18 Burst results for "Robert Livingston"

"robert livingston" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

02:35 min | 8 months ago

"robert livingston" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"I guess the only question then left for me is how do we ever evaluated for making progress. What will be the measure. What is the metric. Will i think the metric and any assessment of progress has to be inextricably tied to the goal. So what is your aspiration. So one of the things that i want to see happen that i think is important is greater economic equality that we have huge both wage and wealth inequality in this country and it tends to track along the lines of race as well. Some people may say that they want more equal justice in the criminal justice system more equal schools. And i think all these things are related. Schools income incarceration health. Like you can't really separate out those and i with organizations that don't really deal with any of those things at all like they don't deal with incarceration when i'm talking to a ceo of microsoft about. How do things within the company. So i think leaders have to decide what their goals are. It's almost like a honeymooning. Couple it you know. If i'm a travel agent you come into my office. I'm going to have to ask you. Where do you wanna go. You can't just tell me send me some were good. I wanna go to a city. Do you like tropical islands. Do you want a ski vacation. Do you want to hike. And if you say. I wanna beautiful island give your choice. I can say yuba. Bermuda bahamas turks and caicos barbados right. Narrow down the scope. So i think there are lots of different metrics of success depending on. What people's aspirations are in obliged asked the question. Because i think it's important to have goals be concrete rather than abstract the research on the level of control. So if you have a new year's resolution say we're in january and your new year's resolution is to be a better person. Guess what you're not going to be a better person. That's too abstract that concrete. What does it mean to you to be a better person. Yeah doctor livingston. It's been so great talking to you. I really hope people pick up the conversation. How seeking in speaking the truth about. Racism can radically transform individuals and organizations. I don't have a co authorship credit on it but solely because it's already imprinted differently than max addition when it includes my two examples hopefully absolutely great while fellow bruin. I really enjoyed talking to you and wish you a ton of luck with the conversation. I hope we get to talk to you again soon. Yeah thank you may talk to. You both. Take care take by..

microsoft january Bermuda two examples one both livingston caicos barbados both wage things wealth turks
"robert livingston" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

02:35 min | 8 months ago

"robert livingston" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"I guess the only question then left for me is how do we ever evaluated for making progress. What will be the measure. What is the metric. Will i think the metric and any assessment of progress has to be inextricably tied to the goal. So what is your aspiration. So one of the things that i want to see happen that i think is important is greater economic equality that we have huge both wage and wealth inequality in this country and it tends to track along the lines of race as well. Some people may say that they want more equal justice in the criminal justice system more equal schools. And i think all these things are related. Schools income incarceration health. Like you can't really separate those and deal with organizations that don't really deal with any of those things at all like they don't deal with incarceration when i'm talking to a ceo of microsoft about. How do things within the company. So i think leaders have to decide what their goals are. It's almost like a honeymooning. Couple it you know. If i'm a travel agent you come into my office. I'm going to have to ask you. Where do you wanna go. You can't just tell me send me some were good. I wanna go to a city. Do you like tropical islands. Do you want a ski vacation. Do you want to hike. And if you say i wanna beautiful island of your choice i can say yuba bermuda bahamas turks and caicos barbados right. Narrow down the scope. So i think there are lots of different metrics of success depending on. What people's aspirations are in obliged asked the question. Because i think it's important to have goals be concrete rather than abstract. There's a lot of research on the level of control so if you have a new year's resolution say we're in january and your new year's resolution is to be a better person. Guess what you're not going to be a better person that's too abstract make concrete. What does it mean to you to be a better person. Yeah doctor livingston. It's been so great talking to you. I really hope people pick up the conversation. How seeking in speaking the truth about. Racism can radically transform individuals and organizations. I don't have a co authorship credit on it but solely because it's already imprinted rally the next edition when it includes my two examples hopefully absolutely great while fellow bruin. I really enjoyed talking to you and wish you a ton of luck with the conversation. I hope we get to talk to you again soon. Yeah thank you may talk to. You both. Take care take by..

january microsoft one two examples both livingston both wage things wealth caicos turks barbados
"robert livingston" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

04:46 min | 8 months ago

"robert livingston" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"A way to do that. And as we were talking about before with racial equity actually gaining a lot of stuff. There isn't sacrifice people think that there will be a sacrifice of fairness for example or sacrifice of quality than if we have diversity in our organization it means that we won't have high quality people and so part of my job is to help convince them that greater diversity and inclusion and equity not involve a sacrifice of either fairness for quality. Why i think it's pretty evident from all the different corporations that have been early. Adopters of actually made a intentional effort towards that. They've in general had great outcomes from that. I think it's pretty well documented at this point. Yeah but science is tricky like you know that's become a mantra that diversity will increase your your prophet. You know. Some people put more women and people of color award. You'll have more profit. I'll just refer you to a very recent that was published. Harvard business review by my colleague. Robyn ely and david. Thomas who is the president of morehouse college where they argue that. That's really not the case. Diversity is not an ad and stir proposition. Where you just add. Some people stirred up in all of a sudden. You're going to get all these fruits from the tree that it's a lot more complicated than that. And if it's not done right diversity can have no effect or even a negative effect on collaboration. Well if the work you're talking about's not done and people are just now silo next to each other than yeah. There's no benefit whatsoever right. But even when people are put in the same team or in the same room and they have to collaborate if they're for example is an implicit or explicit hierarchy where only certain powerful people talk and the people who are subordinate. Don't talk then you're gonna miss out on the unique information that those individuals have and their presence in the team is not going to contribute anything. Because they're not gonna say anything because you didn't give him a chance to get a word in edgewise and they're just not silent like they're all in the same room and there or when you have a diverse panel that's interviewing you know sometimes you might have a white male boss who says i really liked candidate a what do you think monica. And you're a candidate. What do you think that's yeah candidate. Cool we're all decided. Well we're not all decided you decided and your power influence with the rest of us. Said that's not the benefit of diversity. Brunei brown calls at the halo effect. And maybe it's not her term but yeah the halo effect in an organization is that some people follow other people in that..

