10 Burst results for "Robert Mcduff"

"robert mcduff" Discussed on 60 Minutes

60 Minutes

05:27 min | 6 months ago

"robert mcduff" Discussed on 60 Minutes

"The store's owner bookkeeper delivery man and a sixteen year old was shot in the head execution style. No one saw it happen when you heard about the crime and the way they were murdered reaction when my heart drop for the first thing you know i feel sorry performed. The and i thought we could have been there. Curtis flowers had worked at tardy that summer for three days delivering in fixing furniture. But he was let go after. He stopped showing up almost immediately after the murders. Some victims families suspected flowers. The police questioned him but made no arrest. Months past flowers moved to texas to live with his sister. And there's a knock at the door. And i answered it and the next thing was all guest wall being ankle and he explained to me that we just have warrant for your wrists back in mississippi. I said for what he said. Four council capital murder. Yeah send me. Flowers had no criminal record and was more likely to be on stage with a gospel group than in handcuffs. There was no murder weapon. No dna or fingerprints linking him to the crime but it took an all white jury just an hour to deliberate and convict him at age. Twenty seven curtis flowers was sentenced to death putting the mississippi state penitentiary known as parchman prison. Were you scared. What's parchman like the worst thing he ever dreamed up. Yeah like a nightmare. Because you know you hear all cows and the noise and night you know Inmates who l. just some who have lost it the act up all night you were sitting on death row. I imagine other death row. Inmates were beings and recognized so his conviction was appealed and overturned. But there would be five. More trials for curtis flowers for the same crime by the same prosecutor. How can a person be tried for the same crime six times. This case is unprecedented. In the history of the american legal system attorney robert mcduff of mississippi center for justice..

Curtis flowers mississippi parchman prison texas Flowers robert mcduff mississippi center for justice
"robert mcduff" Discussed on Wrongful Conviction Podcasts

Wrongful Conviction Podcasts

07:58 min | 7 months ago

"robert mcduff" Discussed on Wrongful Conviction Podcasts

"Post post post post. Took me a long time. Just to say i delivered its conviction litigation. So you represented now by cure weeble and sherry lynn johnson from the cornell law school death penalty clinic. They appealed your conviction and in two thousand fourteen. The mississippi supreme court upheld the convictions and death. Sense is it. The team sought review in the us supreme court and in two thousand sixteen. They ordered the mississippi supreme court to review the possibly racially discriminatory jury selection in november. Two thousand seventeen. That was ruled. I'm getting chills again. It was ruled by a five to four vote that there was no discrimination. True the most polite way i can think of to say this is what i think. I think i did say that we would ask for her. That really is but your team appealed to the us supreme court again and this is when american public media. Apm started their investigation. And they did this. We talked about the podcast in the dark. And this podcast began in may two thousand eighteen and it was a big hit a big big big hand the things they uncovered a shocking fleming. Now said her testimonies. All the trial relies. She confessed that quote the whole. This is her quote the whole time. I've been telling them. I don't remember the day the whole time i've been telling him i don't remember the day i've been confused of the day from the beginning. I just didn't know how to say it. I was scared. I was going to jail. Wow okay odell home. And also recant saying that everything was all make believe on his part and he also said that evans dropped drug charges pending against him an offered him the other legal assistance. Roy harris who was the friend and drive of clemmie fleming told the podcast that police had showed him a photo of you and harris said that the man he saw running away was not you exactly eventually. He thought he was going to get arrested. If he didn't say was you so he did. Edward mma christian also recanted his testimony. That he was sitting on the porch at seven thirty to eight. Am when you supposedly allegedly walk past. His house from dear uncle doyle simpson's workplace the garment factory. Where the testimony had tied to the alleged stolen gun. So all those lies unraveling so in june two thousand nineteen the us supreme court reversed your convictions and death. Sentences by a vote of seventy two seventy two mazing. It ruled that the prosecution had engaged in racially discriminatory jury selection because they had struck forty one of the forty two black perspective jurors in the six trials combined so sherry lynn. Johnson had made the argument that led to the. Us supreme court's decision to revert. She argued that your case should be dismissed not brought to a seventh trial to be obvious to anybody as you spent over twenty years now on death row a net. The evidence against you was basically advantage. It was not it never had listed but now now proven that had never existed this the washington. Dc law firm of hogan levels as well as a friend of the show. The director of the mississippi innocence project tucker carrington the mississippi office post conviction council got evolved as well as attorneys robert mcduff. We know him and henderson hill. They all began preparing for possible retrial. Now you had the dream team training avengers and on december sixteenth twenty nineteen. You were finally released to home confinement to wait for your seventh trial. This had been almost twenty three years in prison. Right right at twenty three. What do you remember about that day. Our nearest you know at amid so close to home at all ease never made it. You know and at that time. I was like i don't see him. Give me bail. Let me go home. You know until they decide what they want to do while they wanna have a seven trial enough but we get into court role you know in do gives didn't even show up that he sent his assistant. Jerry lober talk and he got started in about do you. The da. Not showing up. You know. I would expect him to be here. You know a note in the more he tall the better off l. And we talked about the and in and he said no antiques time. You know. I am going to grant bill. Where'd you go in texas back to plano plano. Two sisters this. What was your first meal when you got out who lands ahead fried fish catfish a hush public french fries coleslaw. He he was a funny thing too because we were interest room me. My brother-in-law im- hasn't been like seven eight other guy so extended the urinal in related myself. So i get grew up lipa for the handle it. Everybody was saying. Just just walk away. Astronautics route you. Don't leak in urine on. Just walk away. I said laid on star smelling. You know everybody aids his walkaway step back a itself and had to what back to it and look at it you know and one of the guys in the white guy he said. I don't know where you being but you've been gone for long time. And i'm watching my hand and my brother-in-law walk back to the restaurant bradley. Isn't everything people would just stop me. It's going to be okay in big out and told the wives and everything about what happened in a bathroom. You know and people. Just tell me it's going to be okay. that's coming in. It was finding in emotional. Signed on december sixteenth twenty nineteen. You were release home. Confinement waiting for the sevens child like we talked about trial and then in january twenty twenty evans stepped off the case. In the attorney. General's office began reviewing it so hampshire enough on september fourth twenty twenty mississippi attorney general lymph itch announced that the charges were gonna be dismissed. You stated i'm now going to quote you even though you're sitting right here in front of me today. I am finally free from the injustice. That left me locked in a box for twenty three years i felt like doing flips. And you know big guy like nation be doing flips but is a happiness. I can't even describe to hear joe's lober say you know dismissed this case with prejudice in. You know i in at the time the word any ring me in someone told me said when he said with prejudice that means that they can never try you again. Yeah that's beautiful and it's funny. 'cause prejudice is usually a bad word. Since i think of when it's a good word ness show in the meantime. It's great to see you out here. Living your best life married. You know traveling. What can our listeners. Due to show support. I do have a go fund me out there so yes we'll have it lengthened vile so now mr flowers we have a segment of our show that i love the most which is called closing arguments. It works like this. First of all i again. Thank you for just being you and and being here in the studio with me. And then i turn my microphone off kick back in my chair and sometimes i closed my eyes and just listen to anything else. You have to say is called closing arguments in you. Have the mike and you can just talk about anything. You think you.

