19 Burst results for "Robert Land"

Luis Robert Homers Twice as White Sox Pound Cubs 13-1

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 9 months ago

Luis Robert Homers Twice as White Sox Pound Cubs 13-1

"Louise Roberts land too with the white Sox five home runs in a thirteen to one laugher against the cubs Eloy Jimenez yes money growing dollar Brian Goodwin also connected for the white Sox who went five and one versus the cubs this year white Sox slugger Jose Abreu hit a two run double in a seven run fifth giving him one hundred one RBIs with twenty nine games left Robert Jimenez a good when each drove in three runs to support Dylan cease who tied a career high with eleven strikeouts sees limited the cubs to a run and four hits over six innings to help the AL central leaders stay ten games ahead of the Indians I'm the ferry

White Sox Louise Roberts Eloy Jimenez Brian Goodwin Cubs Jose Abreu Robert Jimenez Dylan Al Central
"robert land" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:00 min | 10 months ago

"robert land" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"My name is robert land. And i'm joe. Mccormick him we're back with part three of our talk about mirrors If you haven't listened to the two parts probably go back. Check those out. I but rob to get us started today. I wanted to revisit. One of your favorite topics are failures of intuition and understanding. How mirrors work So we talked in previous parts about Your point about the roof be venus. You know how. There's that painting of a venus looking in the mirror and we see her face and we assume she's looking at herself but since we see her looking at us she actually couldn't be looking at herself. She's looking at us right as you know. And as you love to point out our our misunderstandings about the physics of mirrors. Don't stop there and so So i actually came across one recently. That i really enjoyed rachel and i were doing this experiment earlier today. So so you at home can play along Couple of questions. Imagine yourself standing in front of a bathroom mirror and looking at your own reflection. You're looking at your head regarding this glorious orbital bone and meet maybe some hair on it and the question is how big is your reflection of your head on the mirror if you were to measure it is it smaller than your actual head bigger than your actual head or the same size. Yeah this is a great question because what are you gonna do picking moving closer and measure it. Well you could measure. If you're normal bathroom mirror size. You could measure it without stepping forward. You can just reach out. Mark the places. You touched the mirror where you're chan is and where the top of your head is But before you do that just just guess before you actually measure it. The second thing is After you do that imagine walking backwards away from a mirror so you take a few steps back what is going to happen to the size of your head in your reflection. Is it going to get larger. Is it going to stay. The same is or. Will it gets smaller.

robert land Mccormick rob joe rachel chan Mark
"robert land" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

07:37 min | 1 year ago

"robert land" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Hey, Welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Land, and I'm John McCormack. And today we're gonna be talking about nuclear weapons testing. Now, this is something that has come up on the show. Good bit before. Obviously we've had to talk many times about the very real, you know, danger, potential civilization level threat and the real human costs of nuclear weapons and nuclear weapons testing. But today I wanted to focus on a couple of interesting and lesser known environmental effects of nuclear weapons testing specifically something that I came across as it pertains to industrial metals, and then we're going to get into some other scientific territory as we go on. Quite apart from any straightforward chemical effects on the atmosphere. I think it is pretty fair to say that the the human departure into the nuclear weapons testing era and 1945 was really sort of a shift to moment for for humankind is a species. Yeah, and I feel like there. There are very few things that have been said they're They're very few audio sample. Certainly that sum it up. Quite a swell or or or or as haunting is those given by J. Robert often. Hi Mary in 1965 on the television documentary. Decision to drop the bomb broadcast as an NBC White paper. I imagine most of you heard this before I've heard it's a sampled and used in music it it shows up in comic books, literature. In it. The American theoretical physicist and father of the atomic bomb is he sometimes referred shares the following regarding the first successful detonation of an atomic bomb at the Trinity Test in New Mexico on July 16th 1945 Hey, said quote. We knew the world would not be the same. A few people laughed. A few people cried. Most people were silent. I remembered the line from the Hindu scripture. The Bhagavad Gita fish new is trying to persuade the prince that he should do his duty and to impress him. Takes on his multi armed form and says, Now I am become death. The destroyer of worlds. I suppose we all thought that one way or another, It's a difficult thing to imagine working on that kind of research in away feeling that it is your duty, your your necessity to aid the Allied cause in World War two. But at the same time, knowing that you were working on something that would unleash an age of terror in human history. Yeah, I mean, absolutely a weapon that would As of this recording has only been used twice in war, which on one hand you can, you can say thankfully has only been used twice and war. But and I had the same, and you can say tragically, has been used twice in war. Um, you know, we'll get into the just the destructive capabilities a bit of the bomb as we proceed here, And of course, we've covered it on the show before to varying degrees. But I want to come back to the quote that That Oppenheimer is is deploying here. So if if you're not familiar with it, basically these air these air who the figures are in this, you've got Vishnu, one of the principal deities of Hinduism. The back about Geeta or the Geeta. Is it sometimes just shortened to is part of the Hindu epic The Mahabharata. Technically, it's book six in that. And the Prince in question is the hero Arjuna part of the Pond, a family that wages war against the Carrabba's that the big struggle that XKE to the mob Bharatha anyway. At the beginning of the Geeta, which Oppenheimer is is quoting here, Arjuna rides his cheery it onto the field of forthcoming battle between these two families. But he suddenly overcome by doubt and depression. As he notes there, there on the other side within the ranks of the enemy. He's he recognizes friends, relatives, teachers, and therefore has this this just immense, so wait descend upon him. Um, this is a quote from it. This is as translated by Edwin Arnold in 18, 85. And, as is always the case with translated works of literature and poetry, you know, be English is going to be approximate, and certainly with Hinduism there many cases where particular ideas and phrases don't really have a parallel word in English. Anyway, it goes as follows. Quote. Thus, if we slay kinfolk and friends for love of earthly power of that, what an evil faulted were better. I deem it if my kinsmen strike to face them weapon lists and bare my breast to shaft and spear, then answer blow with blow. So, speaking in the face of those two hosts, Arjuna sank upon his chariot seat and let fall bow and arrows sick at heart, So the prospect of the forthcoming bloodshed is just too much for him. What does he do? He turns to his charioteer for counsel, and luckily his chariot Here is the blue skin Krishna, the avatar of the mighty Vishnu, and he gives him his counsel. In fact, he gives him his counsel for 18 chapters that Z. What the Geeta is, is basically him, providing all of this philosophical and spiritually advice on what it is. You have to make these sorts of decisions and engage in war and duty and so forth. It's kind of like something like the book of job in the form. We have it now, which you have a small framing narrative that mainly contains a didactic discourse on on theological matters, right. Now, if you want, like a really good break down all this episode in the Mahabharata off the Geeta and especially as it relates to open heimer in his life, there's a wonderful paper that you can find out there in full on the on the Internet from James, A Huggy professor of History, University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth. He did. This was a nice write up. He did for the American Philosophical Society in 2000, and he goes into greater depth. But he also summarizes Christmas counsel as follows. He says, Look, you're a soldier. Arjuna. You have to fight. Fighting is your duty, so you need to do it. He also says Look, Krishna, You know this this God who I also am Is going to be the one to determine who lives and who dies. It's not your place to mourn or rejoice over human loss. In this case, you should try to remain unattached from the outcome and then also, faith in Krishna is going to be what saves your soul Arjuna and this is the most important part of the whole scenario. But is Arjuna begins to metaphorically see the light? Or, I suppose, behold the true nature of the reality he's faced with, he asks if he can see Krishna's godlike form and this site ultimately seals Arjun is commitment to do his duty. And this occurs in chapter 11 verse. 32, where with the now cosmically embodied Vishnu speaks to Arjuna. And what exactly says of two English speaking years is going to depend on the translation. But for instance, the rider translation has him say death and my and my present task destruction. There's a translation by Arnold that says, Thou see us Mia's time. Who kills time. Who brings all to doom the Slayer. Time ancient of days come hither to consume and there's another one. I came across that that was pretty good..

Edwin Arnold Oppenheimer Geeta Robert Land John McCormack NBC American Philosophical Society J. Robert New Mexico Mary Krishna physicist principal Mia University of Massachusetts James Dartmouth
"robert land" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"robert land" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Year, but later bonded out. His sentencing is December 17th in Franklin County Court. I'm Matt Reese. News radio. 700 WLW, Ohio Governor Mike DeWine right now, giving his Corona virus update for the state and the Department of Health has just released new numbers. 2000 new cases of covert 19 being reported today and over 200 new hospitalizations that is more than double the three week average. The Justice Department has filed a large antitrust lawsuit against Google, Robert Land with the University of Baltimore Law School. And a director of the American Anti Trust in to two tells ABC News. The timing of the lawsuit does not necessarily mean that there isn't any merit to the case. We know the company illustration has been angry, Big check. Since even before Trump was elected, and they filed it now as an October surprise right before the election. Google's initial response calls the lawsuit deeply flawed, saying quote people use Google because they choose to not because they're forced to meantime, Goldman Sachs is agreeing to pay more than $2 billion to the DOJ for its involvement in the one MDB scandal in Malaysia. Bloomberg is reporting that the settlement could be announced soon. It would allow Goldman to avoid US criminal charges. It comes after Goldman Sachs Agreed to a $2.5 billion settlement with Malaysia earlier this year. The ongoing political scandal started back in 2015 when Malaysia's then prime minister was accused of channeling federal funding to his personal accounts on Wall Street. Right now, the Dow is up little more than 1% 295 points. The NASDAQ also up about 1% at 123. The NASDAQ is up. 40. I'm Jack Crumley. Our next update at 2 30 breaking news any time news radio 700 wlw. Now, more.