david Robyn ely Thomas Harvard morehouse college monica
"robert livingston" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

03:33 min | 8 months ago

"robert livingston" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"You'll have more profit out. Just refer you to a very recent that was published. Harvard business review by my colleague. Robyn ely and david. Thomas who is the president of morehouse college where they argue that. That's really not the case. Diversity is not an ad and stir proposition. Where you just add. Some people stirred up in all of a sudden. You're going to get all these fruits from the tree that it's a lot more complicated than that. And if it's not done right diversity can have no effect or even a negative effect on collaboration. Well if the work you're talking about's not done and people are just now silo next to each other than yeah. There's no benefit whatsoever right. But even when people are put in the same team or in the same room and they have to collaborate if they're for example is an implicit or explicit hierarchy where only certain powerful people talk and the people who are subordinate. Don't talk then you're gonna miss out on the unique information that those individuals have and their presence in the team is not gonna contribute anything. Because they're not gonna say anything because you didn't give him a chance to get a word in edgewise and they're just not silent like they're all in the same room and there or when you have a diverse panel that's interviewing sometimes you might have a white male boss who says i really liked candidate a what do you think monica. And you're a candidate. What do you think that's yeah candidate. Cool we're all decided. Well we're not all decided you decided and your power influence with the rest of us. Said that's not the benefit of diversity. Brunei brown calls at the halo effect. And maybe it's not her term but yeah the halo effect in an organization is that some people follow other people in that. The way around that is like every single vote should be anonymous See that in a jury if you've sat on a jury which i have like when you're deliberating. Basically two people are making the decision forever. When all of a sudden you start seeing everyone starts to be like okay. Yeah yeah yeah. Even if they might have a completely different opinion it just happens that way but also with diversity on these panels or even if they're all in a room i think part of it is because there's maybe two or three people of color they feel that having that position is rare and that they need to keep it like having an opinion might put them at risk to lose the job and have somebody else committed. The stakes feel different totally. How can i hit you with one. It's giving my only question. We might might go wrong. But i gotta ask it because i do think a lot of people will be thinking of this. A lot of people wanna draw a distinction between equality of opportunity versus equality of outcome. And i guess. I'm curious where you land on this because i am a little apprehensive about measuring our progress with a quality of outcome to give the most simple example. I'd say you can make a fire department. Completely equal in what gender they'll hire. You could have every policy in place and you may find that the outcome is that still. Ninety percent of firefighters are male and it would not be intellectually responsible to say that the conclusion is that is in inequitable environment. It's that guess what. Women don't want to be firefighters. Or whatever the case there's many different cases where equality of opportunity is not necessarily going to equal equality of outcome..

david two Ninety percent Thomas Robyn ely two people morehouse college three people one Harvard single vote
"robert livingston" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

03:09 min | 8 months ago

"robert livingston" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Who just sort of standing around in the culture in the kind of try to intervene but not forcefully enough. So i think if you get to policy then you can sort of influence those other two things automatically in a really quick way through policy whereas with the more of this grassroots. You've got build up if it's individuals you've got to convince other people and but you change the law you change your policy you chain to practice and then you sort of hit those other to automatically well. It seems to be the only one that can affect the other ones so an individual choose to act however they wanted them the police department and that will not necessarily affect the culture certainly won't affect policy but policy can curb the culture because if there are rules that prevent certain aspects of the culture. The culture will have to change the culture changed and of course the individuals. Very incentivized change. So yeah it seems like it's the only one that can really transcend to the other levels. But here's the thing. Even though i think is the most important. It's not the only one that can affect the other to all of them can affect all of them so the individual actually can affect the culture. And i tell people this all the time you being celebrity dax or people who were cool people like if you get on tv and you say you know. Eating meat is wrong. That's why oprah got sued right. She said you know eating meat is wrong. There's no law. She can't tell telling what to do but people admire her and they do what she so. She can have an impact on the culture. Certain police officers influencers in. That's why they call them influencers. They can have an impact on the culture within an organization just by modeling. The behavior that they wanna see they can get other people to behave in those ways. And i think through activism individuals can also affect policies. So i sort of see an arrow from all three to all three. But i'd start with policy. Yeah yeah. I totally agree. I just imagine being the one cop in that circle. It's hard it's hard we are. I believe collectively better than we are individually in that we can all get together and think of something very impactful in profound that we might have a hard time executing ourselves but i think collectively were very very.

