17 Burst results for "Robert Lamp"

"robert lamp" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

The Bill Simmons Podcast

04:50 min | 2 months ago

"robert lamp" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

"Tatum, who I think were kind of peer groups for him, right? Tatum and Mitchell were in the same draft, weren't they? 2017? Yeah. And he's just not a two way guy like those guys. Oh no, there's a few time on the pod, but he's probably closer to CJ McCollum than he is to Devin Booker. He's offense first guy. I think he's a, at least in this series was a legitimate liability, and he got outplayed by jaylen Brunson, who's about to go in the fridge market. He's for contracts 30, 32, 35, 37. Next four years. In general, we didn't mention this yet. The jazz there on the books next year for one 55.6. Now that's the number right now without adding minimum guys, draft picks, whatever else you have. So that's a tax team. This is a team that will not be one of the best. I think 7 teams in the west next year. So we're in legitimate blow it up mode. I was looking, what if it's everybody? Because that Conley is going to be the really tough one Conley's 21 million next year. And there is no world where he's in the free agent market this summer. I would say somewhere like a 5 to 6. He's in that what like patty mills got last summer. But maybe they're the team that takes Westbrook. I was trying to think of a four team trade where Mitchell goes to the Knicks with hernan Gomez. Brooklyn gets Gobert, they get Derrick Rose with Royce O'Neal. The Lakers get Ben Simmons, Mike Conley and Kemba Walker. And the jazz get Russell Westbrook, Joe Harris, Taylor Horton, Tucker, RJ Barrett, and it's just, we blew it up. We got nothing left. We're going for 20 wins this year. And we're building around RJ barret and we'll take your Westbrook poison pill for a year. Everybody else is gone. Give us a ton of picks. The next send them picks, the Lakers send them picks, broker, and they just get everybody's picks. And they just start over. I would rather do that than go 42 and 40 next year with a luxury tax, right? Yeah, this is nowhere near a luxury tax team. They just do not have the roster to justify it. And I think most damningly they don't have any young guys who you're looking at and saying, that's the guy who's immediately going to take a jump. That's the young player in waiting that's going to transform our team, Mitchell was supposed to be that guy. Gobert was supposed to be that guy, unless you're, I guess, miles higher on tequila Alexander walker than the consensus is. I'm not looking at this roster. He is technically a playoff. It all goes back to that crazy Terrence man game, right? You'd think there are these weird moments sometime that happened the playoffs. Like the clippers had run in 15 when all of a sudden Corey brewer and Josh Smith are basically ending this CP three Blake Griffin thing. And last year, that Terrence man game where they boil I went to it. 26 point lead and they were never the same. I came out of that season thinking they're never going to be the same. I don't know how you bounce back from that. It was way worse than I thought it was going to happen. One out of ten blow it up, you're a ten. I mean, everything's gone. No, I'm not quite a ten, and that's because of my belief in Donovan Mitchell. I think while his stock is down, I'm buying low. You just said they had no keepers. So he's a summary for you. Well, he's a semi keeper depending on what the return is, but you're talking about someone who's only going to be 26 year old next season who we haven't seen him in a situation that you just mentioned how Jalen Brunson has shined and outperformed Mitchell in the series. Well, Brunson is playing oftentimes in a 5 out offense. And more spacing and he's playing with Luca in that backcourt as well with Mitchell, I would be very curious about seeing him in a different environment in a different situation here. I don't think his age, everything I've heard about him since he was in college, work ethic wise. It's a bet on character. I think he's I think he's better than he was in this series, including on defense. So I'd be hesitant to trade Mitchell unless the return is outrageous, especially considering he mentioned their money, but he still has three more guaranteed years left on his deal before a fourth year player option. So you still have time with him. To me, Rudy Gobert is the guy you look to move to a team that has real contending hopes that can go bear in right away like imagine Gobert in place of Robert Williams in Boston. Just envision that. You'd see you'd see a brand new version of Rudy Gobert that we've never been able to see before. And I think with Mitchell I didn't like that analogy. How come I like Robert lamps? 'cause I don't want to imagine Rudy Gobert in Boston Jersey. Can't come up with a different team. It.

Gobert Mitchell Tatum CJ McCollum Devin Booker jaylen Brunson Conley patty mills hernan Gomez Royce O'Neal Ben Simmons Taylor Horton RJ Barrett RJ barret Lakers Alexander walker Joe Harris Mike Conley Kemba Walker Terrence
"robert lamp" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

05:21 min | 10 months ago

"robert lamp" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind and my name is robert lamp. And i'm joe mccormick. Today we got an art question to start off with If you out there. Have you ever been wandering through museum and looking at old paintings especially maybe paintings From the medieval europe from the renaissance period. And you happen to come across a dog holding in its mouth. Maybe what looks like a big old rolled up newspaper. That's on fire or As as many people on the internet have characterized it a smoking joint or smoking. A hand-rolled cigarette admit that i had i had never noticed this before. And i'm i'm not an expert by any stretch of the imagination. But i feel like i've i've walked through a number of really good art museums. I i've enjoyed in the past diving into sort of detail oriented topics that involve paintings and yet i have never witnessed the joint smoking dog or the firebrand bearing a dog before until it was brought to my attention by a an art net dot com blog. Post article that we were talking about right so i don't know how you came across this but you're the one who sent it to me and this was a blog post by an american art critic named been davis Very funny and it is addressing the question of why are there so many medieval and renaissance paintings. That depict a adult. What looks like a dog smoking joint. That is the way the author phrases it and it's quite amusing because it includes images examples of this and when you start looking at them yeah it looks like these dogs that they're doing something they're holding some sort of a joint like object or at the very least they have fire they have fire in a way that seems totally out of keeping with what dogs actually want and do in reality so few examples there is one paining from the sixteen sixty s by an artist named one day parade that features of very cute dog laid out on the ground with stubby little four legs tucked up under his paunchy chest and there is a bouquet of white flowers toss to the ground in front of him and then between his jaws. He is clutching a foot long. White cylinder that is on fire on the end opposite of his mouth and yes it does look like some kind of giant cigarette or something of that kind of but it could also be maybe a candle. I don't know it was just a white thing that's on fire. Yeah and the dog has a very relaxed vibe doing this. It's just kind of a chunky relaxed dog. Yes it doesn't look like like. I'm gonna burn your city down or anything like that. He's just hanging out. This is a smooth chunk. All these that mentioning are featured in that. That article by ben davis By the way..

robert lamp joe mccormick europe davis ben davis
"robert lamp" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:40 min | 10 months ago

"robert lamp" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"And i'm joe mccormack and it's saturday time to go into the vault for an older episode of the show. This time we are airing the first part of our series on fingernails. This originally came out. September first twenty twenty gal. Let's dive right in. Welcome to blow your mind. Production of iheartradio. Hey what can this stuff to blow your mind. My name is robert lamp. And i'm joe mccormack in today working to be embarking on part one of exploration of nails not nails like you hit with the hammer though. I guess you could hit him with the hammer. The that would be really bad talking about the kind of nails on the human body. And i was thinking just the other day about how nails are sort of the mascot for idleness for human idleness because when humans are idle what part of the body is going to get the most attention. I think it's almost always going to be the nail right. You're either pay. Some people bite their nails. If you're not biting your nails you're often like looking at your nails. It kind of observing like other too long or like. Oh there's some kind of weird thing here perhaps. This is idiosyncratic psychology of mine. But but i think this is pretty common right. Yeah i mean even if you're not even looking at them some sort of feel them like you're just sort of feeling the edges of your nails and making sure everything's things lined up there for my own part. I i tend to find that. I notice him the most when i am or in the more in the past really the but if i was driving into work and be stuck at a light or something and then i would notice my nails and i would be and that's when i would notice that i need to trim my nails and you know of course being in a position where i really shouldn't be trimming my nails and then the rest of the time. I'm not really noticing them. That's why the good lord made teeth. Yeah we'll get into that. That's not particularly my style but Do my cat is a big big fan herself. I'm also not a nailbiter. But i there people very close to me who are and i've observed the the the behavior for many years closed in with a lot of Thoughts about it. Yeah so so much like our two episodes on tomatoes last week. This is going to be a pair of episodes that that are going to get into some real weirdness..

joe mccormack robert lamp
"robert lamp" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:45 min | 11 months ago

"robert lamp" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Kulla voinov. Wicked wizard grasps. The handle of his broad sword asks the blade. The simple question. Tell me oh my blade of honor. Dost thou wish to drink my lifeblood drink. The blood of call avoiding dos. His trusty sword makes answer well divining his intentions. Why should i not drink. Thi- lifeblood blah of guilty call. Avoid since i've feast upon the worthy drink the lifeblood of the righteous. Thereupon upon the youth kalervo wicked wizard of the north land lifts the mighty sword vuko did due to earth and heaven firmly thrust the hilton heather to his heart. He points the weapon throws his way to ban. The broad sword pouring out his wicked life. Blood air be journeys to manala thus the wizard fines destruction. This the end of color voinea born in sin and merced in folly. Welcome to stuff to blow your mind. Production of iheartradio. Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is robert lamp. And i'm joe mccormick and what you just heard was an expert from room. Thirty five of the finnish epic.

