34 Burst results for "Robert Lamb"

"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

06:17 min | 8 months ago

"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"My name is Robert Lamb, and I'm Joe McCormick and often on the invention podcast. We explore inventions in the realm of getting food into your body. That's right. And this is the perfect month to discuss some food technology right? Because it's it's November. Where in the United States, we celebrate Thanksgiving, which is, of course, the time when you were thankful for your food, ideally, but also you engage in some, uh gladness or semi gluttonous behavior to celebrate, said food. You're thankful for the elasticity of your stomach lining, right? I should go deeper than I mean, Ultimately, it is a you see this in various cultures, right? It is the it is the final big feast before winter truly sets in. And threatens your survival. Yeah, the end of Harvest feast. Yeah, of course. But, you know, so one of the over arching stories we often tell about the correlation between technology and and the timeline of human history has to do with nutrition. Of course, like To sustain the civilization in which most people don't spend the vast majority of their time on food. Procurement and production. Need a lot of specialized knowledge and a lot of technological leverage, which humans did acquire in stages over the past 10,000 years or so, largely in the form of agricultural innovations. How to farm how to get bigger crop yields How to grow better food products it etcetera. But when you think about the problem of how to feed the humans of the world, there's a whole second part of the equation that has nothing to do with the initial production of the food products we eat because there is this vast terrain of obstacles and challenges. Between the moment an egg is laid or the moment of potato is harvested, or the moment a cow is milked. And the moment that that final food product is eaten by a human. In fact, you might be shocked to discover how much perfectly good food is produced on Planet Earth, only to never be eaten by anyone. I'm embracing myself because this stuff always makes best skin crawl to hear. Yeah, it's uh, it's it's shocking, actually. So, according to the U. N, Food and Agricultural organization It's estimated that roughly 30%, or about one third of the food produced by humans on earth every year is wasted. By major food category That's about 40 to 50% of root crops, fruits and vegetables about 20% of oilseeds, meat and dairy products about 35% of fish are lost or wasted annually, and that's that's now that's like with 21st century technology for preservation, cold storage, mechanized transport and all that. You know this? This lines up nicely with the recent discussion we had on our other podcast stuff to blow your mind about rats. Yeah, and how rats thrive on disruption and how they have they have done amazingly well living in the shadow of human civilization. And this This is one of the reasons exactly Now that waste occurs at all kinds of stages throughout the chain of supplying food in more developed countries. A lot of times there is less waste. A lot of the waste takes place at the consumer side, including like the leftovers on your plate that you scrape off into the trash waste produced during the food preparation process in the kitchen, like peeling off totally edible bits of food, cutting off crusts, etcetera. Um and then also just the idea like less than perfect produce that sits on bought at the market because of aesthetic defects. Yeah, Speaking of if I remember correctly, there is like a box service you can get now where you're suggest the ugly vegetables. Oh, yeah. Like someone said, Hey, we're throwing all these ugly vegetables away. We should be selling these two hipsters inflated price. That's a great idea. I think it's great to Yeah, Safe to eat doesn't look good. Sure, Bring it on. I prefer funny looking carrots myself more. They look like like pants. The better. I like it, too. Now in the developing world. More food loss occurs actually earlier in the supply chain, mostly due to a lack of infrastructure for storing and transporting food products in a way that preserves their quality. So like a huge part of this food loss is due to spoilage. Food going bad, and much of the spoilage occurs early in the supply chain because Food rots and containers. Well, it's waiting to be shipped to market or spoils in the sun on the back of an UN refrigerated truck on the way to a storage facility. Um, food spoilage is, of course, a double problem because on one end, you might say the more minor end. Of course, it's easy, huge problem worldwide. It wastes valuable food resources that could If the distribution channels were working efficiently get to the people who need them, especially to hungry people. But on the other end, Of course, if food spoiled by microorganisms eat is eaten, it can potentially make you sick or kill you. And these are not new problems. So today we're going to be talking about an invention that played a major role. In the history of this food supply chain and in preventing some of this food waste along the distribution chain from you know food production to eating the food and that invention is canning the process of preserving foods by heating them in a hermetically sealed container. I have to say, I always enjoy discussing hermetically sealed anything. Because it will always brings to mind like this phantom of, uh, of of like an like alchemy and an actual hermit. Oh, I love it. Yeah, Yeah, because of course, her hermetically sealed in this context means airtight sealed air cannot penetrate. But of course, it has the other connotation of like, hermetic philosophy. Her mother religion. Alright, well before we get to the canning, though, We're going to do what we normally do. We're going to talk about what came before. What came before this technology, this food technology of canning and there was a lot that came before. Uh, if you if you wanted to preserve food in the ancient world You had to turn to four different sources sort of four different powers. This, according to Brian Fagan, author of the Excellent 70 Great Inventions of the Ancient World. Hey, classifies them as snow. I smoke and wind and so let's start with the snow and the ice.

Brian Fagan Joe McCormick Robert Lamb United States 21st century Excellent 70 Great Inventions today November 30% Harvest feast U. N, Food and Agricultural about 20% Planet Earth earth two about 35% Thanksgiving 50% second part double problem
"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

06:00 min | 8 months ago

"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"My name is Robert Lamb. And I'm Joe McCormick. And today we're gonna be talking about onside now, Rob, I hope you don't mind if I share a bit of trivia about you with the listeners. I don't know if you're Made clear on this show before. But you are a very caring plant keeper. You for a long time at work had a wonderful little flower on your desk and often, like fear out of town. You would ask me to drop an ice cube on it, which I think I always remembered to do whenever you asked me. Um, but but, yeah, I appreciate that. The Karen tenderness you show for the plant kingdom. Well, I appreciate that show. I guess You could also say, I just I managed not to kill an orchid that that I was charged with, Um, it was my my father in law's orchid. And yes, So I lived on my desk at work there, and it would have an ice cube every now and then to keep it hydrated. And I would ask you or sometimes, uh, Uh, Scott, who sat next to me to do it? Um And, uh, yeah, I managed not to kill it. And there is something kind of satisfying about having this kind of like long term relationship with the plant. This this nurturing, you know, even if it's very slight, nurturing and not like, you know, not a real high maintenance plant. You know, it seems like a pretty sturdy species that I had growing there. And now it's growing in my bathroom. Uh, since I'm not an office anymore, But, yeah, it is very, very satisfying to be involved in a nurturing relationship with the plant like that, Just as it is so frustrating and potentially depressing to have the opposite relation relationship with the plan. You know, I think we've all had that as well. We're like, Oh, my gosh, I cannot keep this thing alive. This plant just wants to die, or I am just horrible at it. Well, so I'm excited to talk about bonsai today. I have never myself taking care of a bonsai tree. I have. I have tried to. I guess I don't know if this was this would count. I have tried to take care of a sort of potted tree of sorts. I don't know if it actually count as bonsai. But I failed. I just killed it, and that's why I'm partially envious. Of the dedicated in regular care that you always show Dear Orchid. Well, I would say that, you know, whatever. However, you classify that care. Bonzai is certainly on an on an entirely different level. It is up on the top of the mountain. We're talking about the pinnacle of of caring for a plant and, uh, yeah, this is this was one. This is an episode I've wanted to do for a while. I think my experience with bonds I have never owned banzai or cared for bonsai. But my experience with them is probably similar to a lot of people's out there. My first exposure was almost certainly watching the karate kid as a child and saying that Oh, Mr Miyagi has has bonsai plants Those are need And then maybe I don't know. Maybe they popped up on a reading rainbow or something. At some point. I don't recall, but then much much later, uh, I was traveling and I was visiting believe one place in San Francisco and another place in San Diego, where I got to see a multitude of bonsai plants with identification information as well as a judge, and it was just really amazing to behold these things these These ancient trees that that you feel should be gigantic, but they are in miniature and they are alive and they are just meticulously cared for it and crafted and Yeah, there's this. There's this kind of magical aura to them. And this and this age, this kind of condensed age, you know. Um, so they're really special to just behold. And then when you read a little bit about caring for them, Yeah, it also that just adds to your level of appreciation when you read about the culture involved in it, And so, Yeah, I wanted to do an episode on this for a while and then I'd kind of forgotten about it. I think we pitched it as part of a deal with A Japanese automobile company that was advertised for this, okay? And and then that didn't happen. I forgot about it. But then I ended up watching Cobra Kai on Netflix, which also has the bonzai trees in it. And and I was reminded. Oh, yeah, we we should do a bonzai episode You got bonzai bouncing around in the brain. Okay, so maybe you can answer a question that I'm sure a lot of people are wondering. What is it? What makes the strict definition of a bonsai tree? What makes a bonsai tree different than any potted plant? Well, um, based on my understanding of it, I would say that the big thing to do is you sort of have to back up and think about it, not just as caring for a tree and growing for a tree and nurturing a tree. But it's also just it's also steeped in just like the basics of art and design, you know, because aren't a design very often sit around the manipulation of the natural world or natural resources into some form that is aesthetically pleasing. And perhaps even philosophic or theologically engaging as well. You know, we take stone and we craft into the likeness of human or some sort of humanoid figure of myth or legend. Trees are cut down and human and then the raw material is carved in all manner of forms and functions. But as for the control of living plants that brings us of course to agriculture and cultivation. Um and inhuman works are pretty grand in this room as well. I mean, you look at what we have done for generations and generations with agricultural cultivation, but the bond Japanese bonsai tree It is the pinnacle of plant cultivation. And and I think that Brad Dunning described this exceptionally well for the New York Times back in 2000 and two they wrote quote. But it's more than just an issue of control, simple for it simply for the sake of control. As nature spins wildly downward, there is an example of man controlling, conquering, nurturing and respecting nature on an extremely, uh, river reverential level by constantly thwarting the growth of new saplings, the bonzai Gardner through pinching, cutting and splitting new growth. Forces the trees branches to strain in any direction to succeed With additional help from restraining.

Joe McCormick Robert Lamb Brad Dunning San Francisco San Diego Scott Rob 2000 Netflix Miyagi two New York Times today Bonzai first exposure Cobra Kai Japanese one place karate Karen
"robert lamb" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:22 min | 10 months ago

"robert lamb" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Welcome to blow your mind. Production of iheartradio. Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is robert lamb. And i'm joe mccormack and in today's episode. We are going to be focusing on a topic..

