5 Burst results for "Robert Mayer"

"robert mayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:16 min | 1 year ago

"robert mayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Signed the national cancer act Because of that law the U.S. government has now invested far more money into fighting cancer than any other disease Gabriela Emmanuel of member station WBUR takes us back to the origins of the law and looks at the impact it's had ever since The national cancer act can be traced back to a shack in Watertown Wisconsin in the early 1900s A little girl named Mary tagged along as her mother went to visit their housekeeper Misses belter Mary stepped into the small room where misses belter lay sick with breast cancer her 7 children crowded around That little girl Mary grew up to be Mary lasker and activist for cancer research She remembers the pain that misses belter was in and I think the hopelessness that there was for her prognosis Claire pomeroy is president of the lasker foundation Mary lasker died in 1994 having spent decades as a philanthropist in citizen lobbyist persuading Washington's elite to support medical research She was relentless For the first half of the 1900s cancer was seen as contagious It was shameful and a death sentence People wouldn't even use the word cancer If they mentioned it they whispered the big sea The lasker argued if you don't talk about it you can't make progress Cancer couldn't be said on the radio Last or change that with the help of her husband a major ad executive And for newspapers she convinced her friend advice columnist and landers to write about cancer But pomeroy says lasker also knew that government would need to help She did understand that NASA was doing incredible things so lasker argued that the U.S. could also do a moonshot to defeat cancer She lobbied Congress and spent hours schmoozing at The White House with her friends president Johnson and lady bird Meanwhile just a few miles away in Maryland a young doctor named Robert Mayer was just starting his career at the national cancer institute Every Sunday Night the planes would fly in with patients The patients were children with leukemia arriving for chemotherapy At the time only a handful of hospitals in the country were trying to aggressively treat and cure cancers My colleagues thought we were crazy that we would be giving people so poisons which is what chemotherapy was thought to be Mayor who now works in Boston says back then at chemotherapy was experimental but it worked For some pediatric cancers the chance of survival went from zero to more than half Wasn't just that they were people They were children And they were children at an adorable age of three or four or 5 As the stories of these children trickled out a sense of optimism to cold maybe cancer could be cured Still Mary lasker felt that the government wasn't spending enough In a 1972 interview she explained how she took out targeted newspaper ads to increase the pressure on Congress Well this absolutely shocked that people in the house because they never had ads were born people were calling up from their districts of sending telegrams in this bottle of commotion She also kept pestering president Nixon publicly She paid for a full page ad in The New York Times in The Washington Post In big letters it said mister Nixon you can cure cancer The work of lasker and other activists and scientists paid off on December 23rd 1971 in The White House dining room And there were about 250 people there many of them who had done their thought wants to defeat the bill in one way or another all taking a lot of credit and call a few talking to each other and make before signing the bill president Nixon said he hoped he would be remembered for pushing forward the fight against cancer Everything that can be done by government Everything that can be done by voluntary agencies In this great powerful rich country now will be done The national cancer act funded research set up training programs and built a nationwide network of cancer centers The act invested more than $1.6 billion That's $10 billion in today's terms and it built up expectations Some even thought cancer might be cured as soon as 1976 according to Robin wolf scheffler a historian at MIT There's a great deal of frustration in roughly 1978 people declare the war on cancer a medical Vietnam Critics were pointing out that even with all that money pouring in people kept dying of cancer at higher and higher rates all through the 70s and 80s But Ned sharpless the current director of the national cancer institute says it's simply took time for the investments to pay off All this basic biology was bubbling beneath the surface it didn't look like much was happening in terms of cancer outcomes but a lot was happening in this sort of cancer research space These days 600,000 Americans still die from cancer every year but the death rates for all cancers have dropped They're about a third lower than their peak in 1991 Now there are new genetic screening tools and targeted therapies for lung cancer melanoma and others But those same effective approaches to cancer are not reaching the entire American population For example certain states in the south and Midwest have higher rates of cancer deaths particularly those places that haven't expanded Medicaid Going forward the goal is to make sure that no matter where you live what race you are or how much you earn you still have access to 50 years of cancer progress For NPR news I'm Gabriela Emanuel in Boston This story comes from NPR's partnership with WBUR and Kaiser health news.