mississippi supreme court us supreme court sherry lynn johnson cornell law school death penal Roy harris clemmie fleming Edward mma christian doyle simpson sherry lynn mississippi innocence project robert mcduff henderson hill odell Jerry lober evans plano harris hogan Johnson washington
"robert mcduff" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:37 min | 2 years ago

"robert mcduff" Discussed on KCRW

"It's morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin and I'm no well king extradition proceedings for wikileaks founder Julian assigned start today in London the U. S. government wants to put him on trial for allegedly conspiring to hack into a Pentagon computer and release hundreds of thousands of secret files and peers Franklin fit is in London watching all of this and Frank where is Julian Assange right now well he's been in Belmarsh prison since may of last year and today he's in a courtroom in southeast London arguing basically pleading for the U. K. authorities not to send them to the states this case has been going on ten years now how did it start remind us we already started back in two thousand and ten wikileaks released hundreds of thousands of secret diplomatic cables and military files in these were focused on the war in Iraq and Afghanistan amid and then some of them were deeply damaging to the Pentagon there was a video of U. S. Apache helicopter attack that killed at least eleven Iraqis including to reporters at the U. S. government said this put Americans at risk putting this material out there was a it was an enormous per each other so groups like Reporters Without Borders they say this is a first amendment case in the U. S. is trying to punish Assad for exposing wrongdoing and right now there are protesters out in front of the courthouse in London calling for Sajjad obsess on should be set free why did it take so long for this hearing to happen he skipped bail soon skip bail me remember this but on an unrelated rape charges in Sweden this was going back six maybe seven years ago those charges have since been dropped but when he skipped bail here he holed up in the Ecuadorian embassy for a very long time the Ecuadorians granted him political asylum but he was not a great house guest and he's a very long time and they revoked his diplomatic immunity last year and a British police hold him out and off he went to prison okay there you go it Frank there's also been an interesting twist in all of this that involves president trump and the twenty sixteen election what what happened there well this is another leak from wikileaks that made a had a big impact if you remember back during the demo democratic campaign Hillary Clinton was running in two thousand and sixteen wikileaks released emails from her campaign and the Democratic National Committee the U. S. indicted twelve Russian agents for that hack up a one of a son his attorneys says that assignment between Rohrabacher he was then a U. S. Republican congressman and Rohrabacher allegedly offered to arrange a pardon for sergeant two thousand seventeen and if he disavowed Russia's role in in all of this which in fact of a son has done in the past the idea was to try to refute evidence that Russia tried to help trump win the White House which of course has been embarrassing to the president something that he wants to race and disdain Aurora Barker admit to that does he say he offered us on to pardon well up to up to a point no well he does say that he did help to offer get a pardon for Saanjh but he never talk to the president about it of course the White House says that as well they say they had nothing to do with it okay so in the end how likely is it that assigned ends up in the U. S. court it's not clear the US probably has quite a lot of evidence in a songes facing up to a hundred seventy five years in prison but of course is on his attorneys are going to argue he can't get a fair trial the trial in the United States and peers Franklin fit in London thanks Frank you're very welcome no well it is illegal for anyone behind bars to process a cellphone in Mississippi it's a felony offense a Mississippi man picked up on a misdemeanor domestic violence charge didn't turn his phone over and he ended up with a twelve year sentence now there's a push to get the Mississippi Supreme Court to reconsider the case NPR's Cheryl Corley reports this case about cellphones prison and sentencing has some complicated twists and turns but there's little disagreement about a few facts number one it was August of twenty seventeen when police picked up now thirty nine year old Willie Nash for what they called a misdemeanor domestic violence charge number two the married father of three had his cell phone on him when police took him to the Newton county jail in east Mississippi and since they didn't search him they didn't find his cellphone will Bardwell is a senior attorney with the Southern Poverty Law Center or SPLC and they might never have discovered that he had a cell phone if he had not offered up the cell phone and ask them to recharge the battery for it those are all sanctions none of those are back Stephen Kilgore is the district attorney for Mississippi's eighth judicial circuit his office prosecuted Willie Nash for his first time in jail for him did not be aware that you could have a cell phone would be shocking there's been lots of speculation about how Nash ended up with a cell phone and whether he knew the policy bottom line it's a felony in Mississippi for any incarcerated person to possess one the penalty is three to fifteen years the judge in the case held two prior convictions for burglary from nearly two decades ago against Nash he sentenced him to twelve years and told him he was fortunate he didn't get more time attorney Robert McDuff with the Mississippi center for justice because that dessert is obviously when a life since then that has not been solved any criminal convictions sure it's in him based in part on convictions that are that old simply makes no sense cell phones have long been considered a problem in prisons and jails thousands make their way behind bars despite efforts to stymie their flow the FBI says prisoners use them to commit more crimes from the inside or to harass victims families over the last few months the Mississippi prisons there's been lots of violent unrest and more than a dozen deaths governor Tate Reeves partially blames contraband cell phones these phones have been illegal for years but they've been snuck in and they're being used coordinate gang activity throughout the Mississippi system and even throughout the country that was a large part of what calls the recent series of killings to escalate as much as it did no no the day after the governor's press conference protesters rallied at the Mississippi state capitol Benny Ivey the head of an activist group strong arms of Jackson said that if it weren't for cellphones in humane conditions in the state's prisons would remain hidden thank god they had cell phones because it is just the models and stuff right there's just a lot of stuff away I haven't nearly every state has a long place to punish prisoners found with cell phones and SPLC analysis shows in at least thirty six states the penalty is no more than a five year sentence and in several states is no prison time at all will Bardwell says that's evidence they want the Mississippi Supreme Court to take into account if we only had poisoned someone in an attempt to kill them if he had sold a child if he had assaulted a police officer he would have received less time for all of those crimes then the sentence he is serving today citing the U. S. constitution Bardwell calls it cruel and unusual punishment and one justice on the Mississippi Supreme Court said the state could have taken a less punitive approach district attorney Kilgore says Nash and his lawyer did turn down a three year plea deal and it's possible that he could come up for parole next year instead of waiting for that to occur the Southern Poverty Law Center once the state's High Court to reconsider and reverse Willie Nash's conviction or.