robert lamb joe mccormack
The Interior World

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

05:06 min | 1 year ago

The Interior World

"Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb, and I'm Joe. McCormick, and today we're going to be taking a look at interior space. Get Era Two thousand twenty brings to mind the old curse. May You live in interesting times and one of the factors here has, of course, been the corona virus cove in nineteen pandemic and in an effort to fight the spread of the illness, save lives and prevent overwhelming are hospitals. We've made a lot of changes to our lives and these range from the simple such as just wearing a mask when you're out in public and you can't so full. Distance from people to the harder choices about employment, and in life choices, we've all been social distancing and stay at home orders teleworking in quarantine have meant that we've all been spending a lot more time at home. Now depending on your home, this could mean a lot of things, but we want to explore what this means from a biological standpoint for the most part here. Now, make no mistake spending more time at home has absolutely been the right move. But just as it's forced you to focus more on, say that weird stain on your ceiling we wanted to focus on the other often unseen aspects of life in home right much the same way that being say on a Spanish galleon out in the middle of the ocean might have made you pay much more attention to the biology and behavior of of ship rats than you ever would have otherwise I. Think being at home more and more is forcing all of us to Turner is and maybe our microscopes and magnifying glasses to the corners and the cornices and the showerheads and the drain traps and all of the wonderful places in our house where life dwells. we're going to really get into the difference really between the natural world outside of our homes in the unnatural world inside and getting into some ideas about how how we could perhaps enable our interior world to be a little more on the natural side of things. But. Before we get into all that, I wanted to take a moment here to discuss the history of houses in general, you know just to get into the concept of what a house is. Our first and most important interior artificial environment. So you can certainly look at a home as an artificial cave to a certain extent indeed, we have lots of early evidence that early hominids sought out shelter in caves in the same way that many other animals do these can shelter one against the elements and against predators and as recently as one hundred, thirty thousand years ago cave-dwellers were already augmenting these natural interior environments with things like rough stone walls using timbers so So you know, even one, hundred, thirty, thousand years ago we were taking naturally occurring interior spaces and. A little less natural. And of course, on top of just the shelter caves can provide. It also seems that caves had a strong sacred meaning too many of these prehistoric peoples those might be important, but ultimately, proximity to water is far more important thus as Kate Spin Brian fagin point out in. In the section of the seventy grade inventions of the ancient world about homes, most early hominids lived out in the open near streams and lakes built temporary structures, and most of this has been lost a time. But some of the earliest evidence of potential structures for homes goes back a one point seven, two point seven, million years ago with Homo Erectus sites in southern Africa, and these were potentially contemporary with the domestication of fire. The have been temporary tents, but they still would have been artificial interior environments. Now, more secure evidence comes from the Ukraine roughly forty four thousand years ago the the mammoth bone structures from mullet ova with recently see us on the show actually yeah we did talknet these that would have been structures in one of the northernmost habitable regions of the earth the time because this was during a time of glacial. Advance where the polar ice caps from the north were coming deep down into Europe and Asia, and and so this would have been far far north way up among the ice and for some reason, humans were building these structures out of the bones of mammoth and we don't know that there are still things. We don't know about those structures like how how consistently they were inhabited and for how long and so forth. Right? Now beyond this, the history of human homes is is largely dictated by local resources and local climate. Long process of trial and error ends up leading to the development of regional and cultural building forums construction methods. Before nine thousand B C e we see evidence of clay houses and Palestine what is today Palestine and before seven thousand BC we see rectangular dwellings in Anatolia. But but a home is far more than just a shelter. As the authors here point out houses became key to social structure as well.

Robert Lamb Palestine Kate Spin Brian Fagin Mccormick Africa Turner Ukraine Anatolia Europe Asia
Ice Like Stone

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

03:28 min | 1 year ago

Ice Like Stone

"Welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb, and I'm Joe McCormick and we're going to be talking about materials today but this is a really fun materials episode that will shatter like glass in our hands or will it I? Guess. It's a big question mark. Yeah we'RE GONNA be talking a lot about ice, but a lot of exciting stuff about is you're gonNA learn some new things about ice I think and you're also going to think A bit more deeply about what can be done and also. Perhaps cannot or should not be done with ice. So if you've read any of George are Martin's a song of ice and fire. If you've read that saga or if you've viewed the TV adaptation, a game of thrones, you're well acquainted with the wall but to reacquaint everybody, this is a fantasy world that's day stunt sort of a medieval European model, and in the far north, you have this massive three, hundred mile long seven, hundred foot tall wall of ice that we're told has stood there for eight thousand years is a barrier against the peoples and the supernatural horrors of the far north. Yeah. It's basically. HADRIAN's wall except much bigger and made of magic. Yes. Yeah. We're told it was built by brandon the builder with the aid of giants and the magical children of the forest were definitely to understand that there is actual magic in its construction. But also there's this idea that brandon was a master engineer that he's in the vein of these various engineering cultural heroes that you see in various cultures. But of course, the the real up feature that makes this while unique is that it is built out of ice not out of stone but out of frozen water. Yes it is a wall of ice so. Ignoring the magic for a second here. It sounds like a great plan, right? I. Mean Humans have been known to make shelters out of ice glaciers and snow has served as natural barriers to travel. So why wouldn't a it'd be ideal to construct this far northern barrier which is going to be dealing with you know with far northern climate why not build it out of ice good. Question is a block of ice not just as good as stone brick. Yeah. So I, I was looking around about this and Fortunately. There is already a great book out there that dives into this very question it sidled fire ice and physics the science of game of thrones by Rebecca Thompson, PhD A physicist, and author of the popular of Spectra Series of Comic Books About Physics and I should also note that Sean Carroll wrote the Intro Cool. So she first of all, this is just a really fun book. If you if if you're interested in game of thrones and science I encourage you to pick it up I love books like this. One about Dune. I I've been eyeing one about star wars. But she goes through various aspects of the books and the world of West rose in breaks about scientifically Indus-. So in a very engaging humorous but also West rose loving style. So, there's there's one section there where she tackles the wall and she points out that ultimately this question would an ice while work is a lot more complex than you might think. So for starters, there's not just one type of Ice Crystal. There are seventeen types of crystalline is that we know of plus there are three different types of amorphous ice and three hundred. Theoretically she says there might be as many as three hundred different phases of ice. Depending on some of the the research out there

Brandon Robert Lamb Joe Mccormick West Rose Rebecca Thompson George Sean Carroll Engineer Physicist Martin
"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

06:03 min | 1 year ago

"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"To invention. My name is Robert Lamb, and I'm Joe McCormick. And we're back with another part of our exploration of the invention of the motion picture. So as we were discussing in the previous episode, so I think one of the things we've been trying to lay the groundwork for is that the idea of the motion picture like the movies we watched today was not one of these inventions that just like comes out of nowhere, right? The eureka moment that strike some brilliant inventors brain. The motion picture very much grew out of several streams of existing technology, right. Absolutely. There's not just one individual as this is this dream of motion pictures and then develops it in density and then unveils the motion picture for hungry for the hungry masses to view right. Ah, and it's something also that I think people's taste foreign away had to develop over time, and I think we can explore that. Maura's thie episodes go on. But like where we're starting today, I think there are three major streams. Of technology that air feeding into the development of the motion picture. So one is something we talked about last time that we might call animation devices like the FINA kissed a cope or the FINA kissed a scope. It's been called both or the Zoetrope. These were toys that created an illusion of continuous motion. By rolling through a succession of still images that took advantage of loopholes in the way that our eyes and our brains perceive images known as apparent movement. Basically, it was an optical illusion that allowed a bunch of still images to appear to us as something that is moving right. And these were devices that grew out of the age of photography, so these were not Ancient bio are really any older than photographic technology, right. But the these early animation devices were mostly known for animating like drawings or silhouette cutouts, right, But An interesting question you might have wondered about the times say it's the 18 seventies, the 18 eighties or so you might begin to wonder if you could combine the optical principles here in the these animation devices of a parent movement generated by looking at successive still images really fast with another technology and development, which, of course, is photography, so to replace these hand drawn or hand cut still images with direct records of scenes in reality. Exactly And then finally another technology that we've explored a lot less so far, but will become really important in today's episode that feeds into the history of the motion picture is something that's known as the Magic Lantern, and that's an invention that had existed for centuries by the time of the motion picture was invented, but essentially, you can think of it as kind of an early version of the slide projector. You ever like, Go over, you know, back in the day over to somebody's house, and they want to show you pictures of their vacation. And they go through the slide projector. It shows them up on a screen or upon the wall. Oh, yeah. I mean, I finally remember my family's own slide projector. I was never really allowed to mess with it on. And maybe that's why it was so fascinating. And then you broke it. No, I never never never got the chance. Okay, Summ School's used these to occasionally. Yeah, I definitely remember projectors. Slide projectors coming up in the classroom environments as well. Yeah, but basically it combines a transparent plate. On which in images drawn or otherwise captured Onda Linz and a light source that shines through the plate that has the image on it and through the lens, projecting the image on a surface or screen. Yeah, I mean, I should also add that of course you have You have other old Performance methods that involved you know, Shadow puppets? Yes. Which would have also been a projection based medium. Well, that's a really great point. I mean, one way to create a very crude version of a motion picture would be to use a magic lantern to project images and then actually just moved the plate or elements within the plate around. Kind of like you would move your hands in a shadow puppet show. You know, like, If you're projecting through a glass plate, and you've got things on the plate, you could Gonna have them dance around and fight each other and all that kind of stuff, But obviously you'd be fairly limited and what you could do with that. So all three of these are not motion pictures. And yet they all kind of converge into the idea of the motion picture. Right? If you combine these three principles you've pretty much got the earliest makings of a live action movie. But we're not there yet. A sort of early combination of thes. Three elements was another device that we mentioned in the last episode. Zo a Praxis scope, which was invented by Edward My Bridge, the photographer and inventor around the end of the 18 seventies. So you remember we talked about Edward my bridge in the last episode where he didn't just use one camera, but he would use a battery of cameras. To capture a bunch of images really fast. Absolute. Yes. Raised as a horse ran by this battery of count of cameras would go off, resulting in this thing this Siri's of images. They portray the locomotion off the horse, right. So if he wanted to, like, show off those images in a way that wasn't just like, you know, looking at them one at a time. He could sort of animate them together. And that's what the so praxis scope was. Four. He used a very complicated process to sort of treat and rear ender the silhouettes of all those still images taken really fast by a battery of cameras, and then it would put he would put them around the edge of a glass disk in sequence. Which could then be rotated in front of a projected light source, showing off the sort of realism of movement captured frame by frame. But of course, even if you look at this, this is sort of the principle of the motion picture. But I think most people wouldn't think that it was a movie just yet. Now, at this point in the story, we have to reintroduce a character who has already shown up On invention in the past. I believe he made an appearance in our X ray episode. Really? Yeah, He shows up a lot in the especially like the second half of the 19 hundreds. If you're dealing with inventions, whether or not he necessarily deserves all the credit for some breakthrough..

FINA Robert Lamb Edward My Bridge Joe McCormick Maura Onda Linz Summ School Siri Edward
Volcanoes of Life

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:56 min | 1 year ago

Volcanoes of Life

"Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb, and I'm Joe McCormack in today, we're going to be talking about something that I've been thinking about doing an episode on for a while ever since I read an article while back that really interested me, and that is the surprising and kind of counterintuitive link that has been proposed by many geologists now between life as we know it. It on earth and the fires of Mount Doom, specifically, the the most violent and scary of geologic processes like volcanic eruptions on the movement of tectonic plates. Yeah. This is a great topic to get into. We kind of had a I guess a preamble to this a couple of episodes ago when we were talking about eggs and we talked about the volcano birds and the idea of a volcano being seeming. Almost. Paradoxically to be something that can nourish. As opposed to something. That's just a purely destructive force. Oh, I. didn't think about that comparison at all. But yeah, the the way that the volcanic sand babysits the egg for for the megapode so that it can just run off and do its own thing. Yeah. Raised by a volcano. But so I thought a great place to start here might be with a brief reading from volusia. It is a famous old norse epic poem from the collection that is known as the Poetic Edda. Now, this is a synonymous work. The author is unknown, but the volusia tells the story of the norse Gods culminating in their destruction in the fiery doom of Ragnarok can I'm just GonNa read a couple of Quad trains here. In Anger Smites, the water of the earth forth from their homes must all men flee nine paces fares the son of Jurgen and slain by the serpent fearless. He sinks the Sun. Turns Black Earth sinks in the see the hot stores down from heaven or world fierce gross. The steam and the life feeding flame till fire leaps high about heaven, itself Nice and one fun thing about this poem. It's bit of Tolkien Trivia Robert Tell me if you've heard this before, but the name of the wizard Gandalf that first appeared in Tolkien's. Tolkien's the Hobbit and then of course, the best character in Lord of the Rings, the name of Gandalf comes from the Veloce token, actually borrowed the name from a section known as the tally of the dwarves from this epic poem. Originally, he was going to apply it to the character in the Hobbit, who became thorn oaken shield the leader of the Dwarf Party. But then he decided later on that, it made more sense to apply the name of Gandalf. The wizard. I think because again, Dal means something like magic staff l.. and. I think he made the right choice like, Gandalf. That makes more sense for the wizard than for Thorin. Think. So but cool thing that happens in this poem sort of part of the RAGNAROK. Myth is that there is a rebirth that follows this fiery doom know after the fire leaps high heaven and the Kingdom of the Gods is destroyed. Earth is not just left in cinders instead, there is a renewal from the fire and the author writes now do I see the earth new Rizal Green from the waves again, the cataracts fall and the Eagle flies and And Fish, he catches beneath the cliffs. So there's this great link between Fiery Cataclysm and rebirth and renewal of life in norse mythology, and and of course, you know these are symbolic elements. I'm not suggesting that they had some kind of scientific insight with this is something that I think is taken as a metaphor largely about human life itself, but coincidentally, it ends up kind of ringing true with things. We're finding out about geology and nature. Well, it's something you see in a lot of different mythological cycles, right I. mean you see it in Hindu mythology? In. Various. American mythologies. Thinking about. Meslin. South America in particular society that things will rise things will fall that there will be cataclysm that whole world will be destroyed, but new worlds will rise out of them and have risen out of them before. Yeah. I was thinking about themes of fiery eruption in the greening of the earth together or sort of a creator destroyer duality. One that came to my mind that that I thought, you might know something about because I know I've heard you talk about Hawaiian mythology before was the Palay myth. Yeah. Yeah. The Hawaiian got his Palay is an interesting example, a deity of fire and Volkan Ism I was reading a book titled Pay Volcano Goddess. Goddess of Hawaii by H are low nemo, and he points out that when Polynesian voyagers I arrived in Hawaii, they brought their gods with

