a young man, there was a whole different sense of humor that was based on kind of overblowing stuff. Exaggerating stuff, and bragging was a part of that. So let's talk first about the British self deprecation. I mean, one thing I always strikes me every time I go to England is English people apologizing, sorry, sorry, you're on my foot. Sorry, would you like red wine or white wine? Sorry. Would you mind? Sorry. Excuse me. Can I sorry, can I give you some more give you some more wine in your glass?.

Richard grant Rick Steves Madrid Robert mcfarlane Isaac Robert McFarland Mark Twain Facebook Grand Canyon port magazine rim Mississippi delta sonoran desert rodeo cowboys Richard Tucson Spain Manhattan America Rick London
"robert mcfarland" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

09:12 min | 9 months ago

"robert mcfarland" Discussed on America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

"Dot com so. There is a word that many words over us and have lost their original meaning. One of them that really shouldn't given the weight of what that word truly represents in the real world is the word war we've seen it abused and used in ways that really are silly and undermine its true meaning war on drugs that's worked out well war on poverty even cultural that is one usage of it that is justified and that the war on our police and it is a war. We've just seen the murder of officer at a french. Played you that shocking disturbing audio recording that dispatcher and her colleagues tried to save her life rushing her limp body to the along with her shot comrade and at the end that just broken voice saying yes she shot in the head shop between the is beautiful young mother aids twenty nine years who had only joined the chicago police three years ago and now she's dead. This is what a beautiful smile. Thank you so. I want to pay tribute to those who are on the front line and i owe a debt of gratitude to someone called island interesting name and let me. That's irish l. An island evans at the daily call. Caller wrote a piece. That was tweeted out. We can put the image of the names listed on the tweet. It's shocking these are the men and women in blue who've been killed in the line of duty since that recidivist felon. Jorge lloyd was killed man. Who's had statues built to him. Euros across the country a man who wants robbed a pregnant woman pushing his loaded handgun into her belly. Yes george floyd aid that wonderful hero. Let's talk about some real heroes. These are people who've died for you and me wearing the badge of the law enforcement officer. Officer cody halt officer. Nathan la- day. Deputy counsel caliber rule. Lieutenant stephen williams officer scot hotton. Sheriff andrew clark deputy sajjan damon guts while and in mill. Animal control officer. Darren young deputy sheriff james blair officer dale province officer destined ella giza corrections officer. Richard yankee sergeant greg johnson officer jason judd officer antony dea officer adele myrow gaza officer. Andy ornelas oughta casey johnson. Officer tyler earned officer jason soup pink sergeant gordon best sergeant daniel mobely deputy sheriff jonathan pryce correctional officer robert mcfarland sheriff's corporal brian levin new lieutenant cultural melting gore officer joseph montgomery corporal christine peters deputy sheriff adam gibson officer brandon. Stolk lieutenant michael boot. Fbi special agent. Laura schwarzenberg fbi special agent daniel alphen officer dairy and jared officer mitchell. Penton deputy sheriff michael magli officer who ratio dominquez lieutenant. Eugene lasco deputy. Sheriff thomas albanese reserve deputy constable martinez mitchum officer dominick wctcam captain justin bedwell officer. Jose zora officer jesse madsen border patrol agent at one hundred flores band. Wella's office ulrich tally. Deputy sheriff logan fox officer christopher fara detective lucre benedetti. Deputy sheriff samuel leonard officer kevin apple. Deputy sheriff tony redondo. Detective greg. Currency deputy william collins. Sergeant josh bartlett sergeant jeremy browne deputy sheriff philip. Campus officer marquis. Mora officer ryan. Be out cap trooper. Mike you may border patrol agent daniel cox officer andy. Trae look officer. Scott dolly officer. Jorge gonzales officer. Brian pearce deputy sheriff brandon shirley officer ella french chicago police department sergeant steven jones officer jimmy in illinois state trooper mosques. The trooper told hannigan officer. Ishmail chavez sheriff's cadet cornelius anderson officer. Jonathan shoop deputy sheriff william ghana. Deputy sheriff dylan pickle. Atf special agent. John boast michigan state trooper callup star officer. Sheena jabre powell park ranger brandon unit. Office a brian brown officer to marist bohannon corporal bryant searcy captain stanley elrod detective james scattered. Any of its officers shown peak. Investigate a mario harare. Thirty sheriff ryan hendrix. Sergeant ethan gaskin deputy sheriff kenny ingram deputy sheriff anthony white officer jacob panshir detective kevin collins detective. Kurt holland sergeant. Conley jumper sergeant. Harold press corp. deputy adam mcmillan deputy corporal daniel abramowicz officer marshall waters. Sergeant shawn rios officer traveled swallow office. At charlie cortes deputy sheriff jared alison culpable. Kyle davis texas state trooper chad walker reserve deputy sheriff james driver officer william evans. Lieutenant james kousky officer brent whole deputy sheriff christopher knight sergeant james smith deputy sheriff pat bonds officer. Nasty sacco's corporal keith. He cook sergeant. Chris ward officer. Chris bernheim officer jeremy brighton corporal. Thomas frazier officers scotty. Triplet conservation office. Sarah grell trooper. John harris officer. Genaro new sergeant dominic vaca detective ryan park detective. Jamie huntley park officer emmanuel amelia. Deputy sheriff william smith officer alexandra harris officer joseph burson officer. Gordon beasley is. That enough is enough for you. D from the police. Democrats is that enough for you. Blm antiques protesters and rioters. How many more. Americans need to die whose job it is to protect us who have been slaughtered in the line of duty. It is a war on america's police and it has to stop recall primary challenge every stinking democrat. Meh congress person. Local county official. Who doesn't stand with our police. That list is wrong. How many statues have been built to them. How many murals have been painted in the names of detective ryan park. Sajjan dominic vaca none zero zilch. Because we celebrate the criminals. The recidivist like george floyd. The people who point loaded downs.

Jorge lloyd george floyd cody halt Nathan la Lieutenant stephen williams Sheriff andrew clark sajjan damon Darren young deputy sheriff ja dale province ella giza Richard yankee jason judd antony dea adele myrow Andy ornelas Officer tyler jason soup gordon best daniel mobely deputy sheriff j robert mcfarland
"robert mcfarland" Discussed on Dunedin Writers and Readers Festival 2019

Dunedin Writers and Readers Festival 2019

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"robert mcfarland" Discussed on Dunedin Writers and Readers Festival 2019

"Thank you next up. We have a poet. Visual artist publisher and translator roger. Hicken many of you know him through cold hub press. Today he'll be talking to us about the recently published work a town trod by poets. Please join me in welcoming. Br dunedin appropriately for new zealand city of literature. Same to crop up in poetry more frequently and more vividly than any other new zealand city or town. It has a temporal symbolic santer of many of the poems of janet frame james k baxter and peter alds. It's charles brash. Home ground city. That floats on the edge past century beat of breakers beyond white island last stiffened nothing it has baxter's southern town a hands breadth from antarctica. It has peter houses deep southern freeze. Montgomery avenue not thinks is tonight with the tampa. Expect to see icebergs floating harbour after this city of literature publication town trod by poets which features photographs and poetry by peter. All of a poem by mexican halio address to peter began as a paper presented. Two thousand sixteen center for the book symposium book and plice sauntering around the city trailing a string of quotations i meant to offer an impressionistic account of dunedin's presence in poetry with an emphasis on the poetry payrolls more than any other writer whose mapped the stories dunedin straits subtitled. Search for truth. Underneath and streets grew from a phrase in a poem of mine grim satori on dunedin streets dunedin having been the locus of my misspent youth. Not all of which i care to remember a backdrop to the adventure of suffering to paraphrase in loni for whom the city was an tip in mount third tory hill tree and tower by sunlight or stylized assembled into a sitting for something to take place in so what follows snippets from town by poets. The old wise journey on foot robert mcfarland right. The compact between riding and walking almost as old as literature award is only a step away from a story. Many of the dunedin poems of peter alds stories of or footnotes to his walks street after salt win street as good an example as any as bell. Now's park or two thousand eight in which he steps into a story in the imagined company of some local literary four years. Charles brash risk dallas. Ah read james k baxter and an ex-lover as he walks up high gaze towards the town belt nor west wind at my back stopped at bell. Now's park for a p and a clump of bush. Got sniffed out by a black dog took a seat on an antiquated bench to take in the view the ground hollowed at my feet by those. Who'd been before me watching. The surf roll into clear. Poets charles and ruth comparing peninsula visions. I am sky sharing egg and possibly sandwiches. Young couples shooting just starting out on life's moonlit journey..