Rachel Martin founder Julian London NPR wikileaks
"robert mcduff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:18 min | 2 years ago

"robert mcduff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Today in London the U. S. government wants to put him on trial for allegedly conspiring to hack into a Pentagon computer and release hundreds of thousands of secret files and peers Franklin fit is in London watching all of this and Frank where is Julian Assange right now well he's been in Belmarsh prison since may of last year and today he's in a courtroom in southeast London arguing basically pleading for the U. K. authorities not to send them to the states this case has been going on ten years now how did it start remind us we already started back in two thousand and ten wikileaks released hundreds of thousands of secret diplomatic cables and military files in these were focused on the war in Iraq and Afghanistan amid and then some of them were deeply damaging to the Pentagon there was a video of U. S. Apache helicopter attack that killed at least eleven Iraqis including to reporters at the U. S. government said this put Americans at risk putting this material out there was a it was an enormous breach others though groups like Reporters Without Borders they say this is a first amendment case in the U. S. is trying to punish Assad for exposing wrongdoing and right now there are protesters out in front of the courthouse in London calling for science to society should be set free why did it take so long for this hearing to happen he skipped bail soon skip bail me remember this but on an unrelated rape charges in Sweden this was going back six maybe seven years ago those charges have since been dropped but when he skipped bail here he holed up in the Ecuadorian embassy for a very long time the Ecuadorians granted him political asylum but he was not a great house guest and he's a very long time and they revoked his diplomatic immunity last year and the British police hold him out and off he went to prison okay there you go it Frank there's also been an interesting twist in all of this that involves president trump and the twenty sixteen election what what happened there well this is another leak from wikileaks that made a had a big impact if you remember back during the demo democratic campaign Hillary Clinton was running in two thousand and sixteen wikileaks released emails from her campaign and the Democratic National Committee the U. S. indicted twelve Russian agents for that hack of the one of the soldiers attorneys says that assignment within Rohrabacher he was then a U. S. Republican congressman and Rohrabacher allegedly offered to arrange a pardon for sergeant two thousand seventeen and if he disavowed Russia's role in in all of this which in fact a son has done in the past the idea was to try to refute evidence that Russia tried to help trump win the White House which of course has been embarrassing to the president something that he wants to race into staying a rocker admit to that does he say he offered us on to pardon well up to up to a point no well he does say that he did help to offer get a pardon for Saanjh but he said he never talk to the president about it of course the White House says that as well they say they had nothing to do with it okay so in the end how likely is it that assigns ends up in the U. S. court it's not clear the US probably has quite a lot of evidence in the sun is facing up to a hundred seventy five years in prison but of course is on his attorneys are going to argue he can't get a fair trial in a trial in the United States and peers Franklin fit in London thanks Frank you're very welcome well it is illegal for anyone behind bars to possess a cellphone in Mississippi it's a felony offense a Mississippi man picked up on a misdemeanor domestic violence charge didn't turn his phone over and he ended up with a twelve year sentence now there's a push to get the Mississippi Supreme Court to reconsider the case NPR's Cheryl Corley reports this case about cellphones prison and sentencing has some complicated twists and turns but there's little disagreement about a few facts number one it was August of twenty seventeen when police picked up now thirty nine year old Willie Nash for what they called a misdemeanor domestic violence charge number two the married father of three had a cell phone on him when police took him to the Newton county jail in east Mississippi and since they didn't search him they didn't find his cellphone will Bardwell is a senior attorney with the Southern Poverty Law Center or SPLC and they might never have discovered that he had a cell phone if he had not offered up the cell phone and ask them to recharge the battery for it those are all symptoms none of those are back Stephen Kilgore is the district attorney for Mississippi's eighth judicial circuit his office prosecuted Willie Nash for his first time in jail for him did not be aware that you could have a cell phone would be shocking there's been lots of speculation about how Nash ended up with a cell phone and whether he knew the policy bottom line it's a felony in Mississippi for any incarcerated person to possess one the penalty is three to fifteen years the judge in the case held two prior convictions for burglary from nearly two decades ago against Nash he sentenced him to twelve years and told him he was fortunate he didn't get more time attorney Robert McDuff with the Mississippi center for justice because that's absurd he has obviously led a life since then that has not involved in any criminal convictions challenging him based in part on convictions that are that old simply makes no sense cell phones have long been considered a problem in prisons and jails thousands make their way behind bars despite efforts to stymie their flow the FBI says prisoners use them to commit more crimes from the inside or to harass victims families over the last few months the Mississippi prisons there's been lots of violent unrest and more than a dozen deaths governor Tate Reeves partially blames contraband cell phones these phones have been illegal for years but they've been snuck in and they're being used coordinate gang activity throughout the Mississippi system and even throughout the country that was a large part of what calls the recent series of killings to escalate as much as it did no no the day after the governor's press conference protesters rallied at the Mississippi state capitol Benny I be the head of an activist group strong arms of Jackson said that if it weren't for cellphones in humane conditions and the state's prisons would remain hidden thank god they.