two things three one cop oprah one
"robert livingston" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

04:03 min | 8 months ago

"robert livingston" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Things i remember watching a frontline on what chicago has paid out and it's in the billions and billions of dollars. It's so costly but you know we're not good you know. This is daniel combines. Book thinking fast and slow. We're not rational when it comes to long term thinking like it's all about the short term fix and then it's back to the problems that we talked about really with alcoholism and drug addiction and things like that. That's not really about the long-term like boring dodging in those things. Because it's about the short term right rather than the long term. And i think we as humans. That's one of our engineering flaws if you will one of our just in. Our cognitive wiring tend to be more influenced by you know short term outcomes than long term outcome. So i think the case for a better long-term is irrefutable. Almost okay so now we get into strategy and this is what we really need. I think so many people out in this conversation are really good at pointing out the problem. I'm among them but boy the strategy and how to come out of it. Seems a little elusive. You know. it's so funny. Because you know in the first paragraph of the book on strategy. I tell the reader. If you've skipped to this chapter then go back and read chapters one through eleven before you get here because part of the s is going through the p. The are in the when i go into so. Many corporations leaders want to jump straight to strategy without their employees even understanding that. There's a problem and that's doomed to failure. Because when you enact these policies and people don't realize there's a problem it seems like the policy of the problem seems like you're being aggressive because they don't understand what it is that you're doing or where it comes from and you haven't sort of increase their concern whether it's intrinsic concern or whether it's extrinsic as you were mentioning dax based on incentives or whatever so you've got to do all.

first paragraph billions eleven chicago billions of dollars daniel chapters one
"robert livingston" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:22 min | 8 months ago

"robert livingston" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Everyone should be raised to the level of civility. That i'm receiving. I don't think life zero sum game. I don't think there's a set finite amount of wealth in this country. I think everything can be lifted. And i think when it's proposed as the cookie plan. Yep people are saying wait. I'm going to have to lose something to make these people equal. And i actually don't think it's zero sum game and so let me clarify that the example that you gave when he comes to respect and we're not come to treatment. That's not zero-sum there's enough respectable around for everybody but when it comes to let's talk about gdp so gdp is based solely on how educated. This population is how innovative. They are every time we invest in that in educating more people in getting more doctor degree holders the overall gdp goes up in that investment is not capped. It's not fine finite every time we invest in we make more money on the investment so i see unlimited growth with all. These people empowered given opportunity. I don't see we've got to cut everything in half. I don't know no. I get what you're saying. But it gets to the difference between absolute deprivation in relative deprivation and i gave an example of zero cookies versus four cookies but i could have easily made it to cookies versus six cookies. Or you know vary and what i'm saying is even if you could because i give this example in the book for some people even if you could invent genie who says okay a wave a magic wand and expand the california coastline so that everyone can have a house in malibu. Are you on board with that. Some people would say no. Because i want to be the only one who has a house in malibu and there's no way to be the king of the mountain right. You can't have mount everest unless there's a valley so in in that sense it's not even a question of whether the resources are available. It's a question of whether people want because there are a lot of fortune. Five hundred companies that can they can afford to pay employees more money but it may mean that they get smaller bonuses because the prophets allure and they won't star because maybe they'll just make sixty million a year versus eighty million a year or whatever it happens to be but as humans. Everything's relatives. I totally agree with you. That there's a big section of this population. That are the malibu house owners. That wanna be the only one that own house there. I don't deny that at all. I totally think there are many winner. Take all people who are like yeah. We're the winners. Why on earth are we going to try to not be the winners exact and i also am scared that there's a good section of people that don't understand what's being proposed in. They're afraid and they don't need to be. That's my fear. Well you know. There was a wonderful group of essays in the new york times on the sixteen nineteen project and matthew desmond wrote an article on what he called low road capitalism and it's a complicated concept and he talks about it not only in that article but his book convicted..

malibu six cookies california matthew desmond new york zero cookies four cookies Five hundred companies eighty million a year sixty million a year half one nineteen sixteen earth
"robert livingston" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

02:16 min | 8 months ago

"robert livingston" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"The bucket listening stay tuned for more armchair expert. If you dare. We are supported by squarespace. If you've been lucky enough to visit armchair expert pod dot com. You will see the gorgeous work of wabi wab and of course squarespace. It is the easiest place to build website. There's many reasons you might need one. Turn a cool idea to a website or showcase your work blogger published content sell products and services of all kinds promote your physical or online business or announce an upcoming event or special project. Squarespace does this by giving beautiful. Templates created by world-class designers. Powerful ecommerce functionality. Lets you sell anything online. The ability to customize look feel settings products and more with just a few clicks and the best part everything is optimized for mobile right out of the box. it's a great place to buy domains and choose from over. Two hundred extensions. Atl that can help you grow in real time in twenty four seven award-winning customer service. Go to squarespace dot com slash dax for a free trial. And when you're ready to launch us the offer code to save ten percent off your first purchase of a website or domain that's squarespace dot com slash dax. Enter code dax. We are supported by two ellison. The future of toilet in has arrived okay. it's technically been around for centuries but hideously expensive costing thousands now the brand new hello to she three point oh modern bidet attachment is here to level the playing field. It's stylish eco. Friendly easy to install an affordable. Hello to she three point. Oh doesn't just cleanse your but with a precise stream of freshwater e cleans itself before and after its used with.