Volusia Robert Lamb Tolkien Mount Doom Joe Mccormack Hawaii Hobbit Thorin Jurgen South America Rizal Green DAL Dwarf Party
The Horned Helm

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:59 min | 1 year ago

The Horned Helm

"Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb and Joe. McCormick and today. We're doing the horned helm. This is going to be one of our essentially one of our invention themed episodes, but I decided. You know we really need to come back to armor, and the best place to start with armor is really the helmet I think the helmet is one of these wonderful things to consider because on the one hand, there is the more sort of combat, centric and medieval. And even fantasy idea of a Hillman Sifi. Fantastic with the concept, but at a very basic level, I feel like we all have some experience wearing a helmet taking this bit of artificial exoskeleton, slipping it over our own skull, and then enjoying its protection. Do you remember the scene in cone heads? Where it? It is revealed that Dan. Ackroyd Cohen Head Bell Dr Enjoys driving a motorcycle, but he's not a fan of helmet laws. No I. Don't remember this. Does he have a? A weird helmet or he just he can't wear human humans. I would imagine that's the source of his frustration. Because seems seems like bell. Dr Is actually normally pretty much rule follower, but but yeah he doesn't like the helmets, and I think it's probably because he has to get one custom made man. I haven't seen that in forever, but I do remember it had a really fun. Stop Motion Monster towards the end. Yes, yes. Bell Dr Scott to fight one with his Gulf skills. It also has a great line that for some reason is is just used for all occasions around our house, which is your phone is too young. Well, you know I. Don't remember if they wore helmets in that at all the more like space centric cone heads, but I feel like there was some sort of a horned crown that one of the more yeah I think. That's right so one of the we're. We're going to be discussing helmets in general, but but one thing that we're also going to discuss. Here is the idea of the horned helm a helmet with horns on it. It's it's an ancient motif in human civilization, and it ties into some earliest ceremonial practices. Practices and models of imaginative thinking. There's also do something so elegant about the idea thing that may be worn upon the head, and in doing so transforms the individual from a mere human into something, symbolically different a hybrid of human embiid. He's channeling the archaic chaotic gods of the Hunt. Oh Yeah I mean it's very therapy. It's what you see in those ancient cave paintings that so exciting when you start to see the human and the animal forms join together, suggesting fantastical thinking it's clearly there in the horned helmet as well. And and and so when you see these ancient motifs, one example that I was looking at before we came in here today. Was Robert Familiar with the the Sutton? Hoo Helmet? Oh, yes, yes, the sudden new helmet I. Had Papa Picture of it, but I this is one of these that I remember from an early age seeing perhaps on the cover of National Geographic, but it was certainly featured in some sort of Historical Book that I had access to his a kid. Yeah, it's just spectacularly creepy with these hollow is the way the mustaches rendered on the the plate of the face covering. I think it also had leather component when it was actually worn, but it's this decorated Anglo. Saxon helmet from I think it was from the seventh century. was buried in this in this ship burial somewhere in east. Anglia and I've actually seen this up close. And there are replicas of it that are really cool, because they reproduce the artwork that would have been originally visible on the sides, and although it's got all these panels over it, basically, it's a helmet covered with like comic strips, and in all the little panels there are scenes depicted in. In one of them shows these figures will like human shaped figures with horns, apparently wearing some kind of horned helmet. Oh, also evidence of Hornet helmets on a helmet. Yes, wonderful, yes, but it doesn't necessarily show the the characters wearing horned helmets say going into battle it appears to have more kind of a ritual religious significance surrounding the horns. Yes, in in this seems to be basically underlying the earliest versions of of this you know horned helmets go back thousands of years as far back as a twelfth century. See we see this in Cyprus Bronze Age Europe. and. The generally the idea is that yeah, this probably has its origins in in against symbolic tinkling thinking and ritual, and the idea that you're transforming. You're becoming something else. Which of course has a role in combat as well in a row and intimidation sort of role in the basic? behavior of making yourself look larger than you are. But, but then there's also this. Imaginative. Side to it there is this ritual aspect of mill, melting, man, and beast,

Robert Lamb Hillman Sifi Mccormick Ackroyd Cohen Dr Scott Robert Familiar DAN Anglia JOE Cyprus Europe.
Heaven and Hell with Bart Ehrman

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

05:44 min | 2 years ago

Heaven and Hell with Bart Ehrman

"Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb and I'm Joe McCormick and this week. We are going to be featuring a couple of interviews. That I recorded last week because last week Robert, you were out of quote, the office you or at least you off work for a bit and so so I recorded conversations with authors of some books one book. That's already out this year in one book. That's coming up so on Thursday of this week. We're going to be airing a conversation that I had with the author of A. A fascinating upcoming book about the evolutionary biology of cancer, but today we're going to be exploring topic in the realm of ancient history and religion. If you've followed us for a while, I think you probably know this about us that one of our favorite kind of trails to go down his tracing the evolution of religious ideas through ancient history I mean I think I've outed myself on this podcast before. As a the kind of nonreligious person who loves the Bible. Can I love to read ancient religious texts and learn about them and see how the ideas from. From the ancient world of super filtered through to us today and shape to the societies we live in, and that's exactly the kind of thing. We're GONNA be diving into in this episode I'm talking with a secular Biblical historian named Bart Erman about his most recent book, which is called Heaven and hell a history of the afterlife. This book was released in March of this year by Simon. And Schuster, and it's all about the Christian ideas of life after death where they come from ancient history, what influence their development and how they changed over time so? So there was a part that cited in the intro of Bart's book where he talks about a pew research poll that was conducted a few years ago. I think. Maybe it was in two thousand fifteen. Where it found that seventy two percent of Americans believe in a literal heaven and fifty eight percent believe in literal hell, and yet I think most Americans would be deeply surprised, even shock to learn what historians can show about the origins of these beliefs in the strange thing. Is that like the historical conclusions that Bart's GonNa talk about in this episode? Are Not fringe or unusual among secular scholars of the Bible, in historians of the ancient Near East This is utterly mainstream, critical scholarship, and yet I think regular people are especially in the united. States, are going to find it very surprising. Yeah, absolutely, and I want to stress something here for everybody, so I just got back. To work this morning and I plugged into a pre production cut of this interview and it's really it's really excellent, so if you're even slightly scared away by the idea of an interview with a secular biblical scholar don't be because Barda is tremendous. He's he's funny. Very High Energy. I think you're really going to enjoy this chat. Joe Had with Bart here. Yeah, parts full of knowledge, good humor passion for his subject. I think you're really going to enjoy the episode, but before we can do it I'll just give a little bit of background on Bart's here's his biography Bart. D Ehrman is a leading authority on the New Testament and the history of early Christianity, and the author or editor of. Of more than thirty books, including the New York Times bestsellers misquoting Jesus, how Jesus became God, and the triumph of Christianity, and that last one's really interesting. It's about how Christianity took over the Roman Empire and went from a really small religion, too dominant religion of the empire, and just a matter of a few centuries anyway, so he is a distinguished professor of religious studies, the University of North Carolina Chapel, Hill and he. He has created eight popular audio and video courses for the great courses. He has been featured in time. The New Yorker The Washington Post and has appeared on NBC CNN and the daily show with Jon Stewart as well as the history channel National Geographic Channel BBC NPR, all the hits his most recent book is Heaven and Hell just one more thing before we get into it I. WanNa mention obviously we are dealing with. With the audio constraints of of remote recording in the age of Covid, nineteen, so for example around the twelve minute mark in the episode there is briefly some background noise that sounds like a fan was turned on or some rain. It only lasts for about a minute or so, and so please just put up with a little bit of background noise, and it's very brief I promise. It's not the sounds of hell right. Now audio recordings of the underworld leaking up through some sort of mining microphone right? The well to hell was not unleashed office. So yeah, I would say without any further ado. Let's jump right in. Bardem and welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks so much for joining us today. Yes, thanks for having me so your Book Heaven and Hell I just finished reading yesterday, and I I really really enjoyed it. and I want to say that I started reading this book. It very opportune time because though I didn't plan it this way. I'm also currently in the middle of rereading. Rereading the divine comedy, actually my wife and I are reading it together and of course, the divine comedy Dante his wonderful poetry, but it's also psychologically fascinating because when you go through the theology of Dante, you get the sense of somebody who is simultaneously ingenious and thoughtful, and in some ways very intellectually bold and open minded for his historical context, but in other ways. Dante's also very limited and provincial in a word medieval like the way you see him taking so much pleasure in designing horrific tortures for his enemies from these. Petty Thirteenth Century political struggles in Italy. Working with ancient religious texts do you find yourself encountering? This kind of irony embodied within the same author or traditional lot

Bart Erman Dante Robert Lamb Joe Mccormick New York Times Schuster A. A Simon Italy Barda Joe Had Ehrman Jon Stewart Bardem Roman Empire University Of North Carolina C Editor Distinguished Professor Hill
"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"My name is Robert lamb and I'm Joe McCormick and today of course we're going to be doing movie episode that's right we've been trying to do one of these a month just because there are so many so many films we love in so many films that either have wonderful tie ins to scientific and cultural topics we've discussed on the show or the you know they they allow us to discuss new things in new angles that wouldn't necessarily necessitate an entire episode on their own all right so what's on the docket today well this month we're looking at really one of my I I have to say is one of my favorite films the you know in terms of thinking about films you saw a definite point in your life that had an impact on your your your outlook in the film is nineteen seventy twos silent running I saw it for the first time this weekend yeah I never seen before I'd seen like stills from it I think it's in stills of the robots because it's a very robot heavy film despite being one obsessed with with nature environmental themes of the robots can awful lot of screen time they do yeah and I think if you're having trouble picturing the film if we just mention like geodesic domes in space with with forests in them Bruce Dern and in three demean diminutive robots that can assemble around that's that silent running in a nut shell now this was directed by Douglas Trumbull right who is like a visual effects guy for many years yeah yeah he he provided special photographic effects for such classic sci fi films as two thousand one a space Odyssey one of the best yeah close encounters of the third kind Star Trek the motion picture Blade Runner and then later on the tree of life yeah and then hit his it was in the family too because his father was a special effects pioneer who worked on nineteen thirty nines the wizard of oz you can really feel the spirit of the sixties in this movie from nineteen seventy two but maybe you can also feel the despair of the seventies and it is the both of those spirits come crashing together in silent running yeah I thought about I've been thinking about this a lot recently in part because we're we're researching episodes about psychedelics and about psychedelic research and then the the decades in which actual medical research regarding psychedelics just completely languish and it always makes me think of hunter S. Thompson's commentary about the attitude of the waves of the of the nineteen sixties crashing and falling back right and and once again I think you know that ties in to to to this film as well now before we continue though let's let's have just a quick audio sample from the original trailer for silent running just remind everybody a little bit about what we're talking about here based on the strange flight carrying a red car the pharmacist the plans the growing things to extinction you're just for three hours this forced silent running every moment as medics blows the mysteries of an unknown and limitless universe so.