Goldman Sachs Google Malaysia Matt Reese Franklin County Court Jack Crumley ABC News US Mike DeWine Department of Health Ohio University of Baltimore Law Sc Justice Department Trump Robert Land Bloomberg director prime minister DOJ
"robert land" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"robert land" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Welcome to stuff to blow your mind. . My name is Robert Land and dime Joe McCormack and I'm so excited because today we're diving the snake bit. . That's right. . <hes> not slashes snake pit. . We're discussing before we started recording the show but this idea of a pit of snakes, , the sort of a place you might want to drop a <hes>, , a doomed hero or a Damsel in distress that sort of thing right and I think the great place to start here is by discussing. . A. . Sort. Of . Snake pit. . Very much a snake pit that we encounter in raiders of the lost Ark, , film that we've, , we spent a lot of time talking about on the show we did we did a couple of episodes on the Ark of the Covenant that I encourage everyone to everyone to go back and listen to <hes> where we spin off. . We also frequently refer back to raiders for examples of things that raiders does that refers to. . Various <hes> <hes> qualities of the arc in ancient traditions. . I've just thinking back on those Ark of the covenant episodes because I remember we talked about this one professor from the. . Nineteen twenties or thirties who had this crank theory that the Ark of the Covenant was a real historical artifact and it was a giant electrical capacitor yes. . Yeah. . That was pretty good. . Yeah. . But what I was laughing at when you were talking, , I'm sorry if I sort of interrupted but I was laughing the fact that you called the pit in Raiders, , a sword of snake pit. . I mean, , it's definitely a snake pit don't beat around the Bush here. . It's very much a snake bit <hes> it. . It is an amazing and really game changing one of the many amazing engaging sequences in the film. . It is the well of souls sequence now to refresh everybody. . First of all the well of souls is an actual place. . It's a partially manmade cave located inside the foundation stone. . Under the Dome of the Rock Shrine in Jerusalem. . The name itself pit of souls well of souls stems from medieval Islamic legend in this where the the spirits of the dead or supposedly awaiting judgment. . Day. . But that it has nothing or very little to do with the well of souls that we encounter in raiders of the lost Ark. . In raiders, , the well of souls, , and this is straight from the Indiana Jones Wicky is quote part of a temple built within the ancient city of tennis where the Ark of the covenant was placed after Farrow <hes> she sacked stole it from Jerusalem again, , that is entirely within the context of the Indiana Jones world don't confuse that with actual history right now there is no indication that there's an actual pit of snakes in any archaeological site in ancient Egypt. . Right but it makes for a great scene because of course, , we remember what happens is that. . Indiana Jones and his cohorts discovered that Oh. . This is the actual resting place of the Ark of the Nazis are off their digging in the wrong spot. . So they open it up, , and of course, , they immediately see it full of snakes. . He hates snakes, , they lower him down. . Anyway they go. . His <hes> friend <hes> who is it <hes>? ? Sala. . Sala. . Yeah. . Solid goes down with them. . They they crank the the arc up in. . That's win Belloc and the Nazi show up they steal the Ark and just for sheer meanness, they , throw Marian down there into the pit with him in an a seal inside with a bazillion snakes

Raiders Robert Land Joe McCormack Jerusalem Rock Shrine professor Bush
Pit of Serpents

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

03:23 min | 1 year ago

Pit of Serpents

"Welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Land and dime Joe McCormack and I'm so excited because today we're diving the snake bit. That's right. not slashes snake pit. We're discussing before we started recording the show but this idea of a pit of snakes, the sort of a place you might want to drop a a doomed hero or a Damsel in distress that sort of thing right and I think the great place to start here is by discussing. A. Sort. Of Snake pit. Very much a snake pit that we encounter in raiders of the lost Ark, film that we've, we spent a lot of time talking about on the show we did we did a couple of episodes on the Ark of the Covenant that I encourage everyone to everyone to go back and listen to where we spin off. We also frequently refer back to raiders for examples of things that raiders does that refers to. Various qualities of the arc in ancient traditions. I've just thinking back on those Ark of the covenant episodes because I remember we talked about this one professor from the. Nineteen twenties or thirties who had this crank theory that the Ark of the Covenant was a real historical artifact and it was a giant electrical capacitor yes. Yeah. That was pretty good. Yeah. But what I was laughing at when you were talking, I'm sorry if I sort of interrupted but I was laughing the fact that you called the pit in Raiders, a sword of snake pit. I mean, it's definitely a snake pit don't beat around the Bush here. It's very much a snake bit it. It is an amazing and really game changing one of the many amazing engaging sequences in the film. It is the well of souls sequence now to refresh everybody. First of all the well of souls is an actual place. It's a partially manmade cave located inside the foundation stone. Under the Dome of the Rock Shrine in Jerusalem. The name itself pit of souls well of souls stems from medieval Islamic legend in this where the the spirits of the dead or supposedly awaiting judgment. Day. But that it has nothing or very little to do with the well of souls that we encounter in raiders of the lost Ark. In raiders, the well of souls, and this is straight from the Indiana Jones Wicky is quote part of a temple built within the ancient city of tennis where the Ark of the covenant was placed after Farrow she sacked stole it from Jerusalem again, that is entirely within the context of the Indiana Jones world don't confuse that with actual history right now there is no indication that there's an actual pit of snakes in any archaeological site in ancient Egypt. Right but it makes for a great scene because of course, we remember what happens is that. Indiana Jones and his cohorts discovered that Oh. This is the actual resting place of the Ark of the Nazis are off their digging in the wrong spot. So they open it up, and of course, they immediately see it full of snakes. He hates snakes, they lower him down. Anyway they go. His friend who is it Sala. Sala. Yeah. Solid goes down with them. They they crank the the arc up in. That's win Belloc and the Nazi show up they steal the Ark and just for sheer meanness, they throw Marian down there into the pit with him in an a seal inside with a bazillion snakes

ARK Raiders Jerusalem Indiana Jones Robert Land Indiana Jones Wicky Joe Mccormack Rock Shrine Bush Professor Marian Belloc Farrow Egypt Tennis
"robert land" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"robert land" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Is a founding member of Chicago unbelievable but musician singer songwriter Robert land Robert how are you I'm doing really well it's great to hear your voice it's great to hear your voice I gotta ask you right up front you guys did a new song by the we're gonna get into it everything's gonna work out fine in fact I'm gonna play some of it in a little while before we go any further go to questions about Saturday in the park if you if you would indulge me number one what exactly are you saying to tell you because I'm Italian guy and I could not figure it out what are you saying in the Italian part with a good deal of the time guys singing say talking songs well it's it's obvious that I don't speak Italians but but I did find out that it Sir come on in let's go listen to music hello very cold it did you know it can you tell me in Italian can you say it in a tie in order only when you're singing it I can not only once it is out Robert live from Chicago what one other question could you do that song in a couple of keys lower brother has a low voice I can't sing along with you on that one well come on then you could see a lot of lord concert I've I've I've got a pretty good range but but that one stretches of for Charlotte's Laura I I that Terry Catholic it's in his range pretty well I lo beginnings you you also wrote that one right I did yes amazing song in what I find in the song it was unbelievable and the vocal gymnastics really give you a workout but what would really good feeling song did you when you go to writing songs do you think to yourself let me make it a major Katie let me make a song is going to put a smile on somebody's face because a lot of what you guys did in Chicago was five four and three four in the let's go six eight for a minute and you guys really were experience experimenting experimenting musically but the really really big head seem to be happy major key songs right it's funny how that worked out that way I I'm always I'm always an optimist and I will use I had written in minor keys occasionally but you know it's really I'm sort of sort of more self obsessed thank you I had a time that the song is gonna make people happy okay or this really I'm just concerned with with writing a song completing a thought again hopefully and optimistic idea whether it's about conditions politics or love right is Robert Lamm incredible singer songwriter musician a you got together with it and it's it's a Jim Peterik as I know he says his name yes Jim Peterik and the end of March Neil Donell in and this is a great song it's called everything's gonna work out fine the inspiration for this is what we're all facing right now a corona virus and and the surrounding political climate too right yeah you know what I actually started writing the track back in February when we were hearing rumors about some sort of some sort of intimate way to America right Jim Peterik intuitive that you know we need to write we need to write something that will you know help people cope cope people's anxiety and you know give it to everybody you know and a good start a positive thought in terms of future certainly we've got we've got that with a great great no I'm always a little bit of a delay only to speak over you at all it's it's Robert Lamm founding member of Chicago unbelievable singer song writer and he's written many of the Chicago songs that you love just go look them up in the catalog is amazing if you don't mind let me play a little bit of the song is called everything's gonna work out fine would that be okay okay great thanks.

founding member Chicago Robert land Robert
"robert land" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