London Pentagon
"robert mcduff" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"robert mcduff" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To be an infectious disease expert for the centers for disease control Pustaka recently wrote an article for the magazine Christianity Today and he argued that now is the time for people to come together we really have a calling and that passengers to care for the vulnerable and to combat that and then it will be a the worst thing we can to your now close our doors to a community that it's hurting that it rang and I cried that is not only mental the recall that all the financial and so over the weekend pastor koh's congregation directly confronted their fears of the virus they sang together listen to a sermon just like any other Sunday what we are doing is opening our doors and inviting them into a place where they can process and share and pray together has to because it's his job now is not only caring for bodies it's about uniting souls it is illegal for anyone behind bars to process a cellphone in Mississippi it's a felony offense a Mississippi man picked up on a misdemeanor domestic violence charge didn't turn his phone over and he ended up with a twelve year sentence now there's a push to get the Mississippi Supreme Court to reconsider the case NPR's Cheryl Corley reports this case about cellphones prison and sentencing has some complicated twists and turns but there's little disagreement about a few facts number one it was August of twenty seventeen when police picked up now thirty nine year old Willie Nash for what they called a misdemeanor domestic violence charge number two the married father of three had a cell phone on him when police took him to the Newton county jail in east Mississippi and since they didn't search him they didn't find his cellphone will Bardwell is a senior attorney with the Southern Poverty Law Center or SPLC and they might never have discovered that he had a cell phone if he had not offered up the cell phone and ask them to recharge the battery for it those are all functions none of those are back Stephen Kilgore is the district attorney for Mississippi's eighth judicial circuit his office prosecuted Willie Nash for his first time in jail for him did not be aware that you could have a cell phone would be shocking there's been lots of speculation about how Nash ended up with a cell phone and whether he knew the policy bottom line it's a felony in Mississippi for any incarcerated person to possess one the penalty is three to fifteen years the judge in the case held two prior convictions for burglary from nearly two decades ago against Nash he sentenced him to twelve years and told him he was fortunate he didn't get more time attorney Robert McDuff with the Mississippi center for justice calls that absurd he has obviously led a life since then that has not involved in any criminal convictions Johnson him based in part on convicts and that are that old simply makes no sense cell phones have long been considered a problem in prisons and jails thousands make their way behind bars despite efforts to stymie their flow the FBI says prisoners use them to commit more crimes from the inside or to harass victims families over the last few months the Mississippi prisons there's been lots of violent unrest and more than a dozen deaths governor Tate Reeves partially blames contraband cell phones these phones have been illegal for years but they've been snuck in and they're being used coordinate gang activity throughout the Mississippi system and even throughout the country that was a large part of what calls the recent series of killings to escalate as much as it did no the day after the governor's press conference protesters rallied at the Mississippi state capitol Benny Ivey the head of an activist group strong arms of Jackson said that if it weren't for cellphones.

Pustaka
"robert mcduff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:52 min | 2 years ago