Kulla voinov hilton heather voinea robert lamp joe mccormick
"robert lamp" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"robert lamp" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Mind. My name is robert lamp. And i'm joe mccormack into introduced today's topic. I wanted to start off by referring to a news article that i found from last year. So this is a local news article from the santa clara california area from march. Twenty twenty. You remember you remember that scary time back when the panic buying going on because Cove is just starting to dawn on people and suddenly everybody was like. Oh yeah okay. We got to stock up. We don't know when we're going to be leaving the house and so forth and so this article is referring to the fact that there were long lines at the costco in santa clara california in march twenty twenty and one element of the story. That i thought was very interesting..

robert lamp joe mccormack santa clara california costco
"robert lamp" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"robert lamp" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"A production of iheartradio. Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. Mine is robert lamp. And i'm joe mccormick and we're back with part two In the last episode talked about the The settlement the original colonization of the pacific islands. Today we're back to talk about some documentation of the The amazing navigation techniques used by the master navigators various pacific islands And i am really excited to talk about this stuff today. Because i i've been reading this big very important book on the subject that was Published in nineteen seventy two by an author named david lewis cold we the navigators that involves extensive interviews with and then direct sailing and firsthand observation of the navigation techniques of master navigators from the pacific islands for example amendment..

robert lamp joe mccormick pacific islands david lewis sailing
"robert lamp" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

12:10 min | 2 years ago

"robert lamp" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Hey Welcome to invention. My name is Robert Lamp and I'm Joe McCormack and you might know us from our other podcast stuff to blow your mind but today you have apparently wandered into our hall of cursed invention that wait. It's not all Kirsten mention. You know so. Some things are perfectly fine inventions Some of them make our lives better but you know or they taunt you with goods that you could almost reach Robert. Did you when you were a kid? Did you ever play that game? I suppose it was a game but I took it very seriously where you really thought you could reach up through the bottom of the vending machine and get that food item from the bottom row I do not remember trying too hard at it because it ultimately seemed like there were there were too many risks. Both both physical and social. Because either you are going to get your arm caught in their jammed or pinched opened. There are going to be some sort of trap failsafe. Or you're just going to be seeing doing it and you're going to get in trouble for trying to steal from a candy machine. It always seemed like a kind of Humiliating homer Simpson. Esque way to die would be you die accidentally pulling the vending machine over on top of you while you're trying to reach up and grab some Andy CAPP hot fries from the bottom row. Exactly and you know these are two key points. Though that we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA come back to again and again in this episode in this episode. We are talking about the Vending Machine Aka. The robot cashier. That's right so time was back in the old days yield and days when you had to either buy goods directly from a human salesperson. Sounds horrible or you simply had to leave payment after you took off with it and as far as that payment goes prior to the invention of money which would be have to be another episode for us. You'd have to leave goods there in. You know in exchange some sort of barter system. That sounds difficult. If you can't workout with the exchange rate for what you bring is all right in either case though there's human interaction or there's some there's some human judgment on what is fair or there's just some sort of an honor system in place or human there just to prevent you from stealing right but then what about a machine that sells goods for you. Something that has become so ubiquitous. Now it's fascinating to think back on where the shift occurs. We get into this vending machine territory just wear does such a machine come from. At what point do we crossover from machines? That are ultimately little more than honor boxes. You know honor system situations where you're just trusted to leave your money and take exactly what you paid for and then where do we get into true mechanical sellers right? The honor box system is what you often find in. Say A church where they'll be selling prayer candles or something like that and there's an offering box and it's like please put a dollar end. Just take all the candles right. And in and yeah. The the honor system is enforced by the sacred nature of the space in your obligations there. There's a supernatural security guard in that right. Yeah you don't have to worry about somebody trying to reach their hand in there. Just make off with all the candles for the most part. But you really do have to worry about that. If say you want to sell minor food items snack items and say you're running a concession stand at the poolside or something like that and you need to run off to put some money in the parking meter. Whatever whatever the people meaning those concession stands had to do when they put up a sign that said be right back so so kids are coming they want to buy an ice cream bar snickers or something like that and the goods are just right there. Do you trust the children to leave. Money on the counter as they should and take things and take only what they've actually paid for. Wouldn't it be better if you had a machine that enforced the exchange of currency for for payout of items and didn't allow kids to sneak an extra hot fries here and there now of course we're talking about honor boxes here one of the important things to notice that you still find plenty of honor boxes out on the street in the form of Of newspaper on her boxes. Oh the newspaper vending machine. Yes yeah you put your money in and if you wanted yes you could take all the newspapers that would be cumbersome. Yes how often somebody want more than one newspaper. Though they're like there's an article about them in it right but but obviously you could not do the same with say You Know Cola machine chocolate machine now. I wonder something that we can become back to a bit. Because I wonder how the psychology of transaction and the psychology of consumer behavior changes when you're dealing with a machine versus with the person because I think back to my childhood self who I would reach my arm in the machine and see if I could grab a whatever a brisk t out of the drink machine. Grab something out of the snack machine. I don't think I was ever able to do anything like that but I would try and I would never do that at even even if the the concession stand attendant was away and I could have just reached out and stolen. Whatever I wanted I would never have done that at a real concession stand that was not controlled by machine operated. Mechanisms has a different scenario entirely and then at the same time it's it's ultimately not. It's still somebody's property is for sale. They're still individuals involved in this scenario. And you are Defrauding them well. It felt completely legitimate to try to reach into the machine and steal from it in a way that it wouldn't from a place that had human even if they weren't there right right because you would have been exploiting a design flaw right. Yeah I guess so that. Maybe that makes it okay. It doesn't to be clear but but let's go back in time a bit. Let's let's look for the roots of the vending machine so I was reading through an excellent book on the Social History of the vending machine titled Vending Machines on American social history by carry. See Grave and points out that the you know. The first American vending machines popped up in the eighteen eighties but the earliest mention of what we can reasonably describe as a vending machine is attributed to The Greek inventor hero or heroine the Alexandrian engineer of the first century CE. Okay now hero has tons of inventions attributed to him right and then the book that the the stems from is is loaded with descriptions of strange devices so This sixty two e book pneumatic has descriptions and illustrations of various curios fountains temple gadgets doors that open due to the you know some sort of movement of steam or firewater with injuries like a drinking horn in which a peculiarly form. Siphon is fixed and water driven from the mouth of a wine skin in the hands of Seder by means of compressed air so a lot of Curios Marvel's toys essentially so it sounds like he designed one of those early on like peeing fountains right exactly and it would would would would have been technological wonders then and are still kind of technological wonders today but Where does the vending machine come in? Well he describes and illustrates a coin operated device for for selling sacred water in Egyptian temples. Okay so the idea. Is it it. Maybe you don't believe in the honor box system like we discussed for buying candles in a church or something. Maybe think well people are just going to be stealing sacred water if we don't make them pay for it. So you need a machine to enforce that transaction. Well I don't know how much of it was because I think there is still an honest. I mean it's a temple right but maybe there's a sense of let's make it a little wondrous you know because they'll number of these devices that like the doors open you know as if by sacred magic but of course it's supposedly caused by some sort of heat apparatus but but here's how this device would work okay. You'd insert a five drachma coin. The coin would tip balance inside which would lift a plug and allow a small amount of water to escape. And then pour into your chalice or copper. What have you and then? Once the coin makes its way into the collection chamber the balance returns in the plug. Goes BACK INTO PLACE? Okay so it sounds like a very simple design. You've got like a lever. And when the weight of the coin hits one side of the lever like a seesaw lifts the Plug Up. And it's kind of like a toilet. Actually it is very much like a modern toilet Especially when you when you see the illustration it basically functions like a coin operated flush. Nice I should also point out that Say He Chagrin also discusses this in his American scientist Article Water Fountains with special effects from two thousand five. But it's still certainly benefited from an honor. System of sorts of the gods are watching. So you're not going to try and cheat the machine with some sort of a coin on a string or some some smooth stones that are just happened to be shaped like five drachma coin ride because this was not a refined system of judging what had been put into the slot it was basically anything that could push the lever down right now in terms of like who actually invented this and whether it was actually bill. This is a little more difficult to to really figure out. It's certainly possible. That hero himself was indeed the inventor of the device. But we don't know for sure it might have been to. Cbs reputed inventor of water clocks from two seventy BC who also would have resided in Alexandria to CBS water. Clocks are worth looking up by the way I looking at some video of how these things worked in. There is some ingenious design because it's difficult to design a consistent water clock that just keeps working the same over time Because you know you're you're reservoir tanks drain down so he created these really smart designs with like extra reservoir tanks that would pour into your main reservoir tank and then siphoned manage. How high the water level was is really clever. Now we also don't know if what hero describes here was ever actually built or just a you know a novel design and this is the case with a lot of old technological gadgets described in books and then on top of this some mentions of this vending machine include embellishments that are difficult to nail down simply don't fit the time line but it does give us an idea of of what some of the earliest if not the an actual vending machine consisted of then at least the earliest ideas of what a vending machine could be right. The general principle of automating transaction without just relying on the honor system on the buyer's part right and it's kind of a gradual evolution to get to that point however as a cigarette points out. It's going to be a long time. After after this temple device. Describe A HERO. Before we actually get any real advancements in vending machine technology. He does point out there. There's some for instance there's an unaccredited nineteen sixty New York Times article that claims among other things that there was a coin operated pencil selling machine in ten seventy six China. You know is really holding out for that medieval European vending machine that You put it in. A coin dispenses a piece of the true cross. Well I mean there were certainly automatons throughout European history and I guess with the vending machine especially the early days of the vending machine. You're looking for a very particular type of Automaton that does something or rather not just does something You know but actually gives some sort of good in exchange either leaks out some sort of valuable liquid more gives you a candy bar in exchange for a coin because we have all matter of amazing. Tomasson of showing up in European history and everything from pooping ducks to praying monks. But to what extent you have things that are actually facilitating exchange of of money for goods. All right.