13:08 min | 2 years ago

"robert land" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Land. And I'm Joe McCormick end today. I wanted to talk a bit about pointing I I think the episodes that we recently did on Medusa really got me in the mind to think about the power of pointing the finger Because when we talked about Medusa recently you know we ended up spending a lot of time thinking about like what what again as means what it means to imagine this kind of ray emerging from the is as you look at someone in the mystical power that ancient people seem to think that had but there's a counterpart to that which is the pointing finger pointing hand. It almost seems like it's the sort of Celestial twin of the of the powerful gays yeah and if you if you follow us in the those Medusa episodes in followed our discussion of of what it is to gaze at something to be gazed at to have our attention focused in such a way. Then I think you you have A. You're in a better place to then contemplate pointing this This extra layer of complexity with human attention. Yeah I agree so in fact I would say you know if you haven't listened to our Medusa episodes yet. You'll probably get more out of this when if you go and listen to those I though you don't have to I would recommend it C. L. Let's get right into it The in in the spirit actually one of my favorite things to do on the show is just to take something. That's so familiar. It's invisible to US and try to figure out again what's strange about it. That's where I want to start with pointing Because I I think it's easy to miss. How Weird and versatile and ingenious the pointing gesture is. It's one of those miracles of nature that that usually remains invisible to us until it fails. I love how the brain works like that like. You don't see it until it doesn't work because it almost always works and one of the ways for me that it fails most often is when I try to use it with my dog. Now there is evidence actually and we can talk about this later in the episode that sometimes domestic dogs can understand pointing gestures and I was testing it out a good bit with my dog Charlie. The other day a I would say occasionally he sort of seems to to follow a pointing gesture but it's very rare. Most of the time he definitely does not get it and when I extend my finger to point something out to him. Charlie doesn't look in the direction that I'm pointing. He looks at my hand because I think most of the time to to him in his dog's brain there is no such thing. Is pointing the outstretched hand and finger is simply a currently active part of my body. I might be about to use it to feed him or pet him. You know activities that interest him but the activity does not seem to indicate anything beyond my body. And it's this kind of failure that makes you appreciate how strange and amazing pointing actually is So probably the most basic definition of pointing say is it's a movement of the body in the direction of a target that draws the attention of an audience to that target But beyond that I think it's also interesting because pointing project the reach of the body in imaginary space. I can extend my hand and instantly cause you not a not. Just invite you to sort of 'cause you even against your own will to imagine. An invisible geometric vector stretching out from my fingertips to the target it. And isn't that actually so strange? Yeah it reminds me of Futurama Dr Farnsworth. One of his many inventions is the thing longer which is basically just as super long finger. That goes on your hands so you can You can touch things and pointed things from from further away but like innocence. Pointing is the fing longer. It is the original thing longer. And so you know it's it's it's one of the things that makes the invention of the thing longer all the more ridiculous and and comedic Because we already do this when we pointed something right. Yeah we do it through the imagination and the there. There's a constant triangulation that that goes on when you're engaging in pointing between the pointer and the the audience and then the thing being pointed at. It's one of the reasons that in in a weird kind of way. Laser pointers like as used in classrooms. Always felt kind of crass and unholy. I think I didn't pick up on the reasoning at the time. But you know what is it that seems kind of like just gross about using a laser pointer to point at things on a projector chalkboard. It's like you're eliminating the triangle now. The indication is all just happening at the thing. You're looking at You know I never thought that way about laser pointers need because Mike comparison was always the terminator films where he had the laser sight on a gun. So anytime anytime. A teacher busted out a laser pointer. Oh it's like terminator. This is awesome. I I guess I would go on more to Predator because predators got a laser pointer to the the triple laser pointer which is also awesome but But I think I think my first exposure to the technology was the laser site that The terminator uses. Oh you know in fact. The Predator takes this elimination of the third party in the triangle To to the ultimate extreme. Because he's got the invisibility cloak on while he projects the laser pointer. So you can't even see him. It's just the DOT. Yeah well here's the subject of my dissertation. I'm I'm going to be taking a few months off to write that but anyway so I wanna come back and think about the sort of instinctual grammar of the gesture of how the pointing gesture is applied and how much we can communicate with it often without saying anything at all so Maybe the most basic is that you can use pointing of course to indicate a place. You know you gesture and it causes the audience to look there or to be suggested to go there beyond that you can indicate something that you want right like imagine a child asking for a toy or imagine even adult like picking out of food item from behind glass at a cafe without any words just point and in fact I think this highlights a distinction that comes up when experts talk about pointing as an acquired skill in childhood development According to a two thousand twelve paper in the journal Cognitive Science by Liszkowski at all in every human culture where we've ever looked at this question. With a few neurological exceptions. Human Infants Begin to point at between nine to fourteen months. This is often average to say about one year of age but like nine to fourteen months is the average and the authors here call pointing a pre linguistic gesture role universal. It appears that every culture does it and children acquire it very early generally before speech. Yeah Yeah and it's I've also seen it referred to as Like what the Golden Road to language the in in having having had a child. That couldn't speak yet. This is one of the primary ways the child can of course acquire the things it wants point at it and it will be given unto you or will be denied you and you know a lot of emotions will result but also it's it's key in helping them acquire language because then we can point at things and let them know what the name is for that what. Word is associated with that thing So it's it's very important for in both ways. Not only their use of the point but their understanding of pointing and others yeah. I think this is a fantastic point. Like if the man we're going to have so many like Pun I had Writing Point Lake. Then this author makes the point of saying they can't do. I know I was trying to take it out of all my notes but I don't think I caught them all and I'm gonNA improvise a few horrible ones as we on so I apologize in advance but yeah but I. I think this is a fantastic. A suggestion you make here About it being the bridge to language and in serving this mediating role because in childhood development there appear to be too very importantly different types of pointing and these are known as imperative pointing versus declarative pointing So to sort those out. Imperative pointing is usually acquired earlier. It comes first and to quote a two thousand four paper by Lund University philosopher. Ingar BRINK She says quote imperative pointing involves a conception of the other as a self propelling causal agent that one can influence to do something for oneself by gesturing so imperative pointing is typified by the. Give me that pointing this pointing. Tends to come first where you. It's kind of ritualized retrieving activity. You point toward the thing you want to cause the agent generally the adult to give it to you but then what follows from that is To pick up again from from brinks writing a declarative pointing on the other hand declared if pointing is defined as the pre-verbal effort to direct the adults attention to some event or object in the world and The thing I was quoting from was published in Cognitive Science quarterly in two thousand four so whereas the imperative pointing is typified by. Give me that pointing. You're trying to affect the adult to do an action to bring you something or something like that. The declared pointing comes later in his characterized as look at that pointing. It's an explicit attempt to control someone else's attention. Yeah and I think it is key. I know the number of of authors. Who are looking at here talking about pointing not merely as suggestion but is in control as demanding intention commanding of intention and I think that's important because we you know we're often kind of even as we're thinking about pointing at things with our finger which we'll discuss later as is often thought of as Pimm perhaps less than polite. Sometimes we're very polite in our analysis of of what it is two point and I do think when we when we are engaging in this kind of pointing there is a there is a force behind it. There is a demand there is a control like it is when it went. Is anyone ever pointed at something and and you find yourself? Not following that finger to the object that they're referring to like we cannot help it. I think you're exactly correct and the idea that pointing much like language. Once you've acquired the ability to understand these gestures or these signs or symbols it becomes not just an invitation to engage in communication with someone. But it's it's irresistible the same way that if. I say a Rangan you you have no choice but to word and in. Rangan came into your mind and you didn't have the ability to say no. I won't process that word and I won't think of. It just happens whether you want it to or not. The same thing appears to be true or at least a pretty pretty close to as true with pointing whereas you know it's just totally irresistible thing. You cannot help but imagine when somebody points that vector coming out of their hand and have your attention thusly directed. Yeah you're like Oh my goodness that guy does have two thumbs. Any loves to party granted. That's dumb pointing but similar effect. Takes place well? Yeah I do so while index finger pointing and we'll talk more about this go. On while index finger pointing does appear to be very common around the world. There are there are tons of different kinds of pointing. It doesn't have to be the index finger. It's whatever you party your body. You used to indicate a vector to direct. Somebody's attention we're going to look at one. Study about Very very interesting type of nose pointing But just to come back to the power of pointing. I think one thing. That's very interesting is that you can go beyond oldest that we've already talked about the like you know. Look at that go there. Give me that kind of pointing one utility. That's extremely versatile is that you can also use pointing to slot in concepts to build sentences within an implied structure grammar so Easy way of conceptualizing. This is think about the different ways that pointing can be used. If you're playing charades you can point at something to indicate that that thing you're pointing at is the subject of a phrase or that is similar to the subject of a phrase. You can point at something to suggest that it's state or activity or properties fills the role of verb or an adjective INA target phrase..

Writing Point Lake US Robert Land Joe McCormick ray Lund University Charlie Dr Farnsworth Cognitive Science Mike comparison Rangan Pimm brinks Cognitive Science quarterly
"robert land" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

11:59 min | 2 years ago

"robert land" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Of I heart radio. Hey Welcome to invention. My name is Robert Land and I'm Joe McCormick and I thought we should start today with a question about science one. That is maybe more vexing. The more you think about it so an often unexamined assumption that undergirds scientific investigation all of science. Is this idea that there are laws of nature right and that those laws are physically fundamental and they apply everywhere and they are never violated right. Yeah it would be. It would be catastrophic if science changed from Say country to country or county to county. Right you go across the state line you fall up right. Yeah so water boils at one hundred degrees Celsius or to twelve Fahrenheit in my kitchen it should also boil at the same temperature in my bedroom or in the kitchen of the white castle down the street or hundred miles away in a different town right now. You might interrupt there and say oh but actually water sometimes does boil at a different temperature right. Like at high elevations where atmospheric pressure is lower? It's easier for water to boil because there's less pressure pressing down on the water so it actually does boil it. Lower temperature like at three thousand meters. Water boils at more like ninety degrees Celsius and in fact Robert. I don't know if you've ever read these. They're great stories. That take this to the extreme. Did you know about the unbearable? Sadness of boiling potatoes on Mount Everest. No so there. Are these stories about mountaineers trying to cook on Mount Everest and they would boil potatoes in a pot of water to eat them but they boil them and they boil them and boil them for hours and hours. After hours of cooking the potatoes were still basically raw and the problem is on Mount Everest. The you're up so high that the boiling point is so low. The boiling water in the pot is not hot enough to cook the TATORS. It's sort of like trying to cook them in hot tap water. Even though it's boiling it's a I in fact I would say it's actually like an inverse pressure cooker. Right you know pressure cooker allows your food to get hotter because of the increased pressure going up on Mount Everest trying to cook something is like doing the opposite. Yes but actually you know there. We've not discovered an absence of an underlying law just because water boils at a different temperature at different elevations. What we've actually discovered is a deeper underlying law that the boiling point of a liquid varies along with pressure and that that relationship is mathematically deterministic. And I would say this is assumption that pretty much guides almost all of applied science in the world today. It's the idea that the laws of physics are out there and they don't change your vary depending on special cases or where you are but how do we know that conditions on the earth and the moon might be different but the underlying physical laws that give rise to those conditions or exactly the same and maybe one thing that's important to point out in understanding this is that people haven't always thought this way. There is a powerful tradition going back into the ancient world. Sort of viewing the behaviors of things in reality as a large collection of special cases governed by their own special essences and by by special circumstances. Maybe like divine intervention. Maybe like some types of magic maybe just by you know the essence of the the way A person falls is different than the way a planet falls because a planet is a different thing than a person. And so you. You'd end up with the idea that the heavens are not subject to the same physical forces as the earth and we see this all throughout ancient cosmology just thinking that there are different different laws applying to different places and circumstances in the universe. Now on one hand you could argue that well. We don't really know that physical laws are the same everywhere right and and that's kind of true like at the very edges of our understanding. There could be ways of arguing. Physical laws aren't really laws maybe. They're just generalizations. We make based on observation or maybe there could be cosmological scenarios. When they're different you know maybe in the beginning of the universe the laws were different or could have been different but for most purposes in the present that assumption that the physical laws are the same everywhere has proven extremely useful in generating accurate scientific theories that make correct predictions and create powerful technology. So I wanted to think about at the beginning of today. Where did this assumption of the uniformity of physical laws come from? How did we end up thinking this way about the world? There's just sort of like a set of underlying ways that things work and that governs everything well as the title of the show. indicates We're going to tie to an invention. You're exactly right now. We don't want to tie it entirely to this invention because there are a bunch of different strains of thinking throughout history that I think have contributed to this way of seeing the world that we generally share now but I believe one really powerful moment of transition here was centered around a particular piece of technology and that technology is the subject of today's episode which is the telescope Yes more specifically the optical telescope right. Now we're just doing one episode. Today here is that we're not going to be able to focus on all the different kinds of telescopes We may come back to them in the future. We're going to be focusing on specifically the earliest optical refracting telescopes right and And yet it's really it. It really is kind of hard to overstate the importance of the telescope in history of science and our history our understanding of the cosmos. Yeah there's a great quote about the invention from the invention of the telescope by Albert Van Hulten from one thousand nine hundred seventy seven then held and writes quote among the scientific instruments which have played an important role in the growth of Man's knowledge of the world around him. The telescope occupies a position of historic preeminence rivaled only by the microscope which was a natural outgrowth of telescope. In a real sense the telescope can be considered the prototype of modern scientific instruments and learned men in the seventeenth century. The first century of its existence were acutely aware of its important role in the formation of a new astronomy. Yeah and some of the earliest accounts of what was viewed through the very first telescopes. You can you can kind of feel the electricity coming off of the writing right like the excitement with seeing stuff that not just seeing new things. I mean. We still see new things in the heavens. That people have never seen before Just this year. There was the very first direct imaging of a black hole not using an optical telescope but yeah But using you know a a form of magnifying. The heavens and that was astonishing because we were looking at something. We'd never seen before but as amazing is that was what if instead of just seeing a new thing you were able to see the universe in a completely different way that now for the first time you can look it really anything beyond the moon as more than a point of light. Yeah it's really. I mean it's really hard to avoid optical metaphors for this optical technology like I wanNA think it's like it's like being able having poor eyesight your entire life and then finally putting on a pair of glasses and seeing things come into sharper detail solidifying things you suspected already but also bringing fine print interview that was invisible to you previously that sort of thing. Yeah I think that's another reason why the telescope is such a major invention is that we are predominantly you know beginnings demand so much on our sense of sight in this so greatly improved our ability to optically. See Things. Well Yeah I mean one thing that's worth thinking about is the very idea that That we could even view the heavens with a with a viewing instrument you know with the magnification device that's entirely contingent on the details of life on planet earth. You go to another planet where maybe life forms evolved at the bottom of an ocean geothermal vents or growing off of. Some kind of like chemo synthesis process in clouded. Hazy atmosphere like Venus Titan. Where you just can't you can't see this. Guy Yeah I mean there's no reason we had to evolve on a planet where you could look at the stars every night but somehow we did and of course. Those stars have always intrigued seven. Human history is a story of of People's looking to the heavens and trying to figure out what is going on up there. Yeah and that's a great point. We should start with which is that. Stran- did not begin with the telescope. Astronomy long predates the telescope. There is a vast tradition of naked eye. Astronomy going back in ancient history. And sometimes it's astonishing what ancient and medieval astronomers could figure out it could discover without optical telescopes just using the naked eye. Sometimes maybe in conjunction with other primitive tools like measuring instruments or something I mean for starters like other planets were known before Before the telescope right. Oh yeah a mercury. Venus Mars Jupiter and Saturn are all observable with the naked eye your innocence and Neptune are generally considered to be only visible via the telescope with with an asterix there. Yeah Uranus Uranus. We always fight about how to pronounce this year. Ns let's say you're an SS technically. I think visible with the naked eye under extremely favourable conditions. But it's very very faint. It was officially usually Recognized as being discovered by William Herschel in seventeen eighty one with telescope of course Telescopes had been around for a good long while in seventeen ninety one but it had probably been observed by others in centuries past who thought it was some kind of faint star. Just barely visible Herschel. Actually initially thought this was a comet on our other. Podcasts stuff to blow your mind. We we've been kind of considering the different planets and their in their Their moons from time to Time. We really really need to go to look at the outer planets a little more. I wonder if there's there's much to say there I feel like the really sexy moons Show up around Saturn and Jupiter Jupiter. You've got Europa. Which is everybody's favorite to find some potential life at because they think they're oceans underneath the icy crust. And then you've got I. O which is just a wonderful yellow hill of volcanoes and sulfur and all that great stuff and then around Saturn of course. You've got tightened. Which is an intriguing mystery. I'm not aware of anything like that going on with Neptune or earnest. But maybe I haven't given them a fair shot. I mean the planets themselves I think would be would be good Topics you know Just so we can say we've covered all of them You know just in time to have to like update with new information for all of. Oh yeah why can't we'll do? We'll do an episode on urine is just so we can pronounce it. Seventeen different ways. Yeah I believe a listener Provided a different pronunciation recently didn't they we heard. I think we've heard Uranus. Of course we've heard Uranus referred us That's it for now but we gotta bring it back to the telescope okay. So here's a question. I wonder about how many stars can you actually see without a telescope? I know there's gotTa be some General Cutoff Point. That most people aren't going to be able to see stars below a certain brightness. Yes there's a there's a there's a the system here for determining how visible Various objects are and. There is a ballpark number. According to astronomer Dorit haw fleet of Yale University. The total number of stars in the sky that can currently be seen from both hemispheres. In given optimal conditions is nine thousand. Ninety six or four thousand five hundred forty eight stars per him. Fear give or take. Depending on the position and the season astronomers use the magnitude scale to measure star implanted brightness so the higher.