cancer Mary lasker lasker Gabriela Emmanuel belter Mary Claire pomeroy lasker foundation Robert Mayer cure cancers Mary pediatric cancers belter cold maybe cancer Watertown national cancer institute U.S. government mister Nixon White House pomeroy president Johnson
"robert mayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"robert mayer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"5 21 Support for NPR comes from member stations and from Carnegie corporation of New York supporting innovations in education Democratic engagement and the advancement of international peace and security More information is available online at Carnegie dot org Heather stirred hege and Paul G hege supporting African wildlife foundation working to ensure wildlife and wildlands thrive in modern Africa Learn more at AWF dot org And the Lang law foundation supporting justice equity and opportunity for all people to foster and sustain safe and healthy communities Learn more at Lang lost dot org It's morning edition from NPR news I mean Martinez And I'm alys 50 years ago this week president Nixon signed the national cancer act Because of that law the U.S. government has now invested far more money into fighting cancer than any other disease Gabriela Emanuel of member station WBUR takes us back to the origins of the law and looks at the impact it's had ever since The national cancer act can be traced back to a shack in Watertown Wisconsin in the early 1900s A little girl named Mary tagged along as her mother went to visit their housekeeper Misses belter Mary stepped into the small room where misses belter lane sick with breast cancer her 7 children crowded around That little girl Mary grew up to be Mary lasker and activist for cancer research She remembers the pain that misses belter was in and I think the hopelessness that there was for her prognosis Claire pomeroy is president of the lasker foundation Mary lasker died in 1994 having spent decades as a philanthropist and citizen lobbyist persuading Washington's elite to support medical research She was relentless For the first half of the 1900s cancer was seen as contagious It was shameful and a death sentence People wouldn't even use the word cancer If they mentioned it they whispered the big sea The lasker argued if you don't talk about it you can't make progress Cancer couldn't be said on the radio Lasker changed that with the help of her husband a major ad executive And for newspapers she convinced her friend advice columnist Ann Landers to write about cancer But pomeroy says lasker also knew that government would need to help She did understand that NASA was doing incredible things so lasker argued that the U.S. could also do a moonshot to defeat cancer She lobbied Congress and spent hours schmoozing at The White House with her friends president Johnson and lady bird Meanwhile just a few miles away in Maryland a young doctor named Robert Mayer was just starting his career at the national cancer institute Every Sunday Night.

"robert mayer" Discussed on The Mark Levin Show

The Mark Levin Show

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"robert mayer" Discussed on The Mark Levin Show