"robert livingston" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

04:08 min | 8 months ago

"robert livingston" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Racism does exist but it's the product of bad apples. Then you're gonna miss all the systemic factors and you're gonna fail to address the systemic causes of it and guess what the diseases still going to be there because you're going to end up treating symptoms and leaving the illness itself there because you haven't properly diagnosed it and so that's the significance of root cause analysis is sort of digging deeper into the underlying causes of the problem. Once you realized that a problem exists and by the way. This shouldn't have to be done. But i do think it has to be done. This overlaps with your ground rules for a productive conversation and one of them that i like. The most is focused on the problem. And not the person. Because i think where a lot of these debates on race go off the rails is it is seems like a personal attack to the person as opposed to a systemic problem. And i think the more we focused on the system the less again. It's embarrassing that we'd have to account for people's defensiveness but it would be stupid not to account for people's defensiveness. I think people can accept that they grew up in a racist system. I think it's hard for them to accept. They are racist. Just a harder leap to your point. I'm going to go through american. Fix each person one by one by some conversion therapy. Or am i gonna fix the roundup systems exactly exactly and i think the latter is a much more productive approach and the second advantage to focusing on the problem and not. The person is based on research by eddie gen karen jakpor and colleagues..

eddie gen second advantage one karen jakpor each person american
"robert livingston" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

05:35 min | 8 months ago

"robert livingston" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"After all these years with a lot of the people that i grew up with and i'm like the underachiever some of them are like star urologists than corporate lawyers and these are people who are very much proud of being black. So i never understood. This sort of notion that blackness meant incompetence or black Criminality like i no one ever got shot in my neighborhood eighteen years i lived like and i saw it on tv. All this wasn't completely sheltered. But i was really intrigued by some of the attitudes about the black community that i didn't share and so i said let me study this. You know you think. I'm inferior like again how your own story becomes a gift in your research and your work which is if you had grown up around it. You might not have thought to question it. It would seem like it is in what is is and you don't necessarily always question what is so you do a great job in the book the conversation. How seeking and speaking the truth about. Racism can radically transform individuals. And or you give us the y when in how of racial bias. So could you walk us through that. I think people have a very binary idea of racism. Right which i'm in the klu klux clan or i'm not or i like black people in quotes so i'm not racist or bias but of course all human beings have bias of all kinds so yeah. Could you help us understand how this came to be. Yeah so i'll answer two questions. What is how the book came to be in how it's structured and the second is what is racism. And how do people understand what. Racism is in those two questions kind of lead together. But the way i came to the book was almost like a seven step plan like when someone has a problem whether it's alcoholism or drug addiction or like climate change or weight loss like any of the sort of challenges that face humans. How is it that they overcome those challenges. And i sort of structure the book around it and i have this model that was published in harvard. Business review the has despite step plan if you will and i call it tress p. r. e. s..

two questions eighteen years second seven step klu klux harvard
"robert livingston" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

05:25 min | 8 months ago

"robert livingston" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Did you know you could do this in the real world. And i was like no. There's a field where you can actually study racism and discrimination. She's like yeah you know. Why don't you come in audit a class. And that was the beginning of the end. So i left that program. I got a master's. I was a heroin from impeach d. But decided to start all over again in social psychology. So i started at yale. Struggled from coast to coast to coast and my professor at ucla said. Don't go to yale because i got into princeton yale. He said go to ohio state. That's like the best program in the country in what you're doing and as a phd student or go to programs not schools. And i didn't think. I could live in columbus ohio so i went to yale and then i was like you know what i can't live in new haven connecticut so the professor at ohio state would you guys take me and fortunately i had my own funding because i wanted. Nsf fellowship. so. I was able to export that i went to ohio state and worked with one of the top people in the field maryland brewer. Who's like the godmother of social identity. Then i started off. I went head my first job. At the university of wisconsin in psychology and afro-american studies went to business school at kellogg northwestern and in a business school in england and now public policy school at harvard. So i get around academically as well having been in all those places would it be silly. Do even attempt this or is it a relevant. Does it all have different shapes but would you be able to rank the experience of a black man in all these different places. Like it certainly. It was worse in some and better in others. There's anyplace stick out as like. Oh they're doing something different here and now through seeing that my eyes are open to how fucked up. It is elsewhere. Yeah well start by saying there was racism everywhere in all of those places anytime you have black and white people together or brown and white people beige and brown people. You're gonna have racism. I think it's just inevitable however the quality of it and the quantity of it did vary from place to place a place. That wasn't as racist. As i thought it would be was madison wisconsin of all places when i was at the university of wisconsin. In part of it is madison's really really liberal city in. there aren't enough black people there. I think to present a threat right where people group. So they're all about please black people com- we wanna roll out the red carpet and have you here. Oh you're in my restaurant please. White person get up and let the black person sit down. You don't have many of those so it was kind of overcompensation if you will..

england new haven connecticut university of wisconsin first job one madison ucla ohio state columbus ohio ohio afro-american kellogg northwestern harvard princeton yale yale madison wisconsin maryland
"robert livingston" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:56 min | 8 months ago