Mount Everest Robert Land TATORS Yale University William Herschel Joe McCormick Dorit Albert Van Hulten Stran Ns
"robert land" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"robert land" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"With us on everything from city. Traffic to ocean. Plastic smart loves problems IBM. Let's put smart to work visit. Ibm DOT COM slash smart to learn more one night in one thousand nine hundred sixty one on the side of a dark highway betty and Barney hill cut lights in the sky. Two years later the underwent hypnosis to try and recall what happened some took it as fact others thought it was a fantasy but what really happened. That September night in rural New Hampshire. Join me toby. Ball for the inaugural season of stranger rivals co-production of iheartradio in grim from Aaron Monkey. Listen to strange arrivals on the iheartradio APP on Apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome stuffed your mind. A production of iheartradio's has networks. Hey what can stuffed blow your mind. My name is Robert Land. And I'm Joe McCormick end in the grand tradition of the dark crystal highlander to the quickening. Two thousand one space odyssey boy. Do we have a movie episode for today? That's right We would previously wondered if we would get outside of the sixty seventies eighties and nineties for a movie episode. And now we have because this episode takes us to nineteen fifty nine This is a very nineteen fifties movie in multiple ways as a will actually kind of connect with our series on psychedelics. Though I'm not sure if that's why we ended up doing this so today we're GONNA be talking about William Castle's the Tingler. How do we arrive at the Tingler? What was this? This was your idea right Robert. Well yeah basically. We just did that. Big Series on psychedelic saw five episodes and I was thinking well. It's time to do a movie at the sewed again will let's. Let's do a psychedelic film. And so I was thinking. Maybe we'll do something like blue sunshine from nineteen seventy eight which we were both partial to or up. Yes one of the ugliest film The the does concern like LSD. Or I thought well you know. Maybe more. Like a modern Film like beyond the Black Rainbow. Which is another psychedelic. Film that I I really like But then I started poking around and I realized that the the earliest reference to LSD in a major motion picture is none other than nineteen fifty nine. The tingler really the earliest. I didn't know that. Yeah that's what I that's what I've read. Is that The references LSD IN. This film marked the first time it. Lsd was referencing a major motion picture. I mean it would make sense because as we know from our research on psychedelics there was legitimate. Lsd based therapy or LSD assisted therapy going on in the nineteen fifties. There was Lsd therapeutic research going on in the nineteen fifties It was it was kind of all over the place and actually in the nineteen fifties. It wasn't as controversial yet as it would become later and it was legal at this point. Two Yeah Yeah and so. They're probably would have been a lot of experience. In fact I remember reading a few accounts about people in Hollywood specifically saying that they benefited from. Lsd assisted therapy the movie stars in the nineteen fifties who had therapists in Beverly Hills. They gave him LSD and had them lie on the couch and talk through their problems and they were like. Wow this stuff is great. So it's Kinda surprising. Didn't end up in the movies earlier. Yeah really is but it's not surprising to me. Anyway that it ends up in a horror film in essentially a B picture Because because that's where you see a lot of the first strikes The first references to some sort of new idea new movement. New sometimes the new technology or some sort of news societal concept or fear. I think we should give you the listener. A direct sense of the flavor of the Tingler. So we do a little audio sample here Wyndham Castle. I feel obligated to warn you about next attraction. You will say this that. The picture.

LSD Tingler iheartradio Robert Land New Hampshire betty IBM William Castle Wyndham Castle Joe McCormick Black Rainbow Aaron Monkey Barney hill Beverly Hills Hollywood toby Apple
"robert land" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