Robert Lamp Kirsten Andy CAPP homer Simpson New York Times American scientist Joe McCormack engineer Alexandria China Cbs CBS
"robert lamp" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

11:40 min | 2 years ago

"robert lamp" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Everyone welcome to invention. My Name's Robert Lamp and I'm Jim McCormick and just a heads up. This is going to be part one of a two part episode because we get going on wheels and we can't stop robbed. I thought today we should start with Some poll results. Are you ready to consult the masses with me? Nothing's more exciting than starting with poll results. Okay so in in two thousand Thirteen Time magazine and qualcomm. They partnered to do a survey they pulled more than ten thousand people across seventeen countries to find out some views about invention inventiveness. And there's some interesting questions here. We might want to come back to in the future about public opinion about how invention happens but They asked people to rank as one of the questions here. What are the most important inventions of all time and three gut singled out in the results? You had the Internet all right. You know it's a great invention a terrible invention is the voldemort of adventurous. Okay yeah is like Odin. It's wise intricacy. It's great and terrible. Yeah I've been bet that's all in vengeance. Really and he kind of he kind of Fabulous new technology is gonNA bring At least equal portions of both I got. The second one is electricity. I'd say that's a really good qualifier. That should be near the top. Yeah then. The third one singled out as the most important is the wheel now. These three are all strike me as very different because illiteracy is not a technology. We invented the technology to utilize electricity and to harness its power and likewise is we'll discuss similar with the wheel the Internet. We're still trying to figure out how to actually sit and keep it from you know shocking us. Yeah there is no Internet in nature. Is there no and people might say? There are no wheels in nature though you could make an argument either way on that and we'll come back to that in a minute but it's true that people really do often single out. The wheel has like the most important invention in history right. It's it's all the Gary Larson cartoons for a reason. No yeah they're they're at least they're they're probably more than two. But I ran across. At least two Gary Larson cartoons about Cavemen inventing the wheel trying to invent the wheel. Generally getting something drastically long wrong like row like writing strapped to the outside of it to go down the hill. There's so many there's so many bits of fiction that have explored the idea of inventing a reinventing the wheel The the Hulu show future man recently explored this with a time traveler. Going to post apocalyptic future and in in having a job in this primitive society as a wheel maker and so he keeps trying to improve upon the design and is catching on fire. They're they're they're falling over until he finally gets design right. Well Yeah I love how? It's it's this cliche that it's the quintessential example of like an already perfected technology. That you don't need to mess with any more right like the cliche is. Let's not reinvent the wheel meaning. Let's not waste time overthinking something right sort of equivalent to if it ain't broke. Don't fix it though. I think this is ironic. Given what we're GONNA talk about in today's episode because throughout history the wheel has undergone lots of reinventions in refinements that. Make it work better or adapt it to a particular us. Let's not reinvent. The wheel is actually a really stupid saying we're constantly reinventing the wheel and we're much better off for those reinventions like in this episode. We're not even going to really get into the tire all that much but certainly the next time you need a new tire for your vehicle. Just go to the mechanic and ask for a wheel. Give me one of those wheels. Says it hasn't been improved upon since the medieval or or Prehistoric Times right. Just just are we on there. I don't care what how what kind of just put it on. Their stone would doesn't matter well. This brings up a really good point that we should make the beginning a caveat that we must raise while the wheel is in a way a simple machine. It's simple in principle. The history of the wheel is a vast complex subject full of questions that aren't yet and may never be answered or solved Like where and win the wheel was truly I invented the. We'll talk about some ideas about that today. there's just obviously not a chance. We can do justice to the entire history of the wheel in a single episode. So I think today we're going to have to consider this sort of a first foray trying to cover some of the basics interesting observations or things that seemed interesting to us and leave ourselves the opportunity to come back and visit more of the particulars from the invention history of wheel technology in the future. For example as you say about tires you know We we wouldn't have the wheeled vehicles we have today without tires and that's just something that we didn't even get into now. Typically consider wheels again the product of human ingenuity alone yet the basic form pops up in nature as well and not only in the form of creatures that can curl up into productive. Balls what's your favorite creature that curls up into a protective ball? I mean sonic the Hedgehog. Actually there are. There are a few that come to mind. I'll get to get to one in a second. Okay one animal. We do have to focus in a certainly the The rotor for the microscopic aquatic animal. Whose very name is Latin for wheel bearer. Okay so does it have wheels. Does it roll around in? Hunker stopping world. Not exactly but it's the name is a reference to the crown of Silia around the rotor first mouth which move rapidly to eight locomotion and feeding but contrary to its name. They don't they themselves. Don't actually rotate. So it's more kind of like circle bearer. Yeah now you do have creatures like the Mount Lyell Salamander and the mother of Pearl Caterpillar. Both of which curl their bodies into hoop type the forms and the little ball like forms and can roll away from threats in their hilly environments. Yeah likewise the Robert of you ever seen video of the wheel spider who? I don't think I have no. This is really cool. The it shows up in some documentaries so it's a spider that's native to the Namib Desert and the Wheel Spider. Is the ground walking spider? Obviously it's in the desert. It's a huntsman spider. It's not a web spinner But it burrows down in the sand dunes of the desert and it has a mortal enemy a parasitic wasp. Now even if you don't like spiders If you don't know much about parasitic wasps watching what a parasitic wasp does to a spider can be. This is worse than any horror. Movie is like the most horrifying thing and leave your sympathizing with the spider team spider. Which I guess you are Joe. I guess I am. You're you're into just like putting an egg on something that ends up eating that thing. I know your general proclivities. I'm on team wasp whenever it's wasp versus spider if it's spider versus pretty much anything else. I'm team spider. Well I guess that's the other way to think about it that the wasp is a miracle of nature that is really awesome So yes so. The parasitic wasp lays an egg on the spider. After paralyzing the spider than the egg hatches. The larva can eat the spider at leisure sometimes. Sort of from the inside out So when a wasp attacks obviously the spider is desperate to escape. It doesn't WanNa get paralyzed and eaten by Larva But it can't crawl across the dunes fast enough to get away from the wasp. So what does it do if it can the wheel spider cart wheels down? A Sand Dune rolling way high speed to escape becoming a host. And I've read that. It can travel it like more than forty revolutions per second. That's awesome and again this is. This is dependent though upon a hilly environment you know. Some sort of Slope Down which it may roll. Yeah and the spider being near the top when it gets tax right like if it's at the bottom when it gets attacked no dice but of course. These rolling animals in a way are not true wheels in technological since because when humans use wheels. What's crucial is that? The wheel is paired with an axle. And that the wheel axle together provide continuous rotational force. That can be used to move a fixed body. So it's not just a wheel rolling by itself right with Gary Larson cartoon taped to the outside of around stone rolling down a hill so the question is is there anything more like a true wheel in the natural world. Were something rotates around fixed body to move it. I mean there's nothing quite like a wheel In nature but there is a rare example of a similar movement that takes place and that's with bacterial jehlum structure found species such as E. coli the full jehlum essentially amounts to a long helix. Screw that rotates to propel the bacterium through its environment much like a boat's propeller propeller isn't pretty much a wheel. I would say yeah. Yeah depends on the same sort of movement now. Of course lots of things in the natural world that are not alive also role. Oh Yeah I mean. Snowballs GonNa Roll Downhill get bigger. Pedals are going to roll. So these are certainly examples. That early people would have been in in various cases had had access to they could have seen in action and seeing what rolling consists off but another one we often forget about is the rolling world of poop. Oh Yeah Yeah I mean consider for instance that the near constant poops of the goat are essentially self hiding rolling away from these hill. Roamers which gives them an advantage against Stalking predators with a nose for their scent and then on the other end of the spectrum. You have the poop combat. That is that is more cubicle in shape and one of the theories here is that since their poop isn't essential calling card for other members of their species like essential for territory mating and so forth With the WOMBAT IT. It pays for these poops to not roll away. Hide themselves and thus they have this kind of cubicle structure to them and then ended in addition to poop various Seeds and fruit is. Well certainly roll away. After they have fallen and outside of the actual movement of rolling we should also note that the basic form of the wheel is but what a circle a disk and one needs only glimpse the sun or the Moon in the sky or sea various other circular forms in nature to grasp the idea of if not a disc in enrolling motion than at least a disc. It's not it it it. It's it's central. Shape can be found of fairly easily in the natural world. Absolutely now one of the things I think we have to also acknowledge up front. Is that when people say that the wheel is like the most important invention of all time? I think what they're usually thinking of is the wheel for transportation but we should also acknowledge that like the wheel is like way bigger than just transportation applications right even in technology. Are you saying like they could be a complete psychopath in there? Like all the breaking wheel obvious. No greatest tune invention. How did we ever strap people down and break all their limbs before that. That is no. They're missing out on that. But no I was thinking more of We like the milling wheel. Potter's we I mean these. These are incredibly important inventions. But I think they're not usually what people have in mind when they think of the wheel right says we're not going to really explore the like Milling Wheel. Potter's wheel in this episode. But just to give everybody a an idea of the timeframe we're talking about here. The Potter's wheel was common in Mesopotamia in the Near East from thirty five hundred.