"robert livingston" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"How you doing. I'm doing good doctor livingston. Are you bummed. That if you google your name you're going to get one of the fathers of the constitution right or one of these early founding fathers taking all the real estate yes yeah this ranch of being named dax. There's just not a bunch out there right now your christian name it is. It is yeah. My mom and dad had read a book in the lead character's name was dax. And let's go for it where you from originally. So i was born in lexington kentucky and that's where i spent most of my time but i've lived in six states in four foreign countries. So do you have a favorite my favorite place to visit his turkey. Eastern bowl is my favorite city in the world really has the oslo balance of chaos and order if you will oh okay good. I need you to drill down on the order. Because when i look at it looks very bright. Very frenetic very exciting. And i'm a little bit like that's seems maybe too chaotic. There's a method to the madness because there are places. I've been that are chaotic. They're just chaos deal with it but turkey just seems chaotic like this. Is it comparable to any other form or european country or is it its own thing and that's why you love it. It's its own thing. But i would say it's most comparable to spain. I don't know if you've been disowned ensuring people go out to eat restaurants. Don't open before nine o'clock in the party starts at one. Am and it goes to eight in the morning and spain has a different rhythm. And i think that's the most similar country to turkey and its mediterranean so similarities in the cuisine fish a lot of oil you know and then a crazy history. One of the most historical places you could visit. And that's what i like about it too. So you just hit the number one criteria for whether i like cities or don't and that is rhythm so i'll be places and i'm like yeah it's beautiful. That's a big tall building. That's got all the accoutrements of a great city. But there's just no rhythm happening here and then conversely you go down to austin texas. They don't have a ton to look at. And i'm like oh i can feel the rhythm all around me exactly now. How did you end up at harvard. Like most things in life. It had something to do with my network. So i was in england at the time because i had accepted a position because again our wanderers case. You can't tell i. Don't mind packing up and going to some exotic place. And i got an offer to take over as head of organizational behavior department at the university of sussex and i had my own center and when i was there at the center i discovered my real passion. I like to say. I transitioned from being a gardener to being a florist. When i was just a straight researcher i had my hands in the dirt. Cultivating blooms if you will. And then. when. I was head of the centre. I interacted with metropolitan police. The nhl the national healthcare service all these organizations to sort of give away my flowers if you will and so. I got into the florist business. Like how do you arrange these flowers into the perfect bouquet to give it to people at weddings. Because what's the point staying in a greenhouse if no one ever sees the beauty of your flowers and so you know when i was in england i discovered the passion of sort of giving away the science and then harvard. You know i was giving a talk. And they said well. You know we're holding company of entrepreneurs will let you come here and do whatever you wanna do if you don't want publish anymore will let you be a practitioner. But an academic at the same time and i was like really because most places aren't set up you know. Harvard makes its own rules. So i sort of took on this position to be an academic practitioner which led to this book that we're going to talk about which is sort of trying to distill. The science synthesize it assembly like a bouquet into something that people can digest and use to make profound sustainable change around racism. So that's like my purpose in life. Now where did you get your doctor. Degree because lexington kentucky and then ending up england emceeing already. You're privy to to dramatically different racial structures. And i wonder where you went to college if you maybe even a third and that somehow helps you on your journey just to have witnessed all this stuff firsthand. I went from coast to coast to coast and into the mid west. So basically i started my undergrad tulane university in. I did a study abroad in spain. Which is how. I came to know. Spain fell in love with spain. And i majored in spanish. That was one of my things. And then i went to. Ucla started at the gulf of mexico. Coast number one went to california. Ucla that was number two. And i was getting a phd in romance language and linguistics. So something completely unrelated. But i was looking at themes of oppression in latin american literature and colonialism. So i always been interested in that. In undergrad i did the thesis on a comparative study of racism in brazil and the united states but long story short i was hiking in joshua tree. And there was a psychology student. Who said you know you're doing really cool research. Did you know you could do this in the real world. And i was like no. There's a field where you can actually study racism and discrimination. She's like yeah you know. Why don't you come in audit a class. And that was the beginning of the end. So i left that program. I got a master's. I was a heroin from impeach d. But decided to start all over again in social psychology. So i started at yale. Struggled from coast to coast to coast and my professor at ucla said. Don't go to yale because i got into princeton yale. He said go to ohio state. That's like the best program in the country in what you're doing and as a phd student or go to programs not schools. And i didn't think. I could live in columbus ohio so i went to yale and then i was like you know what i can't live in new haven connecticut so the professor at ohio state would you guys take me and fortunately i had my own funding because i wanted. Nsf fellowship. so. I was able to export that i went to ohio state and worked with one of the top people in the field maryland brewer. Who's like the godmother of social identity.

robert livingston los angeles yesterday Today harvard kennedy school one thing every vitamin one second leah one ac burke many stressors bledsoe monica One couple ads
Interview With Robert Livingston