09:00 min | 2 years ago

"robert land" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Hey what stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Land and I'm Joe McCormack in today. We've got a very special episode creole out there. We are doing a partnership with National Geographic. Yeah so they've got a new show coming out called one strange rock and it is produced by Darren aaronow Sqi of many movie fame. And all about it's all about the science of planet Earth in the sort of intricate interconnected processes both geological and biological the keep the earth stable as a sanctuary for life as we know it and in that sense. It has a kind of Ecological Alexander von Humboldt. Kind of VIBE. That I really like I like it when you can see the large-scale and small-scale interconnectedness of all things to to make the world how it is yes in speaking of saying. This is a visual spectacle. Yeah it's got a lot of really beautiful photography and it's hosted by Will Smith. I don't know if he ever says welcome to Earth and it kind of hope so And it tells stories through the experiences of a large cast of real life. Astronauts who are the only humans ever to venture beyond the shield that protects us from the universe at large and so because of our partnership with National Geographic. For this episode. We got an opportunity to talk to one of the astronauts on the show. Dr Jeff Hoffman. Who flew five space shuttle missions including a Hubble Space Telescope Repair Mission? And this is a great interview. We're just delighted to share it with everybody. Doctor Hoffman is very knowledgeable from multiple vantage points. About the thing that we're going to be focusing on today. Which is the radiation risk from space and how Earth protects us and he's knowledgeable in a couple of different domains because he's done high energy astrophysics knows all about the radiation environment of our solar system and the universe at large but he also has direct experience of what it's like to be an astronaut out in space to sorta go beyond our protective barriers. And that kind of perspective is kind of hard to come by. Because I would say one thing. It's really easy to lose sight of in your day to day. Life when you're reading about politics are playing with your dog or making some dinner is that your body is made of molecules and in order for molecules in your body to do what they do they have to remain what they are and most of the time. The internal chemistry of our bodies is pretty stable right but we have to recognize that the chemical stability of our bodies is an enormous and unique privilege provided to us by virtue of the fact that we live on planet earth and this into a truth that we touch on quite a bit on the show and that is that Earth is just the right planet. Yeah for life as we know it kind of unsurprising. Of course being creatures that evolved on planet Earth that planet earth is just the right planet for us but despite realizing the kind of anthropic obviousness of that fact it is still a kind of strange and comforting feeling. Well wait a minute. Is it comforting or is it discomforting? The fact that most of the universe is going to be so hostile to us so unbelievably hostile so incredibly violent that it's just impossible to even consider and I'm not even talking about the vaporizing heat of stars of the cold airless void of deep space. I'm talking about the fact that the universe is an acid bath of killer. Radiation including ionizing radiation which often takes the form of these high energy charged particles that blasts through animal bodies damaging changing the molecules within them as they go along and even changing the DNA of our cells altering the blueprints for cell replication and bringing about tissue damage sterility cancer and so that body integrity and chemical stability we so take for granted to keep living is only possible because of the planet we inhabit which shields us from being blasted by the sun nearby and by the galaxy at large. Yeah it's interesting to think about this that we we are creatures of the shallows. Yeah so life as we know it essentially thrives in a tide pool protected from the full onslaught of wind and wave. If you've ever been to to a number of beach environments you've seen those areas right where we're the waves are crashing. But the but there's this pool this this area of calm water that is protected from all of that. And that's where a lot of life can thrive that otherwise would not be able to bear the hostilities beyond the rocks. And it actually reminds me of this quote by John Steinbeck And he's not directly talking about what we're talking about here but the comparison is is just beautiful he. He wrote the knowledge that all things are one thing and then one thing is all things plankton. A Shimmering phosphorescent on the sea and the spinning planets and an expanding universe all bound together by the elastic string of time it is advisable to look from the tide pool to the stars and then back to the tide pool again. Our Earth is protected from wind and ways but from the full blast of solar and cosmic radiation instead of rocky sea walls protected by a robust atmosphere and most importantly the magnetosphere. Yeah the interesting other side to the fact that we've got this kind of connected consciousness that we're aware of like there is no real division between the Earth and the heavens. They're just different places. The only real division is distance and so all the universe is connected and does have a common origin and the Big Bang. But at the same time that connectedness we use the word connected in such a happy way. It's nice to be connected to things but you could also think about that is extreme vulnerability like you are right next door to everything in the universe that would crush in annihilate you and what we've got standing in the way of those those crushing annihilating forces beyond our power to control is essentially a big magnetic field and a thin layer of gas around the rocky surface of the planet as right so basically we have going on here. Is Your earth solid? Inner core in liquid outer core. They play a crucial role in protecting life as we know it from deadliest Deadly radiation differences in temperature and composition in the two core regions. Drive a powerful. Dynamo emitting Earth project protective electromagnetic field and remember. This is one of the key factors we have to consider in proposed. Interplanetary space travel and establishing stations on other worlds the only planets in our solar system with some form of magnetosphere in place are Mercury Earth Jupiter Saturn Uranus and Neptune. Right so then. Of course you've also on the surface of the Earth got the atmosphere to count on that. There's more stuff that radiation has to get through to get to you. And so the atmosphere will block some kinds of incoming radiation but the other big protector is the magnetosphere that keeps these particles directed away from the earth. Some of course still get through right and also serves to protect the atmosphere as well. Yes because if you don't have magnets fear your atmosphere over time can be stripped away. Which is one of the things that they think probably happened to Mars long ago right. So it's protective barrier against the elements it's our battlements and the only humans to have walked these battlements our astronauts such as Dr Jeff Hoffman now most astronauts never even go beyond the shield that protects us right we know that astronauts in space are exposed to extra levels of radiation. And that's one reason you want to limit your time and space you'll like you can't live in the ISS forever they WanNa bring you back eventually because the more time you spend up there the more you're exposed to this dangerous radiation that could harm you in the long run but even up in the ISS. You're still you're still benefiting from a large part of the Earth's protective shield right. Yes it gets a lot worse if you want to go to the moon or Mars or colonize another planet. Yeah because then you're going beyond Earth's protection so I guess we want to go now to our conversation with Dr. Jeff Hoffman to talk about the radiation risks posed by the universe and what astronauts have done in can do to protect themselves. But I I guess we should give you just a little bit of background on. Doctor Hoffman. Yeah so his original research interests were in high energy astrophysics specifically cosmic gamma radiation and x ray astronomy and his doctoral work at Harvard Entail balloon-borne Low Energy Gamma Ray telescopes and design. And then the testing of the technology for making seventy two to nineteen seventy five during post doctoral work at Leicester University worked on several X. Ray Astronomy rocket payloads. An and then he worked in the Center for Space Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology from Nineteen Seventy five to nineteen seventy eight as project scientists in charge of the orbiting H. A. O. One eight four hard x Ray and Gamma Ray experiment. Which launched in August nine hundred? Seventy seven but in in seventy eight. He was selected to become an astronaut and he went on a total of five different shuttle flights..

Dr. Jeff Hoffman National Geographic Darren aaronow Sqi Robert Land Alexander Will Smith Humboldt X. Ray Astronomy John Steinbeck Leicester University Center for Space Research Joe McCormack Massachusetts Institute of Tec H. A. O.
"robert land" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"robert land" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Are you looking to stuff to blow your mind my name is Robert land and I'm Joe McCormick in today of course we're going to be doing the episode that's right we've been trying to do one of these a month just because they're so many so many films we love in so many films that either have wonderful tie ins to scientific and cultural topics we've discussed on the show or the you know they they allow us to discuss new things and new angles that wouldn't necessarily necessitate an entire episode on their own alright so what's on the docket today well this month we're looking at really one of my I I have to say it's one of my favorite films on it and you know in terms of thinking about films you saw a definite point in your life that had an impact on your your your outlook in the film is nineteen seventy twos silent running I saw it for the first time this weekend yeah I never seen before and seen like stills from it I think it's in stills of the robot because it's a very robot heavy film despite being one obsessed with with nature environmental themes of the robots can awful lot of screen time they do yeah and I think if you're having trouble picturing the film if we just mention like geodesic domes in space with with forests in them Bruce Dern and in three demean diminutive robots the kinda Shambaugh around that's that's silent running in a nutshell now this was directed by Douglas Trumbull right who is like a visual effects guy for many years yeah yeah he he provided special photographic effects for such classic sci fi films as two thousand one a space Odyssey one of the best yeah close encounters of the third kind Star Trek the motion picture Blade Runner and then later on the tree of life yeah and then he he's using the family too because his father was a special effects pioneer who worked on nineteen thirty nine the wizard of oz you can really feel the spirit of the sixties in this movie from nineteen seventy two but maybe you can also feel the despair of the seventies and it is both of those spirits come crashing together in silent running yeah I thought about I've been thinking about this a lot recently in part because we're we're researching episodes about psychedelics and about psychedelic research and then the the decades in which actual medical research regarding psychedelic just completely languish and it always makes me think of hunter S. Thompson's commentary about the related to the wave of the of the nineteen sixties crashing and falling back right and and once again I think you know that ties in to to to this film as well now before we continue though let's let's have just a quick audio sample from the original trailer for silent running just remind everybody a little bit about what we're talking about here the strange for carrying a rare the pharmacist the plans the growing things to extinction just for return our commercial this forced silent running every moment the danger as man explore the mysteries of an unknown and limitless universe so.

Robert land Joe McCormick
"robert land" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