Robert lamb Joe McCormick
"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Name is Robert lamb and I'm Joe McCormick and today of course we're going to be doing movie episode that's right we've been trying to do one of these a month just because there's so many so many films we love in so many films that either have wonderful tie ins to scientific and cultural topics we've discussed on the show or the you know they they allow us to discuss new things in new angles that wouldn't necessarily necessitate an entire episode on their own all right so what's on the docket today well this month we're looking at really one of my I I have to say is one of my favorite films the you know in terms of thinking about films you saw a definite point in your life that had an impact on your your your outlook in the film is nineteen seventy twos silent running I saw it for the first time this weekend yeah I've never seen before and seen like stills from it I think it's in stills of the robots because it's a very robot heavy film despite being one obsessed with with nature environmental themes of the robots can awful lot of screen time they do yeah and I think if you're having trouble picturing the film if we just mention like geodesic domes in space with with forests in them Bruce Dern and in three demean diminutive robots the kinda shambling around that's that silent running in a nut shell now this was directed by Douglas Trumbull right who is like a visual effects guy for many years yeah yeah he he provided special photographic effects for such classic sci fi films as two thousand one a space Odyssey one of the best yeah close encounters of the third kind Star Trek the motion picture Blade Runner and then later on the tree of life yeah and then he he's using the family too because his father was a special effects pioneer who worked on nineteen thirty nines the wizard of oz you can really feel the spirit of the sixties in this movie from nineteen seventy two but maybe you can also feel the despair of the seventies and it is the both of those spirits come crashing together in silent running yeah I thought about I've been thinking about this a lot recently in part because we're we're researching episodes about psychedelics and about psychedelic research and then the the decades in which actual medical research regarding psychedelics just completely languished and it always makes me think of hunter S. Thompson's commentary about the mood of the waves of the of the nineteen sixties crashing and falling back right and and once again I think you know that ties in to to to this film as well now before we continue though let's let's have just a quick audio sample from the original trailer for silent running just remind everybody a little bit about what we're talking about here based on the strange for a rare car the pharmacist the plans the growing things all the four return our ship this forest silent running every moment Enger as Mannix blows the mysteries of an unknown and limitless universe so.

Robert lamb Joe McCormick
"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Name is Robert lamb and I'm Joe McCormick and today of course we're going to be doing the episode that's right we've been trying to do one of these a month just because there's so many so many films we love in so many films that either have wonderful tie ins to scientific and cultural topics we've discussed on the show or the you know they they allow us to discuss new things in new angles that wouldn't necessarily necessitate an entire episode on their own all right so what's on the docket today well this month we're looking at really one of my I I have to say is one of my favorite films on the you know in terms of thinking about films you saw a definite point in your life that had an impact on your your your outlook in the film is nineteen seventy twos silent running I saw it for the first time this weekend yeah I've never seen before and seen like stills from it I think it's in stills of the robots because it's a very robot heavy film despite being one obsessed with with nature environmental themes of the robots can awful lot of screen time they do yeah and I think if you're having trouble picturing the film if we just mention like geodesic domes in space with with forests in them Bruce Dern and in three demean diminutive robots that can assemble around that's that silent running in a nut shell now this was directed by Douglas Trumbull right who is like a visual effects guy for many years yeah yeah he he provided special photographic effects for such classic sci fi films as two thousand one a space Odyssey one of the best yeah close encounters of the third kind Star Trek the motion picture Blade Runner and then later on the tree of life yeah and then he he's using the family too because his father was a special effects pioneer who worked on nineteen thirty nines the wizard of oz you can really feel the spirit of the sixties in this movie from nineteen seventy two but maybe you can also feel the despair of the seventies and it is the both of those spirits come crashing together in silent running yeah I thought about I've been thinking about this a lot recently in part because we're researching episodes about psychedelics and about psychedelic research and then the the decades in which actual medical research regarding psychedelics just completely languished and it always makes me think of hunter S. Thompson's commentary about the related to the wave of the of the nineteen sixties crashing and falling back right and and once again I think you know that ties in to to to this film as well now before we continue though let's let's have just a quick audio sample from the original trailer for silent running just remind everybody a little bit about what we're talking about here based on the strange for carrying a rare car the pharmacist the plans the growing things to extinction all the forest return our ship this forced silent running every moment the danger as Mannix blows the mysteries of an unknown and limitless universe so.

Robert lamb Joe McCormick
"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"My name is Robert lamb and I'm Joe McCormick and today of course we're going to be doing movie episode that's right we've been trying to do one of these a month just because there are so many so many films we love in so many films that either have wonderful tie ins to scientific and cultural topics we've discussed on the show or the you know they they allow us to discuss new things and new angles that wouldn't necessarily necessitate an entire episode on their own all right so what's on the docket today well this month we're looking at really one of my I I have to say is one of my favorite films the you know in terms of thinking about films you saw a definite point in your life that had an impact on your your your outlook in the film is nineteen seventy twos silent running I saw it for the first time this weekend yeah I've never seen before I'd seen like stills from it I think it's in stills of the robots because it's a very robot heavy film despite being one obsessed with with nature environmental themes of the robots can awful lot of screen time they do yeah and I think if you're having trouble picturing the film if we just mention like geodesic domes in space with with forests in them Bruce Dern and in three demean diminutive robots that can assemble around that's that silent running in a nut shell now this was directed by Douglas Trumbull right who is like a visual effects guy for many years yeah yeah he he provided special photographic effects for such classic sci fi films as two thousand one a space Odyssey one of the best yeah close encounters of the third kind Star Trek the motion picture Blade Runner and then later on the tree of life yeah and then you know his it was in the family too because his father was a special effects pioneer who worked on nineteen thirty nines the wizard of oz you can really feel the spirit of the sixties in this movie from nineteen seventy two but maybe you can also feel the despair of the seventies and it is the both of those spirits come crashing together in silent running yeah I thought about I've been thinking about this a lot recently in part because we're we're researching episodes about psychedelics and about psychedelic research and then the the decades in which actual medical research regarding psychedelics just completely languished and it always makes me think of hunter S. Thompson's commentary about the noted that the waves of the of the nineteen sixties crashing and falling back right and and once again I think you know that ties in to to to this film as well now before we continue though let's let's have just a quick audio sample from the original trailer for silent running just remind everybody a little bit about what we're talking about here based on the strange for a rare car the pharmacist the plants the growing things to extinction you're just before we turn our ship this forced silent running every moment the danger as Mannix blows the mysteries of an unknown and limitless universe so.

Robert lamb Joe McCormick
"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Mind my name is Robert lamb and I'm Joe McCormick and today of course we're going to be doing movie episode that's right we've been trying to do one of these a month just because there are so many so many films we love in so many films that either have wonderful tie ins to scientific and cultural topics we've discussed on the show or the you know they they allow us to discuss new things and new angles that wouldn't necessarily necessitate an entire episode on their own all right so what's on the docket today well this month we're looking at well really one of my I I have to say is one of my favorite films on the you know in terms of thinking about films you saw a definite point in your life that had an impact on your your your outlook in the film is nineteen seventy twos silent running I saw it for the first time this weekend yeah I've never seen before and seen like stills from it I think it's in stills of the robots because it's a very robot heavy film despite being one obsessed with with nature environmental themes of the robots can awful lot of screen time they do yeah and I think if you're having trouble picturing the film if we just mention like geodesic domes in space with with forests in them Bruce Dern and in three demean diminutive robots the kinda shambling around that's that silent running in a nut shell now this was directed by Douglas Trumbull right who is like a visual effects guy for many years yeah yeah he he provided special photographic effects for such classic sci fi films as two thousand one a space Odyssey one of the best yeah close encounters of the third kind Star Trek the motion picture Blade Runner and then later on the tree of life yeah and then he he's using the family too because his father was a special effects pioneer who worked on nineteen thirty nines the wizard of oz you can really feel the spirit of the sixties in this movie from nineteen seventy two but maybe you can also feel the despair of the seventies and it is the both of those spirits come crashing together in silent running yeah I thought about I've been thinking about this a lot recently in part because we're we're researching episodes about psychedelics and about psychedelic research and then the the decades in which actual medical research regarding psychedelics just completely languished and it always makes me think of hunter S. Thompson's commentary about the alleged that the waves of the of the nineteen sixties crashing and falling back right and and once again I think you know that ties in to to to this film as well now before we continue though let's let's have just a quick audio sample from the original trailer for silent running just remind everybody a little bit about what we're talking about here based on the strange for carrying a rare car the pharmacist the plans the growing things all the forest return our ship this forest silent running space every moment the danger as man explores the mysteries of an unknown and limitless universe so.

Robert lamb Joe McCormick
"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"My name is Robert lamb and I'm Joe McCormick and today of course we're going to be doing movie episode that's right we've been trying to do one of these a month just because there's so many so many films we love in so many films that either have wonderful tie ins to scientific and cultural topics we've discussed on the show or the you know they they allow us to discuss new things and new angles that wouldn't necessarily necessitate an entire episode on their own all right so what's on the docket today well this month we're looking at really one of my I I have to say is one of my favorite films the you know in terms of thinking about films you saw a definite point in your life that had an impact on your your your outlook in the film is nineteen seventy twos silent running I saw it for the first time this weekend yeah I never seen before I'd seen like stills from it I think it's in stills of the robots because it's a very robot heavy film despite being one obsessed with with nature environmental themes of the robots can awful lot of screen time they do yeah and I think if you're having trouble picturing the film if we just mention like geodesic domes in space with with forests in them Bruce Dern and in three demean diminutive robots that can assemble around that's that silent running in a nut shell now this was directed by Douglas Trumbull right who is like a visual effects guy for many years yeah yeah he he provided special photographic effects for such classic sci fi films as two thousand one a space Odyssey one of the best yeah close encounters of the third kind Star Trek the motion picture Blade Runner and then later on the tree of life yeah and then you know his it was in the family too because his father was a special effects pioneer who worked on nineteen thirty nines the wizard of oz you can really feel the spirit of the sixties in this movie from nineteen seventy two but maybe you can also feel the despair of the seventies and it is the both of those spirits come crashing together in silent running yeah I thought about I've been thinking about this a lot recently in part because we're we're researching episodes about psychedelics and about psychedelic research and then the the decades in which actual medical research regarding psychedelics just completely languished and it always makes me think of hunter S. Thompson's commentary about the related to the waves of the of the nineteen sixties crashing and falling back right and and once again I think you know that ties into to to this film as well now before we continue though let's let's have just a quick audio sample from the original trailer for silent running just remind everybody a little bit about what we're talking about here based on the strange Floyd carrying a rare the pharmacist the plans the growing things to extinction just before we turn our ship this forest silent running the space every moment the danger as man explores the mysteries of an unknown and limitless universe so.