Gary Larson Potter Thirteen Time magazine qualcomm Robert Lamp Hulu Silia Namib Desert Jim McCormick Prehistoric Times Mount Lyell Salamander Stalking Mesopotamia Joe Pearl Caterpillar
"robert lamp" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

09:02 min | 2 years ago

"robert lamp" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"With open source leadership of Red Hat. Let's unlock the world's potential. Let's put smart to work. Learn more at IBM dot. com slash red hat one night in nineteen, sixty, one on the side of dark highway, Betty and Barney Hill Kat lights in the sky two years later, the underwent hypnosis to try and recall what happened. Some took as fact. Others thought it was a fantasy, but what really happened? That's night in rural New Hampshire. Join me, toby ball for the inaugural season of stranger rivals a CO production of iheartradio in grim, mild from Aaron Monkey listen to strange arrivals on iheartradio APP on Apple, podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome to invention a production of iheartradio. To invention, my name is Robert Lamp and I'm Joe McCormack and we're back with part three of our discussion of the invention of photography now last time we got up to the moment of invention, the debut of the Daguerreotype, of course Louis Daguerre in Paris and the the early paper-based negative photo procedure of Fox Talbot in England, which was initially. Initially far less successful right? Yeah, we spend a lot of time talking about the early laborious methods of taking a photograph but the the the startling and just game changing results that they gave us You know and all that discussion of Daguerreotypes. I neglected to mention my daguerreotype boyfriend, and what is this? This is a believers tumbler page. And it was just a collection of like handsome dudes with their. You know their photo having been taken with Daguerreotype, a lot of like a really neat sideburns and whatnot but it was kind of a trend at least a few years ago. I remember it making the rounds and people having a lot of fun with it. I'm looking at it now. You know one of the things. Is Nobody smiling and they're Garitano. Yes, some. Some guys look Kinda smuggled. It's not really a smile right and there's an important reason for that which will get into this episode. This is a great blog now. That I'm looking at it it. Do you have a favorite old school daguerreotype or I don't know if it's actually daguerreotype one? I'm going to bring up in an old school photograph Doppler Ganger. Of course I love the old Nicholas cage from the nineteenth century. Yeah, I think that's the main one that comes to mind Because yeah, you go back to photographic history even though we have. Very little off it really aiming can compared to the you know the deeper history of of the human species, but yeah, you can find these weird d'appel gangs where you're like. Yeah, that looks like Stevie semi especially if I just Kinda. Blur, my is a little bit. Yeah, so last time we cover this transition from the resin based. He'll yager fee method of Joseph Nissan naps the French inventor and scientist and Aristocrat to the big breakthrough announced in described in eighteen, thirty, nine by Louis Daguerre, the daguerreotype method, which for a brief refresher on how that worked remember in. It had many steps that was sort of declares. Breakthrough was multi step chemistry procedure so it involved. Involved sensitizing a silver coated plate with iodine fumes in this would produce a layer of the light, sensitive compound, silver iodide, and then you expose that plate inside a camera obscure, and then, and this is the real genius step you would take the lightly exposed played on which the image would still be invisible to the naked eye. You couldn't see anything yet, and you would develop that by exposing it to mercury fumes, which would bring out the latent? Latent image on the plate and create a sharp contrast and then finally you'd wash off the remaining silver iodide to prevent further darkening, and originally this washing off step took place in in hot salt water until the better solution of Hypo Sulfite of Soda, a now known as sodium, Theo sulfate was suggested by John Herschel. Now it's widely agreed the Gares most original and brilliant contribution to the invention of photography. Was this chemical development stage of course? Course, the development was so useful because it greatly cut down on exposure times, which before had been very before the development stage. You might have to expose a plate for hours at a time like maybe seven hours or twelve hours before the image would really come through on it. you only had to get a very faint initial exposure of maybe ten to fifteen minutes before you could develop it with the mercury fumes, which sounds like a lot. To us, but like you said it was a huge improvement over hours of exposure time. Yeah, gigantic difference back then I mean that it made it suddenly realistic to photograph landscapes safe. If you had to expose a plate for hours on a landscape, all the shadows would be messed up right. I mean. Shadows are such an important part of our view of the natural world. If the shadows keeps shifting over the many hours of exposure, nothing's GonNa look right now also in the last episode we talked about English polymath, scientist, politician, and inventor Henry Fox Talbot who had independently invented a kind of different method of photography years earlier in England, but unfortunately even though he invented it I, he never. Never got around to publishing his findings until after Daguerre announced his invention in France, and was cemented in the minds of most people as the inventor of Taga fee Henry. Fox Talbot's original method is different. It used paper instead of these sensitized metal plates. He sends ties the paper to light by coating it in silver chloride into would expose it in a camera for a longer period than Gares, final method, and then wash it off afterward to stop the exposure now tell that actually had a few different methods over time after declares method was announced in eighteen, thirty nine talbot eventually went on to create and patent different process known as the Calo type, which also made use of different chemical form. Form of Gares concept of development right to shorten the exposure time needed in the camera, and while gears method produced these sharp one of a kind positive, shiny reflective images on metal plates, Talbot's method produce kind of fuzzy soft, but highly replicable copy -able negative images on paper, so these are the two main things you've got by eighteen, thirty, nine, eighteen, forty and again we just have to drive home. How photography was this collision of advancements in optics? Chemistry and the arts all coming together it just the right time with just the right individuals. Yeah, and one of the things we talked about it in the last episode is how surprising it is that this this first big breakthrough comes. Comes from Louis Daguerre. Who was not a scientist is not. He was not trained in chemistry together was a painter. He was an artist. I mean he was clearly a very clever and energetic kind. Go go-getter, but he he was not trained in chemistry. He didn't have a lot of scientific knowledge. He was kind of just bumbling around in the dark in a way, at least at first and one of the funny things about this is we know a lot about what Henry Fox. Talbot was doing because he usually took extensive notes and journals about his ideas and his projects daguerre generally did not so remember. Last time we talked about how Louis Daguerre had this brief partnership with with niece. How dare got from Nips? Is He liagbility which used? This resin wasn't really like the ultimate process of the daguerreotype to the daguerreotype. The what happened in those years in between is not fully known. We don't have accurate reliable information about what declares post. Nips partnership experiments were or like what roadmap of discoveries led to his invention, so there's kind of a mystery there there. There are stories that were reported later. One common example of one of these stories is the story about declares Magic Cabinet. Have you ever heard about this No, but it already sounds perhaps a little dramatic size you know. Very well could be apocryphal, but that's always the tendency right like the you lay out the various steps, and and minor revelations that lead to some sort of an invention or you come up with something. More sexy like I, saw a dream Yeah. Do you, tell good story. Yeah, and so the magic cabinet is one of these good stories that might not be true. Supposedly it was about how he discovered the developing process, his most his most important key insight on photography, the mercury fumes to bring out the latent image from short exposure. Supposedly what happened is that daycare had underexposed a plate, and then he put it inside a cabinet that. That he was storing some chemicals in, and then came back later and found.