13:54 min | 2 years ago

"robert land" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Welcome stuff to blow your mind. Production iheartradio has networks it. Wasn't this stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Land and I'm Joe McCormack and we're back with part two of our exploration of Sagittarius Ace star the Compact radio source the supermassive black hole we think at the center of the Milky Anyway Galaxy yeah this is so as we mentioned in the last episode we had learned what three episodes we'd done previously just on black holes in general and in these two episodes deal supermassive black holes more specifically and yeah so if you're listening to this episode you do need to have at least listen to the previous supermassive black hole episode but I think the supermassive black hole episodes are are tailored to stand on their own without necessarily having listened to the previous black hole episodes in either case it is recommended that you have seen either Walt Disney the black hole or event horizon so the proper basis for all of our terrible jokes which one of those two is more kid friendly you think oh I am. I think it's the Disney Disney movie is also surprisingly dark like Anthony Perkins is eviscerated by a killer robot likes awful scene where Maximilian the robots coming at him with the spinning blade arm it holds up like a giant dictionary to block it any like cuts right through the dictionary and and apparently disembowelled Anthony Perkins it cuts out the the definition of trails. Don't see any entrails but it's still pretty horrific. there's some scary moments in it but I loved it as a kid. I really need to sit down and watch it again. Now speaking visceral we're GONNA be talking about some somewhat violent events going on around a black hole or at least a presumed black hole today and one thing we promised you last time is that we would answer a few questions everything you've always wanted to know about the supermassive black hole at the center of the Galaxy but were afraid to ask and one of the questions people most. I often ask about black holes. If you're ready to jump right in Robert Let's do it is with this big supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way will the rest of the Milky Way including Earth One day get sucked into this black hole and I was trying to find a good answer for this. I think the short answer is no or at least that's not a given all all evidence indicates that of course the Milky Way does have the supermassive black hole center. The galaxy is sort of orbiting around it earliest roughly orbiting around rounded but our solar system is in a stable orbit that is pretty far out at something like twenty five thousand light years away from the Galactic Center and Black Holes even unbelievably unbelievably giant black holes still basically behave like stars until you get really close to them. They're not vacuum. Cleaner is just sucking being down the entire universe you know they're objects traveling through space gravitational traction that is a product of their mass in your distance from them and like other objects if you're far enough away their gravitational attraction is negligible so we've got no indication that there is a risk of a black hole swallowing our solar system more of the earth or the rest of the Milky Way but of course if anything is massive is a black hole pass near our solar system thing I mean that would be a problem blow. It might not swallow our solar system but its gravitational influence could alter the orbits of the planets which would be not good obviously life on earth depends very heavily billy on us being where we are relative to the sun and other objects in the solar system staying where they are. You don't want say the orbits of comets and other objects like like that thrown out of whack because then that can lead to interplanetary bombardment yeah I think the fact that a black hole was an object is something that we do have to come back to again and again and because especially with science fiction treatments especially this especially the Disney black hole There's this idea of like thinking of it as a whirlpool. It's a hungry hungry hippo yeah yeah or thinking of it as a tunnel or just to an open like some of these these analogies they they may maybe useful to a certain extent it gives us something to picture in our mind but it kind of drifts away from the idea that this is an object this highly dense thing a now of course in the region really close to it. It doesn't behave like most other objects but once you once you get farther away I would say that the ways in which it is unique become. I'm less relevant to you. Is that make sense. Yes now you you touched on some of this but but I was looking around like okay what is the scenario in which which the supermassive black hole at the center of our Galaxy could conceivably destroy us and there is a one. They're very very strong possibility so we've mentioned that our system is again in a stable orbit around the Galactic Center we're not being pooled pulled old in to secretary as a star but in four point five billion years the Milky Way Galaxy will likely merge with the ANDROMEDA data galaxy warps and when this happens all bets are off. It's possible that everything gets pushed around it gets shuffled around in our solar system than could be gulped hold up or just hideously disrupted by secretary's Day Star in the process this according to Fabio Makuuchi be. Hi Fellow at Harvard University. I and Klay Fellow at the Smithsonian astrophysical observatory. He has a wonderful Ted ed video about this. If you just go to if you go to youtube and you look up just look up Ted ed in general because they're great educational short form videos to watch the entire family we watch them all the time in my household but they have an extra x excellent one about out black holes that Fabio is the contributor for yeah now when we talk about the collision of galaxies maybe someday we can do a whole episode just on the upcoming collision in between the Milky Way and the andromeda galaxy yeah so they're on a collision course on one hand. That sounds like okay so that's just the end of everything right. Actually I think not necessarily because you have to remember well. You know there is a lot of space in between stars right. You know there's there's a lot of space for things to go by but but one of the big fears I think is not necessarily that like Earth will smash directly into a star from Andromeda or something that the fear is about gravitational disruption. I two things moving past each other in space can still have a perturbation effects on on stars on the planets orbiting stars on the objects and Junkin space space all around stars well. None of that's good yeah I mean it's kind of like this is a terrible analogy. I'm sure but it's like two companies merge. Your your concern is not that you know if you're an editor at one company and you merged with another company. You're not concerned that there's another editor over there that you're just gonNA smack into so hard hard that you both explode. No you're worried about redundancies. You're worried about reshuffling of titles and priorities etc which in all of that can be concerned. It can certainly be catastrophically disruptive to your life but you're not worried about you know physically exploding or you know melting into them like Ron Silver and time cop though I guess that is possible I mean whenever things drift past each other in space. There's always potential for collision is just you know that that's that's not necessarily the thing you should be worried about. I think the big thing would be yeah. Do you get thrown out of place you get thrown in getting thrown into the near orbiter towards a black hole would obviously be bad right and catastrophic in its own right for sure all right so the next big question that that you might be wondering about could intelligent life forms live and or operate in orbit around a supermassive black hole a specifically are supermassive black hole. Oh you know how this factor into like a galactic civilization yeah or in the in the galaxy center more generally right. Can you get close close to the Galaxy Center and have life. They're the seems debatable right like so there are some scientists who think that just the way solar their systems have habitable zone for planetary orbits the galaxy as a whole has some kind of habitable zone for star systems now in than star systems of course this habitable zone has temperature as a primary variable right and this depends on the radiation coming off of the parents star and and how far away that planet is from the Star so if you're planning to close it's too hot to have liquid water. You'd be something like mercury or could be a hot gas. Ask Planet too far away. It's too cold to have liquid water. You might be like Jupiter Saturn and is generally believed that liquid water is sort of a prerequisite for life or at least. It's the kind of life that we understand. Could it be the galaxies as a whole have zones kind of like this where life is statistically more likely he to emerge thrive in survive then in other zones of the galaxy some scientists have proposed this and if that is the case what characterizes arises this zone first of all if the proponents of the idea of galactic habitable zone or correct the zone of the galaxy most suitable for life would tend to be a sort sort of wide ring around the center of the Galaxy so not farther out in the Galactic Halo not not way out there but also not deep in the the middle near the Galactic Center now. Why would this region be potentially better to live in than say the Galactic Centre just the short basic version of your main considerations here would be first of all conditions give rise to life and then the conditions that can sustain life so to give rise to life we assume you need first of all terrestrial planets with stable orbits right and and this means solar systems with a moderate amount of metal in them? If if you've got a solar system that's like mostly hydrogen and doesn't have much that looks like it could turn into rocky terrain that probably means you're not gonNA have life forms at least as as we understand them but this isn't the primary concern for our question a big one for our question would be conditions that can sustain life life like how often or how intensely would a planet in a given region be subjected to outside damaging influences examples sales of this could be radiation from violent nearby phenomena their stars. you know violent things going on obviously nearby Super Novi would be a huge is problem. If a star anywhere nearby you goes Supernova it will blast your planet and could potentially sterilize it. the the near passage of of other massive objects stars or black holes is a huge issue that could potentially disturb planetary orbits or bring about a bombardment of terrestrial terrestrial planets by comments and other junk from space so like if something passes through your solar system and is really heavy it'll disturb these cometary orbits and then suddenly you know the things that haven't been hitting your planet for a long time. Suddenly are the even makes me think about the Lisa Randall dark matter and the dinosaurs hypothesis and I can't remember if we talked about that on the show basically her idea was that you know it's possible that some extinction events in Earth's history are correlated to births passage through a region of the Galactic plane where dark matter is concentrated in the extra gravitational influence of that dark matter along that plane and disturbs the orbits of some objects in the solar system and makes the earth get bombarded by stuff or maybe influences can't remember. I think it was mainly unle comments. She was talking about but maybe he was also Vulcan as I didn't actually read the book but I remember reading articles about it when it came out it seemed interesting. Maybe we'll have to come back and take a look at that someday yeah. It sounds awesome frightening. I I don't know whether that theory is widely believed to have credence or not but generally if something disturbs the gravitational well field of your of your star system that can be really bad for anything living there yes and so there are a lot of variables at play but generally these kinds of dangerous conditions like being subjected subjected to more intense or more frequent radiation or radiation events and more more frequent disturbances of gravity by large objects. That's going to be more likely in densely packed regions of galaxy light closer to the Galactic Centre the higher the density of nearby stars and other her stuff. The more dangers there are in a very crude analogy is you're more likely to have some kind of auto accident or mishap on a busy city street then on some empty country road right yeah well. There's there's just more going on there yeah but then again I do want to say it seems like a lot of the writing about galactic habitable zones is subject to ongoing going criticism and dispute it does seem clear that there are at least some risks to life associated with moving closer to the Galactic Center but you know where exactly this habitable zone of galaxy would be if it in fact is true that some regions of the Gal here on average more habitable than others. I think that's highly disputed so this is not settled science. We're going to take a quick break. When we come back? We have a little more information about just how chaotic and destructive the inner reaches of the Galaxy seem to be and then we'll move on to some other possibilities for extraterrestrial activity in the inner galaxy support.

Galactic Center Galactic Centre Galaxy Center Anthony Perkins Walt Disney Fabio Makuuchi Robert Land Harvard University Disney Maximilian Ron Silver youtube Klay Fellow Ted ed editor
"robert land" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"robert land" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Are you looking to stuff to blow your mind my name is Robert land and I'm Joe McCormick in today of course we're gonna be doing a movie episode that's right we've been trying to do one of these a month just because they're so many so many films we love in so many films that either have wonderful tie ins to scientific and cultural topics we've discussed on the show or the you know they they allow us to discuss new things and new angles that wouldn't necessarily necessitate an entire episode on their own all right so what's on the docket today well this month we're looking at low really one of my I I have to say is one of my favorite films on the you know in terms of thinking about films you saw a definite point in your life that had an impact on your your your outlook in the film is nineteen seventy twos silent running I saw it for the first time this weekend yeah I never seen before and seen like stills from it I think it's in stills of the robot because it's a very robot heavy film despite being one obsessed with nature environmental themes of the robots can awful lot of screen time they do yeah and I think if you're having trouble picturing the film if we just mention like Jurassic gnomes in space with with forests in them Bruce Dern and then three demean diminutive robots that can assemble around that's that's silent running in a nutshell now this was directed by Douglas Trumbull right who is like a visual effects guy for many years yeah yeah he he provided special photographic effects for such classic sci fi films as two thousand one a space Odyssey one of the best yeah close encounters of the third kind Star Trek the motion picture Blade Runner and then later on the tree of life. yeah and then he he's using the family too because his father was a special effects pioneer who worked on nineteen thirty nine the wizard of oz you can really feel the spirit of the sixties in this movie from nineteen seventy two but maybe you can also feel the despair of the seventies and it is both of those spirits come crashing together in silent running yeah I thought about I've been thinking about this a lot recently in part because we're we're researching episodes about psychedelics and about psychedelic research and then the the decades in which actual medical research regarding psychedelic just completely languished and it always makes me think of hunter S. Thompson's commentary about the United to the wave of the of the nineteen sixties crashing and falling back right and and once again I think you know that ties in to to to this film as well now before we continue though let's let's have just a quick audio sample from the original trailer for silent running just remind everybody a little bit.

Robert land Joe McCormick
"robert land" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"robert land" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Welcome to stuff to blow your mind my name is Robert land and I'm Joe McCormick in today of course we're going to be doing the episode that's right we've been trying to do one of these a month just because they're so many so many films we love that so many films that either have wonderful tie ins to scientific and cultural topics we've discussed on the show or the you know they they allow us to discuss new things and new angles that wouldn't necessarily necessitate an entire episode on their own alright so what's on the docket today well this month we're looking at really one of my I I have to say is one of my favorite films on it you know in terms of thinking about films he saw a definite point in your life that had an impact on your your your outlook in the film is nineteen seventy twos silent running I saw it for the first time this weekend yeah I never seen before and seen like stills from it I think it's in stills of the robot because it's very robot heavy film despite being one obsessed with nature environmental themes of the robots can offer a lot of screen time they do yeah and I think if you're having trouble picturing the film if we just mention like Jurassic gnomes in space with with forests in them Bruce Dern and in three demean diminutive robots that can assemble around that's that's silent running in a nutshell now this was directed by Douglas Trumbull right who is like a visual effects guy for many years yeah yeah he he provided special photographic effects for such classic sci fi films as two thousand one a space Odyssey one of the best yeah close encounters of the third kind Star Trek the motion picture Blade Runner and then later on the tree of life yeah and then hit his it was in the family too because his father was a special effects pioneer who worked on nineteen thirty nine the wizard of oz you can really feel the spirit of the sixties in this movie from nineteen seventy two but maybe you can also feel the despair of the seventies and it is both of those spirits come crashing together in silent running yeah I thought about I've been thinking about this a lot recently in part because we're we're researching episodes about psychedelics and about psychedelic research and then the the decades in which actual medical research regarding psychedelic just completely languished and it always makes me think of hunter S. Thompson's commentary about the United to the wave of the of the nineteen sixties crashing and falling back right and and once again I think you know that ties in to to to this film as well now before we continue though let's let's have just a quick audio sample from the original trailer for silent running just remind everybody a little bit about what we're talking about here based on the strange for carrying a rare the plans the growing things and then for return our commercial this forest silent running every moment danger as man explores the mysteries of an unknown and limitless universe.