peter alds new zealand james k baxter antarctica tonight Today four years janet frame robert mcfarland loni two thousand Montgomery avenue new zealand city peter charles brash mexican past century Charles brash couples roger
"robert mcfarland" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"robert mcfarland" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"I'm krista tippett and this is on being today with robert mcfarland. He's written about the human fascination with mountains the old way of knowing land by walking it and he's a lyrical excavator of lost words for the natural world in his newest literary adventure and he explores the hidden worlds beneath our feet. We've been talking about the world of emerging discoveries about that another whole new a whole new planet in our midst is what you this language of the would wide web would wide web. Yeah would that when my phrase but it is it is not Did you was that fresh to you. The this revelation of the woodward web. No i mean i. I don't know if i'd heard that phrase before not I have been aware of this. Here's what we're learning about trees. And yes and forest and and things like fungi and mosses which were things we've thought of as parasites. It turns out her essential vitality and an collaboration mutuality. Yeah the school orioles Mutual ism which is about four hundred and fifty million years old. We think Because of fossil photograph lithograph effectively exists from iran. Then showing it in action whereby. Fungi set in fungi. Act to an end. Microbial fungi. I'm plug into the roots of trees and plants at a cellular level. Create an interface across which Resources and and messages to some degree can be carried. And and then those fungi plug into the roots of other trees and say the trees can as citizens cima- the pioneering forest ecologist. Who helped break open this. Grind rights can talk to one another And this once you've met this idea. Wow it shakes the grandeur. Con park is a is a wondrous place but it also challenges our ideas of of what an individual is what an organism is wellbeing begins and ends. It does not end the body horizon. We getting increasingly complex and political ways. there is a You're describing a conversation and underlined with martin sheldrick in epping forest in into the wonderfully named merlin sheltering marlins merlin and you quoted him. It was just fantastic thing might early. Superheroes weren't marvel characters but lichen and fungi in that they annihilate are categories of gender. They reshape our ideas of community and cooperation. They screw up our hereditary model of evolutionary descent. The utterly liquidate our notions of time. What's most superheroes than that. I think that you're also making Kind of circling back around women have circled around in this conversation. I'll say let me say this we're speaking medico at about places we find hope and kind of new new imagination. Yes for new realities forming. And i do experience and and you know i could word gets overused in human cultures. Right so i feel like now. The word ecosystem is being overused but but it's tectonic shift really like thinking about how institutions work in leadership works and how things happen How movements work. How forms changed. How minds are changed. work together to create New realities it does feel to me like these kinds of discoveries about how reality works how life works are not only relevant to hauer reimagining. I think somewhere you said historical narratives of progress but also remaking how we structure our life together. I hope so. Chris i really hope so At the core of them his something a bit more complex than just connection it's entanglements and simeon tangled is different to connection because connection is purely a structural effect but entanglement is as it were Requires a meacham to be recognized that there are consequences of entanglement that if one thing is destroyed or lean too heavily on our exhausted than than this will recoil as it were and we we have to long thought of ourselves. As a as an arrogant species that can draw on the world as inexhaustible standing resource whether that be provide or to to accept that which we dispose of and that relies on a very monastic notion of being and these revelations of of entanglement. Aw they they they destroy those ideas and they show us to be profanity porous to be nothing but holes almost and string. I think. Donna a harrowing. Who whose work you will will know. She talks about making kin As an an another lovely where. She has his symbiosis so poisonous. Has that that sense of creation of creating but sim gives us that creating with so the idea of making ken and pieces and and for her working with lynn modules. This is happening at a at a genetic level. An epa genetic level as well as a kind of creative and coming on societal level so it kind of has form as proceeding if you like. Life has always film literally flourished and and grown through co making Okay this is. This is a turn minecraft. I was so surprised and this just reveals the limits of my knowledge but You wrote a piece about minecraft and he started by saying The imaginary landscape in which i spend most time is born not of a book or a film an algorithm time in minecraft. With your one of your check the when i was writing when i read that that short piece about minecraft i. I was spending a great deal of time in in that underworld and it was also the time when i was you know when i was i was in physical underlines a great deal and i just became fascinated by it as this virtual realm. Of course people have written about height is sort of parables of extractive human progress. You got to get there and mind your resources and build and build and build But it was as this realm this mythic rome called the nether and the nether is what you you pass into through a portal that you construct out of obsidian And the nether is all our underlines rolled into one. And so i found myself. Sometimes i would come back from these. These trips into nuclear waste storage facilities cave systems and And then i would be sitting down with my kids and they'd be. Let's go to the nether dad. I've just come back from there..

krista tippett robert mcfarland Chris martin sheldrick today Donna minecraft four hundred and fifty million one Con park
"robert mcfarland" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"robert mcfarland" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Really want to focus on under land. Which is your your newest book And also i think a book that people are discovering in this country in in a big way which has been exciting to see That use that as kind of a focal point to also more expansively explore. How you're thinking accumulated way of seeing the world and experiencing it rolls around inside you. And i feel like that also does find expression in in the writing of land so And it's always. It's so interesting to see how. I think you said it this way some in another interview that your body of work. The gradient of your body of work has been tending down because she began writing about mountain mountains of the mind. And then there were the values in moore's in wild places and then there's traversing the world on foot in the old ways and now you have gone down to the world's beneath our feet and you said we know so little of the world's beneath our feet i think just naming that not something that we even think about how little we know of the world's beneath our feet they. They are dark places in in several senses. That a sometimes say to my children. We walk on this thin above this raging space of life and matter in an oil its vibrancy and and fury and we knew nothing of it. site stops at our toes. It's tops at ground. Level in sight is so bind up with with with with modern ways of of of knowing we. Can i say alien unless we can look up and see literally trillions of miles. We can see light coming from starr's across the universe across the galaxy but we looked at and we we can't see beyond the grass or the tomczak

Chris robert mcfarland krista tippett mike lynn cambridge
"robert mcfarland" Discussed on Stephanomics

Stephanomics

08:38 min | 1 year ago

"robert mcfarland" Discussed on Stephanomics

"All ghibli. We have a different kind of slightly slower but a different kind of paradigm shift. That's happening over. The last few years in regards to china and how the world looks at china and i just wonder whether you feel. Maybe there's a risk that you're actually out of step with that still carrying the flag for a belief that engagement with china and gradual bringing of china into the sort of multilateral liberal economic order was the direction the world was going to take and instead now you have clear competition much more than engagement and a very muscular china. where does your vision. I mean a you. Not changing your approach false enough. Oh well stephanie. I think a watershed moments in canada's relationship with china has been arbitrary detention of michael cove. Reagan michael spor That is the issue for our country when it comes to china. These are two really brave canadians. Who has been detained for. No fault of their own and canadians are really aware of it. Does that change. Your view of what is possible in terms of future policy with china is a country that you can do business with you. Can continue to engage with positivity. Well let's. It is a country that canada and every member of the g seven and the g twenty does business with so that's a reality This is very different from the relationship of the world's democracies with the soviet union for example Where we occupied very separates economics spheres. But you know in the game Turning to that soviet experience of my own I have always believed that. Still shared values are really important and are very important basis or deep international collaboration for canada. Those values our democracy. They are human rights that has also that has been a sea-change in at jesus spending and deficits resident biden's proposed six trillion just under six trillion dollars worth of spending three big packages. You talked about having had your experience in the post-soviet world you saw. We saw their. How incredibly damaging. It was to a society and economy. Sometimes if you lose control of inflation lose control of the economy. Is there a bit of you that that things were being too complacent about spending and borrowing in this area. And it's we're gonna come back to haunt us. Not just not just canada but this this change in the global attitude so no but i am very careful. I am a canadian finance minister so i am surrounded by economists who are very very careful With our numbers with our projections. And i'm canadian too. So that comes naturally to me. And i think it's a good thing and i'm gonna give you an example stephanie In our fall economic statement we predicted a deficit for twenty twenty twenty twenty one of three hundred and eighty one point six billion dollars and we came in at three hundred and fifty four point. Two billion dollars crashes the goody two shoes economy we we we embrace it. Some people say that we are earnest and boring. And i say it's comedian way. It's a good things but by six. Be biden's not this not being cautious. And we know that there are people on all sides including his supporters. Who were worried that the numbers are getting a bit big if the us in cautious and gets into trouble. Canada get sucked into you. Know we talked about paradigm shifts. And what shapes. You're you know how the lessons of the past shape your actions. I would say something that has shaped. My actions are government actions and based on the conversations around the g seven table. I can tell you this is shaping. The actions of many g. Seven ministers is actually the experience of two thousand eight two thousand nine and i think what most g seven countries feel looking back on the response to two thousand eight. Two thousand nine is we didn't do enough and didn't recover soon enough from the two thousand eight two thousand nine recession and it's one reason that i am very focused on driving a fast and robust recovery from the recession canada. Has today we still have. you know. we're glad to have had the ten percent grave in the fourth quarter of last year. But we still have five hundred thousand canadians. Who either don't have a job or working. Fewer fewer than they were before coded that it to me is an economic imperative but also a political imperative to get them back to work all of us politically can reap the whirlwind if we don't if we allow economic hardship to fester and i think a fair criticism of elites you know including financial journalist deletes I was a financial journalist in two thousand and eight. Two thousand nine like stephanie. And i think you know people could quite fairly say In the recovery elites did pretty well pretty quickly but a lot of regular people were left behind for far too long I think it behooves all of us to not let that happen. This time and i remember stephanie. I don't know if anyone ever told you this when we were baby. Journalists at the f. T. but i remember One editor saying to me. You know what the difference is between a recession and depression. It's a depression when a journalists framed loses their job and something. I've been mindful of in. This recession is the kinds of people. Who've you and i know stephanie. White collar people Have absolute than pretty fine You know the worst we've had to deal with is is strain from zoom and certain you know having your kids around the house in them. Struggling from ice rink from zoom to one of my children was doing online school today wearing sunglasses when he said it was because of the glare from screen when we look at the numbers in canada people at the top of the income distribution actually have more money than they did before the crisis. They've been saving money. And i would just urge all of us to remember the case shape also means people at the bottom people who work with their means have suffered a much greater health risks. They're the ones who have lost their jobs and our economies will be if we don't help them but our societies and at the end of the day democracies will be weaker if we don't help them. Chip robert mcfarland the british author. He's written about insight different context. He writes about called under land he talks about. I'm burials and he's actually talking about you. Know in the arctic circle where things have become unburied peop- by climate change. That people thought we're going to be buried for hundreds of years. I sort of feel like there's been masses of burials jakovic covert you know things come unto the surface that we sort of knew were there. I mean slightly with your if you were still journalistic and you think about the things that have been revealed by kevin. Maybe permanently changed in. What's the book that you would be writing. What do you think is the most significant thing about this whole period..

michael cove kevin Two billion dollars six billion dollars two thousand six trillion Reagan Two thousand ten percent Chip robert mcfarland stephanie three hundred six fourth quarter of last year today two michael spor Two thousand nine one reason hundreds of years
"robert mcfarland" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"robert mcfarland" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Album in collaboration with the author Robert McFarland. It's full of modern folk songs with big Sing along choruses like this 1 10 Degrees of Strange Identity. Strange try Jane shape up myself to be together. So Because I'm I need that dog 10. Degrees of strange by Johnny Flynn and Robert McFarland. This is part of our weekly music round up. You can check out the whole thing at new sounds dot or g'kar. Gonna run like the side through the heart of a dream. I run because I my eyes see that Logan and down You were holding study of 61 with sunshine this morning Sunny with a high near 81 today, then mostly clear with the law around 65 Tonight Wednesday, the perhaps the warmest day of the week, and 85, 83, 80 and 80 and 80 sounds like a broken record for this week. This is W N. Y. C at 7 46. Six times for wonders and summer meters. It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Rachel Martin. Millions of Americans live abroad, many in places were access to covert vaccines is limited.

Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin Robert McFarland Johnny Flynn Degrees of strange this week NPR News 85 10 Degrees of Strange Identity this morning 83 61 today Six times 81 80 I'm I need that Millions Strange Americans
"robert mcfarland" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

06:44 min | 1 year ago

"robert mcfarland" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Luxury out there. Dan richards documents is adventures in outpost. A journey to the wild ends of the earth. The also wrote holloway with robert mcfarland which we spoke about on a recent addition of travel. With rick steves then posts to twitter at dan. Underscore zip dan. You were talking about shepherds in switzerland. Can you describe that to us. That was a writing up that i went to switzerland. There was a shepherd's hut. That's in this chapter. Which is roger deakins. Kind of shepherd's hut. He was an amazing nature writer from britain. So i'm visiting his farmstead in suffolk in this chapter and really juxtaposed this very very simple almost little caravan that he had on wheels that he would move about his estate and he would write and they'll be a little potbellied stove in there and a wonderful quite uncomfortable horsehair mattress bed. And you had your own little world in there and i oppose this with A really space age. Treehouse is in switzerland. Which is part of your mcculskey foundations writing. I suppose you it. Looks like a fortress. But i think really. It's kind of Residency program so writers can go and they're given everything that they would need to write and one of those things is a solitude but also they're given solitude safe from the ground as in this suspended in this amazing bruce list plywood tree house with old. Maude comes under floor. Heating and things like that is the sort of thing. Silicon valley tech entrepreneur might build in upstate. New york you know. But you're in the sierra mountains of switzerland and it's for writers and it was a really interesting juxtaposition because for one you've got roger deakins very very spot in space and in the other you've got this super high tech almost sifi swiss little cube. That's very blade runner amid at the other extreme you have again this just enough architecture to make you aware that you're not completely outside so i was juxtaposing nose and seeing which might be better for the creative process and everything wasn't dan. I'm fascinated in that. Because i can see the rustic shepherd's hut and then i could see you in this super high tech pod. Did you try writing and thinking and organizing your thoughts in the high tech pod. I did but it strange. You know the parts of that adventure. I spent six weeks in. That part is exactly the right word you use. It was a pod and the nights. I loved best with a stormy nights where you'd get the snowstorm. And you get the gaels coming in and you would see these triple ply windows. but they would warp. You know you'd see them. Woman's breathing with the storm such was the elemental force outside. And you would feel the hull. Pod begin to move on its horses and it felt for a moment like you're in a ship in the middle of a stormy sea and those are the elements. I liked best when nature almost tried to get back on an even keel. Because you can be in this kind of almost a medically sealed box away from everything way. You can't hear the birds. Wherever is automated. You know everything is digital but nature will always find a way and the parts. I love most with the stormy elements and also. There was an amazing weekend where the pod developed several leaks and so you could hear dripping of water and you know the electrcity and there's something in me that likes the chaos of that. i really enjoyed. So your book takes us all over the world Tell us a little bit about being at that lighthouse. That french late house with centuries old stone slowly. Losing its battle with the see mrs cole. Don lighthouse which is just off the coast of north atlantic. It's quite an near bordeaux. A lighthouse has been on this particular psalm. Bank at the mouth of the jere own estimates about the main river going into out a centuries and centuries and the lighthouse. That's currently there the foundations of it. The i say ten twenty meters of it. Go back to sixteen hundreds that palladian. They're made in the most amazing stone. That often needs to be replaced. You have the most amazing carvings on it. And it's very very palladian beautiful. And then above that you have what people would generally recognizes the lighthouse. You know you have this long tapering tower and at the top. You have a lantern room. And that's where fresno developed and tested his amazing concentric rings of lenses but to enter. That building is incredible. You go in and it feels like you're in a cathedral church and the first floor is actually an apartment for the king of france. You have the most amazing classical architecture going on the bed. Isn't there anymore but you. How will these busts of great statesman you can tell you an building because france has not really had a king for a while now and then you go above and the next floor up. You have this amazing chapel to the virgin. Mary with this coffered ceiling is like the pantheon in rome. And then you go further up and all the time you gave up his little spiral staircases in stone. And it feels like you're going up a belfry. You could be inside a calm shallow. Something really organic. And then you get up and there. There's another area. It's amazing all the same time. You can be whipped by the fury of the. See all around you and you're all alone. Yes and it's incredible. I was with on that particular occasion. A wonderful guide. Jean marie and when we actually were at the talk in the lantern room and we were looking at the works. He was saying that he has previously been up there in a two hundred mile an hour gale and he couldn't feel the tower moving though he knew that it was because it was all relative out there there was some going on but the actual movement of the light the way that they keep that lubricated as they have it in a small pool of off of a monkey liquid mercury and he was suddenly aware that was splashes of mercury on the floor around his feet and suddenly he was aware that in this massive mellstrom the whole stone tower was moving like an oak tree. The stories that he tells it was incredible to be in his presence and a lot of time in the book. I met unexpectedly the most amazing people. I would go and i would try and be alone. But often they're the most amazing characters who pop up and act as my guides in this book and i was incredibly lucky and also incredibly grateful to those people who kind of populate these unpopulated areas. This is traveled speech. We've been talking with dan richards. Dan's book is outpost at journey to the wild ends of the earth. So dan all of this makes me. I find it like an amazing vicarious. Adventure was part of your Reason for writing this just to give people something fascinating to read about from their coach. Did you want to inspire people not to visit these places but just to realize.

Dan richards switzerland Jean marie Dan New york robert mcfarland six weeks first floor sixteen hundreds rick steves ten twenty meters dan north atlantic suffolk twitter Mary dan richards sierra Silicon valley one
"robert mcfarland" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