Robert lamb Joe McCormick
"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Is Robert lamb and I'm Joe McCormick and today of course we're going to be doing the episode that's right we've been trying to do one of these a month just because there are so many so many films we love in so many films that either have wonderful tie ins to scientific and cultural topics we've discussed on the show or the you know they they allow us to discuss new things and new angles it wouldn't necessarily necessitate an entire episode on their own all right so what's on the docket today well this month we're looking at well really one of my I I have to say is one of my favorite films on the you know in terms of thinking about films you saw a definite point in your life that had an impact on your your your outlook in the film is nineteen seventy twos silent running I saw it for the first time this weekend yeah I never seen before and seen like stills from it I think it's in stills of the robots because it's a very robot heavy film despite being one obsessed with with nature environmental themes of the robots can awful lot of screen time they do yeah and I think if you're having trouble picturing the film if we just mention like geodesic domes in space with with forests in them Bruce Dern and in three Dineen diminutive robots the kind of shambles around that's that silent running in a nut shell now this was directed by Douglas Trumbull right who is like a visual effects guy for many years yeah yeah he he provided special photographic effects for such classic sci fi films as two thousand one a space Odyssey one of the best yeah close encounters of the third kind Star Trek the motion picture Blade Runner and then later on the tree of life yeah and then he his it was in the family too because his father was a special effects pioneer who worked on nineteen thirty nines the wizard of oz you can really feel the spirit of the sixties in this movie from nineteen seventy two but maybe you can also feel the despair of the seventies and it is the both of those spirits come crashing together in silent running yeah I thought about I've been thinking about this a lot recently in part because we're we're researching episodes about psychedelics and about psychedelic research and then the the decades in which actual medical research regarding psychedelics just completely languished and it always makes me think of hunter S. Thompson's commentary about the mood of the wave of the of the nineteen sixties crashing and falling back right and and once again I think that you know that ties into to to this film as well now before we continue though let's let's have just a quick audio sample from the original trailer for silent running just remind everybody a little bit about what we're talking about here based on the strange flight carrying a red car the pharmacist the plans the growing things to extinction all the four return our commercial this forest silent running every moment the danger as man explores the mysteries of an unknown and limitless universe so.

Robert lamb Joe McCormick
"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Are you looking to stuff to blow your mind my name is Robert lamb and I'm Joe McCormick and today of course we're gonna be doing movie episode that's right we've been trying to do one of these a month just because there are so many so many films we love that so many films that either have wonderful tie ins to scientific and cultural topics we've discussed on the show or the you know they they allow us to discuss new things in new angles it wouldn't necessarily necessitate an entire episode on their own all right so what's on the docket today well this month we're looking at really one of my I I have to say is one of my favorite films the you know in terms of thinking about films you saw a definite point in your life that had an impact on your your your outlook in the film is nineteen seventy twos silent running I saw it for the first time this weekend yeah I've never seen before and seen like stills from it I think it's in stills of the robots because it's a very robot heavy film despite being one obsessed with with nature environmental themes of the robots can awful lot of screen time they do yeah and I think if you're having trouble picturing the film if we just mention like geodesic domes in space with with forests in them Bruce Dern and in three demean diminutive robots that can assemble around that's that silent running in a nut shell now this was directed by Douglas Trumbull right who is like a visual effects guy for many years yeah yeah he he provided special photographic effects for such classic sci fi films as two thousand one a space Odyssey one of the best yeah close encounters of the third kind Star Trek the motion picture Blade Runner and then later on the tree of life yeah and then he his it was in the family too because his father was a special effects pioneer who worked on nineteen thirty nines the wizard of oz you can really feel the spirit of the sixties in this movie from nineteen seventy two but maybe you can also feel the despair of the seventies and it is for the both of those spirits come crashing together in silent running yeah I thought about I've been thinking about this a lot recently in part because we're we're researching episodes about psychedelics and about psychedelic research and then the the decades in which actual medical research regarding psychedelics just completely languished and it always makes me think of hunter S. Thompson's commentary about the mood of the wave of the of the nineteen sixties crashing and falling back right and and once again I think that you know that ties in to to to this film as well now before we continue though let's let's have just a quick audio sample from the original trailer for silent running just remind everybody a little bit about what we're talking about here based on the strange flight carrying a red car the pharmacist the plans the growing things to extinction you're just for and our ship this forest silent running every moment the danger as Mannix blows the mysteries of an unknown and limitless universe so.

Robert lamb Joe McCormick
"robert lamb" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

09:03 min | 2 years ago

"robert lamb" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"Is Robert lamb and I'm Joe McCormick and today on stuff blow your mind we're gonna be doing something a little bit different than we usually do we are going to be talking about an ongoing global disease outbreak so if you listen to us for a while you know that while science is the heart of the show we you know we rarely cover breaking science news it's not really our wheel house that have been well maybe one or two times and we've kind of dip their toe into that and part of the deal with breaking science is that sometimes it it breaks you back when you realize oh well that's steady about tardigrades had some problems with it I remember that like recording another episode on tardigrades the following week yep so yeah obviously what we like to give the most up to date information we can whenever we dive into a subject is actually pretty rare that we cover science story because it's the subject of current headlines in there a few reasons for this you know we like to go deep a lot of times when news about a discovery first breaks there is a lot of depth yet to explore but also the early days of the scientific news story are often full of rapid revisions and leads that turn out to be false or misguided those can be easier to fix I think in a printed article worrying simply go in and make edits or corrections or links to updates that kind of thing doesn't work very well for recorded audio so we do our best to cover subjects that we think we can get right the first time go deep on and cover any kind of evergreen way but right now there is a still developing global health story that we figured it was really important to address on our show and that's the at this point very likely global pandemic of corona virus so given the subject of today's story we really need to be made even more clear than usual about when we are researching recording and then publishing this episode it was researched the last week of February twenty twenty recorded on February twenty eighth and it will be published on March third twenty twenty now we're going to do what we can to make sure it's up to date at the point of publication but certainly bear in mind that the story will continue to move in the days and weeks following its publication right so there's a a lot of media coverage out there about this right now some of it is is great some of it is perhaps a bit more on the panic side of the equation studies are flying off the digital press government health organizations such as the C. D. C. and that's the the centers for disease control and prevention and the World Health Organization or did we call them the who do you like to comment on the W. H. O. or the who I call them the who are you they are essential voices in all of this but in the in some cases governmental responses and communications have been criticized and there's also a fair amount of misinformation racism xenophobia and fear out there so we're going to do it we can't it to stick to the facts here and to give you a balanced view of the current state of the corona virus and give you some tips about what you need to do to potentially prepare and to further educate yourself on the topic right so I guess we should start with a brief sketch of the timeline on this new disease up to the present well at the end of last year on December thirty first twenty nineteen the national China office of the World Health Organization was notified of a localized surge in cases of pneumonia with an unknown origin in Wuhan city which is in the who bay province of China and it's home to about eleven million people so this is considered central China and if you're listening to this you're trying to roughly pictured on a map it's something like six hundred miles more or less directly north of gong show so we're talking about like an eleven hour bus drive according to Google yeah now these were cases of pneumonia at the time that that's how they were recognized in pneumonia just refers to a type of inflammation in the air sacs of the lungs usually due to bacterial or viral infection I guess there are multiple types of pathogens like fungus and other parasites can get in there too so pneumonia can have many causes a common one would be the influenza virus or flu except the patients presenting at the hospitals in Wuhan did not have the flu by January third there were forty four cases of Wuhan city pneumonia with unknown etiology meaning we don't understand what's causing it but obviously a new on identified pathogen was suspected so when a new and unfamiliar epidemic breaks out what tools to epidemiologists have to try to understand things will one is to look for underlying patterns among the people presenting with the novel infection is there anything many or all of them have in common any place they've all been any food they've all eaten or anything like that in this method quickly brought a likely ground zero for exposure and focus which was a specific food market in Wuhan which in some cases sold live animals including seafood rabbits and poultry this was the horn on seafood wholesale market and several of the initial patients apparently worked there the market was shut down on January first and subjected to sanitation protocols yeah and again despite its name the market sees fairly very trade in numerous animals including several different varieties of mammals so we call cases such as this zoo gnosis in which bacterium virus or parasite transfers from an animal host to a human host and there are numerous possible vectors and ways that you can spread the reverse is also possible by the way known as reverse soon notices for anthropology of sis in which a one of these pathogens or virus or whatever passes from a human to an animal yeah and very very often when there is a new disease it's a case of zoo no sister Agnes something has popped up because a disease formerly present in some species of animal has jumped and suddenly appeared in humans yeah I mean that's why can be dangerous because then we have a a new bacteria virus or parasite that the immune system and health experts are not specifically ready for or or you know or you know you haven't had a chance for immunity to build up or for very targeted health strategies to be put in place yeah were unprepared in multiple ways right we don't have effective treatments yet likely we don't have affected vaccines yet likely we don't know what to look for yeah when this new disease and people don't have a natural immunity to it so it hits us in our unpreparedness in multiple ways all at once so one thing we need to drive home with sue Nelson says that it has always occurred you know anywhere humans have been in close confines with animals there is a possibility for for the pathogen to switch teams step to mutate any dented to jump over to a new house and examples include everything from like rabies and bird flu to to HIV with it with HIV being an example of something that subsequently mutated into human only variety yeah I believe the most recent to consensus on that is there was probably originally an immune virus affecting apes right and intercourse there are multiple ways for these this lead to take place you can come from the eating of animals from just you know raising animals and being in close proximity with them hats or another area and we'll get back to some of the details on that but okay so what were the symptoms that were identified for this unknown type of new Monia that was appearing in Wuhan city some of the early symptoms were fever difficulty breathing and X. rays showing lesions in both long this there were initially fears that the virus was a resurgence of the severe acute respiratory syndrome or sars an outbreak of viral infection that killed hundreds of people worldwide in two thousand two and two thousand three but was ultimately contained and the suspicions of association with sars were close they were close to the mark on January seventh officials announced they had identified a novel virus is the culprit which was at the time called twenty nineteen in C. O. V. E. it was a new strain of the coronavirus family and corona viruses are common and they account for all kinds of diseases including sars but also instances of the common cold like the common cold isn't caused by just one pathogen but a range of similar viruses that affect the upper respiratory system on January eleventh China announced the first death from this new disease was a sixty one year old man who passed away two days earlier of heart failure stemming from the infection confirmed infections and deaths continue to spread in the following days by the twenty second of January at least seventeen people died in China there were more than five hundred and fifty infections there were attempts to control the spread of the disease through travel restrictions and quarantines but they failed essentially they weren't able to contain it on January thirtieth the World Health Organization announced the corona virus was a global emergency at this time there'd been a hundred and seventy deaths in China with seven thousand seven hundred and eleven cases reported in the country where the virus had spread to all thirty one provinces by this time also by the stem cases are popping up in other countries around the world as one note on February seventh to leave when Leon who was one of the first doctors and trying to raise concerns about the new virus died on February eleventh there were more than forty two thousand infections in more than a thousand deaths in China and the world health organization at this point announced the new corona virus had to name it would be.