Louis Daguerre Fox Talbot scientist Daguerreotypes Red Hat New Hampshire England Magic Cabinet IBM toby ball Nicholas cage Doppler Ganger John Herschel Aaron Monkey Apple Henry Fox Stevie Betty Joseph Nissan Barney Hill
"robert lamp" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

08:31 min | 2 years ago

"robert lamp" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Leadership of Red Hat. Let's unlock the world's potential. Let's put smart to work. Learn more at IBM, dot com slash Red Hat? One night in nineteen, sixty, one on the side of a dark highway, Betty and Barney Hill Kat lights in the sky two years later, the underwent hypnosis to try and recall what happened. Some took as fact. Others thought it was a fantasy, but what really happened. That's night in rural New Hampshire. Join me toby ball for the inaugural season of stranger rivals a CO production of iheartradio in grim, mild from Aaron Monkey. Listen to strange arrivals on iheartradio APP on Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome to invention a production of iheartradio. Hey Welcome to invention. My name is Robert Lamp and I'm Joe, McCormack, and today we're going to be embarking on a sort of second part of our saga photographic history. We just did several parts talking about the camera obscure, and then the invention of photography, and now we're moving on to the motion picture and I wanted to start with a question that might be a stupid question, but it's something that I often think about when I go to the movies and. And it's that when you go to the movies you sit down to see a motion picture. The basic media that you're viewing is a succession of still images that are perceived by the brain is continuous visual motion and audio that accompanies it, and so that in itself is pretty neutral. Right like that that it could show you any number of sites and sounds, but what we came to view for some reason as the motion picture. The thing you go see in. In a theater most of the time these days is something like a visual, novel or visual Short Story. It's like a story shaped thing, and then you watch it for an hour and a half or two hours, and then it's over, and obviously there are lots of exceptions to this, and if you want to expand video, I mean God I mean there's a whole pool of different kinds of content out there, but the things we think of his movies are these. These stories and I wonder why that is well. I mean there's a lot to be said about just the the importance of storytelling in human culture something. We've talked about unstoppable. Your mind recently I think that's that's a major factor. Like what do we? What do we do with our art and Art Technology? While we do human things we, we tell stories for starters but it's interesting when you go back to the earliest days of the motion picture. I feel like you get a sense back then that it wasn't always necessarily GonNa be this way. No, because some of the examples we're going to discuss in this episode. You see the more the the scientific. Direction of motion picture. The weighted motion picture can be used to to unravel what is actually going on in the world to slow it down into to better understand it. Yeah, to either present kind of a non story based visual spectacle to just kind of show you a succession of things happening or to study yet to study the world and get a closer look at it maybe to see it in a kind of slow motion that you wouldn't have seen before so you're. You're wondering if there's perhaps like an alternate reality, where say documentary is? Is the primary when you saw and says hey, you want to over to our house and watch movie You just assume documentary, and if it's a fiction film, you're like Oh. It's not a documentary. How surprising or things that might be called like art films now I mean there are a million different ways you could show somebody, a succession of still images, simulating motion and accompanying sound, and it would not like you know there's an infinite variety of things you could do there. That wouldn't be a story that some somewhat simulates the structure of a novel. Yeah or I mean. Of course there are plenty of examples of things like say live sporting events also. Present. It the the medium of essentially the moving picture. Yeah, well, maybe then this just has more to do with with our categories like the things that we end up calling movies. because as you know as we mentioned a minute ago, there's a there's an whole Internet full of video content that you wouldn't call movies, but it's something right, yeah! but you know this this does get to the heart of what we're talking about here and what we've been talking about with the evolution of photographic technology how it how we see the the technology grow advance, then spread out, and and become not merely the technology of elite individuals, but the technology of the masses, and then how bad inevitably changes everything is well exactly no one of the things that we have been talking about in our history of photography here is how the invention of. Of photography was sort of part of a quest for ever increasing realism in imagery. Right that that was something that Louis Daguerre was concerned with. He wanted to create more and more realistic paintings I, working on his panoramas in the Diorama like taking the art of painting to to new heights of realism in simulating real scenes, and of course, the next step beyond that is directionally just transferring the light reflected off of things onto a permanent record, but of course as as we were talking about fixed images. Images or also sort of a simulation, because reality is never a fixed image, right we, we see a fixed image, and it kind of implies motion right? Yeah, there's this wonderful blurring the kind of takes place in our nation. Yeah, just I. Mean just think about the ways that people had to be put in the iron maiden in order to have their portrait taken in the earliest daguerreotypes. 'cause you had a exposure of several minutes, and you couldn't move your face so so, how natural is that a representation? Representation of person so the real way to get it reality even more to get even closer to the experience of just looking at the world would be to record continuous imagery. Yeah, this. There's a particular type of of video portrait. I think probably the the number of people probably seen it utilized in the film Baraka that came out many years ago. I haven't seen it. Oh, we should. It's a fabulous La. Beautiful Cinematography Just you know scenes of life and tradition and ritual. Around the world, but if these wonderful scenes where it's just an individual staring into the camera, and and you're just kind of. Blocking is with them, and it feels a very intimate. It's essentially a emotion portrait. That is interesting. I wonder why that didn't catch on once. We had photo and video technology as the new form of portrait. You had painted portraiture than you had photo portraiture video portraiture so up on the wall. There's GRANDPA. They're just on a continuous loop of about ten minutes of looking into the camera, but that's what they have in the Harry Potter world. Here? Do, not seem to really be any stationary photographs, all photographs or these motion portrait's so their head. Yeah, they they are ahead. We don't lack the technology is just. That doesn't seem to be what people want when they're in their portraiture. All right so you as we've been discussing some of the predecessors to the motion picture are are very much the photographic technologies we've discussed before, but but that some things are not cool, really directly related to that technology, and then we also really need to discuss some key phenomena that play into the experience of motion picture viewing right, these would be neurological and brain brain phenomenon, psychological phenomena, also, and one of these phenomena has historically been referred to. To though it's problematic concept, we can discuss a little bit as persistence of vision and other relevant phenomena that I think we'll have to mention or known as Beta motion in the five phenomenon, which we will collectively call apparent movement or apparent motion. Right so as we proceed, we'll look. Can I play catchup all that? Yeah, but Let's let's start with this idea of persistence of vision. Okay, so how do we think about motion? Pictures when? When when it's really good, we often don't think about it at all, do we? Oh, yeah I. Mean that's what they say is the the best director of film is the one who creates a film where you don't notice the direction like you're not picking out technical elements. I mean unless you're really looking for.

Red Hat New Hampshire IBM Aaron Monkey Betty Louis Daguerre Barney Hill director Robert Lamp La Baraka McCormack Joe
"robert lamp" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