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"robert mcfarland" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Realize when they got onto everest. The thousand closed system froze so they the luckily they had a couple of open systems with them but they had some rugged enough areas in north wales where they thought they could have some practice there. And you to some mountain they're not resorts there. Sort of hiking centers or something. There's some beautiful towns There's a temple beth. Lert have to guess who described beth gillard. Well it's a mountainous area and therefore towns villages they nestle in the valleys. they don't sit on top of hills and bear galette which means galaxy grave is Is in little bowl with rivers running through it stone building. Oh yes everything's built of stone. I have everything is built a stone. Don't bridges over the babbling thrown bridges. And of course slate roofs because wales used to be these slate production center of the world at one time. That's right so when we think about going to north wales as a visitor and we wanna do some hikes. What advice would you give for enjoying the nature of snowden national park and bringing up some calories at the same time you can hike at all levels. Mt snowden itself with as it is in. Welsh is an attraction. And there's railway that runs up so if you don't want to walk for three hours just take the train and this is kind of a cute little tourist steam train yell it goes from clan sambas up to the top and that's a family day out it is. It gets crowded what was going to say is that snowden is like a magnet people have heard of it people know that so that eight hundred and twenty seven square miles so get away from snowden. You'll see fewer and fewer people which is a lovely thing. It is very emptier. It is and if you wanted to have some rugged memory you could hike it without the steam train. Take what five hours or three hundred zero five hours up down if if you know it. It's a nice day. it's a lovely day. Beware say this flatter. Beware of times of year like easter. Right when it's considerably the top dress. Well okay archaeologist martin delenda Our guide right now on travel with rick. Steves to mount snowden and snowdonia national park. it's near where. He makes his home in northern wales. When we're enjoying the great nature anywhere in britain if you want experienced the industrial age sleet industry. The heritage in wales. What are your suggestions. I would suggest inflammatories itself now. We suddenly mountain railway goes up and better better. You have part of the national museum of wales. The slate museum of the north. There is no charge to go in and to me it's fascinating i go there myself. I dropped in. It's very well done. It is well done. But it's it's a museum in its it. Duplicates replicate some sort of slices of life from those days. But you can actually go into a mind and you can take the lifts down and experience. What would you recommend if you want to actually put a hard hat and doing. I would go to blame of his synagogue. Leno festina neha with this. What what festina starts with two fs. Yes f- f- and then through two hours and when you l. is pronounced l. but to el-zor pronounced esh okay so that be f- that initials of the town's name in when you see that you know. That's the quintessential slate mining town just outside of town. There's the liquid mine from say embarrassed with is about. I'd say comfortable drive on the wrong side of the road that is it's a bat and now has maybe forty five minutes when you going to tour a mine. What does that entail you. Go in told history of the mind you see how it worked and then people will demonstrate slate into you have to understand that everybody in the region was employed in the slate industry chewy and they can split that slate. It's just like incredible. They'll make shingles them. You can get it down to a sixteenth of an inch even less sixteenth of an inch now as a traveler real fun part of his in northern wales assistant to hear the the choirs inaction and I understand a lot of towns. They have a practice the same day every week interest actually welcome usually it's tuesday wednesday midweek and You go along making contribution. Why wouldn't you sure is like the practice for everything. It's almost more interesting. Interestingly the event oh it's so convivial so and culture and then afterwards they're done singing what are they do. They go over to the bar and they sing some more. They sing better with lubricated voices. It's beautiful thing and as a traveler. You become a temporary welsh person. And he joined by him a few beers. And you're part of the family. This is travel with rick steves. We're talking with martin. Dilemna bits from northern wales talking about snowden in the area around northern wales where. You've got the slate culture. You got the tallest mountain in wales and he got plenty of opportunities to enjoy as a traveler. Our email is radio. Rick steves dot com and bj. Mackinaw illinois has emailed us and martin. Bj rights with a limited time for our first trip to the uk. Our family of four which includes two. Teenagers can't hit every park to the extent that we'd like should we see snowdonia. Instead of dartmoor yorkshire dales or the lake district And should we climb snowdon. Or ben nevis. Well snowden as the tallest mountain wales. Ben nevis the tallest mountain in scotland. First of all dartmoor and yorkshire dales are kind of dot more is let's say is not as elevated the extra days are beautiful rolling. It's rolling it's it's mellow leads is sort of remote unused flat. I rolling hills. Is its farmland mostly but it says is just want more neutral if you want more hardcore nature. I think i would recommend lake district or snowdonia. Okay it's me. I'd recommend snowdonia of the late. Just district is more rounded. Snowdonia is no jagged. I love scotland ben. Nevis is four thousand four hundred thousand six feet so that's another thousand feet or whatever dot com and because it's so much further north it can get much colder and you have to be aware of remember the latitude factors in there But bj's talking about the lake district. That's the cumbrian lake district. That's you've got to to the south in the north. The south to me is more touristy. I i love settling down in the north and comes. They can plenty hikes there but a great thing about wales is the castles. You can't go to north wales without being just wonder struck by the castle's tell us just briefly as we visit snowden and we drive there and we explore around. We're gonna see castles. Who built them in. Why well there two sets if you like of cancels in north one set was built by the princes. Gwinnett dear understand. That's the area which not only finds itself now. if you're trying to attack them that you have to. Because it's a mountainous landscape you have to come along mountain valleys and so to defend their homeland. They built their castles in the valleys however granada was conquered by edward the first in the twelve eight long shanks of braveheart fame so beautifully played by patrick mcmullan. But he wasn't interested in the valleys he wanted to be able to get to. His castles built his castles. Which are the most expensive set of wonderful castles. You've ever seen but his castle on the edge of the seat so he could access bring building materials by sea So the castles that. I'm thinking of in wales for these big dramatic state of the art in the thirteenth century castles. They would be english. Castles built to keep the indigenous welsh. People down yeah and they would be accessible by cc. Because that's what you you don't need to control the countryside you just didn't have these tow- halls access by sea. And then you can administer your empire when you've been there you know there's a very narrow coastal strip mountains on the inside so if you're gonna move in granada north wales. You can't move either along the coastal strip all through the valleys. Well if you build castles at the mouths of rivers on the seashore. You've got landscape tighter. You bottled up the country king edward. He had his castles there. And what are the top three or four castles that come out and conway damaris. I'd say those arteries one. How beautiful gorgeous castles this is travel. With rick steves joined by martin land of its guide from northern wales. We're talking about the snowden national park in the cultural and historic wonders nearby martin. Thanks so much for joining us. And i'd like to just close with a moment with your unit. Just spent three just exhilarating hours. We didn't take the steam train week. Claimed that is a beautiful day. We got to the top of mount snowden you as a welshman tell me what do you see and what do you think accept. The view from the top is stunning. You can see ireland from the top star. You can see the island man from atop certain the see is there. The lakes heavily glaciated landscape deep steep narrow valleys little streams that run down them and a very green countryside is not by accident that tom jones sang of the green green grass of home. It does rain a bit. But you know it's worth putting on her coat to go out into the of snowdonia in at that moment. You're in the top of wales literally house martin. Thanks so much joining us. Thank you fat in just a bit. Well explore the outdoorsy appeal of laid-back former yugoslav nation slovenia where there'll be celebrating thirty years of independence later this year but i british travel writer. Dan richards looks at the small outposts. You can find scattered around some of the wildest paces on earth. It's travel with. Rick steves as a kid. Dan richards climbed trees and built forks in the countryside of western england since then his enthusiasm for adventure as him to untamed landscapes around the world. Some even come with a place to stay end up breathtaking view for his book outpost. A journey to the wild ends of the earth. Dan explored the huts cabins and refugees that have sheltered wilderness adventures for decades. He joins us now on travel with. Rick steves to take us to these secret worlds that you won't find on airbnb. Dan welcome. Hello thank you for having me. You mentioned in your book that it all started with a polar bear pelvis. That sat on your father's desk. Can you explain that. Just before i was born. My dad came back from an expedition That he had done to combat in the high arctic when he was younger he was a mountaineer and also a bit of an explorer and he went to this the most northerly human permanent settlement on earth. Which is called neo listened as part of a sort of geology expedition. And when he came home he unpacked his bag. And he had this amazing almost alien artifact. Which was this whole obama pelvis very old when he founded so you know he never met the bear involved but he found this kind of bony frame and brought it home and as you say. Kind of existed has incredible object in his study. So there's the polar bear pelvis and then a photograph of your dead in bird. Yes and he'd stayed with his team In a number of shots up that just very very rudimentary very fragile. Little buildings where they had stayed for an identity so when your school friends are going to me orca for their summer. Break you decide to fall board and find that shed and tell us about how you got into going to these remote outposts because you've gone to these places all over the world will in light of my dad's trip. I began to think about these outposts as witness in a way to amazing adventures and travels that people had had over centuries really and often the people are gone and the only thing that remains. Is there jumping off point and that could be a base like scott space in antarctica or it could be beacon like a lighthouse or if watching cabin and the pass these places are now out of use but they still exist as these kind of amazing survivors memorials to things that went on i began thinking about that and also the way that often creative people will try and make shed or a spot in space either in the house or in the garden in a way to try and sort of interact with amuses or just create enough kind of clear space. Too thin create so I began to combine those. That is so important. I just love going to the remote fjords on the west coast of norway and finding the little tiny cabin where ivar greek. The great norwegian composer would work. And you can see the simple piano he composed on and you can look out the window and see the solitude in the pristine nature and the vastness of it all that inspired him and you can imagine that solitude was his moose absolutely. I think a lot of the places that i visited were that they had just enough to make some difference so you weren't completely outside and And thorough has that line where his walden pond hot. He was caged amongst birds so the birds were free and that he was with you know at his desk Just in the nature. So i suppose venturing to these places you would prepare yourself to know what was the purpose of this hutton. And what is the humanity of it. What was the struggle. What was the heroics of this hut and then when you go there. It becomes a little more rewarding and a little more meaningful. Yes absolutely and some of them have had amazing. Double triple quadruple lives. So that were sale house that i visited in iceland and these are buildings that are incredibly rudimentary assault and they were built by the early norse to make crossing the very barren interior of iceland possible. So they were joined the dots kind of stations along the way and they started out being almost little igloos. If you can imagine an eagling that was made of turf and rocks And then over the years. They've been rebuilt so many times that now they look