"robert mcduff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"R. and listeners like you who support KQED public radio eighty eight point five FM in San Francisco and eighty nine point three FM in Sacramento good morning I'm Dave Freeman morning edition continues now as the time approaches five thirty five it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin and I'm no well king extradition proceedings for wikileaks founder Julian assigned start today in London the U. S. government wants to put him on trial for allegedly conspiring to hack into a Pentagon computer and release hundreds of thousands of secret files and peers Franklin fit is in London watching all of this and Frank where is Julian Assange right now well he's been in Belmarsh prison since may of last year and today he's in a courtroom in southeast London arguing basically pleading for the U. K. authorities not to send them to the states this case has been going on ten years now how did it start remind us we already started back in two thousand and ten wikileaks released hundreds of thousands of secret diplomatic cables and military files in these were focused on the war in Iraq and Afghanistan amid and some of them were deeply damaging to the Pentagon there was a video of the U. S. Apache helicopter attack that killed at least eleven Iraqis including to reporters at the U. S. government said this put Americans at risk putting this material out there was a it was an enormous for each other so groups like Reporters Without Borders they say this is a first amendment case in the U. S. is trying to punish Assad for exposing wrongdoing and right now there are protesters out in front of the courthouse in London calling for Sajjad society should be set free why did it take so long for this hearing to happen he skipped bail soon skip bail me remember this but on an unrelated rape charges in Sweden this was going back six maybe seven years ago those charges have since been dropped but when he skipped bail here he holed up in the Ecuadorian embassy for a very long time the Ecuadorians granted him political asylum but he was not a great house guest and he's a very long time and they revoked his diplomatic immunity last year and a British police hold him out and off he went to prison okay there you go it Frank there's also been an interesting twist in all of this that involves president trump and the twenty sixteen election what what happened there well this is another leak from wikileaks that made a had a big impact if you remember back during the demo democratic campaign Hillary Clinton was running in two thousand and sixteen wikileaks released emails from her campaign and the Democratic National Committee the U. S. indicted twelve Russian agents for that hack of the one of the soldiers attorneys says that assignment within Rohrabacher he was then a U. S. Republican congressman and war Barker allegedly offered to arrange a pardon for sergeant two thousand seventeen and if he disavowed Russia's role in in all of this which in fact a son has done in the past the idea was to try to refute evidence that Russia tried to help trump win the White House which of course has been embarrassing to the president something that he wants to race into staying a rocker admit to that does he say he offered us on to pardon well up up to a point no well he does say that he did help to offer get a pardon for Saanjh but he never talk to the president about it of course the White House says that as well they say they had nothing to do with it okay so in the end how likely is it that assigns ends up in the U. S. court it's not clear the US probably has quite a lot of evidence and the sound is facing up to a hundred seventy five years in prison but of course is on his attorneys are going to argue he can't get a fair trial in a trial in the United States and peers Franklin fit in London thanks Frank you're very welcome no it is illegal for anyone behind bars to possess a cellphone in Mississippi it's a felony offense a Mississippi man picked up on a misdemeanor domestic violence charge didn't turn his phone over and he ended up with a twelve year sentence now there's a push to get the Mississippi Supreme Court to reconsider the case NPR's Cheryl Corley reports this case about cellphones prison and sentencing has some complicated twists and turns but there's little disagreement about a few facts number one it was August of twenty seventeen when police picked up now thirty nine year old Willie Nash for what they called a misdemeanor domestic violence charge number two the married father of three had a cell phone on him when police took him to the Newton county jail in east Mississippi and since they didn't search him they didn't find his cellphone will Bardwell is a senior attorney with the Southern Poverty Law Center or SPLC and they might never have discovered that he had a cell phone if he had not offered up the cell phone and ask them to recharge the battery for it those are all symptoms none of those are back Stephen Kilgore is the district attorney for Mississippi's eighth judicial circuit his office prosecuted Willie Nash for his first time in jail for him to not be aware that you could have a cell phone would be shocking there's been lots of speculation about how Nash ended up with a cell phone and whether he knew the policy bottom line it's a felony in Mississippi for any incarcerated person to possess one the penalty is three to fifteen years the judge in the case held two prior convictions for burglary from nearly two decades ago against Nash he sentenced him to twelve years and told him he was fortunate he didn't get more time attorney Robert McDuff with the Mississippi center for justice calls that absurd he has obviously led a life since then that has not involved in any criminal convictions challenging him based in part on convictions that are that old simply makes no sense cell phones have long been considered a problem in prisons and jails thousands make their way behind bars despite efforts to stymie their flow the FBI says prisoners use them to commit more crimes from the inside or to harass victims families over the last few months the Mississippi prisons there's been lots of violent unrest and more than a dozen deaths governor Tate Reeves partially blames contraband cell phones these phones have been illegal for years but they've been snuck in and they're being used coordinate gang activity throughout the Mississippi system and even throughout the country that was a large part of what calls the recent series of killings to escalate as much as it did no no the day after the governor's press conference protesters rallied at the Mississippi state capitol Benny Ivey the head of an activist group strong arms of Jackson said that if it weren't for cellphones in humane conditions in the state's prisons would remain hidden thank god they had cell phones because it is just a minute right it is just the models and stuff but we haven't nearly every state has a long place to punish prisoners found with cellphones and SPLC analysis shows in at least thirty six states the penalty is no more than a five year sentence and in several states is no prison time at all will Bardwell says that's evidence they want the Mississippi Supreme Court to take into account if we only had poisoned someone in an attempt to kill them if he had sold a child if he had assaulted a police officer he would have received less time for all of those crimes then the sentence he is serving today citing the U. S. constitution Bardwell calls it cruel and unusual punishment and one justice on the Mississippi Supreme Court said the state could have taken a less punitive approach district attorney Kilgore says Nash and his lawyer did turn down a three year plea deal and it's possible that he could come up for parole next year instead of waiting for that to occur the Southern Poverty Law Center once the state's High Court to reconsider and.

San Francisco KQED Sacramento Dave Freeman
"robert mcduff" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:36 min | 2 years ago