Robert lamb Joe McCormick
"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Is Robert lamb and I'm Joe McCormick and today of course we're going to be doing the episode that's right we've been trying to do one of these a month just because there are so many so many films we love in so many films that either have wonderful tie ins to scientific and cultural topics we've discussed on the show or the you know they they allow us to discuss new things and new angles it wouldn't necessarily necessitate an entire episode on their own all right so what's on the docket today well this month we're looking at well really one of my I I have to say is one of my favorite films on the you know in terms of thinking about films you saw a definite point in your life that had an impact on your your your outlook in the film is nineteen seventy twos silent running I saw it for the first time this weekend yeah I never seen before and seen like stills from it I think it's in stills of the robots because it's a very robot heavy film despite being one obsessed with with nature environmental themes of the robots can awful lot of screen time they do yeah and I think if you're having trouble picturing the film if we just mention like geodesic domes in space with with forests in them Bruce Dern and in three demean diminutive robots that can assemble around that's that silent running in a nut shell now this was directed by Douglas Trumbull right who is like a visual effects guy for many years yeah yeah he he provided special photographic effects for such classic sci fi films as two thousand one a space Odyssey one of the best yeah close encounters of the third kind Star Trek the motion picture Blade Runner and then later on the tree of life yeah and then he he's using the family too because his father was a special effects pioneer who worked on nineteen thirty nines the wizard of oz you can really feel the spirit of the sixties in this movie from nineteen seventy two but maybe you can also feel the despair of the seventies and it is the both of those spirits come crashing together in silent running yeah I thought about I've been thinking about this a lot recently in part because we're we're researching episodes about psychedelics and about psychedelic research and then the the decades in which actual medical research regarding psychedelics just completely languished and it always makes me think of hunter S. Thompson's commentary about the noted that the waves of the of the nineteen sixties crashing and falling back right now and once again I think you know that ties into to to this film as well now before we continue though let's let's have just a quick audio sample from the original trailer for silent running just remind everybody a little bit about what we're talking about here based on the strange for a rare car the pharmacist the plans the growing things to extinction and then just before we turn our commercial this forced silent running every moment as medics blows the mysteries of an unknown and limitless universe so.

Robert lamb Joe McCormick
"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"robert lamb" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Robert lamb and I'm Joe McCormick and today of course we're going to be doing the episode that's right we've been trying to do one of these a month just because there are so many so many films we love in so many films that either have wonderful tie ins to scientific and cultural topics we've discussed on the show or the you know they they allow us to discuss new things and new angles that wouldn't necessarily necessitate an entire episode on their own all right so what's on the docket today well this month we're looking at well really one of my I I have to say is one of my favorite films on it you know in terms of thinking about films you saw a definite point in your life that had an impact on your your your outlook in the film is nineteen seventy twos silent running I saw it for the first time this weekend yeah I've never seen before and seen like stills from it I think it's in stills of the robots because it's a very robot heavy film despite being one obsessed with with nature environmental themes of the robots can awful lot of screen time they do yeah and I think if you're having trouble picturing the film if we just mention like geodesic domes in space with with forests in them Bruce Dern and in three demean diminutive robots that can assemble around that's that silent running in a nut shell now this was directed by Douglas Trumbull right it was like a visual effects guy for many years yeah yeah he he provided special photographic effects for such classic sci fi films as two thousand one a space Odyssey one of the best yeah close encounters of the third kind Star Trek the motion picture Blade Runner and then later on the tree of life yeah and then his it was in the family too because his father was a special effects pioneer who worked on nineteen thirty nines the wizard of oz you can really feel the spirit of the sixties in this movie from nineteen seventy two but maybe you can also feel the despair of the seventies and it is both of those spirits come crashing together in silent running yeah I thought about I've been thinking about this a lot recently in part because we're we're researching episodes about psychedelics and about psychedelic research and then the the decades in which actual medical research regarding psychedelics just completely languish and it always makes me think of hunter S. Thompson's commentary about the noted that the wave of the of the nineteen sixties crashing and falling back right and and once again I think you know that ties into to to this film as well now before we continue though let's let's have just a quick audio sample from the original trailer for silent running just remind everybody a little bit about what we're talking about here based on the strange for a rare car the pharmacist the plans the growing things to extinction and then for return our commercial this forced silent running every moment the danger as Mannix blows the mystery someone on that list universe so.

Robert lamb Joe McCormick
Overconfidence: The Icarus Paradox

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

09:49 min | 2 years ago

Overconfidence: The Icarus Paradox

"Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb. And I'm Joe McCormick and we're back with part two of our discussion of overconfidence. That's right If you did not listen to the previous episode do go back and listen to that episode. Because we're GONNA lay the groundwork we're going to discuss overconfidence. Hubris and mythology in human histories. And then get into the psychology of it and what various psychological studies have revealed and continue to reveal about the nature of overconfidence. And how we can. Divide this sort of amorphous concept of overconfidence out into categories that can be more easily studied and understood. That's right now in the last episode one of the main things we talked about was this huge new review of the scientific literature on something known as the better than average effect. Which is the tendency for people to rate themselves as better than average with respect to their peers on all kinds of stuff One classic example is that something like ninety. Three percent of people think they are a better than average driver. And so if you're if you're listening to this as you drive is back on the road and make sure you use the turn signals principle. Stay save lives turn signals. Let other drivers and the districts. No what you intend to do. Even if you think you're a great driver drive like your less good than you are and it will make you a better driver drive like you can't see all the other cars and around you because sometimes you cannot drive like you're driving a murder weapon because potentially you are. It's quite true. Are Now one of the things we talked about it in the last episode was A paper from two thousand seventeen by dawn Amorin Derek. Shots called the three faces of overconfidence which Which actually broke. Overconfidence down into three distinct categories of of bias or misperception and And we talked about those a little bit last time. We're going to be exploring more of what that paper had to say. And it's critiques of overconfidence. Research specifically with reference. To these three types of overconfidence and has a brief refresher. The three types are overestimation over placement and over precision overestimation is thinking that you're better than you are and this would be with reference to some kind of You know objective measure out in the world so if you think you are taller than you are if you think that you can jump higher than you can if you think that you would get a better score on a test than you actually could. That's overestimation the next one over placement is similar but instead it's comparing yourself with other people so the better than average effect would be an example of over placement. It's you know thinking you are better than average compared to your peers at some task or it would be thinking that you know that you work harder than other people or thinking that you are smarter than other people of course with the. If it's overconfidence. Meaning that those are not actually accurate assessments and then finally the other one would be over precision which is being too sure that you know the truth Again this this might be called EPIs- stomach over-confidence it's just being too certain that your beliefs are correct now to get into more and chances paper from two thousand seventeen one of the questions that they address. What actually drives some of these different Effects as as they are manifested so they they start with overestimation what causes us to say think we would get a better score on a test to than we do or to think we have more money in the bank than we do a common answer that people give to this is the idea of wishful thinking. It would feel good if this were true. Therefore I believe it right the authors don't think that this Explanation is very plausible and they offer several problems with it and we can interrogate these. Maybe disagree with them as we go on but first of all they say you know self delusion is demonstrably maladaptive for example a tendency toward wishful thinking about the safety of kissing sharks. So with tongue is is not a trait that the environment will tend to select for people overconfident about their academic abilities. We'll tend not to study and actually do worse people who believe themselves invulnerable. We'll take risks that sometimes get them killed. This might seem obvious but there is actually plenty of research on this. I mean people who are over confident about their abilities. Do face a lot of downsides when those abilities are put to the test right. Yeah I mean one example from literature that comes to mind is that of Macbeth who believes himself protected by prophecy? And of course snuffs it exactly but then again I think okay so it is true that these people will face a Lotta downside but then again people do engage in self destructive self deluded behavior all the time. This is a common feature of human life. Yeah I mean for instance. We were just recently talking about Sepo Affect Our our movie episode. We're talking about the fly and a about the possibility that the placebo effect is is basically due to You know this innate tendency toward self delusion that may very. Well be adaptive in at least in this scenario where yeah we we benefit from being able to believe something is going to work and And experiencing at least a small physical benefit from it like a small cured of benefit from it. And then you know I also can't help but think that you know self-delusion entails far more than just over-confidence it also entails. All manner of paranoia and there is a strong case for the adaptive nature of say making type one error in cognition a false positive the belief that the Russell in the tall grass is that of a tiger. When it's not because of you make the type to air. You're more likely to be eaten by the Tiger. Right right yeah. Having accurate information about the world is actually very useful and having inaccurate information can kill you. Yeah but but I'm not so much you know trying to disagree with the maladaptive Self-delusion argument That we mentioned earlier but but rather you know to point out. The human experiences is rife with self delusion. So might a dash of overconfidence. Even in the form of overestimation serve do balance out this alchemy of of our perception of reality for example. Have a singer in granted cariocas very low stakes right but it could involve social embarrassment which you could fear would lead to ostracism. And that's actually one of the most powerful negative motivators human behavior right but again curiosity is also one of these things. Where like sometimes? It's cool to do it badly. So this is a perfect example. But so you have a carrier. Karaoke singer then imbibe in a little liquid courage before taking the microphone as most Kariuki participants are are want to do but yeah they they get a little liquid courage because they know they don't have the greatest voice in the world and then they feel a little awkward getting up there but but they they know that a little bit of booze induced. Overconfidence might help matters. I think you're exactly right there and this is funny to start here because I think while the authors make tons of good points this is one of the ones they make that I might disagree with the most. I think that there are antagonist adaptations in human behavior. One pressure might favor having an accurate picture of the world. Assessing things in a clear and accurate way while across pressure favor self-deception especially self-deception in the form of overconfidence. For example. You might be more likely to survive if you have accurate assessments of your own abilities but you might be more likely to take big risks with potentially big rewards if you overestimate your abilities Or Self Delusional. Overconfidence could be adaptive. Because it helps us persuade or even deceive other people about are worth. Yeah old ultimately you have to believe in yourself you know other people are not going to believe in you for you right. I mean we. We talked in the last episode about how. It's probably not a coincidence that you really often notice overconfidence in people who occupy high status leadership roles. Right how did they get there? I mean it's not hard to imagine. The overconfidence helped them get to that point. Yeah it's Something it's a fine sometimes terrifying exercise to like if you if you engage with people like this and then when you realize Oh. They're just really overconfident. They don't they're they're not to say they're not skilled but when you realize here is they're not sometimes they're not but sometimes you realize. Oh there. There is this gap between ability. And and and what? They're they're saying they're going to deliver on what they are. Estimating the future will consist of. Yeah I mean I. It is kind of shocking. How often in life? You will suddenly come to a realization that you know the boss. Or the leader whatever's main skill is B. S. ing. Yeah like that they can just go out there and wing it in a way that you would be too timid in reserve to do right now this idea of the accurate assessments playing into our. You know our own abilities i. I couldn't help but think of the film Butch Cassidy and the Sundance kid scenario because really as it relates to two specific points in the film one is the the whole. Would you make that jump if you didn't have to scenario where they're being tracked? They're being hunted and they've come to this cliff overlooking this river and they realized that if they jump if they jump off this cliff may land in that river and they don't die they'll get away because the stakes are such that those pursuing them will not follow them. They will not make that jump if they don't need to. So so there's there's that and then at the very end there's kind of a going out the old fashioned way. Guns a blazing scenario where corner. They're going to slowly be killed and they decided to just go for it to just bust out shooting and just

Joe Mccormick Robert Lamb Butch Cassidy Amorin Derek Murder Macbeth Russell
"robert lamb" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"robert lamb" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Myself especially it was so cool Rick Palmer from Macy's entertain we're talking about the thanksgiving day parade we had Robert lamb on the show earlier in the week you know from the band Chicago and he's very excited about performing again during the parade how does that decision how would how do you decide which band to so much music out there how do you know who's gonna play who's not I mean this year I see you have quite a lineup we do have quite a line up and really we like to think about the parade as representation of pop culture at the moment but also we love to have those classic artists we love to have something for everyone and when you think about a band like Chicago I mean they are legendary and he has a band like that joining the likes of you know some new names that you may not have heard of that they are larger than life that's what the tapestry of the parade is all about something for everyone a demon cells gonna be there as well that is the voice of frozen basically Cooper yeah I know it very well and frozen to we might add so that that my comic voice say it's that kind of range which makes it a great day for everyone for the older folks and obviously for even my kids that for that matter we're talking to Rick palm reserve creative director for Macy's entertainment final question for you wreck as far as the parade and what we see on our television screens it's the choreography I think right in front of Macy's right in Herald square that is just remarkable to me and I I guess my question is where are the changing rooms and everything else that is because there's just a big story behind there's added that work so yeah you're right about choreography there is no bigger show than the Macy's thanksgiving day parade and a lot of that happens along the route they might pause a little bit before they turn that corner on thirty fourth but really everyone has prepped from from the moment the parade steps off so there's a lot that happens along the route maybe it's a different routine it's a lot of waving it's not necessarily the performance but if you think about those bands and the dance group for the cheerleaders they are going full on throughout the whole parade route it's incredible and what to watch the balloons being blown up so that is B. D. it started at one o'clock today and ends at eight and that you can enter at seventy third street in Columbus and we got about a million people there so you might be waiting in line it's it it's a fun time though thank you so much Rick Palmer we are so excited for the ninety third annual Macy's thanksgiving day parade we love that you gave us some background information and get some of those female balloons out there for me right I heard you thank you Rick we appreciate thanksgiving and Cooper we come back have you seen the movie frozen to yet no but I feel like I'm about to okay well this isn't frozen to with this is our daily dense delinquent stupor criminal the day and we have the story about a frozen rancid goat intestines that was also mixed with meth and heroin I don't even know how to quite explain that but that's so cryptic but you have to stick.