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

05:56 min | 8 months ago

Interview With Robert Livingston

"How you doing. I'm doing good doctor livingston. Are you bummed. That if you google your name you're going to get one of the fathers of the constitution right or one of these early founding fathers taking all the real estate yes yeah this ranch of being named dax. There's just not a bunch out there right now your christian name it is. It is yeah. My mom and dad had read a book in the lead character's name was dax. And let's go for it where you from originally. So i was born in lexington kentucky and that's where i spent most of my time but i've lived in six states in four foreign countries. So do you have a favorite my favorite place to visit his turkey. Eastern bowl is my favorite city in the world really has the oslo balance of chaos and order if you will oh okay good. I need you to drill down on the order. Because when i look at it looks very bright. Very frenetic very exciting. And i'm a little bit like that's seems maybe too chaotic. There's a method to the madness because there are places. I've been that are chaotic. They're just chaos deal with it but turkey just seems chaotic like this. Is it comparable to any other form or european country or is it its own thing and that's why you love it. It's its own thing. But i would say it's most comparable to spain. I don't know if you've been disowned ensuring people go out to eat restaurants. Don't open before nine o'clock in the party starts at one. Am and it goes to eight in the morning and spain has a different rhythm. And i think that's the most similar country to turkey and its mediterranean so similarities in the cuisine fish a lot of oil you know and then a crazy history. One of the most historical places you could visit. And that's what i like about it too. So you just hit the number one criteria for whether i like cities or don't and that is rhythm so i'll be places and i'm like yeah it's beautiful. That's a big tall building. That's got all the accoutrements of a great city. But there's just no rhythm happening here and then conversely you go down to austin texas. They don't have a ton to look at. And i'm like oh i can feel the rhythm all around me exactly now. How did you end up at harvard. Like most things in life. It had something to do with my network. So i was in england at the time because i had accepted a position because again our wanderers case. You can't tell i. Don't mind packing up and going to some exotic place. And i got an offer to take over as head of organizational behavior department at the university of sussex and i had my own center and when i was there at the center i discovered my real passion. I like to say. I transitioned from being a gardener to being a florist. When i was just a straight researcher i had my hands in the dirt. Cultivating blooms if you will. And then. when. I was head of the centre. I interacted with metropolitan police. The nhl the national healthcare service all these organizations to sort of give away my flowers if you will and so. I got into the florist business. Like how do you arrange these flowers into the perfect bouquet to give it to people at weddings. Because what's the point staying in a greenhouse if no one ever sees the beauty of your flowers and so you know when i was in england i discovered the passion of sort of giving away the science and then harvard. You know i was giving a talk. And they said well. You know we're holding company of entrepreneurs will let you come here and do whatever you wanna do if you don't want publish anymore will let you be a practitioner. But an academic at the same time and i was like really because most places aren't set up you know. Harvard makes its own rules. So i sort of took on this position to be an academic practitioner which led to this book that we're going to talk about which is sort of trying to distill. The science synthesize it assembly like a bouquet into something that people can digest and use to make profound sustainable change around racism. So that's like my purpose in life. Now where did you get your doctor. Degree because lexington kentucky and then ending up england emceeing already. You're privy to to dramatically different racial structures. And i wonder where you went to college if you maybe even a third and that somehow helps you on your journey just to have witnessed all this stuff firsthand. I went from coast to coast to coast and into the mid west. So basically i started my undergrad tulane university in. I did a study abroad in spain. Which is how. I came to know. Spain fell in love with spain. And i majored in spanish. That was one of my things. And then i went to. Ucla started at the gulf of mexico. Coast number one went to california. Ucla that was number two. And i was getting a phd in romance language and linguistics. So something completely unrelated. But i was looking at themes of oppression in latin american literature and colonialism. So i always been interested in that. In undergrad i did the thesis on a comparative study of racism in brazil and the united states but long story short i was hiking in joshua tree. And there was a psychology student. Who said you know you're doing really cool research. Did you know you could do this in the real world. And i was like no. There's a field where you can actually study racism and discrimination. She's like yeah you know. Why don't you come in audit a class. And that was the beginning of the end. So i left that program. I got a master's. I was a heroin from impeach d. But decided to start all over again in social psychology. So i started at yale. Struggled from coast to coast to coast and my professor at ucla said. Don't go to yale because i got into princeton yale. He said go to ohio state. That's like the best program in the country in what you're doing and as a phd student or go to programs not schools. And i didn't think. I could live in columbus ohio so i went to yale and then i was like you know what i can't live in new haven connecticut so the professor at ohio state would you guys take me and fortunately i had my own funding because i wanted. Nsf fellowship. so. I was able to export that i went to ohio state and worked with one of the top people in the field maryland brewer. Who's like the godmother of social identity.