"robert mcduff" Discussed on KCRW

"Rachel Martin and I'm no well king extradition proceedings for wikileaks founder Julian assigned start today in London the U. S. government wants to put him on trial for allegedly conspiring to hack into a Pentagon computer and release hundreds of thousands of secret files and peers Franklin fit is in London watching all of this and Frank where is Julian Assange right now well he's been in Belmarsh prison since may of last year and today he's in a courtroom in southeast London arguing basically pleading for the U. K. authorities not to send them to the states this case has been going on ten years now how did it start remind us we already started back in two thousand and ten wikileaks released hundreds of thousands of secret diplomatic cables and military files in these were focused on the war in Iraq and Afghanistan amid and then some of them were deeply damaging to the Pentagon there was a video of U. S. Apache helicopter attack that killed at least eleven Iraqis including to reporters at the U. S. government said this put Americans at risk putting this material out there was a it was an enormous breach others though groups like Reporters Without Borders they say this is a first amendment case in the U. S. is trying to punish Assad for exposing wrongdoing and right now there are protesters out in front of the courthouse in London calling for Sajjad obsess on should be set free why did it take so long for this hearing to happen he skipped bail soon skip bail me remember this but on an unrelated rape charges in Sweden this was going back six maybe seven years ago those charges have since been dropped but when he skipped bail here he holed up in the Ecuadorian embassy for a very long time the Ecuadorians granted him political asylum but he was not a great house guest and he's a very long time and they revoked his diplomatic immunity last year and a British police hold him out and off he went to prison okay there you go it Frank there's also been an interesting twist in all of this that involves president trump and the twenty sixteen election what what happened there well this is another leak from wikileaks that made a had a big impact if you remember back during the demo democratic campaign Hillary Clinton was running in two thousand and sixteen wikileaks released emails from her campaign and the Democratic National Committee the U. S. indicted twelve Russian agents for that hack of the one of the soldiers attorneys says that assignment within Rohrabacher he was then a U. S. Republican congressman and Rohrabacher allegedly offered to arrange a pardon for sergeant two thousand seventeen and if he disavowed Russia's role in in all of this which in fact of a son has done in the past the idea was to try to refute evidence that Russia tried to help trump win the White House which of course has been embarrassing to the president something that he wants to race and disdain Aurora Barker admit to that does he say he offered us on to pardon well up to up to a point no well he does say that he did help to offer get a pardon for Saanjh but he said he never talk to the president about it of course the White House says that as well they say they had nothing to do with it okay so in the end how likely is it that assigned ends up in the U. S. court it's not clear the US probably has quite a lot of evidence in the sun is facing up to a hundred seventy five years in prison but of course is on his attorneys are going to argue he can't get a fair trial the trial in the United States and peers Franklin fit in London thanks Frank you're very welcome no well it is illegal for anyone behind bars to process a cellphone in Mississippi it's a felony offense a Mississippi man picked up on a misdemeanor domestic violence charge didn't turn his phone over and he ended up with a twelve year sentence now there's a push to get the Mississippi Supreme Court to reconsider the case NPR's Cheryl Corley reports this case about cellphones prison and sentencing has some complicated twists and turns but there's little disagreement about a few facts number one it was August of twenty seventeen when police picked up now thirty nine year old Willie Nash for what they called a misdemeanor domestic violence charge number two the married father of three had a cell phone on him when police took him to the Newton county jail in east Mississippi and since they didn't search him they didn't find his cellphone will Bardwell is a senior attorney with the Southern Poverty Law Center or SPLC and they might never have discovered that he had a cell phone if he had not offered up the cell phone and ask them to recharge the battery for it those are all sanctions none of those are back Stephen Kilgore is the district attorney for Mississippi's eighth judicial circuit his office prosecuted Willie Nash for his first time in jail for him did not be aware that you could have a cell phone would be shocking there's been lots of speculation about how Nash ended up with a cell phone and whether he knew the policy bottom line it's a felony in Mississippi for any incarcerated person to possess one the penalty is three to fifteen years the judge in the case held two prior convictions for burglary from nearly two decades ago against Nash he sentenced him to twelve years and told him he was fortunate he didn't get more time attorney Robert McDuff with the Mississippi center for justice calls that absurd is obviously when a life since then that has not been solved any criminal convictions challenging him based in part on convictions that are that old simply makes no sense cell phones have long been considered a problem in prisons and jails thousands make their way behind bars despite efforts to stymie their flow the FBI says prisoners use them to commit more crimes from the inside or to harass victims families over the last few months the Mississippi prisons there's been lots of violent unrest and more than a dozen deaths governor Tate Reeves partially blames contraband cell phones these phones have been illegal for years but they've been snuck in and they're being used coordinate gang activity throughout the Mississippi system and even throughout the country that was a large part of what calls the recent series of killings to escalate as much as it did no no the day after the governor's press conference protesters rallied at the Mississippi state capitol Benny Ivey the head of an activist group strong arms of Jackson said that if it weren't for cellphones in humane conditions in the state's prisons would remain hidden thank god they had cell phones because it does show the models and stuff right it does show some models in stock away I haven't nearly every state has a long place to punish prisoners found with cellphones and SPLC analysis shows in at least thirty six states the penalty is no more than a five year sentence and in several states is no prison time at all will Bardwell says that's evidence they want the Mississippi Supreme Court to take into account if we only had poisoned someone in an attempt to kill them if he had sold a child if he had assaulted a police officer he would have received less time for all of those crimes then the sentence he is serving today citing the U. S. constitution Bardwell calls it cruel and unusual punishment and one justice on the Mississippi Supreme Court said the state could have taken a less punitive approach district attorney Kilgore says Nash and his lawyer did turn down a three year plea deal and it's possible that he could come up for parole next year instead of waiting for that to occur the Southern Poverty Law Center once the state's High Court to reconsider and reverse Willie Nash's conviction or send a blank to.

Rachel Martin founder Julian London wikileaks
"robert mcduff" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"robert mcduff" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To be an infectious disease expert for the centers for disease control Pustaka recently wrote an article for the magazine Christianity Today and he argued that now is the time for people to come together we really have a calling and that passengers to care for the vulnerable and combat take that and then it will be yeah the one thing we can to your now close our doors to a community that is hurting that it rang and I cried that is not only mental the recall that offer financial into over the weekend pastor koh's congregation directly confronted their fears of the virus they sing together and listen to a sermon just like any other Sunday what we are doing is opening our doors and inviting them into a place where they catch all set and share and play together has to because it's his job now is not only caring for bodies it's about uniting souls it is illegal for anyone behind bars to possess a cellphone in Mississippi it's a felony offense a Mississippi man picked up on a misdemeanor domestic violence charge didn't turn his phone over and he ended up with a twelve year sentence now there's a push to get the Mississippi Supreme Court to reconsider the case NPR's Cheryl Corley reports this case about cellphones prison and sentencing has some complicated twists and turns but there's little disagreement about a few facts number one it was August of twenty seventeen when police picked up now thirty nine year old Willie Nash for what they called a misdemeanor domestic violence charge number two the married father of three had a cell phone on him when police took him to the Newton county jail in east Mississippi and since they didn't search him they didn't find his cellphone will Bardwell is a senior attorney with the Southern Poverty Law Center or SPLC and they might never have discovered that he had a cell phone if he had not offered up the cell phone and ask them to recharge the battery for it those are all symptoms none of those are back Stephen Kilgore is the district attorney for Mississippi's eighth judicial circuit his office prosecuted Willie Nash for his first time in jail for him to not be aware that you could have a cell phone would be shocking there's been lots of speculation about how Nash ended up with a cell phone and whether he knew the policy bottom line it's a felony in Mississippi for any incarcerated person to possess one the penalty is three to fifteen years the judge in the case held two prior convictions for burglary from nearly two decades ago against Nash he sentenced him to twelve years and told him he was fortunate he didn't get more time attorney Robert McDuff with the Mississippi center for justice calls that absurd is obviously when a licensed band that has not involved in any criminal convictions Johnson him based in part on actions that are that old simply makes no sense cell phones have long been considered a problem in prisons and jails thousands make their way behind bars despite efforts to stymie their flow the FBI says prisoners use them to commit more crimes from the inside or to harass victims families over the last few months the Mississippi prisons there's been lots of violent unrest and more than a dozen deaths governor Tate Reeves partially blames contraband cell phones these phones have been illegal for years but they've been snuck in and they're being used coordinate gang activity throughout the Mississippi system and even throughout the country that was a large part of what calls the recent series of killings to escalate as much as it did no the day after the governor's press conference protesters rallied at the Mississippi state capitol Benny Ivey the head of an activist group strong arms of Jackson said that if it weren't for cellphones in humane conditions in the state's prisons would remain hidden thank god.