like what you might recognize as a sort of prairie farmstead In a way but they still retain the foundations and the story and the myth and the ghosts of all of these different incarnations all of the travelers who've passed through them. I found that really fascinating. And you can hike to one of those. What was it like lumps in a house of joy in the middle of iceland. It was amazing. Because i think i describe in the book is driving over this featureless because we were renovating it. We actually drove out. But you can imagine the north walking over this featureless terrain immense seeing little hammock as it would have been in their day appearing and the house of joy. You know you can imagine the joy that you'll sleeping you have a roof to might you know you're going to be warm because if you miss that you get lost if you can't find it then you're out on a permafrost did completely baron sort of tundra. So the the need to get in and get warm with immense and very kind of you know essential and elemental and when i approached have atmos which was the sal house that i visited. I describe it as a little. A little house sat up and hugging its knees And when you're out in this kind of environment and you got your note pet there as a writer. All sorts of beautiful thoughts would think just flutter by and you wanna grab them and write them down absolutely. Although often i end up thinking about this. In retrospect how try and take a few pictures but often when you're in these bases it's so important just to live in the moment even writing something down you don't wanna take your eyes off What's around you directly in front of this sale house was the second largest glossier in iceland and just to look at it it was just so it had such charisma. This thing you know it exuded. This cold cold charisma. It was really hypnotic. He would look into these deep deep. Blue's all the blues. You can imagine of this you know elemental incredibly old incredibly important blasio year and then to actually take your eyes off it and write something down would almost feel like dereliction of duty you need to sort of soak it up. Take it all in. This is the quintessence of travel. What you're talking about this is travel. With rick steves. If you ever wanted to really get away. And i mean really away. The you'll enjoy the stories of travel writer dan richards. This book is outpost attorney to the wild ends of the earth and in this book. He takes adventures to ten remote cabins and refuges and some of the most hostile terrain on the planet. Dan is a royal literary fund fellow at bristol university in england. We have links to dense work with this week. Show at rick steves dot com slash radio so then you talk about these little huts in these sheds and whatever we call them and they have interesting names in scotland. What is it a booth or a buffy a buffy. yes tell us about arriving at a buffy in scotland. Well i think the word bossy comes from There are several of derivation. But if you can imagine a booth it's a single room dwelling and again your arriving. After a heart. They slug it scotland. So you know it rains and then it rarely rains and if the sun is shining it's probably still raining you know and you be hiking over. Maybe some moorland. Or maybe you've come off the cango mountains and you just immersed in this amazing plateau of mountains and gorse and heather and moorland menu see on the horizon again a little buffy this little former crofters hut perhaps a little house or little dwelling and you get in and one of the most amazing things about scottish and bodies exist over the uk. There are some in wales. There are some in the lake district. You get into this very simple dwelling and they're the marks of the people who have been here before you and it really put me in mind. There's a wonderful poem by philip. Larkin and the poem is called. Home is so sad and the lines go it stays as it was left. Formed to the comfort of a loss to go as if to win them back. I've got a cabin. I rarely visit up in the mountains outside of seattle. And it's like that. I never know who was there last. And sometimes it's been months but you still feel the spirit of the people who were there last and how they left it and what they must have done and the fund they must have had and then you get absolutely you get to take that story and carry it forward. That's it and the carrying forward. I think is such an amazing thing of a lot of the places i visited in the book. The bodies and the sale house. They are generous architecture and as much as they allow on movement they allow further adventures. Into as you said earlier apparently completely inhospitable terrain but within them hidden these jewel like dwellings at that. Allow you to spend a night in relative comfort. The scottish have a word rough stuffing they call it. So you know you don't find a body. You don't find sal house you end up sleeping in relatively dry ditch with your packers appello and the coat as a as a do or you know. And that's rough stuffing and the alternative to that. Is this amazing body. Give me the any day overrun absolutely. Yeah so you can have a fire and that's great. It is kinda cool to think. They're not the end of the road. They are at depot on the way to somewhere in most cases absolutely. Yeah they're kind of silo. I think you know because some people leave you know you might get candles you mike matches you might get some food. That's been left this kind of in a ten you might. You might even get biscuits. I mean that's real luxury out there. Dan richards documents is adventures in outpost. A journey to the wild ends of the earth. He also wrote holloway with robert mcfarland which we spoke about on a recent edition of travel. With rick steves then post to twitter at dan underscore zap. Then you were talking about a shepherd's hut in switzerland. Can you describe that to us. That was a writing up that i went to switzerland. There was a shepherd's hut. That's in the swiss chapter. Which is roger deakins. Kind of shepherd's hut. He was an amazing nature writer from britain. So i'm visiting his farmstead in suffolk in this chapter and really juxtaposed this very very simple almost little caravan that he had on wheels that he would move about his estate and he would write and they'll be a little potbellied stove in there and a wonderful quite uncomfortable horsehair mattress bed. And you had your own little world in that. And i just oppose this with A really space age tree house. I visited in switzerland. Which is part of your mcculskey foundations writing. I suppose you could. It looks like a fortress. But i think really it's kind of Residency program so writers can go and given everything that they would need to write and one of those things is a solitude but also they're given solitude also from the ground as in the suspended in amazing bruce list plywood treehouse with all combs. You've got under floor heating and things like that is the sort of thing that a silicon valley tech entrepreneur might build upstate new york. You know. but you're in the juror mountains of switzerland and it's for writers and it was a really interesting juxtaposition because for one you've got roger deakins very very spot in space and in the other you've got this. Super hightech almost sifi swiss. Little cube very blade runner met at the other extreme. You have again this just enough architecture to make you aware that you're not completely outside so i was juxtaposing those and seeing which might be better for the creative process and everything wasn't dan. I'm fascinated in that. Because i i can just see the rustic shepherd's hut and then i could see you in this super high tech pod. Did you try writing and thinking and organizing your thoughts in the high tech pod. I did but it strange. You know i'm the pots of that adventure. Spent six weeks in. That part is exactly the right word you use. It was a pod and the nights. I loved best with a stormy nights where you'd get a snowstorm. And you get the gaels coming in and you would see these triple ply windows. But they would warp. You know you'd see the moment breathing with the storm such was the elemental force outside and you would feel the hall. Pod begin to move on its horses and it felt for a moment like you're in a ship in the middle of a stormy sea and those with the elements. I liked best when nature almost tried to get back on an even keel. Because you can be in this kind of almost hermetically sealed box away from everything where you can't hear the birds where everything is automated. You know everything is digital but nature will always find a way and the parts that i love. Most were the stormy elements and also. There was an amazing. we can't wear. The pod developed several leaks and say you could have dripping of water and you know the susie electricity and there's something in me that likes the chaos of that the pits. I really enjoyed so your book takes us all over the world. Tell us a little bit about being at that lighthouse. That french late house with centuries old stone slowly. Losing its battle with the mrs cole Lighthouse which is just off the coast north atlantic. It's quite an near bordeaux. A lighthouse has been on this particular sam bank at the mouth of the gironde estuary. So that's the main river going into a centuries and centuries and the lighthouse that's currently there the foundations of it. The i say ten twenty meters of it. Go back to the sixteen. Hundreds that palladian. They're made in the most amazing stone that often needs to be replaced. You have the most amazing carvings on it. And it's very very palladian beautiful. And then above that you have what people would generally recognizes the lighthouse. You know you have this long tapering tower and at the top. You have a lantern room. And that's where fresno developed and tested his amazing concentric rings of lenses but to enter. That building is incredible. You go in and it feels like you're in a cathedral or church and the first floor is actually an apartment for the king of france. You have the most amazing classical architecture going on the bed. Isn't there anymore but you. How will these busts of great statesman you can tell you in an old building. France has not really had a king for a while. Now and then you go above and the next floor up. You have this amazing chapel to the virgin. Mary with this coffered ceiling is like the pantheon in rome. And then you go further up and all the time you get these little spiral staircases in stone. And it feels like you're going up a belfry. you could be inside a calm shallow. Something really organic. And then you get up and there's another area. It's amazing all the time. You can be whipped by the fury of the see all around you and you're all alone. Yes it's incredible. I was with on that particular occasion. A wonderful guide komori and when we actually were at the top and the in the lantern room and we were looking at the works. He was saying that he has previously been up there in a two hundred mile an hour gale and he couldn't feel the tower moving though he knew that it was because it was a relative out there there was some going on but the actual movement of the light the way they keep that lubricated as they have it in a small pool a bath of mercury liquid mercury and he was suddenly aware that was splashes of mercury on the floor around his feet and suddenly he was aware that this massive mellstrom the whole stone tower was moving like an oak tree. The stories that he tells it was incredible to be in his presence and a lot of the time in the book. I met unexpectedly the most amazing people. I would go and i would try and be alone but often they're the most amazing characters who pop up an act. My guides in this book. And i was incredibly lucky and also incredibly grateful to those people who kind of populate these unpopulated areas this is travel with. Rick steves we've been talking with. Dan richards. Dan's book is outpost had journey to the wild ends of the earth. So dan all of this makes me. I find it like an amazing vicarious. Adventure was part of your Reason for writing this just to give people something fascinating to read about from their couch or did you want to inspire people not to visit these places but just to realize that. That's an option. What was your reason for writing the book. I had several reasons one was to show people. He's places exist. Another was to really open their eyes. To the fact that a lot of the ends of the world this idea of these wall places. They're very vulnerable. They're quite fragile and to suggest that maybe should you wish to visit. There are certain ways that you can do so without causing harm. The idea of leaving no trace was very important to me and in the final chapter. When i go to foul bod. It's a revelation to me. Traveling with dogs on a dog. Sled how much better that is both as an adventure as a traveler both sonically. You don't have the noise of the Snowmobile you have the wonderful patting of the dokes. The speed is so much more animal at so much more human in a way and also it gave me the opportunity to actually take in and really enjoy and become steeped and soak up the landscape. I've gone to see. I think so much travel. These days is fast travel. You go to a place and you try and use it for all of these experiences and as much as anything. I think outpost is about this idea of traveling slowly and then spending time in the place she wished to visit not trying to wring it out as if it were a dish cloth but to try just you know be in that space and to really appreciate the world. We have dan richards. The book is outpost a journey to the wild ends of the earth. Sounds like this experience for you. It's been good for your soul and.