06:29 min | 2 years ago

"robert lamp" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"How stuff works DOT com. Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert. Lamp and I'm Joe McCormack and today. We're GONNA be having a little bit of Amphibian Talk. That's right. We're going to be chatting with Marc Ban. Deka the Executive Director of the Fabian, foundation the Amphibian Foundation is an Atlanta area based nonprofit organization, dedicated to connecting individuals, communities and organizations in order to create and implement lasting solutions to the global amphibian extinction, crisis. So it was just a great opportunity for us to reach out to a a local expert in their field to discuss the wonderful world of Amphibians, especially Salamanders Right, so we talked frogs, tadpoles, especially salamanders, death, defying winter weather adventures I think we talk some wolverine toward the end. Yeah, there will be Cannibal, more severe getting all geared up for Halloween. Don't worry. There will be some. There will be some some Halloween worthy content in this episode and just learn a great deal about emptied in biology. Just a little more INFO here before we get rolling you. If you want to check out more about and foundation, you can go to Amphibian Foundation Dot, Org you can also follow them on twitter. handle is amphibian found on instagram. It's an foundation and it's empty and found on facebook as well and mark is also on twitter himself. You can follow him Mark Mantica that's. K. NDIC so I'd say let's get right into our chat with mark. Hey mark thanks so much for coming on the show I was wondering if before we get into any questions Ram Fabian today, could you just introduce yourself to our listeners? Tell them who you are and what you do. really My name is Mark Mantica. I'm the Executive Director of the Amphibian Foundation here in Atlanta. Excellent. Will thanks for taking time out of your day to chat with us? I was already familiar with with with some of what what you guys were up to an Atlanta area through some your salamander strolls, and other educated outreach programs You know in the Atlanta area but but then I started looking into it more and learn a little bit more about the foundation I realize this was a really great fit for stuff to mind pain well actually. Can you tell us just a little bit about what you do at the foundation? Absolutely the Amphibian Foundation is a nonprofit We just had our second anniversary. And we focus on a novel conservation, research, plans for endangered species both here in the southeast, United States and globally. we also have a educational component that we use. For several reasons, one is, it's our main way to support the foundation through these programs, but we firmly believe that we need to raise the next generation of conservationists, and that's our main target through our outreach programs, getting people excited about Amphibians and excited about saving them because they're in a lot of trouble. And when you say you work on a novel, Conservation Solutions You. Give me example of what you mean by that. Does that mean like non non standard approaches to es So for example, our highest priority research program is on the frosted flatwoods Salamander, which is Significantly imperilled, there's one tiny puddle left in the state of Georgia with this species in it they're already extinct from South Carolina. Something needs to be done immediately in quickly, so we've developed. twenty artificial wetlands where we can monitor them very closely. Make sure that these salamanders have everything they need. It's the only captive colony of the species on the planet, so it's really important. That were successful We've developed these miniature ecosystems which have have never been developed before so their brand new. We're very optimistic, but that's what I mean by novel. We had to figure out something that we needed to do immediately, because the species is considered at imminent risk of extinction so it's imperative. That were successful, and we felt like this was our best shot at having them breed successfully in captivity while our partners, restore habitat so that we can have some place to release them back into the wild. so that that's kind of what I mean by novel so with that species in particular. Would you say that your main goal is to build up the populations where they can get a foothold in their environment, or would it be more of a research focused to understand what you can do to let them thrive again. We want to do research, but right now. We're really just trying to keep the species alive We're trying to figure out how to breed them which. which has never been done before so we've been charged with figuring out how to breed them in once. We've cracked that we are going to basically export this recipe to other institutions with some of our captive produced, offspring said that we can really start generating large numbers of frosted flatwoods salamanders every year in have big numbers to release back into restored habitat. Do you know what has driven them to this point to begin with? Does with habitat good idea so? frosted flatwoods salamanders are long leaf pine endemic. Pine is the coastal plain of Georgia, but that's been reduced to three percent of its historic range, so that whole habitat is almost gone. Obviously, any species that are reliant on that habitat are not doing well. To further that flatwoods, salamanders are dependent on a wildfire. That has been suppressed by large even in the remaining Longleaf, pine habitat fought. Would Salamanders need that fire? So if you suppress it or if you do controlled Burns non natural times, which is also very common. That really negatively affects the salamander, so we're trying to identify Longleaf Pine with land managers that are willing to either let wildfires through there or.

Amphibian Foundation Amphibian Foundation Dot Atlanta Mark Mantica Executive Director Longleaf Pine Georgia DOT Joe McCormack Robert Ram Fabian twitter Marc Ban facebook United States K. NDIC South Carolina twitter.
"robert lamp" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

11:41 min | 3 years ago

"robert lamp" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Hey welcome to invention my name is robert lamp and i'm joe mccormack i have to admit that i love chopsticks and kind of embarrassing and naive way like one of my favorite things about about eating several different kinds of asian food is using chopsticks to eat them i love like chinese noodles with chopsticks i love eating sushi with chopsticks though sometimes i just eat sushi with my hands as as you often do yeah but i love using chopsticks i love it almost as much as i love the food itself but i have found very strangely that i have a psychological block against using chopsticks on ethnic cuisines with which they do not originally a pair so i love using chopsticks and i want any excuse to use them but i've tried to eat spaghetti with them with leggings tornado basil sauce and it does not work it is psychologically revolting but this is ridiculous when you start getting into the deeper history of any nation's cuisine where do you think those those noodles spaghetti and italian spaghetti came from that's a good point came from the east they they came from the land of chopsticks and of course one of the things we're going to get into in this episode is that you know there was a time before widespread chopstick usage in asia there was a time before widespread noodle and dumpling consumption in asia and it's all part of the history of how we eat our food and what we eat right so today's episode is going to be about chopstick technology right so everyone i think is familiar with chopsticks we don't have to really explain these too much but it does allow an amazing amount of precision i remember at an early age i was really impressed by chopsticks in part because you know we would go to little chinese restaurants in the in the states and when my family was living in canada one of my father's co workers Was a Chinese Canadian physician and he would use chopsticks and he would let us use chopsticks, and there was a story he told when he was a child. If you missed behaved his mother would dump a small bowl of uncooked rice out under the table. Give him a pair of chopsticks. And then he would have to move each grain of rice with the chopsticks a back into the bowl, that is amazing because that sounds like a punishment straight out of a fairytale. Doesn't it? that that's like a that's like a cinderella type punishment but chopsticks they are exactly the tool you would want to use to to carry out this task i mean they they're just so precise they even beat a human fingers in many instances if not in precision than at least intact right because it allows you to too much of our our our use of utensils it's about how do you eat the food effectively but also in a way that doesn't insult the people that you're eating with likewise if you're eating hot food which is been popular in human culture it it it it moves you to be able to handle that food without burning your fingers and chopsticks allow you to do that yeah one thing is certain no when i'm using chopsticks and think about i mean just always impressing these are great and i do feel that temptation to want to use them on other foods and really about the only foods that i when i think about it they don't make sense for so much our foods that require a great deal of cutting and carving you know as i'm thinking like if you're eating a steak you would need a knife now i guess you could you could use a knife and shot sticks and that would that would work but for the most part chopsticks are going to are going to get you there with just about any food you know when you mentioned paring knife with chopsticks there at least once was a product called fork and knife chopsticks this there's like a a promo obnoxious comedy promo video that used to go around the internet actually it was a video where hilarity ensues win some caucasian gentlemen is trying to eat something with chopsticks he just keeps dropping it all over himself and other muslim there's got to be a better way and the better way is that the other side of these chopsticks are four kind of knife so you can flip them around see it i i bet you meant that you're using them like chopsticks but then it has a tiny tiny knife on the end flip them around okay no yeah so it stick party in front four connive business and back and actually they would like they would sorta hook together to make hinged chopsticks which are not exactly traditional chopsticks okay well that's not the worst invention i suppose no the the promo videos really obnoxious but the invention is fine though it looks like it's been discontinued or at least from the original seller as far as i could tell chopsticks themselves however of course are still very much in production they have not been discontinued there's no sign of chopsticks going away anytime soon in fact i think i read about a problem with billions of disposable chopsticks being used every year if anything the the big take home is if you like using chopsticks if you find yourself regularly using chopsticks invest in a in a set of chopsticks mobile set that you can carry around and use it home and cut down on the on the disposable chopsticks now where did chopsticks come from well they came from china and And is is we were talking about with our researcher for this program. Scott benjamin. they propped up prior to twelve hundred b._c. though some sources say they've been around for nearly nine thousand years but this is this is cooking utensils away of moving ingredients around and hot walked for instance but it when it comes to the use of chopsticks at the dinner table or as a means of bringing through to your mouth sometimes you see it stated that we're really looking at more four hundred see as kind of a rough very rough time stamp for when it really began to become more popular and begin to spread culturally the idea that these are utensils that should be used to consume food as well now is we'll get into this this is not a very not super firm time stamp it's not like you will not find people eating with chopsticks before that point but this seems to be where the levy really breaks on the idea people do like like to come up with origin stories for things so even when there isn't a clear origin story well that's often part of the fun right is that there's not a there's not an actual inventor but there's a mythic character that had some sort of role in the invention some sort of cultural hero who stole fire from the gods etcetera exactly so we were both looking at a book robert i think you actually read the whole book to yeah it's it's a short read actually something like two hundred and something pages it's book by hugh edward wang that is called chopsticks a cultural and culinary history published in two thousand fifteen from cambridge university press and wine points out that a common chinese legend tells the story of how chopsticks were first invented by dr you founder of the shot dynasty which ruled from twenty one hundred to sixteen hundred b._c. and i've poked around for a couple of versions of this legend basically the story goes like this die you was the figure credited with fight getting the great flood of chinese history and mythology by the use of dredging in the riverbeds and construction of irrigation canals to divert water flow a robber you've talked about the chinese great flood legends on podcast before yeah and you definitely comes up in that episode and because he's a he's a true cultural hero in chinese mythology and the if i'm remembering correctly the the knowledge to to to overcome the flood was was actually stolen or obtained from the gods i think by us father and then you himself is the one who really brings it to the people i think that's correct but so you eventually succeeds in defeating the great flood and this made him emperor and founder of the shadow minister but there are lots of stories and legends about how much he sacrificed personally and how tirelessly he worked on this project to to defeat the floodwaters and one of these legends is the die you had one point heads some sizzling and a walk but he was in such a hurry to fight the flood that he couldn't sit there and wait for the meat to cool down enough to handle an eat so he got a pair of twigs and he used them to pick up the hot pieces of meat and hurry along as meals so we get back to work but clearly this is just a legend but it's still there it does it will straight like the basic clever idea that the novelty of using just some twigs and sticks but using them using found objects but us them in an inventive way that changes the way you do things and this is this is likely exactly how chopsticks emerged in just the the darkness of prehistory is the use of found twigs maybe the tweets within manipulated in some fashion but for the most part just a couple of found sticks that are used to manipulate food inside of a cooking pot or also the use of fire sticks which would just be chopsticks that are used for moving the burning wood or coal around now one thing that i think is interesting about chopsticks that is different from the use of say a fork or knife or even i mean sort of like a spoon but also somewhat different from a spoon is that chopsticks in a way function sort of like extensions of the fingers yeah you know they do a similar pinching action that you can do with your thumb and index finger but they you know they extend the fingers farther they can handle hot stuff without getting greece on the fingers and all that they can reach into soup and pull out noodles they they can do all that kind of stuff but they in a way feel like a more natural extension of the pinching grasping action of the skeleton itself they feel like more like they emerge out of the scheme of the human body than say a knife which you know you don't have a knife in you don't have any sharp fingers you don't have four really there's no stabbing sharp tines on your hand and there's just nothing analogous to a knife and a fork on your body this makes me realize that in gra- granted i i definitely use for can knife more than i use chopsticks and i am not by any means you know a an expert practitioner with chopsticks but i do feel like i am far more likely to bumble and drop fork knife or spoon than i am to bumble and drop my chopsticks like the chopsticks to your point are just more an extension of your body when you're using them now obviously if you're looking for ancient artifacts ancient evidence of chopsticks just standard twigs aren't gonna stick around very well right so you'd you'd be looking probably for chopsticks or indications that chopsticks were made out of other materials right so for instance you will find bronze chopsticks or what are believed to be chopsticks in the tombs of the of the ruins of yin.