Pustaka
"robert mcduff" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:44 min | 2 years ago

"robert mcduff" Discussed on KCRW

"From Americans for the arts it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin and I'm no well king extradition proceedings for wikileaks founder Julian assigned start today in London the U. S. government wants to put him on trial for allegedly conspiring to hack into a Pentagon computer and release hundreds of thousands of secret files and peers Franklin fit is in what is in London watching all of this and Frank where is Julian Assange right now well he's been in Belmarsh prison since may of last year and today he's in a courtroom in southeast London arguing basically pleading for the U. K. authorities not to send them to the states this case has been going on ten years now how did it start remind us we already started back in two thousand and ten wikileaks released hundreds of thousands of secret diplomatic cables and military files in these were focused on the war in Iraq and Afghanistan amid and then some of them were deeply damaging to the Pentagon there was a video of U. S. Apache helicopter attack that killed at least eleven Iraqis including to reporters at the U. S. government said this put Americans at risk putting this material out there was a it was an enormous per each other so groups like Reporters Without Borders they say this is a first amendment case in the U. S. is trying to punish Assad for exposing wrongdoing and right now there are protesters out in front of the courthouse in London calling for Sajjad obsess on should be set free why did it take so long for this hearing to happen well he skipped bail soon skip bail me remember this but on an unrelated rape charges in Sweden this was going back six maybe seven years ago those charges have since been dropped but when he skipped bail here he holed up in the Ecuadorian embassy for a very long time the Ecuadorians granted him political asylum but he was not a great house guest and he's a very long time and they revoked his diplomatic immunity last year and a British police hold him out and off he went to prison okay there you go it Frank there's also been an interesting twist in all of this that involves president trump and the twenty sixteen election what what happened there well this is another leak from wikileaks that made a had a big impact if you remember back during the demo democratic campaign Hillary Clinton was running in two thousand and sixteen wikileaks released emails from her campaign and the Democratic National Committee the U. S. indicted twelve Russian agents for that hack up a one of a son his attorneys says that assignment within Rohrabacher he was then a U. S. Republican congressman and Rohrabacher allegedly offered to arrange a pardon for sergeant two thousand seventeen and if he disavowed Russia's role in in all of this which in fact of a son has done in the past the idea was to try to refute evidence that Russia tried to help trump win the White House which of course has been embarrassing to the president something that he wants to race and disdain Aurora Barker admit to that does he say he offered us on to pardon well up to up to a point no well he does say that he did help to offer get a pardon for Saanjh but he never talk to the president about it of course the White House says that as well they say they had nothing to do with it okay so in the end how likely is it that assigns ends up in the U. S. court it's not clear the US probably has quite a lot of evidence in the sun is facing up to a hundred seventy five years in prison but of course is on his attorneys are going to argue he can't get a fair trial the trial in the United States and peers Franklin fit in London thanks Frank you know you're very welcome no well it is illegal for anyone behind bars to process a cellphone in Mississippi it's a felony offense a Mississippi man picked up on a misdemeanor domestic violence charge didn't turn his phone over and he ended up with a twelve year sentence now there's a push to get the Mississippi Supreme Court to reconsider the case NPR's Cheryl Corley reports this case about cellphones prison and sentencing has some complicated twists and turns but there's little disagreement about a few facts number one it was August of twenty seventeen when police picked up now thirty nine year old Willie Nash for what they called a misdemeanor domestic violence charge number two the married father of three had a cell phone on him when police took him to the Newton county jail in east Mississippi and since they didn't search him they didn't find his cellphone will Bardwell is a senior attorney with the Southern Poverty Law Center or SPLC and they might never have discovered that he had a cell phone if he had not offered up the cell phone and ask them to recharge the battery for it those are all sanctions none of those are back Stephen Kilgore is the district attorney for Mississippi's eighth judicial circuit his office prosecuted Willie Nash for his first time in jail for him did not be aware that you could have a cell phone would be shocking there's been lots of speculation about how Nash ended up with a cell phone and whether he knew the policy bottom line it's a felony in Mississippi for any incarcerated person to possess one the penalty is three to fifteen years the judge in the case held two prior convictions for burglary from nearly two decades ago against Nash he sentenced him to twelve years and told him he was fortunate he didn't get more time attorney Robert McDuff with the Mississippi center for justice calls that absurd he has obviously led a life since then that has not involved in any criminal convictions Johnson him based in part on convictions that are that old simply makes no sense cell phones have long been considered a problem in prisons and jails thousands make their way behind bars despite efforts to stymie their flow the FBI says prisoners use them to commit more crimes from the inside or to harass victims families over the last few months the Mississippi prisons there's been lots of violent unrest and more than a dozen deaths governor Tate Reeves partially blames contraband cell phones these phones have been illegal for years but they've been snuck in and they're being used coordinate gang activity throughout the Mississippi system and even throughout the country that was a large part of what calls the recent series of killings to escalate as much as it did no no the day after the governor's press conference protesters rallied at the Mississippi state capitol Benny Ivey the head of an activist group strong arms of Jackson said that if it weren't for cellphones in humane conditions in the state's prisons would remain hidden thank god they had cell phones in a because it is just the models and stuff right there's just a lot of stuff away I haven't nearly every state has a long place to punish prisoners found with cell phones and SPLC analysis shows in at least thirty six states the penalty is no more than a five year sentence and in several states is no prison time at all will Bardwell says that's evidence they want the Mississippi Supreme Court to take into account if we only had poisoned someone in an attempt to kill them if he had sold a child if he had assaulted a police officer he would have received less time for all of those crimes then the sentence he is serving today citing the U. S. constitution Bardwell calls it cruel and unusual punishment and one justice on the Mississippi Supreme Court said the state could have taken a less punitive approach district attorney Kilgore says Nash and his lawyer did turn down a three year plea deal and it's possible that he could come up for parole next year instead of waiting for that to occur the Southern Poverty Law Center once the.