patrick mcmullan martin delenda switzerland rick steves scotland martin uk north wales england Dan dan richards eight hundred five hours suffolk robert mcfarland forty five minutes Dan richards twitter six weeks antarctica
"robert mcfarland" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

14:34 min | 1 year ago

"robert mcfarland" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Attack them that you have to. Because it's a mountainous landscape. You have to come along mountain valleys and so to defend their homeland. They built their castles in the valleys. However gwynedd was conquered by. Edward i in the twelve long shanks of braveheart fame so beautifully played by patrick mogollon. But he wasn't interested in the valleys he wanted to be able to get to. His castles built his cousins. Which are the most expensive set of wonderful counselors you've ever seen. But his cancels are on the edge of the seat so he could access bring building materials by sea. So the castles that. I'm thinking of in wales for these big dramatic state of the art in the thirteenth century castles. They would be english. Castles built keep the welsh people down. Yeah and they would be accessible by cc. Because that's what you you don't need to control the countryside. Just didn't have these toehold access by sea. And then you can administer your empire when you've been there you know there's a very narrow coastal strip with mountains on the inside so right if you're gonna move in gwynedd in north wales you can move either along the coastal strip all through the valleys well if we build castles at the mouths of rivers on the seashore. You've got the landscape. Tida you bottle up the country king edward. He had his castles there. And what are the top three or four castles that they come out and conway damaris. I'd say those arteries one gorgeous castles. This is travel with rick. Steves been joined by martin. The land of it's the guy from northern wales. We've been talking about snowden national park in the cultural and historic wonders nearby martin. Thanks so much for joining us. And i'd like to just close with a moment with you. Just spent three just exhilarating hours. We didn't take the steam train week. Climbed that is a beautiful day. We got to the top of mount. You as a welshman tell me what do you see. And what do you think accept. The view from the top is stunning. You can see ireland from top style. You can see the island man from tops zone. The see is there. The lakes heavily glaciated landscape deep steep narrow valleys digital streams. That run down them and very green countryside is not by accident that tom jones sang of the green green grass of home. It does rain a bit. But you know it's worth putting on a coat to go out into the of snowdonia and at that moment you're in the top of wales literally house martin. Thanks so much for joining us. thank you for. Having merrick injustice well explore the outdoorsy appeal of the laidback former yugoslav nation of slovenia where. They'll be celebrating thirty years of independence later this year. But i british travel writer. Dan richards looks at the small outposts. You can find scattered around some of the wildest places on earth it's travel with. Rick steves as a kid. Dan richards climbed trees built forks in the countryside of western england simpson. His enthusiasm for adventure has taken him to untamed landscapes around the world. Some even come with a place to stay and breathtaking view for his book outpost. A journey to the wild ends of the earth. Dan explored huts cabins and refugees that have sheltered wilderness adventures for decades. He joins us now. Travel with rick steves to take us to these secret worlds. That you won't find on airbnb. Dan welcome hello. Thank you for having me. You mentioned in your book that it all started with a bear pelvis. That sat on your father's desk. Can you explain that. Just before i was born. My dad came back from an expedition That he had done to. Sal bot in the high arctic. When he was younger he was a mountain near and also a bit of an explorer and he went to this. You know the most northerly human permanent settlement on earth which is called nielsen as part of a sort of geology expedition. And when he came home he unpacked his bag. And he had this most amazing almost alien artifact which was this holiday pelvis a very old when he found it. So you know. He never sort of met the ba- involved but he found this kind of bony frame and brought it home. And as you say it kind of has this incredible object in his study. So there's the polar bear pelvis and then a photograph of your dead in snowbird. Yes and he'd stayed with his team In a number of sets up that just very very Rudimentary very fragile. Little buildings where they had stayed for a nato team so when your school friends are going to new york for their summer break you decide to go to fall board and find that shed tell us about how you got into going to these remote outposts. Because you've gone to these places all over the world will in light of my dad's trip. I began to think about these outposts. As witness in a way to amazing adventures and travels people had had over centuries really often. The people are gone and the only thing that remains. Is there jumping off point and that could be a base like scott space in antarctica or could be a beacon like a lighthouse or fi watching cabin and the pass. These places are now out of use but they still exist as these kind of amazing survivors. The memorials to that went on. I began thinking about that and also the way that often creative people will try and make shed or a spot in space either in the house or in the garden in a way to try and sort of interact with amuses or just create enough kind of clear space to think and create so I began to combine those. That is so important. I love going to the remote fjords on the west coast of norway and finding the little tiny cabin where edvard grieg the great norwegian composer woodwork. And you can see the simple piano he composed on you can look out the window and see the solitude in the pristine nature and the vast -ness of it all that inspired him and you can imagine that solitude was his muse absolutely. I think a lot of the places i visited were like that. They had just enough architecture to make some difference so you weren't completely outside and And thorough has that line where his walden pond heart. He was caged amongst birds so the birds were free and that he was with at his desk just in the nature. So i suppose venturing to these places you would prepare yourself to know. What was the purpose of this hutton. And what is the humanity of it. What was the struggle. What was the heroics of this hut and then when you go there. It becomes a little more rewarding and a little more meaningful. Yes absolutely and some of them have had amazing. Double triple quadruple lives. So that were sale house that i visited in iceland and these are buildings are incredibly rudimentary. Stop and they were built by the early norse to make crossing the very barren interior of iceland possible so they were joined the dots kind of stations along the way and they started out being almost little igloos. If you can imagine an igloo that was made of turf and rocks And then over the years. They've been rebuilt so many times that now they look like what you might recognize as a sort of prairie farmstead In a way but they still retain the foundations and the story and the myth and the ghosts of all of these different incarnations and all of travelers who've passed through them. I found that really fascinating. And you can hike to one of those. What was it like lobster house of joy in the middle of iceland. It was amazing. Because i think i describe in the book is driving over this featureless because we were renovating. We actually drove out. But you can imagine the norse walking over this featureless terrain immense seeing this little hammock as it would have been in their day appearing and the house of joy. You now you can imagine the joy that you know you're sleeping. You have a roof tonight. You know you're going to be warm because if you missed that if you get lost if you can't find it then you're out on a permafrost did completely barren sort of time. So that the need to get in and get warm with immense and very kind of you know essential elemental and when i approached Happiness which was the sal house. That i visited i describe it as a little. A little house sat up and hugging its knees And when you're out in this kind of an environment and you get your notepad there as a writer all sorts of beautiful thoughts. I would think just flutter by and you want to grab them and write them down absolutely. Although often i end up thinking about this. In retrospect try and take a few pictures but often when you're in these bases it's so important just to live in the moment and even writing something down you don't wanna take your eyes off was around you. Directly in front of the sale house was the second largest glossier in iceland. And just look at it. It was just so it had such charisma. This thing you know it exuded. This cold cold charisma. It was really hypnotic. Would into these deep deep blue's all the blues you can imagine of this you know elemental incredibly old incredibly important last year and then to actually take your eyes off it and write something down with almost feel like a dereliction of duty while you need to sort of so kit all up. Take it all in. This is the quintessence of travel. What you're talking about this travel with rick steves. If you ever wanted to really get away. And i mean really away. The neil enjoy the stories of travel writer. Dan richards his book is outpost attorney to the wild ends of the earth and in this book. He takes us on adventures to ten remote cabins refugees and some of the most hostile terrain on the planet. Dan is a royal literary fellow at bristol university. In england we have links to dense work with this week. Show rick steves dot com slash radio. So dan you talk about these little hudson. These sheds and whatever we call them and they do have interesting names in scotland. What is it a booth or a buffy. Yes tell us about arriving at scotland. Well i think the word bossy comes from There are several of derivation. But if you can imagine a booth it's a single room dwelling and again your arriving after a heart. They slow it scotland. So you know it rains and then it really rains and if the sun is shining it's probably still raining you know and you be hiking over. Maybe some orlando. Maybe you've come off the cango and mountains and you're just immersed in this amazing plateau of mountains and gorse and heather and moorland you see on the horizon again a little buffy this little former crofters hut perhaps a little house a little dwelling and you get in and one of the most amazing things about scottish bodies and bodies exist all over the uk. There are some in wales. There are some in the lake district. You get into this very simple dwelling and they're the marks of the people who have been here before you and it really put me in mind. There's a wonderful poem by philip. Larkin and the poem is called. Home is so sad and the lines go it stays as it was left. Formed to the comfort of last to go as if to win them back. I've got a cabin. Rarely visit up in the mountains outside of seattle. And it's like that. I never know who was there last. And sometimes it's been months but you still feel the spirit of the people who were there last and how they left it and what they must have done in the funded must have had and then you get absolutely you get to take that story and carry it forward. That's it and the carrying forward. I think is such an amazing thing of a lot of the places i visited in the book. The bodies and the sale house. They are generous architecture. And as much as they allow on would movement they allow further adventures into as you said earlier partly completely inhospitable terrain but within them hidden these jewel. Like dwellings at that. Allow you to spend a night. In relative comfort. The scottish have a word rough stuffing they call it. So you know you don't find a buffer you don't find a sale house you end up sleeping in a relatively dry ditch with your pack as a pillow and cote is a do or You know and that's rough stuffing and the alternative to that. Is this amazing. Both the any day over absolutely. Yeah so you can have a fire and it is kinda cool to think. They're not the end of the road. They are a depot on the way to somewhere in most cases absolutely. Yeah they're kind of silo. I think you know 'cause some people leave you know. You might get candles you mike matches. You might get some food. That's been left this kind of a ten you. Might you know you might even get biscuits. I mean that's real luxury out there. Dan richards documents his adventures in outpost. A journey to the wild ends of the earth. He also co wrote holloway with robert mcfarland which we spoke about on a recent edition of travel with rick. Steves dan post to twitter at. Dan underscore zip dan. You were talking about as shepherd's hut in switzerland. Can you describe that to us. That was a writing heart that i went to in switzerland. There was a shepherd's hut. That's in the swiss chapter. Which is roger deakins. Kind of shepherd's hut. He was an amazing nature writer from britain. So i'm visiting his farmstead in suffolk in this chapter and really. I just oppose this very very simple. Almost little caravan that he had on wheels that he would move about his estate and he would write and they'll be a little potbellied stove in there and a wonderful quite uncomfortable horsehair mattress bed. And you had your own little world in there and i just oppose this was A really space age treehouse. I visited in switzerland. Which is parts of jan mcculskey foundations writing. I suppose you it. Looks like a fortress. But i think really it's a kind of Residency program so writers can go and they're given everything that they would need to write one of those things is a solitude but also they're given solitude also from the ground as in their suspended in this amazing brutally honest plywood treehouse. With all maude combs. You've got under floor heating and things like that is the sort of thing that a silicon valley tech entrepreneur might build in upstate new york. You know. but you're in the jerem mountains of switzerland and it's for writers and it was a really interesting juxtaposition because for one you've got roger deakins very very spot in space and in the other you've got this super high tackle sifi little cube..

patrick mogollon Dan richards robert mcfarland new york scotland england Rick steves switzerland dan Dan antarctica philip Steves northern wales slovenia Larkin twitter tonight suffolk thirteenth century
"robert mcfarland" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:23 min | 1 year ago