asia joe mccormack canada Scott benjamin. nine thousand years
"robert lamp" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"robert lamp" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Happy face production of house, two forks executive producers Melissa more Lauren bright, Pacheco guess ticket, or, and we'll Pearson supervising producers Noah Brown. Music by Clare Campbell, page Campbell and hope for a golden summer story, editors Matt riddle audio editing by Chandler maze, and Noah Brown assistant editor is Taylor. Chicago special thanks to fill Stanford, the publishers of the Oregonian newspaper in the Carlisle, family. Discover your next favorite podcast from over twenty five thousand available to you right now all free by downloading the heart radio app. Hey, welcome to in venture. My name is Robert lamp, and I'm Joe McCormick. Have you ever had the misfortune of going to.

"robert lamp" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

11:49 min | 3 years ago

"robert lamp" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Invention. My name is Robert lamp. And I'm Joe McCormick. I have to admit that I love chopsticks and kind of embarrassing and naive way. Like one of my favorite things about about eating several different kinds of Asian food is using chopsticks to eat them. I love like Chinese noodles with chopsticks eating sushi with chopsticks. Sometimes I just sushi with my hands as, as you often do. Yeah but I love using chopsticks. I love it almost as much as I love the food itself. But I have found very strangely that I have a psychological block against using chopsticks on ethnic cuisines with which they do not originally pair. So I love using chopsticks. I want any excuse to use them, but I've tried to eat spaghetti with them with tomato basil sauce. And it does not work. It is psychologically revolting, but this is ridiculous. When you start getting into the, the deeper history of, of any nation's Zine where do you think those those noodles? To get in Italian spaghetti came from. That's a good point came from the east. They, they came from the land of chopsticks. And of course, when get into get into in this episode is that there was a time before widespread chopstick usage in Asia. There was a time before, widespread noodle and dumpling consumption in Asia. And it's all part of the history of, of how we eat our food in what we eat. Right. So today's episode is going to be about chopstick technology. Right. So everyone, I think is familiar with we don't have to really explain these, too much, but it does allow an amazing amount of precision. I remember at an early age. I was really impressed by chopsticks, impart, because we would go to little little tiny restaurants in the states. And when my family was living in Canada. One of my father's co workers was a Chinese Canadian physician, and he would use chopsticks. He would let us. And there was a story, he told when he was a child, if you if you misbehaved his mother would dump a small bowl of uncooked rice out under the table. Give him a pair of chopsticks. And then he would have to move each grain of rice with chopsticks back into the bowl, that is amazing because that sounds like a punishment straight out of a fairytale. Doesn't it? That that's like a that's like a Cinderella type punishment. But chopsticks. They are exactly the tool, you would want to use to, to carry out this task. I mean they they're just so precise. They even beat human fingers in many instances, if not in precision than at least intact. Right. Because it allows you to our, our, our use of utensils. It's about how do you eat the food effectively? But also in a way that doesn't in Seoul, the people that you're eating with likewise. If you're eating hot food, which has been popular in human culture. It, it, it hooves, you to be able to handle that food without burning, your fingers and chopsticks allow you to do that. One thing is certain. When I'm using chopsticks think about, I'm just always impressing, with these are great. And I do feel that temptation to want to use them on other foods and really about the only foods that I when I think about it. They don't make sense, for so much our foods that require a great deal of cutting and carving. Thinking, like if you're eating a steak, you would need a knife. Now, I guess you could you could use a knife and chopsticks, and that would that would work. But for the most part, chopsticks are going to are going to get you there with just about any food. You know, when you mentioned paring knife, with chopsticks there, at least once was a product called four can knife chopsticks. There's like a promo obnoxious comedy. Promo video that used to go around the internet. Actually, it was a video where hilarity ensues win some Caucasian gentlemen, is trying to eat something with chopsticks. Hey, just keeps drop it all over himself. And. Oh, they're Muslims. Got to be a better way. And the better way is that the other side of these chopsticks are four kind of. Nice so you can flip them around. And I, I bet you that you're using them like chopsticks, but then it has a tiny tiny knife on the end, flip them around. Okay. No. You so it stick party in front, four connive business in back, and actually they would like they would sorta hook together to make hinged chopsticks, which are not exactly traditional chopsticks. Okay. Well, that's not the worst invention. I suppose, no, the, the promo videos really obnoxious. But the invention is fine though it looks like it's been discontinued or at least from the original seller as far as I could tell chopsticks themselves. However, of course are still very much production. They have not been discontinued. There's no sign of chopsticks going away anytime soon. In fact, I think I read about a problem with billions of disposable chopsticks being used every year. Anything? The, the big take home is if you like using chopsticks if you find yourself regularly using chopsticks invest in a in a set of chopsticks, a mobile set that you can carry around and use it home and cut down on the on the disposable chopsticks now where did chopsticks come from. Well, they came from China. And as as we were talking about with our, our researcher for this program Scott Benjamin. They popped up prior to twelve hundred BC though. Some sources say they've been around for nearly nine thousand years. But this is this is cooking utensils away of moving ingredients around in hot walk for instance, but it when it comes to the use of chopsticks at the dinner table or as a means of bringing food to your mouth. Sometimes you see it stated that we're really looking at more four hundred see as a as a kind of a rough very rough time stamp for when it really began to become more popular and begin to spread culturally, the idea that these are utensils that should be used to consume food as well. Now is we'll get into this. This is not a very is not a super firm time stamp. It's not like you will not find people eating with chopsticks before that point. But this seems to be where the Levy really breaks on the idea people do lie. To come up with origin stories for things. So even when there isn't a clear origin story. Well, that's often part of the fun. Right. Is that there's not a there's not an actual inventor, but there's a mythic character. That had some sort of role in the invention, some sort of cultural hero, who stole fire from the gods. It cetera. Exactly. So we were looking at a book, Robert. I think you actually read the whole book. Yeah. Yeah. It's a short read, actually something like two hundred something pages, it's book by Q Edward Wang. That is called chopsticks cultural and culinary history polish in two thousand fifteen from Cambridge University press and wine points out that a common Chinese legend, tells the story of how chopsticks were first invented by Dr you founder of the shot dynasty, which ruled from twenty one hundred to sixteen hundred BC and poked, around for a couple of versions of this legend, basically, the story goes like this Donohue was the figure credited with fighting the great flood of Chinese history, and mythology by the use of dredging in the riverbeds, and construction of irrigation canals to divert water flow. A robber, you've talked about the Chinese, great flood legends on podcast before, and you definitely comes up, and that at this owed, and because he's a he's a true cultural hero in Chinese mythology and the. If I'm remembering correctly, the, the knowledge to, to, to overcome the flood was was actually stolen or obtained from the gods. By use father in the new himself is the one who really brings it to the people. I think that's correct. But so you eventually succeeds in defeating the great flood, and this made him emperor, and founder of the Xiao dynasty. But there are lots of stories and legends about how much sacrifice personally and how tirelessly he worked on this project to, to defeat the floodwaters and one of these legends. Is that Dr you had one point had some meat sizzling and walk? But he was in such a hurry to fight the flood that he couldn't sit there and wait for the meat to cool down enough to handle an eat. So he got a pair of twigs and he used them to pick up the hot pieces of meat and hurry, along meal. So we get back to work, but clearly this is just a legend, but still there, it does illustrate the basic clever idea that the novelty of using just some twigs sticks, but using them using found objects but us. Them in an inventive way that changes the way you do things. And this is this is likely exactly how chopsticks emerged in just the, the darkness of prehistory is the use of found twigs, maybe the Twix manipulated in some fashion, but for the most part, just a couple of found sticks that are used to manipulate food inside of a cooking pot. Or also, the use of fire sticks, which would just be. Chopsticks that are used for moving the burning wood or coal around now, one thing that I think is interesting about chopsticks, that is different from the use of say a fork, or knife, or even I mean, sort of like a spoon, but also somewhat different from a spoon. Is that chopsticks in a way function, sort of like extensions of the fingers? Yeah. You know, they do a similar pinching action that you can do with your thumb and index finger, but they, you know, they extend the fingers farther, they can handle hot stuff without getting Greece on the fingers, all that they can reach into soup and pull out noodles, they, they can do all that kind of stuff, but they in a way feel like a more natural extension of the pinching grasping action of the skeleton itself feel like more like they emerge out of the scheme of the human body than say knife, which, you know, you don't have a knife in you don't have any sharp fingers. You don't have a fork, really. There's no stabbing sharp tines on your hand. There's just nothing. Analogous to a knife and a four on your body. This makes me realize that in gra- granted, I, I definitely use for connive more than I use chopsticks. And I'm not by any means a, you know, a an expert practitioner with chopsticks but I do feel like I am far more likely to bumble and drop fork knife, or spoon than I am to bumble drop my chopsticks the chopsticks to your point are just more an extension of your body when you're using them. Now, obviously, if you're looking for ancient artifacts, ancient evidence of chopsticks, just standard twigs aren't gonna stick around very well. Right. So you'd be looking probably for chopsticks or indications chopsticks were made out of other materials. Right. So, for instance, you will find like bronze chopsticks or what are believed to be chopsticks in the tombs of the of the ruins of yin in. Enhanced province in central China because essentially what we're talking about here is a Neolithic invention. Like you say, the, the twigs are not going to stick around..