Rachel Martin founder Julian London NPR wikileaks
"robert mcduff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:32 min | 2 years ago

"robert mcduff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Martin and I'm no well king extradition proceedings for wikileaks founder Julian assigns start today in London the U. S. government wants to put him on trial for allegedly conspiring to hack into a Pentagon computer and release hundreds of thousands of secret files and peers Franklin fit is in what is in London watching all of this and Frank where is Julian Assange right now well he's been in Belmarsh prison since may of last year and today he's in a courtroom in southeast London arguing basically pleading for the U. K. authorities not to send them to the states this case has been going on ten years now how did it start remind us we already started back in two thousand and ten wikileaks released hundreds of thousands of secret diplomatic cables and military files in these were focused on the war in Iraq and Afghanistan amid and then some of them were deeply damaging to the Pentagon there was a video of U. S. Apache helicopter attack that killed at least eleven Iraqis including to reporters at the U. S. government said this put Americans at risk putting this material out there was a it was an enormous for each other so groups like Reporters Without Borders they say this is a first amendment case and the U. S. is trying to punish Assad for exposing wrongdoing and right now there are protesters out in front of the courthouse in London calling for Sajjad says son should be set free why did it take so long for this hearing to happen well he skipped bail soon skip bail me remember this but on an unrelated rape charges in Sweden this was going back six maybe seven years ago those charges have since been dropped but when he skipped bail here he holed up in the Ecuadorian embassy for a very long time the Ecuadorians granted him political asylum but he was not a great house guest and he's a very long time and they revoked his diplomatic immunity last year and a British police hold him out and off he went to prison okay there you go it Frank there's also been an interesting twist in all of this that involves president trump and the twenty sixteen election what what happened there well this is another leak from wikileaks that made a had a big impact if you remember back during the demo democratic campaign Hillary Clinton was running in two thousand and sixteen wikileaks released emails from her campaign and the Democratic National Committee the U. S. indicted twelve Russian agents for that hack of the one of the songs his attorneys says that assignment within Rohrabacher he was then a U. S. Republican congressman and war Barker allegedly offered to arrange a pardon for songs in two thousand seventeen and if he disavowed Russia's role in in all of this which in fact a son has done in the past the idea was to try to refute evidence that Russia tried to help trump win the White House which of course has been embarrassing to the president something that he wants to race and disdain a rocker admit to that does he say he offered us on to pardon well up up to a point no well he does say that he did help to offer get a pardon for Saanjh but he never talk to the president about it of course the White House says that as well they say they had nothing to do with it okay so in the end how likely is it that assigns ends up in the U. S. court it's not clear the US probably has quite a lot of evidence in the sun just facing up to a hundred seventy five years in prison but of course is on his attorneys are going to argue he can't get a fair trial in a trial in the United States and peers Franklin fit in London thanks Frank you're very welcome no it is illegal for anyone behind bars to process a cellphone in Mississippi it's a felony offense a Mississippi man picked up on a misdemeanor domestic violence charge didn't turn his phone over and he ended up with a twelve year sentence now there's a push to get the Mississippi Supreme Court to reconsider the case NPR's Cheryl Corley reports this case about cellphones prison and sentencing has some complicated twists and turns but there's little disagreement about a few facts number one it was August of twenty seventeen when police picked up now thirty nine year old Willie Nash for what they called a misdemeanor domestic violence charge number two the married father of three had a cell phone on him when police took him to the Newton county jail in east Mississippi and since they didn't search him they didn't find his cellphone will Bardwell is a senior attorney with the Southern Poverty Law Center or SPLC and they might never have discovered that he had a cell phone if he had not offered up the cell phone and ask them to recharge the battery for it those are all sanctions none of those are back Stephen Kilgore is the district attorney for Mississippi's eighth judicial circuit his office prosecuted Willie Nash for his first time in jail for him did not be aware that you could have a cell phone would be shocking there's been lots of speculation about how Nash ended up with a cell phone and whether he knew the policy bottom line it's a felony in Mississippi for any incarcerated person to possess one the penalty is three to fifteen years the judge in the case held two prior convictions for burglary from nearly two decades ago against Nash he sentenced him to twelve years and told him he was fortunate he didn't get more time attorney Robert McDuff with the Mississippi center for justice calls that absurd he is obviously when a life since then that has not involved in any criminal convictions challenging him based in part on convictions that are that old simply makes no sense cell phones have long been considered a problem in prisons and jails thousands make their way behind bars despite efforts to stymie their flow the FBI says prisoners use them to commit more crimes from the inside or to harass victims families over the last few months to Mississippi prisons there's been lots of violent unrest and more than a dozen deaths governor Tate Reeves partially blames contraband cell phones these phones have been illegal for years but they've been snuck in and they're being used coordinate gang activity throughout the Mississippi system and even throughout the country that was a large part of what calls the recent series of killings to escalate as much as it did no the day after the governor's press conference protesters rallied at the Mississippi state capitol Benny Ivey the head of an activist group strong arms of Jackson said that if it weren't for cellphones in humane conditions in the state's prisons would remain hidden thank god they had cell phones and.

Martin founder Julian London wikileaks