"robert mcfarland" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Little more rewarding a little more meaningful. Yes and some of them have had amazing. Double triple quadruple lives. So there were sale house that i visited in iceland. And these are buildings that are incredibly rudimentary stop and they were built by the early knauss to make crossing the very barren interior of iceland possible. So they were join the dots kind of stations along the way and they started out being almost little igloos. If you can imagine an ignorant that was made of turf and rocks And then over the years. They've been rebuilt so many times that now they like what you might recognize as a sort of prairie farmstead In a way but they still retain the foundations and the story and the myth and the ghosts of all of these different incarnations and all of the travelers pass through them. I found that really fascinating and you can hike to one of those. What was it like. Lampson were house of joy in the middle of iceland. It was amazing. Because i think i describe in the book is driving over this featureless because we were renovating it. We actually drove out. But you can imagine the norse walking over this featureless terrain immense seeing little hammock as it would have been in their day appearing and the house of joy. You know you can imagine the joy that you'll sleeping you have a roof tonight. You'll going to be warm because if you miss that if you get lost if you can't find it then you're out on a permafrost did completely barren sort of tundra so the the need to get in and get warm with immense and very kind of essential and and when i approached Have atmos which was the sal house that i visited. I describe it as a little. A little house sat up and hugging. Its knees and when you're out in kind of an environment and you got your note ped- there as a writer all sorts of beautiful thoughts. I would think just flutter by you wanna grab them and write them down absolutely. Although often i end up thinking about this. In retrospect how try and take a few pitches but often when you're in these bases it's so important just to live in the moment and even writing something down you don't wanna take your eyes off. was around you directly in front of this sale. House was the second largest glassy-eyed in iceland and just to look at it was just so it had such charisma. This thing you know it exuded. This cold cold charisma. It was really hypnotic. You would look into these deep. Deep blue's all the blues you can imagine of this you know elemental incredibly old incredibly important lancia and then to actually take your eyes off it and write something down almost feel like a dereliction of duty while you need to sort of soak it all up take it all in. This is the quintessence of travel. What you're talking about this is travel. With rick steves. If you ever wanted to really get away. And i mean really away. You'll enjoy the stories of travel writer. Dan richards this book is outpost attorney to the wild ends of the earth and in this book. He takes his on adventures to ten remote cabins and refugees and some of the most hostile terrain on the planet. Dan is a royal literary fund fellow at bristol university in england. We have links to dense work with this week. Show rick steves dot com slash radio. So then you talk about these little hudson. These sheds and whatever we call them and they do have interesting names in scotland. What is it a or a buffy up offy. yes tell us about arriving at a body in scotland. Well i think the word bossy comes from There are several of derivation. But if you can imagine a booth it's a single room dwelling and again your arriving. After heart they slog it scotland. So you know it rains and then it really rains. And if the sun is shining it's probably still rank and you'll be hiking over. Maybe some more orlando. Maybe you've come off the candle and mountains and just immersed in this amazing plateau of mountains and goss- and heather and moorland menu. See on the horizon again. A little offie this little former crofters hot perhaps a little house little dwelling and you get in and one of the most amazing things about scottish bodies and bodies exist all over the uk. There are some in wales. There are some in the lake district. You get into this very simple dwelling and they're the marks of the people who have been there before you and it really put me in mind. There's a wonderful poem by philip. Larkin and the poem is called. Home is so sad and the lines go it stays as it was left. Formed to the comfort of a last to go as if to win them back. I've got a cabin. I rarely visit up in the mountains outside of seattle. And it's like that. I never know who was there last. And sometimes it's been months but you still feel the spirit of the people who were there last and how they left it and what they must have done in the fund they must have had. And then you get you get to that story and carry it forward. That's it and the carrying forward. I think is such an amazing thing of a lot of the places i visited in the book. The buff thieves and the sale house. They generous architecture. And as much as they allow onward movement they allow further adventures into as you said earlier apparently completely inhospitable terrain but within them hidden at these jewel. Like dwellings at that. Allow you to spend a night. In relative comfort. The scottish have a word rough stuffing they call it. So you know you don't find a body you don't find a sale house you end up sleeping in a relatively dry ditch with your pack as a pillow and the cote is a do or you know and that's rough stuffing and the alternative to that is amazing body. Give me. I'll tell you the any day over absolutely. Yeah so you can have a fire in. That's great it is kinda cool to think they're not the end of the road. They are depot on the way to somewhere in most cases absolutely. Yeah they're kinda silo. I think you know because some people leave you know you might get candles you mike matches you might get some food. That's been left this kind of in a ten you might. You might even get biscuits. I mean that's real luxury out there. Dan richards documents is adventures in outpost. A journey to the wild ends of the earth. He also co wrote holloway with robert mcfarland which we spoke about on a recent addition of travel. With rick steves then posts twitter at ben underscore zep. Then you were talking about a shepherd's hut in switzerland. Can you describe that to us. That was a writing heart that i went to switzerland. There was a shepherds hut in the swiss chapter. Which is roger. Deakins kind of shepherd's hut. He was amazing nature writer from britain. So i'm visiting his farmstead in suffolk in this chapter and really juxtaposed this very very simple almost little caravan that he had on wheels that he would move about his estate and he would write and there'll be a little potbellied stove in there and a wonderful quite uncomfortable horsehair mattress bed. And you had your own little world in there and justaposed this with A really space age treehouse. I visited switzerland. Which is part of your mcculskey foundations writing. I suppose you it. Looks like a fortress. But i think really. It's kind of Resiliency program so writers can go and they're given everything that they would need to write and one of those things is a solitude but also that given solitude also from the ground as in suspended in this amazing list plywood treehouse with all mod cons under floor heating and things like that is the sort of thing that a silicon valley tech entrepreneur. Might build in upstate. New york. you know. But you're in the juror mountains of switzerland and it's for writers and it was a really interesting juxtaposition because for one you've got roger deakins very very spot in space and in the other you've got this super high tech almost sifi swiss little cube. That's very bladerunner amid at the other extreme. You have again this just enough architecture to make you aware that you're not completely outside so i was juxtaposing nose and seeing which might be better for the creative process and everything dan. I'm fascinated in that. Because i can see the rustic shepherd's hut and then i could see you in this super high tech pod. Did you try writing and thinking in organizing.

Dan richards scotland england rick steves wales switzerland robert mcfarland New york Dan twitter suffolk Larkin philip bristol university uk tonight swiss iceland this week one
"robert mcfarland" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"robert mcfarland" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Let's start the our in one of germany's power cities frankfurt in an interview recorded just before the global pandemic lockdown typically berlin. Munich can steal the show at the german city of frankfurt shines on its own as a modern city that also offers a great look. Today's germany devastated in world war two bombings and rebuilt with a new design. Today it's a gleaming city of towering skyscrapers and powerful straddling the mine river and the mine river is find riverside park lined with museums and taverns that are popular for their apple. Wine to learn more. We're joined in our studio by two german guys. Caroliina marburg and barbara ship kofsky barbara and carolina. Thanks for joining us. Thank you having us. Currently know when people think frankfurt in germany. What do they think. What's the reputation of frankfurt. The reputation is of. I think in english it's referred to as banquet but we more often call it mine. Hatton mind being the river that runs through it and mine. Hatton the reference to manhattan so skyscrapers banks and all that which however implies a certain lack of soul and therefore a lot of germans like well frankford so it's it seems to be just bank money trade however if you actually get to know it. Compared to at first sight frankford is a love at second side because it is it has a lot of local. Beauty has a lot of local charm. But it's something you need to discover. Yeah and it does have a shiny skyline. It's a city of skyscrapers. I think mine. Hutton is a good name because in germany. There's nothing so close to new york as frankfurt and it's a beautiful sky and they take care of how it is assembled so even though it keeps growing it's nicely assembled. There's a pedestrian bridge across the mine. River the irony. The irony is energy and when you stand in the iron bridge. You've got these beautiful parks on both sides of the mine river and then you've got this skyline and it just feels like a kind of a german new york. It's actually the recommendation for some a night is to go to the other side of the mine river and sit down on the green get. Maybe a fish sooner and napa valley and then marvel at. That's gallon i you know. Most americans they go to to old stuff. I love to see modern skylines also. I like modern architecture. London is great for that and in germany. You wouldn't find that in munich that's for sure to find it in frankfurt and the the big skyscraper that's open for the tourist as i understand is the tower named after the river and it's fifty four floors tall six hundred and fifty feet up there and the terrace on top is just an amazing view at the city. Now barbara one. We're thinking about frankfurt. It also has obviously a lot of history. And i know there was a big struggle in the nineteenth century when germany was being united. There's a small states that spoke german and there was prussia and there was and those were of the leading contenders to be the force behind which germany was united but apart from prussia and bavaria. You had a bunch of little states than looked to frankfurt talk about frankfurt in eighteen. Forty eight and how that was part of this german unification while you have in frankfurt. The famous poet skier it used to be an actual protestant church and if somebody gets the german medal of honor. I'm gonna macos going to give that to that person. In that church it goes back to that assembly in eighteen forty eight. The first national assembly democrats were getting together and saying this is what we want. We don't want the monarchy. Let's be democratic country so it was sort of the home of the german <hes>. Feeling for democracy rather than autocracy. Yeah you mentioned pulse church. i think. The englishman repulsed. And that's a museum for that today. Essentially can go and see paintings and etchings that period. Our german tour guides to frankfurt on travel. With rick steves barbara schakowsky and carolina marburger.

frankfurt rick steves germany barbara schakowsky Munich Frankford new york britain europe robert mccaren carolina robert mcfarland iron bridge manhattan Hatton prussia apple Caroliina marburg
"robert mcfarland" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"robert mcfarland" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"What where and when you can and be curious and and be astonished by the live in a live in what Joe miracles a storm of one a few minutes or a few hours each week with kids and speak the things you see stay hi do you travel from the maybe you the street Robert McFarlane is a fellow of Emmanuel college at the university of Cambridge his books include mountains of the mind landmarks the lost words and most recently under land a deep time journey and saying the things you see this is the lost lords blessing from the album spell song created by eight musicians in the British Isles to accompany Robert McFarland spoke and work to conjure back lost words of landscapes okay swim you all she on being project is Chris he really Percy merry Sam away Aaron feral Laurents or at all Tony Lee you Aaron call psycho Kristin land property does any Gonzalez Williams Lucas Johnson came in the early Zack rose Grassley Nicole fan and calling check be on being project is located on to coach him land are lovely theme music is provided and composed by silly cheating in the last voice that you hear singing at the end of our show is Cameron can form on being is an independent production of the on being project it's distributed to public radio stations my P. R. X. created the show and American public media funding partners include the Fetzer institute helping to build the spiritual foundation for.