Robert lamp China Asia founder Joe McCormick Seoul Canada Greece Edward Wang Cambridge University BC researcher Scott Benjamin Donohue nine thousand years
"robert lamp" Discussed on Invention

Invention

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"robert lamp" Discussed on Invention

"Hey, welcome to invention. My name's Robert lamp, and I'm Joe McCormack, Robert were you in a band when you were in school, not not like not like a rock band. I mean, like a school van school band is the only thing was in. Yeah. I played trumpet for a while that I played French horn. And I played just a little more trumpet. And that was it. Did you ever get good at your instruments? No, no, not really same here. Yeah. I I played trumpet when I was in school. And I was like I I think I was probably a source of great amusement for like my band, teachers and stuff they'd probably play. My tapes at home for their friends at parties. I I was probably much in the same territory. I we'll say the toward towards the very end. I was ended up being like a like the school jazz band. I guess it was I don't know we play different types of music. We played Chicago and stuff, and that was pretty fun like for just a brief period of time. I saw the potential of playing music playing an instrument and enjoying it at the same time. It wasn't later until I picked up the guitar that I realized the thing about music is you don't have to be really good at your instrument to have fun playing, but you have to be good enough to play to have fun playing. And I think when I played trumpet. I never got there. I never even got to where I could really do it. But anyway, when I was in school bands. I remember being there with the kids in the room who played saxophone, and they'd have to, you know, like learn all the fingerings and mess with the reads and everything and I remember thinking looking at these instruments. With you know, my my Trump three vowel buttons on it and keys, whatever you call in the sex had so many had all these like lumps, and wires and keys and stuff. And I thought how could you ever learn all that? And how why why would you put this like brass alien parasite up against your body? It's so lumpy at the same time though. I always thought the saxophone clarinet various other woodwinds, they they looked more organic, especially the saxophone really because he has this. It's like it's coiling like some sort of a beast. And and it makes sense that you would utilize all of your fingers in playing an instrument as opposed to our use of the trumpet where you're just using the the three or in the case of the French horn, you have one hand sort sorta shoved up there for good measure that is right. You put. Yeah. So when you played French horn, what is that for what happens if you take your hand out of the whole, well, it helps you support the horn. But also, you can sort of shape the sound a little bit with it. Oh, I see. But of course, my view of the. Exa phone changed greatly. When I grew up, and I think that largely had to do with me learning to appreciate jazz like that. I'd never really listened to jazz when I was a little kid, and, you know, once I heard actual jazz music, or you know, the stuff from the middle of the twentieth century, then the saxophone kind of made sense to me. I agree went once you hear somebody that is a true master the saxophone as with any musical instrument. You you you see what the deal is? He see why you hear why it exists. You know, why it exists? Why it was invented you know, what what sort of hole it's filling in the human experience. Well at the same time. There's nothing like hearing a terrible saxophone or. There's also the saxophone I feel can be a difficult instrument. If it's a playing in a John Rao that you have a little exposure to for instance, the the more the spacier more chaotic versions of jazz. I know recently you and I were on a work trip and we had early morning lift ride to the airport and the the lift ri- driver was playing some very free form jazz. And it's it's not something that like, I I am climatize to right..

Robert lamp John Rao Chicago Joe McCormack ri one hand
"robert lamp" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

03:04 min | 3 years ago

"robert lamp" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"And then he's remembered the Simpsons when mill house said his dad was put a pretty big wheel down at the cracker factory. And then he said so pretty solid joke. But. Is not true. And then just a fun tweet. I like from Brit at its Berle's tweeted hits blunt hits back me one. Yeah. Be careful. You can find us on Twitter at Daly's guys for at the daily zeitgeist on Instagram. We have fiscal champaged in a website dailies like dot com or post our episodes and our foot note link off to the information that we talked about today's episode as well as the song we right out on miles. What's on our we read this is tracked by Jumanji J, O M A N J. I not the actual the version that's happy and this song's called chasing Ryan's featuring Sarah. Get into that. Low fi action was you'll like it essential pharmacy. How long can keep beco-. I confide Lucy very quickly. When I begin a sentence without knowing house. All right. We're gonna ride out on that. He will be back on Tuesday. We are taking Monday off for Martin Luther King day. Yes, sir. Sorry won't be there Monday. But we will be back Tuesday. Yes. Yes. The holidays, and we will see some of you this Saturday up in San Francisco, kqei you're having a great weekend. But also, please safe come hang out for very lonely. We're stand up late Saturday. I'm hanging. Doc what else? All right, guys, talk to you. Meaning all. You know, people say necessity is the mother of invention. But that's not always true. Sometimes the mother of invention is advertising. Yeah. Or pure accident. How about ego maniacal delusion? Absolutely. Or just a desperate longing. To be cool. I'm Robert lamp, and I'm Joe McCormick. We're the host of the science podcasts stuff to blow your mind. And now we're branching off into the exploration of invention. Invention is the story of human history told one piece of technology at a time the things we made and how they made us invention publishes every Monday, listen and subscribe to invention on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you find your podcasts..

Ryan Berle Martin Luther King Jumanji J Twitter Lucy San Francisco Robert lamp Joe McCormick Daly apple Sarah mill
"robert lamp" Discussed on Invention

Invention

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"robert lamp" Discussed on Invention

"Welcome to invention. Mine is Robert lamp, and I'm Joe McCormick. And today we are going to be talking about death rays now on this show. We we've talked about a lot of very real in some cases, very mundane yet interesting inventions things like chopsticks or less Monday and things like the x Ray machine. But today we wanted to talk about a an invention that sort of existing throughout its entire lifetime at the crossroads of myth and legend and reality. Yeah. This is a curious one. This is this is a perhaps our first topic where we cannot point at the thing and say here it is. Here's the here's the invention. Let us explore its history. Now, we all know today. I mean, we are at a point where maybe we do risk the topic becoming somewhat mundane because everybody knows about lasers now. You know, this is the twenty first century laser research is going on all the time. Yeah. I mean insert as we'll explore a little bit. There have been large scale military projects that have looked at the use of of a particle beam and laser technology to to inflict damage to the, but we have not reached the point of the the classic SCI death. Ray we haven't reached the point where a a beam based weapon is targeting a city or shooting a, you know, an airplane out of the sky, or being, you know, used in Bank robberies by high-tech bandits that sort of thing at least on a large scale me some very good reasons for that not just that like we don't have the technology to do it. But maybe because you know, they're easier ways to accomplish the same goal, right? But yeah. So we're going to be talking about death rays, and this turned out, I think to be a much more interesting and culturally relevant topic than I would've expected because I wanna start a positing something essentially that what people have in mind when they talk about..

Robert lamp Ray Joe McCormick