Spain Harvard Lexington Kentucky Livingston England Oslo University Of Sussex Mediterranean Metropolitan Police Google Ucla Turkey Austin NHL Texas Tulane University Assembly Gulf Of Mexico Princeton Yale
"robert livingston" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

02:09 min | 8 months ago

"robert livingston" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"It's difficult to maintain effective nutritional habits. This is where athletic greens can help their daily. Only one supplement powder is by far the easiest and most delicious nutritional habit. You can add to your health one tasty scoop of athletic. Greens contains seventy five vitamins minerals and whole foods. Sourced ingredients that all worked together to fill nutritional gaps in your diet can increase energy and focus aid digestion and support a healthy immune system. Right now athletic. Greens is doubling down supporting your immune system during the winter months. They're offering arm series of free one year supply vitamin d and five free travel packs with your first purchase. If you visit the link today you'll basically never have to buy vitamin d again simply visit athletic. Greens dot com slash tax and join health. Experts athletes podcasters and health conscious. Go getters around the world who make daily commitment to their health everyday again simply visit athletic. Greens dot com slash tax. Get your free year. Supply of vitamin d and five. Free travel packs today. We are supported by. Hbo's new docu series the lady and the dale the genre bending documentary series details the rise and fall of one thousand nine hundred seventy s transgender entrepreneur elizabeth carmichael and her radical car. The dale the film traces. The story of elizabeth carmichael larger than life entrepreneur who rose to prominence during the nineteen seventies gas crisis with her promotion of fuel-efficient three wheeled vehicle known as the dail as she wins over major carmakers and investors a web of mystery unfolds regarding the cars technology and carmichael surprising. Pass a portrait of an extraordinary entrepreneurs rise and eventual fall. One of a kind story of fraud family and identity direct by nick Malaria and zachary drucker from emmy winning producers. Marc j d plus. Hbo's room one zero four the four part. Hbo docu series premieres january. Thirty first on hbo. Max the series debuts with back to back episodes sunday january thirty first nine pm to eleven pm eastern in pacific with new episodes airing subsequent sundays at nine pm eastern and pacific. He's.

"robert livingston" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

02:50 min | 8 months ago

"robert livingston" Discussed on Experts on Expert with Dax Shepard

"Will come welcome. Welcome to armchair expert. This is part of our black voices series. Yeah are bonus episodes which. I love the metoo. Today we're gonna talk to robert livingston. Who is a social psychologist at the harvard kennedy school. He studies the science underlying implicit bias and racism. He has a new book out called the conversation. How seeking and speaking the truth about. Racism can radically transform individuals and organizations. This was just the most wonderful conversation it was. It was so informative too. He named a few things in a way that i had not heard before. Like he explains equity versus equality. In a way that has really stopped. There was a ding ding ding. It will be. Because i'll keep referring to every few days before we get into the show. You just had a great experience with black owned business. You wanna tell me. Well yeah. And i just want to be transparent so on these episodes we normally do to shout outs to black owned businesses in lieu of a couple ads. But we actually have filled that space with ads. But i i would still like to shout out those businesses were gonna do it right now. Perfect i bought a sweatshirt yesterday just yesterday. Just yesterday from a black owned business. Called a leah one ac. I really hope i'm pronouncing that right. It's a l. I y w. a. n. e. k. This awesome woman and she makes the most beautiful clothes to be his. I'm upset with her. Because everything was sold out except one thing. Okay and i bought it immediately. It didn't have my size is your favorite thing is. He didn't have my size. And i bought it immediately didn't matter they're gorgeous and i found it on a blog and there was like in the comments. People were talking about the best sweatshirt and this came up bro tip if anyone wants to sell anything to monica. Just tell her that all the other ones have been sold and it's the last one and check in on a weightless and stuff so by some wet in this. One only extends the los angeles area. I'm sorry but bledsoe's my favorite burke restaurant so good blood so's b. l. e. d. s. o. b. l. u. d. s. e. I believe you will. I think i think you've added a need. I'm gonna look on my. I'm going to look at my food. Delivery app hold on one second b. l. u. d. so apostrophe s. I looked so yes the most amazing barbecue angeles and sides. Oh beautiful sides check it out and enjoy robert livingston. We are supported by athletic. Green's my favorite part of every morning. Athletic greens is so delicious. And it's the only way i have found to get every vitamin and mineral and need without having some concoction that tastes terrible was so many stressors in life..

robert livingston los angeles yesterday Today harvard kennedy school one thing every vitamin one second leah one ac burke many stressors bledsoe monica One couple ads
"robert livingston" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

02:50 min | 8 months ago

"robert livingston" Discussed on Armchair Expert with Dax Shepard

"Welcome welcome welcome to armchair expert. This is part of our black voices series. Yeah are bonus episodes which. I love the me metoo today. We're gonna talk to robert livingston. Who is a social psychologist at the harvard kennedy school. He studies the science underlying implicit bias and racism. He has a new book out called the conversation. How seeking and speaking the truth about. Racism can radically transform individuals and organizations. This was just the most wonderful conversation it was. It was so informative too. He named a few things in a way that i had not heard before. Like he explains equity versus equality. In a way that has really stopped. There was a ding ding ding. It will be. Because i'll keep referring to every few days before we get into the show. You just had a great experience with black owned business. You wanna tell me. Well yeah. And i just want to be transparent so these episodes we normally do to shout outs to black owned businesses in lieu of a couple ads. But we actually have filled that space with ads. But i i would still like to shout out those businesses were gonna do it right now. Perfect i bought a sweatshirt yesterday just yesterday. Just yesterday from a black owned business. Called a leah one ac. I really hope i'm pronouncing that right. It's a l. I y w. a. n. e. k. This awesome woman and she makes the most beautiful clothes to be his. I'm upset with her. Because everything was sold out except one thing. Okay and i bought it immediately. It didn't have my size is your favorite thing is. He didn't have my size. And i bought it immediately didn't matter they're gorgeous and i found it on a blog and there was like in the comments. People were talking about the best sweatshirt and this came up bro tip if anyone wants to sell anything to monica. Just tell her that all the other ones have been sold and it's the last one and check in on a weightless and stuff so by some wet in this. One only extends the los angeles area. I'm sorry but bledsoe's my favorite burke restaurant so good blood so's b. l. e. d. s. o. b. l. u. d. s. e. I believe you will. I think i think you've added a need. I'm gonna look on my. I'm going to look at my food. Delivery app hold on one second b. l. u. d. so apostrophe s. I looked so yes the most amazing barbecue angeles and sides. Oh beautiful sides check it out and enjoy robert livingston. We are supported by athletic. Green's my favorite part of every morning. Athletic greens is so delicious. And it's the only way i have found to get every vitamin and mineral and need without having some concoction that tastes terrible was so many stressors in life..