Robert land Joe McCormick
"robert land" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

09:30 min | 3 years ago

"robert land" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"To invention, Robert land, and Joma Forman's can be part two of our first foray into the exploration of the wheel the ultimate technology. The one everybody goes to when they're asked to think of an invention the thing that they tell you let's not reinvent when, in fact people reinvented all the time. And thank God, they do the very technology that Anthony survey was so down on in the Megan. Talking. I thought they wrote on cars and stuff. The wheel was for them. Okay. If you haven't seen the omega man based on Matheson's excellent, I am legend is a kind of a sad reworking of it. It's a corny Charlton Heston, led this redundant nineteen seventies. Post apocalyptic film, in which Charlton Heston, is seemingly the last human, and then you have these pale vampires that are ruling the night and, and he's a scientist, like Chrysler, scientists battling vampires in the vampires like see the wheel as a symbol of everything that humanity got wrong. At some point I kind of shaky premise. They tell him he stinks of oil and electric circuitry. He did look a little oil in I have to say, but, but it but it was corn oil. So, yes, we're continuing our discussion of wheel technology. We're not quite as down on wheel technology as the as the future of vampires are. So let's jump back into our discussion. So how does the wheel and the wheeled cart changed things? How of these technologies change the world? Well, one thing I would say, is that the legacy and impact of wheeled transportation has been much more profound in say the last four or five centuries than it was for the you know, most of the time, wheeled vehicles of existed. Their impact was less profound, basically, you know, they made it easier to move some stuff around in places where you could use them. Right. And then ultimately that, that is one of the main advancements here is that this was for the transportation of goods and people to a certain extent as well. You can also make of course, the argument for these chariots in a military. Yes or the museum moving around say, large scale siege equipment, though, after the age of chariots wheels, basically, sort of fell out of use in military context and replaced largely by heavy cavalry, fear horsemanship. Yeah. Now another important the impact of the wheel. It's just the stimulation of carpentry and road technologies like the because that's something to keep in mind to have like a really functional useful cart. You've got to have a certain level of carpentry in play for that thing to even exist. And then you're going to need to up your game with with roads so that you can get it all the places you need to get it. So that it can actually transport goods and people or you know, acquitted from one place to the other bullet writes about this a lot about the, so he's got a section of his book where he talks about the fact that the wheel shape to the modern world and that these influences were highly contingent. Not just on the wheel existing, but on the different types of wheels, we're talking about, like he explores, how fixed wheel sets like the early steam engine locomotive wheels, and then axles with independently rotating wheels, like we saw on the more versatile carriages in modern cars had very different impacts on the world. And he mentions road design so think about how we were talking about roads in the last episode when the first carriage roads came about. They were usually based on old roads that had been used for centuries by foot, and, you know, animal transport, whereas the first railroads had to be a completely different design, they'd be built a new into the landscape for obvious reasons. Example, early trains, with fixed wheel sets couldn't handle sharp turns or steep grades down a hill. And this meant that the landscape had to be altered to accommodate them to allow a train to pass through, and they also required. The intervention of government authorities help manage things like right? Away and scheduling abuse. And this was not originally the case for carriage roads, which eventually became automobile roads but funny enough. A lot of aspects of the design of railroads were then leader recreated when interstate highway systems in the worldwide equivalents like the autobahn were born. Just the idea that over, we're going to bring a Bill to road from planning to point B. There's a hill in the way. We're not going to go around it. We're not going to go over it. We're going to go right through it. Building a tunnel, we're going to do it or just going to cut a massive slice out of that hill. And we see this all over with the trains, but also with our interstates, but also voiding stops avoiding sharp turns of doing all that kind of stuff you would see in railroad design. But now it's to get lots of cars through all at once another story. A bullet tells about road design that. I thought was interesting was about the Scottish guy named John mcadam, who was born in seventeen fifty six who came up with a new design for carriage roads. So you had a traditional way of building roads, which is essentially based on the Roman road design, you'd have flat, paving stones, on top of a layer of cement, that went on top of a layer of smaller looser, stones. This is great for foot traffic. You're you wanna March legionary through, that's fine. But heavy carriages and courts with iron rimmed wheels would crush these roads. They would break the flat paving stones and ruin them. And one. Point, even the Roman emperor Theodosius, set weight, limits on wheeled carts was in four thirty eight. C E to prevent damage to the roads systems, but by the sixteenth century when carriages were becoming really popular in Europe. It was clear that in inverted design worked better. So you'd have larger stones or blocks on the bottom, and then you cover it with smaller stones, like you could use stream bed gravel that could better survive, the assault of wheeled carriages. But an even better designed supposedly was this guy, John mcadams, and this was roads paved with small stones, not tiny pebbles, but small stones. That had to be of a certain small size and sharp edge rather than round. And when it comes down to the size bullet writes that, quote, building supervisor sometimes put them in their mouth to check. But the sharp edges of the stones, actually mattered because that meant that when traffic went over them, it would pound the stones into each other, and sort of compact them, rather than pushing them out to the sides of the road, as often happened with smoother so, and bullet writes, that mcadam became known for insisting that the best way to make sure stones were the correct size and shape was to have a bunch of workers, sit alongside the road and use hammers to break rocks. And this led to the common image of the chain gang of prisoners breaking rocks on the side of the road. I had no idea. But of course as we discussed in our road episode it's not the changes are not just to the way you get from point. A two point be there. They actually change the cities and towns, the traveling to completely change in the urban culture. I mean, have you ever seen like old city centers from very old cities across the Middle East and North Africa where there will be the city centers? There are a may. As ING they're, they're gorgeous. And they are not made with wheeled vehicles in mind, and it's great because they've got like staircases in the middle of the city roads and they, they can be very narrow. Sometimes bullet writes that, even some city like city, roads in city, centres have ladders in them. And this is fine even deal with this on foot, but they're just not made for cars. And so the carriage revolution of the sixteenth century led to city designs with straighter roads wider roads that were better paved, and with sort of regimes to keep obstacles out of the middle of the road. And this had a really profound effect on culture. Like, do you ever think about the irony of what it means to be streetwise or life on the streets? Like I think what we use that to mean is being out in public mingling with people and strangers. Right. Yeah. But that doesn't literally apply, because like, if you're, you're not mingling with people in the street. Treat and less, I guess there's a festival going on or something like cars are going by you need to get out of the way. Maybe that's the one of the appeals of street festivals and probably like these various fun runs as well as your retaking the street for what they originally were used for, for us to move around devoid of these murderous machine housings that we use all the time. I mean, traditionally streets in most cities are a place for people to walk and sometimes for people on horseback to travel, but also the replace for public commerce, therefore the public square to take place in so you'd have people in the streets mingling talking having public events, buying and selling things, and this changed somewhat with the carriage. And then it changed a huge amount with the motorized car the motorized car with the car, you know..

Charlton Heston John mcadam scientist Robert land Matheson Anthony Middle East Europe Joma Forman Chrysler assault John mcadams supervisor North Africa five centuries
"robert land" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