"Well you can't do that. Well they wanna do that. What's the problem anyway. The insanity that goes on on television insanity. Msnbc cnn you can see this view program. This is the view of ratings mr producer. Who the hell's watching this show. I mean you have to be really low. I q and mentally unstable to watch these low. Iq mentally unstable hosts. I think but that's just me unbelievable. Let's take a call or to mr producer. To whom shall i speak. Yeah they great. Wj no palm beach. Florida jim who has a lot more smarts than i. Because he's in palm beach florida right now and i'm not how are you sir. I'm very well sir. Thanks for taking my komo from a former liberal democrat. You've got Your previous caller was kind of god. The word just went on my mouth was guest on You must mean guest in guests us In that deal with hurts number one how People are not up to their level. We have to give the ball past according to lok. But now dave want they're going all of these corporate boards according to the two guys So what are they looking for these corporate corporations sale because we want people to be all before. It's i guess what they're talking about is not really diversity with. They're talking about her quotas. They're not really talking about racial quotas. They're talking about racial quotas for marxist hardcore leftists. They're not saying let's have black people on brown people on yellow people on red people on what they're saying is and what this This group did with exxon. Is they put three radical leftist minorities on the board so it's not even diversity. It is less people on the board of a corporation that have as their purpose to destroy the corporation. It is endless insanity but when you understand. What's behind it again this marxism idea. It makes plenty of sense and You know you got a guy who's running a nine trillion dollar hedge fund the world. Tomorrow he's going to be just fine. The won't matter the world blah tomorrow is going to be just fine. Fact looked for more opportunities to make money. These are ambulance chasing belly crawling. Sleaze balls all hedge fund. Investors aren't the same producing anything. I mean they're they're providing capital. They're making decisions like that. And i'm not attacking them as a group but it's not like they're they're making vaccines or they're making a new inventions or products. They'll say they're funding them. Maybe they are. Maybe they're not all right. Jim thanks your call. Let's continue pamela. Baxter tennessee craig k. n. z. z. How are you. i'm fine a mark. No actually i'm in carmel. California my brother Lived in baxter tennessee. Alright hills of tennessee. Okay sorry about that. He and i. I love your show but i have a even more of a reason to listen to you as my brother loved her show and he would we would. He passed away last july. He would text me Mar levin on fire tonight and because there's a two hour difference. I'd be listening to you and he's already listened to you but It i saw sorry for his passing. And that's very very sweet that you guys did that to me but this is the special memory that whenever i listened to i'm going to have i took care of them in two thousand eighteen when he had his hip replaced and i went to baxter and No he has not had no internet and television but he had his radio and we listened to your show along with some of his other conservative Favorite shows but at night and it was like we were kids again. You know not it was a. It was an aug hot summer nights and We were just hit the lights off. And just listen to your show and we'd comment and laugh and he'd yell and the cool listening to you and i. When i listened to you now i will always think about my brother robert. Mayer well your your sweetheart. And i really appreciate that very much and i'm sorry he's not with us anymore but yeah those great memories and you know what that reminds me some of my own radio memories when i was a kid growing up and pamela. Th god bless you and you take care of yourself thank you. What.

Jim pamela robert last july Mar levin two hour Tomorrow California exxon tonight two guys tomorrow nine trillion dollar Florida palm beach Baxter tennessee three radical lok carmel aug
Apple profit stable as service gains offset iPhone slump

Bloomberg Daybreak

00:52 sec | 4 years ago

Apple profit stable as service gains offset iPhone slump

"From the year ago quarter. So I look at it. Now, look like this, and I think not so bad. You know, it really could have been worse honestly revenue from iphones tumbled fifteen percent while apple posted solid growth in the services business. The results have shares up more than five percent in early trading. Robert Mayer is president of semiconductor advisors. Stocks moving here in somewhat of a relief rally where the results aren't as bad as they could have otherwise been. I think we're seeing that out of some of the chip stocks as well one of those chips stocks AMD its shares rose more than eight percent in early. Trading. The second largest maker of computer processors reported profit in line with estimates and gave a rosy outlook for twenty nine thousand nine of next on earnings frowned results from twenty seven companies in the s&p five hundred including Facebook, Sarah Frier reports from the Bloomberg nine sixty newsroom in San Francisco. Most of the growth, I think we'll

Sarah Frier Robert Mayer Facebook AMD Bloomberg San Francisco Apple President Trump Fifteen Percent Eight Percent Five Percent
FatCam: Museum of London launches livestream of a rancid fatberg

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

00:41 sec | 4 years ago

FatCam: Museum of London launches livestream of a rancid fatberg

"Against Britain's famous festering fat Berg lives, on at the museum of London the chunk of oil fat diapers and baby wipes that blasted out of a sewer last year is now. Part of the museum's permanent collection the fabric. Was on display for several months, this year nestled inside transparent boxes protecting visitors from potentially. Deadly bacteria and the noxious smell. Now it's getting, its own livestream the museum says the highly Toxic glove will be stored in a secure case and displayed. Online via a fat Cam so that viewers. Can watch changes and it says, things are happening in that quote since coming off display. The Fatburger has started to grow. An unusual and, toxic

Aretha Franklin United States Scott Walker Senator Amy Klobuchar Robert Mayer Jacky Quin Minnesota Detroit Aide Amoroso Mangano Newman Museum Of London Wisconsin Christine Hall Quist Oscar Wells Gabriel Lamont Kristen Bell President Trump Jim Neuberger State Representative Senate White House