robert livingston los angeles yesterday today one thing leah one ac harvard kennedy school every vitamin one second bledsoe burke many stressors One couple monica days
"robert livingston" Discussed on Women at Work

Women at Work

04:10 min | 3 years ago

"robert livingston" Discussed on Women at Work

"We are in a great position to be able to educate. Other people about racism microaggressions intersectional. Invisibility other struggles at women of color face, especially since some research finds that white people are more likely to listen to other white people about race related messages than they are to people of color. So we need to change that long term. But in the meantime, white people can use that to their advantage to try to use their privilege for good. And I know a lot of my white women colleagues are not comfortable with expressing emotion in the workplace specifically anger, and there's research Victorian Brasco has done some work on angry women as have actually Shelby. Zet and Robert Livingston and others. And so I know that there can be backlash against women, especially white women when they express anger, however, passion, if there's a way for white women to lobby passionately about this and to be undeterred when they knock on the door the first time and someone says, you know, we have other priorities will why. Ask follow up questions. Why isn't this a priority? Other organizations have worked on this. Why can't we here's some suggestions on what we can do? Here's some women of color who I think can help us think through this. Here's some ways that this will benefit us and advantage. I I really think this topic. It can be so uncomfortable that it's very easy for it to be dismissed, and we go to the next annual evaluation, the next strategic planning session and it falls lower and lower and lower in priority. And I think it's important for us as women. To really emphasize the need for equity for women and also for women of color and other demographics. I really want to emphasize for me, the importance of that passion, or anger anger is a signal of something else that. Our spouse it inactive values are misaligned. We're not doing what we say. We're supposed to stand for that is harmful to organizations. And I love this organization. I wanted to do better. So I'm going to keep pushing on this front, and I think it's just difficult for me to imagine that if women are readily half of the population in organizations that have fifty percent of the population was pushing on this. We wouldn't make more advance. I just wanna make the point that as women are climbing higher in organizations. We don't have to ask for permission so much. We can just go out. And do you can bring in candidates who don't look like everyone else in the office who don't think like everyone else in the office. I think that people pay a lot of lip service to the value of diversity, and when faced with it get frightened, but you can call people out when they do when they start making excuses. We have power, and we should be using it amended that run cook. Can you help help us understand where white women have some blind spots? Sure. So Tina already mentioned some of them. I think one of the biggest one is idea of defensiveness, and what Robin Dangelo calls white for Jillette -i, and essentially it comes down to resistance to being held accountable for racism. So if someone is called out or held accountable for something they said or did that was problematic. There's a tendency to react with frustration or to cry or to become very defensive and this kind of reaction. Overpowers the conversation. And then whoever brought up the behavior situation to begin with that was potentially racist sexist or whatnot. Their job is then to console the person crying and upset that they've been accused so to speak so something we all need to do is to develop and strengthen our skills. Need it to hold each other accountable clearing?.

Zet Shelby Robert Livingston Tina Robin Dangelo Jillette fifty percent
"robert livingston" Discussed on Perspective

Perspective

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"robert livingston" Discussed on Perspective

"Who argues very strongly on the floor of congress against independence so the resolution for independence gets tabled until all the colonies are unanimous in the meantime five men get together to draft a document we call the committee of five uh so you have robert livingston of new york roger sherman of connecticut benjamin franklin of pennsylvania uh and uh thomas jefferson virginia and john apps always forget about john unfortunately for guy i think he's still kinda forgotten about in jefferson gets the call to be the lead author he works on the rough draft of the declaration over that to two week period now you lived on the outskirts of the city i should add which was one block away from us and he decided to noisy i i need peace and quiet you know he's a country boy and he rents a bedroom and panama in office space a parlor and ultimately those are the two rooms were would write the declaration of independence run july second congress formally resolves and declares independence but we still have a document yet we don't have a document to put forth to a candid world as as they say entered thomas jefferson fresh out of his office with a draft it turns out though the jefferson was not super cool with being edited jefferson says they would make over eighty he says mutilations to his document he was very upset two days go by here we are july fourth now for the big moment adam duncan brings us into independence all you can see thomas jefferson's actual walking stick is george washington's chair taken us up to july fourth right up to the moment of separation it's a teaser because what.

robert livingston roger sherman benjamin franklin pennsylvania john thomas jefferson new york connecticut thomas jefferson virginia panama adam duncan george washington two days two week