Rick Palmer Macy Robert lamb
A Look Back at '2001: A Space Odyssey'

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

08:58 min | 2 years ago

A Look Back at '2001: A Space Odyssey'

"Wasn't step to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb and Joe McCormick and Robert. Do you remember about seventeen years ago. How disappointing it was that? The year two thousand one was not like the year two thousand one in the movie. The two thousand one a space odyssey. Well certainly it did not resemble the nineteen sixty eight film. Two thousand one space Odyssey did not resemble that that vision of the future. Not Not exactly. We were not not traveling. We didn't have a moon base. I I want my milk. Carton of corn destructor Straw. Well that can be arranged if if that's if that's the definite futuristic experience you're looking for but yeah this is the this is a classic science fiction film perhaps the League Classic Science Fiction Film. I mean you can. You can certainly make the case for other pivotal works of sci-fi cinema but Stanley Kubrick and and Arthur C Clark's two thousand and one has a film that has stood the test of time inspired countless other sci-fi visions. And and and yeah definitely gave us this sort of benchmark to look for in the future so the reason we're talking about two thousand one space odyssey. He is because this year. That movie is actually fifty years old. Yeah it's hard to believe it half a century old. It was released in April. The one thousand nine hundred sixty eight and so because of the fiftieth anniversary because the movie so endlessly fascinating to talk about. We thought we would vote today to a discussion of two thousand one the film itself. It's ideas and its legacy Robert. How old were you when you first saw two thousand one? ooh I saw it when I was pretty young so I don't have a very very concrete memory of it. I think my dad he either he had headed the H. S. copyrighted playing or it was on TV. I'm not sure but I'd I'd say cu maybe eight or something. I'm not sure about Barack being a very interesting film to watch because it was it. has this dream like in quality to it. That is is there no matter. What level of a awareness You're approaching with viewer. You know whether you understand the more complicated science fictional or philosophical aspects of its message. They're still this hypnotic quality to the film that draws as you in I have a weird question about it I wonder if a kid For whom the plot pretty much goes over their head actually understands the the movie better than an adult who can grasp more of the content of the plot because the movie is in many ways. It's almost almost like a more like a painting or like a work of art that is radically open to interpretation where the stuff that the characters do. Well I'm not so sure that it matters as much as more the kind of visual themes established in the questions raised by you know the the spectacle gold before your eyes. Yeah the spectacle is Is a huge part of it. I actually was tempted. I I'd I thought well should. I let my six year old seat at least part of two two thousand and one I am just see what his take is on it and I did not quite get around to to to performing a test of that sort But I have a feeling he would be drawn in by the visuals for sure. Just thinking about the visuals alone. It's hard to believe this movie's half a century old. Like we were saying a minute ago. It still feels so weird and so fresh and so intellectually adventurous. Apparently you know when it premiered. One of the things about the movie is that it's it's mostly silent. They're only actually very limited parts of it were characters are speaking to each other. And according to the stories about the premier the first audience is just Hayden. Hayden not everybody. There were some people who saw okay. This is revolutionary something very different and new and original is happening here but a lot of the Hollywood hotshots shots who were in attendance just hated it There were tons of people. Walking out of the theater. Allegedly Rock Hudson walked out saying out loud. Will someone tell me what the hell this is about. Talk it's interesting because it is a film in which a lot of stuff does not happen. A lot happens. It's a film that that that kind of sums comes up the scent of humanity and where humanity might go beyond the beyond our planet but at the same time every any time. Something seems to be happening. We kind of get a cut. The scenes where characters are having pivotal discussions about what's happening is becomes just sort of a staple of so many other film like most films are missing. The murder that occurs to in the film is not actually seen so it. When you're watching two thousand one space odyssey there is almost this sense that someone is messing with you by removing these key? Bits of information. That should tell you what you're supposed to think about well. I can understand people hating it at first because it is in a way an intentionally challenging film it's it it goes against narrative conventions in a very Deliberate Way and another thing about it is just. I'm not usually a person to call out special effects. I as a thing I love about the movie but the visual effects in this movie movie are just unparalleled in so many ways. They look astonishingly realistic for for a time in the nineteen sixties when we hadn't even been to the Moon in yet when this movie was made we had not been to the moon. Space photography was very limited. So it's amazing. They could get something looking as accurate to the experience of outerspace as as they did. But then at the same time it so D- realized so monreale and It has almost kind of a Dario are Gento kind of quality though. Of course predates are Gento. But I mean like the you know the strange lights and The way the colors color our moods. I it's so oh good I'm glad Argenta did not directed by the way is very different than the monk. The the the the the dawn of man sequence might have been similar but The yeah the special effects in this film are just so breathtaking. I feel like if anyone out there is wondering what is it like to watch two thousand and one a space odyssey with Robert Atlanta. It's like every five minutes may saying aloud. Why can't we make? Why don't we make movies? That looks like this now. Why can't why can't why don't spaceships look like this anymore? Films and basically they don't look this good in anything else for instance nineteen seventy-two silent running another one of my favorite sci fi films was directed by Douglas. Trumbull who worked on two thousand one worked on the effects and silent running looks fabulous but it. It's not as pristine as two thousand and one in garbage can point to a lot of different reasons for that. But then there's you know you can. You can say well. These other films were not directed by Kubrick they. Maybe they did not have the budget. They didn't have the right key key. Artistic people in place this kind of perfect storm of creativity and intent. But but but you end up with this film that yeah just look so unlike unlike anything else and every single frame of this film I feel like you could you could print out and you could put on the wall and and no one would question the choice. It's also somehow a movie that many people I think have tried to copy and been unable to. It's a movie the style of which is uncopyrightable In my I've talked about this a bit with my friend Dave. He's he often points out that you have the the sequel to the two thousand and ten which which correct Kubrick did not direct came out in the eighties. Oh who was the guy who directed two thousand ten who is the same gentleman and directed outlandish alcohol Peter and not just outland. He made time cop. Oh The guy who made two thousand ten made time cop was interesting just if you just look at the trailers the between the two and you see just to start different because on one on one hand you have again the pristine white you know. Almost hermetically sealed all edible seeming. Like you feel like you could just crowd bite into the white chocolate goodness of the spaceships in two thousand one space Odyssey and then by two thousand ten everything is industrial grimy and not just the says the order of the day was the not only the sets but also also the character interactions because suddenly it's not this this very subdued performance limited interaction limited discussions between characters. No you have Roy. Scheider Heider Running Center Mayor Not Mayor of Amity from Jaws Chief of police. Chief Brody. Yeah chief Brody's just right up front getting into you know loud our discussions with with all of the characters We're GONNA need a bigger space craft

Stanley Kubrick Chief Brody Hayden Robert Lamb Barack Heider Running Center Robert Rock Hudson Joe Mccormick Murder Robert Atlanta Arthur C Clark Dave Gento ROY Peter Hollywood Argenta Dario Trumbull
The Voynich Manuscript: A Book We Cannot Read

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:10 min | 2 years ago

The Voynich Manuscript: A Book We Cannot Read

"Into stuff to blow your mind. My name is robert lamb and i'm joe mccormack and today do we have a a conundrum consider a book that cannot be read by anyone so it's kind of a riddle in the dark isn't isn't it like something that gall might ask of <hes> of bilbo or bilbo might cunningly ask of ghalem right. It's like i walk but i have no feed. I stand but i have no legs. They're so bad but but it it is an intriguing kinda riddle. Why can't the book in question be read so we instantly. He can think to some of the tricks of riddles right well. Perhaps the book does not exist. You cannot read a nonexistent <hes> fictional book such as <hes> <hes> your hey louis as the book of sand or a thorough peres revert as the book of nine doors to the kingdom of shadows. These are books that exist within stories or within other works that have no reality in our world likewise. You cannot read a book that no longer exists. You know a book that has become law such as you are. The various destroyed meyer. Kota sees or aristotle second book of poetics of which of course a major plot point in berlin echoes the name of the rose right <hes> but no the book <hes> that we're talking about here it is real and it definitely exists okay so that might lead you to the next <hes> like level of contemplation contemplation here okay well. Perhaps this book cannot be read because it is forbidden. You know some powerful librarian or clerk keeps it hidden perhaps alongside the ark of the covenant inter something right okay so like that same aristotle text but in the name of the rose right yeah where's where somebody just preventing you from viewing it and reading it no <hes> that's not not the case with this book because plenty of people have attempted to read it and still attempt to any serious scholar can <hes> you know they can actually travel to its physical location and go oh through the you know the the the necessary of paperwork. One presents can examine it physically and you you the listener can even attempt to read it on the internet or you can so you can acquire a printed facsimile <hes> many of which were very nice understand okay.

Robert Lamb Joe Mccormack Aristotle Peres Meyer Kota Louis Berlin
Why a Gaggle of Geese? Where Do Collective Nouns Come From?

BrainStuff

06:40 min | 3 years ago

Why a Gaggle of Geese? Where Do Collective Nouns Come From?