13:28 min | 3 years ago

"robert land" Discussed on KTOK

"Steph blow your mind, and my name is Robert land. And I'm Joe McCormick. And before we got on Mike here. Robert, and I were just talking about our favorite coffee Cliche's. What do you call those sayings things that people put on a t-shirt or little medium or on a pillow or keychain fob? You're talking about a little bumper sticker. Wisdom, aren't you? Yeah. I don't know what the word for that. Is it's not quotes. The kinds of texts. Do you put on things in order to be witty like I like my coffee like I like my men, and then there's some joke. Of course, what we're trying to do is noble. We're trying to bring coffee and space together. And really that's been. That's been a noble mission in space exploration in general for awhile. How how are we going to enable our brave astronauts to drink coffee in space coffee is an institution of human life in many cultures around the world. It's not just a chemical. But it's an important texture of life. Yeah. I mean, it's it's the drinking of the coffee and the, but it's also the making of the copy the practice of making a Cup of coffee for many people myself, included, like bad is a part of the ritual. You you just it's part of your morning or your your afternoon whenever you essential Cup. It's quiet. It's meditative. It makes me start to feel like I'm getting ready for the day. It's one of those things. You know, I think often we underestimate the power of simple physical rituals in preparing our mind space for for activities like people think they need coffee because they need caffeine in order to start getting work done. And that that is somewhat true the caffeine does something. But you also need the process of the brewing in the drinking that doing those familiar motions gets you primed. Yeah. It's the you're engaging in the story to like, this is the story of the thing. I must do to start working, and and likewise, that's a whole other avenue to for many coffee drinkers like the story of the beans. And certainly yes there are varying degrees of quality and varying flavors for different different types of coffee beans, and different preparation methods, etc. But we also get just so into the story, and it's like with with with with with wine enthusiast. Oh, yeah. I mean, there's some scientific studies that that kind of cast doubt on to what degree a wine enthusiasts can actually takes various differences. In the vintage that they're drinking. But I mean, if you put a label on wine that said tastes like seashells, and sweet and low people would be able to taste that. Right. Yeah. But, but ultimately, it's all about the story of that wine, and you're engaging with that story, and it's bringing you value. You know, it's a. I don't think there's anything wrong with that. So there's there's that going on with coffee as well. And as we'll touch on later, there's a little of that in the story of coffee in space. You know, Robert one of the things that you made me realize is that the reason we actually need coffee in space for real astronauts is the same reason there's always a scene of astronauts drinking coffee inside movies about space. Oh, yeah. Yeah. We were we were sort of brainstorming about this like what what films what classics I five films. Have coffee drinking scenes, and there's you see it in alien nine. You see it in silent running from seventy two two thousand and one A Space Odyssey forgotten. Yeah. Know, I'm not sure I don't remember. It's been a little while since I've seen it. I'm due for a reviewing it's possible that they're they're they're drinking tea. I'm not sure which characters are drinking this particular Saint maybe just scalding hot, orange, juice. Yeah. But t very similar, of course, because it t is also checking off the same boxers the ritual the hot brew that invigorates you at cetera. Speaking of tea, we know that at least a certain Starfleet, captain loves his Earl grey hot. But do they drink coffee on the enterprise? At least a screen shot from Star Trek Voyager. So there's at least one scene with coffee, but I'm sure there countless other examples of characters drinking some sort of coffee based beverage did the long ones drink coffee in the expanse. Well, there is a lot of coffee drinking in the expanse. There's a particular high grade coffee machine on one of the main ships, and it's it's referenced a lot and at one point it's broken. And and everybody is is rather upset about it. But this is a show that does at least value, the the the engineering challenges involved with creating a proper coffee brewing device for a spaceship that's going to be going in and out of microgravity. And then of course, there's this scene from event horizon, don't speak feature some really tasteless jokes. Yeah. Yeah. But but even still we see this trend continuing where you have characters. In outer space in this just unrelatable environment for the vast majority of the population. You haven't been gauging and even more elaborate scenarios encountering aliens or demons from from the other side of a wormhole. But there's if there's anything that we can relate to in what they're doing and what they want out of life. It's that Cup of coffee. Oh, yeah. This is a standard part of narrative theory that you have if you wanna tell an extraordinary story you need to ground. The extraordinary elements of the story in mundane things things that make you feel familiar and comfortable in order to accent, the unfamiliarity of the strange parts of the story. Yeah. I remember Umberto eco wrote an essay dealing with some of this talking about coffee consumption in I think JAMES BOND novels as well as another spy series. What was the one that they made films of it with Michael Cain was Michael Caine, spike character. I just looked it up. It's Harry Palmer. Yeah. That's the one. That's the one up Chris. Yeah. So the ideas, you have you have this these these characters, and they're doing all this crazy stuff homes for some reason. But no matter what they're doing. They're wrestling giant squid over what have you still drinking that coffee, and that that serves as an anchoring point for the for our experiences, a lot of horror and SCI fi movies. Do this also with cigarettes? Oh, yeah. Coffee and cigarettes. I think are especially useful consumables for this narrative purpose for grounding. The narrative kind of mundane familiarity and comfort because coffee and cigarettes are symbols of order. You think about this like you can group food and drink and drugs into categories of order symbolically in chaos symbolic if you had characters on a on a starship doing heroin or something like that. That would that would like throw you off even more, right? Sort of like make the narrative feel even more untethered in chaotic. But if you give people these drugs that we typically think of as societas with regularity stability routine comfort compliance. There's sort of signals of orderliness predictability. And nicotine and caffeine or definitely both drugs. Like that. Of course, that's not an endorsement of of actually doing them. Never to your point. Like the order comes from far more than just the substance itself. I've talked to people who are who have been smokers and former smokers in most cases, and they talk about how just having a cigarette like gives them a sense of purpose in a particular environment. So standing around. Outside at a show or something and the like having the cigarette it kind of gives you licensed to be they're doing something, and then potentially engaging socially with other people. Yeah. Well, it's also a meditative ritual you perform the same familiar actions in the same order over and over again when you brew a Cup of coffee or when you have a cigarette again, not endorsing tobacco. But when you do these things you light up again that familiar pathway in your brain. Yeah. I've been at like social situations where I don't know anyone and if there's coffee or sometimes it's some other beverage, but as long as I have the beverage that gives me an added sense of purpose. I have this thing that I'm doing. And then when the Cup is empty I still feel compelled to carry the Cup around the down. Then I'm just standing here with nothing in my hands. What am I doing here? What kind of a freak show, Emma? You need a Cup in each hand. Even more secure duct taped into place, right? Edward coffee hands. Yes. Yes. So it's clear coffee plays a role in in establishing these meditative rituals that make us feel comfortable in putting us in a call mindset. Getting us ready to do things making productive. It has all these benefits. I wanted to talk about a couple of other benefits. I just found poking around in in studies on the effects of coffee that seem like they would be useful in space one of them. Robert. I bet you may have encountered this is the principle. We've discovered in recent years that warm drinks make us feel social warmth. Oh, yeah. We have touched on that before. Yeah. So the standard study, I think the original one of these was published in science years ago, by Williams and bargain, it's called experiencing physical warmth promotes interpersonal warmth, and the basic setup is you've got people who hold a Cup of hot coffee as opposed to a Cup of iced coffee. And apparently what study found is that subjects who were holding the hot coffee quote. Judge. They target person as having a warmer personality in terms of being more generous or caring and also people holding the hot coffee were more likely to choose a gift for a friend instead of for themselves, and I've read their subsequent studies on this that look into things like oral temperature and all that it seems generally that hot beverages encourage positive social connections. And we can certainly see the value of that just know. In an office environment or out on the street. But certainly in space you have a team that's having to work together to keep everything running keep everybody alive, and sometimes international team, this the coffee, and or can be a unifying force. Exactly. And so this effect maybe there with other hot beverages. I mean, sure you could also have people hold and drink hot water or scalding hot orange juice, but people already like hot coffee. They already have hot coffee ritual. So why not try to give them that? I got another one. Have you read about how coffee apparently seems to give you some kind of advantage in causing the brain to recognize emotionally positive stimuli. Yeah. So there was a study NPR one in two thousand twelve by LARs coach Inc and Vanessa Lux called caffeine, improves left, hemisphere processing of positive words. So basically what they found is that caffeine consumption boosts, the speed at which the left hemisphere of the brain recognizes and processes positive words, but doesn't have any effect on the processing speed of neutral or negative words. And they think this is probably because caffeine seems to boost dopamine transmission in the brain, the Ohio State, professor of psychology, Gary, wink, who has written a lot about the connection between foods and neuro chemistry writes that the basically the dopamine activity caused by caffeine is probably one of the main reasons that caffeine is one of the most widely consumed psychoactive substances across the entire world. And so to go back to the PLO one study, the the authors think that the dopaminergic qualities of caffeine are what's leading to this. Increased positively boost in in the processing powers of the, you know, the the the verbal processing centers in the left hemisphere. So at a time when you need people to work together as a team get along. Well, have everybody happy with each other seems to be like, boosting the recognition of words and other types of cues signal. Positive emotion. Sounds like a good deal. Right. Yeah. Yeah. Anything you can do to boost the positive communication right anything that would help assist. The processing of at least some cues of positivity in our environment seems worthwhile in space. And of course, again, you could just have people take caffeine pill. Probably right. Yeah. But people already like coffee, they already have coffee rituals. It seems like you can you can get all of these different effects concentrated into one thing. If you just get coffee in space. So is there a problem with coffee and space? Why can't we just take Mr. coffee up there? Well, it's only occurring to me. Now that there's the whole diuretic. But that's that's that's that's a whole another episode right there. You're thinking about that. While I'm going on about positively year like pooping. Yeah. I didn't think of it till till now to be honest, but but that's a whole side of the human condition that is also problematic in microgravity and a lot of engineering prowess has been directed at the problems related to just going to the bathroom in space. Right less effort has been put into the coffee problem coffee problem is is not as high level. But the the the problem of making copy in space is that pretty much all of our methods of brewing coffee are highly dependent upon gallon, gravity. Oh, yeah. Yeah. And so were you don't even think about how important it is. Yeah. Yeah. Even like did just roughly speaking there are two methods of making coffee like one that's using the straight up using gravity like water flowing down through grounds..

caffeine Robert land Cup Joe McCormick Mike Michael Cain Harry Palmer Umberto eco heroin Chris Emma Edward Michael Caine Williams JAMES BOND nicotine Ohio State professor of psychology NPR
"robert land" Discussed on Never Not Funny

Never Not Funny

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"robert land" Discussed on Never Not Funny

"So it's like you're seeing an alternate reality or something because he's like a full minute delay. Maybe it was it was neat. And if you looked around it looked like with stadium seating was and again, but I I was I was bamboozled into forgetting where I was standing. Yeah. Because you know, obviously tracks your head motion looking around you could lose yourself in it a little bit. Even though the resolution isn't like super insanely realistic looking like a screen like you're aware that you're looking at. It was really cool. It was very cool. So yeah, any number not funny fans, we're on their please. Let us know that be is urging little I did a thing last night. You guys I went to see Leonid and friends Leonid and friends they are from Russia. Okay. There are YouTube videos. I believe they have over five million. Views. Okay. They are a Chicago tribute band wove from Russia. Oh my God. Wow. And they these videos are they are phenomenal. They are they are eleven top notch musicians him doing Chicago songs. And so they'd had these videos out and they are on their first ever American tour. They did a couple of shows in New York. They did three here in L A, not a huge venue place called the village. It's a recording studio or a lot of your favorite albums were recorded, and it was about three hundred people there. So they they probably got between nine thousand people over the weekend. But Robert land from Chicago is there the first night, Danny Seraphin from Chicago. Is there what are the nights? So like Chicago's embracing these guys will they were. So here's what happened. So I it was sold out all three shows sold out almost instantly. Wow. So I I, you know, I don't do this. I had my people reach out. To see could we get a press tickets, and they were kind enough. Ramon Ramon Roman Roman Roman was kind enough to say, yes, he's their manager. And so, but it was like I had to text him when I got there. So I I texted him because I wasn't going to get there said, I'm texting you now because you'll probably gonna be very busy. I'm not going to get there till right around Showtime. Can you please leave the ticket at the door? My name's Dorian. No problem. No problem Jimmy, which likes to save you a seat. And it was like I've known you don't have to do that. I I'll just stand or sit in the back. Okay. See you. Then let me know when you're here would love to meet you great. So I get there, and and I really walk in as their starting. And there was like a reception earlier like where you got to experience Russian food. No, they did a Russian slash Chicago. The band trivia contest. That I wish I could have gotten therefore, but I couldn't and then the the show. So I get there. Right. Is it starting and they started they just don't phenomenal. They all have Russian accents. So they're singing with accents. Here's the it's one of those things where they were when people sing they kind of lose the exit. But there were certain words like, for instance, like, and this this one makes no sense to me..

Chicago Danny Seraphin Ramon Ramon Roman Roman Roman Russia Jimmy Leonid YouTube New York Robert land Dorian
"robert land" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

03:21 min | 3 years ago

"robert land" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Hey, welcome to stuff, the blow your mind. My name is Robert land. And I'm Joe McCormick. And Robert not too long ago. We were talking about ticks. Oh, yes about how it turns out. You can get a tick on your eyeball suck in the juice from within straight through the conjunctiva. It turns out you can get all kinds of acquired diseases from ticks like the acquired meat allergy syndrome, or the, of course, Lyme disease. We all know about all these other diseases. Of course, the woods are full of not just small animals that can hurt you. But in fact, if you wanna go up to the north west or somewhere like that there might be bears to be threat to you. And yet people want to go to the woods. Well, they're lovely dark and deep. That's the thing. I mean, I like to go to the woods. And yet there's nothing in the woods that materially benefits me. There's no food there. There's no like mating opportunity there. Those kind of an odd thing to say, but you know, there's no in a biological sense of the word. Nothing there for me, really accept an experience. And yet I seek that experience. I love going hiking in the woods. Yeah. I find the same situation with with my family. We go out in these these little hikes, you know, in the Atlanta area. And yeah, we're not we're not foraging for berries or mushrooms or hunting small Paret. We're just going out there and kind of breathing air getting a little exercise. And I mean, you can you could break it down into those tangible 's and say, well, I'm getting some fresh air. I'm getting some exercise. I'm, you know, I'm occupying myself for the morning, I'm getting away from my phone or something like this. But be happened in terms of these like evolved needs these basic biological needs. They're not they're not necessarily being fulfilled. Yeah. The woods for some reason seem to give you pleasure. It's a thing you're seeking out even though there's not a really direct on there might be indirect explanations. But there's not a really direct explanation for why your body would be sending you there. Here's another question. Why do we like pets? Oh, yeah. I mean, this is a question my wife, and I ask a lot about our cat because she's kind of a nightmare. But we so we always have these discussions where like parasites. Yeah. They're living in our house eating our food in. What does she give back like, she's not she's not keeping mice out of our grain or anything? She's just laying around and frequently attacking my feet and sometimes barring on the floor. But then, but we still love her for some reason, she's still in enriches our lives somehow our dog Charlie is an absolute parasite, he sometimes can be so annoying. But we love this dog this dog. He he brings me so much pleasure. I'm so happy to have this dog. Even when he's barking at me to take him on a walk while I'm trying to work on something or or just eating a bunch of food that we have to pay for. I mean from strict material point of view, there's not really a reason to want to have this thing in my house, except that I love him. Yeah. And you know, I bet a lot of people out there right now are thinking, well, I'm not a dog person. I'm not a cat person. I don't like to go into the woods. I would I would invite you to expand these definitions because I feel like they're certainly individuals out there who really don't want to go into the, you know, the north Georgia wilderness, but they might be very attracted to say, you know, the desert.

Robert land Joe McCormick north Georgia wilderness Charlie Atlanta