Joe Robert McFarlane British Isles Robert McFarland Chris Aaron feral Laurents Tony Lee Lucas Johnson Cameron Fetzer institute university of Cambridge Kristin land Gonzalez Williams Zack rose
"robert mcfarland" Discussed on When We Talk About Animals

When We Talk About Animals

09:53 min | 3 years ago

"robert mcfarland" Discussed on When We Talk About Animals

"In the evolution of the on thinking it had always been a portal for you into nature following your <hes> thread death through <hes> through those tunnels and they ought tunnels because he's a hard thoughts <hes> i find myself in two chambers as i listened and one was <hes> mm one was to do with the fact that i think this simple <hes> powerful proposition that language always alienates which for example david abram in the spread of the sensors which is a a huge book me really fascinating and important book <hes> but if i had one criticism of it it might be that it it finds language always warping us away away from the world and i in my own experience that that isn't the case. I think that when when recognizes that language will always be an artificial medium of meeting between self and world whatever out of it we mean by those categories but that it can be better done a western that it can be that it can bring clay cerro pushes feather away or it can be revelatory aw conquistador in these ways then the conversation starts to become interesting to me and this is the second chamber. I've i myself was thinking back to this book called the peregrine by j baker and i didn't view read this yet <hes> vivica. I have quite a while ago. I someone once told me it was like their line was very true. Like eating extraordinarily rich dark chocolate. It's so magnificent and and yeah i guess i would think of it as as eating the the the the the blood hot and trails of wood pigeon fresh josh fresh from the peregrine kelly wade sky both revolting and compulsive compulsive and problematic and yeah <hes> but that book is one of the most stylized an artificial works of writing. I know it is also one of the most extraordinary works i know about particularly about human an animal relations and it is in effect the the the confessional diary of a man who is so pulled with his own species that he wishes to delete it by means of you've kind of forceful in shamed negative capability and the means of negative capability is ritual. He re performs the actions of of the mantaining unsettling hoke the hunting hook bathing hook because he calls it a hope. It's a folk <hes> <hes> but also through language and language is the best. I bad means. He has of of becoming bird of absconding guilty from his own murderous. Species category degree so i that to me is is problematic. In compelling exemplifies languages work will pinkus towards towards the other. The one thing i really loved about this book is that you combine glimpses of tremendous skills of of time and of size of the glaciers and of depth of all sorts that we humans can hardly comprehend with stories of individual characters you meet along the way during your expeditions who the reader comes to feel very obvious you feel extraordinary affection for and these are people good people who can see the horizon of various sorts of ginger of planetary disaster and two are profoundly worried in many cases or or who are simply trying to understand it almost all of whom are trying to do their best to be good ancestors as they as they understand that <hes> and one of the early stories you tell l. in your book is about visiting a laboratory with a young physicist named christopher and he's located half a mile underground in a mine in the earth's surface and you point out he's there to study studied dark matter which is a paradox given that he has to go deep into the earth to watch the stars and wondering if you don't mind surprising you if you'd be willing to read so readers have a sense it's ever section from that. I'd love to does it. Change the way the world feels i ask him knowing that one hundred trillion neutrinos pass through your buddy every second and the countless such particles perforate our brains and our hearts does it change the way you feel about matter about what matters surprised we don't fool full through each surface of our world at every step in pushed through it with each touch christopher nods. He thinks his screensaver changes as to the limestone tiles at graylan senior dusk such that that back lead in ways that are considered widely appealing on instagram that large-scale image sharing platforms at the weekends christopher says when i met with my wife along the clifftops near here on a sunny day i know buddies are wide mesh nets and that the cliffs walking on nets to and sometimes it seems yes as miraculous as if in our everyday world we suddenly find ourselves walking on in water or air and i wonder what it must be like sometimes not to know that he poses and it's clear that he's thinking now beyond the confines of the salt common beyond even the known limits of the universe but mostly and in several ways. I'm amazed i'm able to to hold the hand of the person i love that was one of many sections of the book that i vigorously highlighted start and i wonder if you could speak to how being in places like this underground mine with christopher and like the <hes> enormous mess glaciers where you go into the milan's and and so forth changed you personally yes. I what i think that takes us to is as you said is. The question of scale and scale is is takes us to the question takes me to the question of value which she's something i touched on earlier when when you confronted by time in a sense it it abolishes value. Oh the world is so vast and so old and we'll be sold in the future. What does what does the action of one species matter and that that to me is the ultimate kind of ethical esque apology work it just gives an instant alibi <hes> and it's deeply problematic and irresponsibility think to take it <hes> i think that deep time and i argue that deep time should shop in a sense of responsibility to ourselves and to to to the the ghostly billions as yatom bone. Rebecca solnit folks <hes>. I'll be being good ancestors. But how do you do that. How'd you how'd you shape value within a vastness of scale. It is impossible so i became interested in those tiny touches. There's tiny encounters these tiny axe tenderness <hes> in my case. Many of them are derek. Did i mean my son. I don't that might family into my work very much to put my son was growing up through the writing of this book and there are just a couple of points where he appears and and i just i just want to a finger against his his face and feels skin on skin to know he's they're alive and in the world and made of matter that i can touch and we will construct of value from big philosophical systems but also from tiny touches so i yes i think if if i learned anything it is the island to head to the living even more than i had been able to do before well and your essay the gifts of reading you quote quote lewis hyde says great art offers us images by which to imagine our lives and once the imagination has been awakened. It is procreative. Oh creative through it. We can give more than we were given say more than we had to say and so it is with under land and can we do to close. We like to ask our guests if they have books are films are works of art that have been especially impactful. Come in you and how the in their thinking and especially in their thinking about us in other beings and thank you for all of this and <hes> and for that cretaceous tation for this invitation to speak with you and finish with the book and i i think i do have to go back to the peregrine partly because it also because it's so jemaine to what what you're interested in and partly because for all its bloody difficulty as a text and it has some spikes wchs and rebublican aspects and politically problematic aspects that i still wrestle with it was it told me to write <hes> it it taught me how to hide hi to make a grammar of animosity actually taking jobs as well as by putting them in and i grew up learning how the right by imitating other writers and they included barry lopez one of the great writers of animal in kind of odd time and an jay bakker's the peregrine <hes> among many others so yes i would take up to dreams and and the peregrine among that that famous desert in library that we all hope. I hope we never have to pack well robert mcfarlane. Thank you very much for joining us things so much me both thank you to to ryan mcevoy and the yellow human nature lab for making this episode possible we would love it if you would subscribe to when we talk about animals on apple podcasts rates review and visit our website when we talk about animals dot org where you can find out more about robert mcfarland and his work. Thanks for listening..

christopher david abram j baker robert mcfarlane ryan mcevoy barry lopez Rebecca solnit jay bakker robert mcfarland hoke instagram lewis hyde milan physicist graylan l.
"robert mcfarland" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"robert mcfarland" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The cure. According to professor, Allah. Do this version of Feachem is steeped in the teachings of not only African culture, but is long exposure as well the healing that she brought to the prince is reflective that's contrary to assumption. That women do not have greater knowledge. This narratives come to show that fighting is in fact in knowledgeable person who is revealing that understanding of the Koran because one of the passages in the Koran is about the birds who would deliver the he'll empowers birds come to be known as the fairy godmother in later telling. Yes, here it is the bird who shedded the tree that give Fatimah shade. In her Joni were killed the prince the birds were singing were looking for this. Holy men who is going to kill the. Prince here is our estimate. You did hear that? Right. The bird who help Fatima give her the cure for the prince in their droppings it out of estimate that the press would be good. So in that says, it becomes the Feddie mother. But it's a fetid godmother we've been in knowledge system that brings the African under Islamic together. But Fatima is the mind for which that knowledge will be reveal Feachem received a popularity boost in a very modern local production just over twenty years ago. Put your needed. This version is the nineteen nineties version that emerged on the radio in nineteen ninety seven and this station called radio unfunny broadcast their production of fetching we tried unsuccessfully to get hold of a copy, but seen Allah do hurt it and the way Fatima was portrayed as a determined and self reliance into rela made an impression that resonates with her to this day. It was very interesting that in the context of democrat position of broadcasting of media that the women storytellers in my own societies decide in now media producers and directors to invite storytellers who will present other versions of women's studies that shows women's intelligence and women's capacity to actually transform that conditions of operation and provide social Justice. This with insights Fatima story is one example of how the Taylor Cinderella and her plight keep evolving, and is likely to continue to do. So as long as they're people with imagination to tell it. Oh, it is so many versions of Cinderella type stories as we'll say in folklorist IX, and even in one culture like in the house a pick. Just one example. This narrative has a diversity of versions depending on the storyteller. So folktales ration- at infinite even with an particular culture. The reversion ING is infinite. Cinderella's such an epic heroin while many people say, it's quite dated. It is still a story. Very much of hope, and it's about overcoming good triumphing over evil and living happily ever after. Did you change is an author and folklore enthusiast so much so that she founded folklore Thursday, a group who share her passion and gather each week for the hashtag of the same name. It's a tract some high profile followers. The film director gamble del Toro and the author Robert McFarland..

Fatimah Prince Cinderella Feachem professor Joni Robert McFarland Toro heroin director twenty years
"robert mcfarland" Discussed on Nocturne

Nocturne

03:23 min | 3 years ago

"robert mcfarland" Discussed on Nocturne

"And so I think about the nights that made it possible to think thoughts they did right away. They did as really unique to that time period and the nights we right about now or are different in many ways and not better not worse. But there is something really tangible for me in the language of their poems. That speaks to or communicates equality of night that is different from ours. There was a kind of. Delight can losing oneself in the night. But some of these writers communicate the idea of the ING truly alone in the night is no longer possible. In the way, it was then. Our nights are eliminated from within and without the eerie. Blue glow of information incessant accompanies us into the unknown and our solitude only to dissolve it. I think the marker of a good poem is the fact that it's made us feel something. And I think. Good poems about the night. Make us feel not only the power of the night as the natural environment. But perhaps also the powerful loss of that night. I feel like I read poems to kind of feel the risk that went into writing them. And in the homes about the night that I read from from the nineteenth century earlier. I have a sense that there is even on the part of the author's. What felt like a physical risk like a really stepping into the unknown because of the quality of night that I imagined they experienced. I recognized that this can be like a woeful kind of romanticism nation on my part. But I do I do feel like the stakes of stepping outside and being outside at night must have been very different for those writers and the relationships that they've formed with celestial bodies, or or the out of doors would have been somehow more fraught with with the kind of risk that I feel like is communicated in some of these writings. Poets have long captured and distilled the risks and pleasures of the night, the writer Robert McFarland collected some of his favorite phrases related to nature doom fire is sunset light, which has the appearance of apocalypse to it Shepard. Lamp describes the first star that rises after sunset and along the North Sea coast, the word blaze means to take salmon by striking them at night by torchlight with a three pronged spear acorn beach, bluebell buttercup catechin cow slip signet dandelions fern Hazel, Heather Heron as a thing or experience is lost often so two or the words used to describe it McFarland discovered that the latest edition of the Oxford junior dictionary. No longer contains many words relating to the natural world..

Robert McFarland Oxford junior dictionary North Sea Heather Heron writer Shepard Lamp