"Today's episode is brought to you by listerine ready tabs small discrete tabs, the transform from a solid to a liquid just to switch and swallow no sink required to get that just brushed clean feeling, and they pack a huge punch up to four hours of fresh breath, and the confidence that goes with it on the go wherever life takes you to a surprise meeting a date you want to freshen up for or just from one event to another try listen ready tabs today. Find them near the mouthwash. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain Steph, Lauren vocal bomb here. Have you ever heard of a group of ferrets called a business of ferrets or a collection of jellyfish referred to as a smack of jellyfish? What about shrewdness of apes? We use collective nouns also known as nouns of assemblage to describe all sorts of groups hosts of angels bands of men and shocks of corn. Are commonly heard these days, but the nouns associated with particular groupings of animals can get weird fast because words in their uses are invented by people when we see a bunch of specific construction, you can bet on it being the result of a language fad and sure enough five hundred years ago, nouns of semblage were all the rage. We spoke via Email with Magdalen Jacobs a PHD candidate in the Vanderbilt University department of hearing and speech sciences. She said these are generally terms that came about from upper class hunting culture in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. They're called terms of Venneri, and they're linked to north. And culture and influence into the idea of proper hunting language over one hundred and sixty terms of Venneri are listed in book of Saint Albans, a wildly popular at the time manners guide published in fourteen eighty six the coached the medieval gentlemen through having conversations about hunting falconry fishing sports in heraldry without embarrassing himself at dinner parties. These collective nouns are found in a chapter entitled the companies of beasts and fowls though, some of the terms referred to people rather than animals a bit of a joke. The book Saint Alban's not only described a sleuth of bears and a skulk of FOX's, but also linked women to geese in the collective consciousness by labeling collections of both Gakhal's. According to Jacobs, this is partially because there is a direct linguistic link from the word gaggle to the middle English word for cackle, a collection of wives was labeled and impatience a group of writers on the other hand was called a worship if language tells us how to think about the world we conceive fifteenth. Century European gentleman's social priorities, though. Of course because you can't keep the kids for making up slaying. Once the construction was introduced in the book of Saint Albans, people started coining their own nouns of semblage. Although a lot of these terms slipped into obscurity in the sixteenth century like much of the lingo, we generate on a continual basis. Some of them were adopted into common speech these days. We don't often have occasion to talk about a sneer of butlers or misbelief of portrait painters, but whoever came up with a staff of employee's a congregation of churchgoers or a panel of judges should congratulate themselves on a job well done linguistically. Speaking. A much of the time that correct term for a group of anything. Let us know our collective views on the disposition of whatever we're naming some of the most evocative terms of veteran can be found in birds the book of Saint Albans lists and unkindness of ravens and a murder of crows, definitely creepy negatives. But a charm finches adorable, whoever I referred to a college of cardinals was probably suggesting they thought the group of little red birds looked like a meeting of academics. But why a group of storks is called a mustering is a little less clear. See us Lewis coined the term parliament of als in children's book series, the chronicles of narnia a nod to chaucer's poem, a parliament of fowls. The term is now recognized in dictionaries is being the correct term for a group of AL's. There are meanwhile, few nouns of assemblage for insects mentioned in the book of Saint Albans, we still refer to a swarm of bees which was recorded in the book, but we don't talk as much about a business of flies or a flock of lice. If you've ever heard of a kindle of kittens that comes in the middle English word kindling, which meant to give birth or produce a litter which was originally used only for puppies. But is now commonly used for all kinds baby animals, a group of adult cats might be a glaring or a pounce, but crowd of feral cats is a distraction anyone concerned about the decline of migrating songbirds can understand why that might be. Dogs, which were as much a man's best friend in the middle ages. As today got a lot of play in the book of Saint Albans, hunting hounds alone got several group titles. A cry a mute a pack and a kennel. Some of the most inventive terms of entry are plied to wild animals Jacobs said because they began as hunting terms, the original names from the book of Saint Albans reflected a specific societal disposition towards the animal being hunted. A pride of lions is a good example others that came later such as a wisdom of wombats may be inaccurate. As wombats are rather solitary and don't spend time in groups, others likely referred to qualities of the animals themselves, a business affairs came from a business affair, it's which makes more sense than business. If you've spent any time at all watching ferrets. These days folks continue to make up new nouns of assemblage and bring back old ones. Thus we can talk about April of hedgehogs an obstinacy of buffalo a bloat of hippos and a game of Wales regardless of whether we're planning on hunting them or not. Today's episode was written by when shields and produced by Tyler clang for iheartmedia media, and how stuff works for more on this and a wonder if other topics visit our home planet has Steph works dot com. Hey, brain stuff listeners instead of an ad today. I wanted to tell you about new podcast, they think you might dig from my friends, Robert lamb, and Joe McCormack, you might already know them from the weird science podcast stuff to blow your mind. Their new show is called invention each episode of invention examines, a different technological turning point and the people and cultures the provoked the change they consider the origins and impact of everything from the guillotine to the vending machine. Chopsticks to sunglasses. Braille to x-rays and lots more new episodes of invention come out every Monday, listen and subscribe to invention on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you happen to find your podcasts.

Saint Albans Magdalen Jacobs Steph Saint Alban Cardinals Vanderbilt University Departme Tyler Clang Lauren Apple Murder AL Wales Lewis Gakhal Robert Lamb Iheartmedia Media Chaucer FOX Joe Mccormack
"robert lamb" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"robert lamb" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Hey, welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert lamb, and I'm Joe McCormick. And Robert you remember back in the day when we did that pair of episodes about urban evolution about how certain animals and plants were adapting to the ways that humans are changing the landscape on the surface of the earth changing it to build cities to build suburbs. And all that and and along with all this change in the landscape. Come new ecological niches new opportunities for nutrition new ways of surviving, new new incentives and disincentives and along with that you get this whole new brand of evolution is the kinds of creatures that evolved to live in environments that we've created now, of course, it's easy to think about ways that that might happen in cities on land. But you can also think about the fact that sometimes people refer to like aircraft carriers and large naval vessels as a city. It see. So that starts to maybe make you. Wonder is the same thing happening with our large watercraft are we creating sort of urban marine environments in which in which all new types of evolutionary niches or created. This is a great question. And this is a question we're going to dive into in one point almost literally right in this two part exploration of stuff to blow your mind. The first episode. Here's going to focus on functional ships ships at sea at large. And then we're going to talk in the second episode about what very often happens to ships at sea. Eventually they wind up at the bottom of the sea. Right, right. Wind up at shipwrecks. And in either case there, all these wonderful examples of how life adapts to this unnatural structure, this unnatural of floating a floating city of fluent and aircraft carrier or just a mere Dini blistering barnacles M. I so excited to talk about this stuff today. Yes. Now, I do want to throw in just a quick note. We are going to talk about some of the dire consequences of ships. But we're not going to get into some of the particulars. Some of these we've talked about on the show concerning say ship strikes and propeller injuries to to various organisms or sonic distress that can occur..

Robert lamb Joe McCormick Dini
Why Do Coffee Drinks Often Have Italian Names?

BrainStuff

06:30 min | 3 years ago

Why Do Coffee Drinks Often Have Italian Names?

"Hey, brain stuff listeners instead of an ad today. I wanted to tell you about new podcast. I think you might dig for my friends, Robert lamb, and Joe McCormack, you might already know them from the weird science podcast stuff to blow your mind. Their new show is called invention each episode of invention examines different technological turning point and the people and cultures the provoked the change they consider the origins and impact of everything from the guillotine to the vending machine. Chopsticks to sunglasses. Braille to x-rays and lots more new episodes of invention come out every Monday, listen and subscribe to invention on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you happen to find your podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, bring stuff on Lauren Vogel bomb. And if you can't start your morning without a Cup of Joe, you're certainly not alone. I'm right there with you. But Americans consumption of coffee is up. It's the highest. It's been since two thousand twelve and global exports are up to according to the International Coffee Organisation world coffee exports increased by seventeen percent from October two thousand seventeen to October of two thousand eighteen and overall global shipments were four point two percent higher year over year, clearly coffee has become an important daily ritual for many Americans which begs the question, why are so many coffee lovers? Ordering those drinks using Italian words from lattice Tamaki autos. How did this happen after all coffee doesn't have its roots in Italy legend has it that the great being originated in the Ethiopian plateau and was discovered by goat herder who noticed his goats veritably danced after eating a certain plant. It's spread throughout the Arabian peninsula and adjacent areas before Europeans encountered coffee in the. Seventeenth century, nevertheless, many of the coffee drinks, we know today and popularized by Starbucks more on that in a minute do originate in Italy, and it has everything to do with the invention of the Espresso machine. Espresso doesn't refer to a particular type of coffee bean. It's actually a coffee preparation method, and it was first developed in Italy in the nineteenth century because brewed coffee could take up to five minutes to make coffee lovers. Sada way to shorten the time between ordering and drinking the first Espresso machines were bulky and difficult, but by the early twentieth century Milanese manufacturer Luigi bizarre had developed a single shot Espresso the produced one Cup of coffee in seconds, though. It did take a while for the machines to improve in terms of ease of use and flavor of the coffee produced we spoke with Paul Bassett former world barista champion, he said, the Espresso machine kind of revolutionized coffee to some extent. Everything was centered around the way Espresso was made the way it was consumed as well, he explained that with the Espresso machine. Coffee could be made on. The spur of the moment and was intended to be drunk immediately after being served typically standing at a bar Italian coffee culture grew and Espresso as we know it today became popular in Italy and France in the nineteen thirties, the nineteen fifties beatnik movement and its coffeehouse culture launched Espresso craze in the United States. We also spoke with Mike Ferguson with OEM specialty coffee, he explained early in the specialty coffee movement authenticity meant Italian in the nineteen eighties. Many if not most coffee houses had Italian names and adopted as much Italian as possible into their cafe menu. So the trend continued the coffee drinks, they served also retained their -talian nomenclature because they were specifically made with Espresso the names referred to what is added to the Espresso, for example. But the word Mark Jato into Google translate and you'll get stained or spotted so the drink name refers to the spot of milk that stains the Espresso Bassett said, I think fundamentally Espresso is directly linked to Italy as beverage and the way it's part of their culture. It's been transported all around the world and reinterpreted despite reinterpretation, the drinks with talion names have an Espresso base. And typically, some kind of milk added. For example, a cafe latte usually just called a lot in the United States consists of Espresso milk and milk foam. It's not brewed coffee with milk. Although that's the literal translation to be fair ordering an Espresso with milk and milk foam doesn't sound as catchy the distinction between Espresso and brewed coffee is important consider the Americano which was named for Americans in Italy who sought a drink. Similar to the brood or filtered coffee. They drink at home because it emerged in Italy and is made by adding water to Espresso, it retains its talion title. So this answers the question about coffee drink names. But what about Starbucks use of sizes like 'Grande inventing, which are also talion words, this sizing nomenclature short tall and 'Grande was introduced when ill Nali opened its doors in one thousand nine hundred six and the venue size came in the early nineties ill. Denali was the name of the coffee houses launched by Starbucks chairman emeritus Howard Schultz during his mid eighties hiatus from the company the company's website states. That sheltered been quote captivated with talion coffee bars and the romance of the coffee experience a tradition. He wanted to bring to the United States he returned to Starbucks and purchase the company in one thousand nine hundred seven and that branding now extends to fo- Italian product names, like the Frappuccino, which is a trademarked name and not actually Italian word by the way bonus back to the episode the caffeine in coffee that perks. You up is considered the most commonly used drug in the world. Today's episode was written Vicary, Whitney and produced by Tyler claiming for I heart media, and how stuff works or more on this and lots of other peppy, topics. Visit our home planet has to work dot com. You know, people say necessity is the mother of invention. But that's not always true. Sometimes the mother of invention is advertising. Yeah. Or pure accident. How about ego maniacal delusion? Absolutely. Or just a desperate longing. To be cool. I'm Robert lamb, and I'm Joe McCormick. We're the host of the science podcasts stuff to blow your mind. And now we're branching off into the exploration of invention. Invention is the story of human history told one piece of technology at a time the things we made and how they made us invention publishes every Monday, listen and subscribe to invention on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you find your podcasts.

Italy International Coffee Organisat Starbucks United States Apple Robert Lamb Paul Bassett Ethiopian Plateau Lattice Tamaki Lauren Vogel Joe Mccormack Europeans Mike Ferguson Joe Mccormick Sada Luigi Bizarre Howard Schultz Mark Jato Google Chairman Emeritus
Are the Dare Stones Forgeries or the Key to the Roanoke Mystery?

BrainStuff

06:36 min | 3 years ago

Are the Dare Stones Forgeries or the Key to the Roanoke Mystery?

"Today's episode was brought to you by the new Capital One saver card with which you can earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. That means four percent on checking out that new restaurant everyone's talking about and four percent on watching your team win at home. You'll also earn two percent cashback at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet? Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff. Lauren Bogle bond here. An unsolved mystery can drive people crazy and the fate of the first English settlers ever to establish a colony in the new world ruin oak is a puzzle that will probably never be entirely solved. But it doesn't keep people from trying in July. Fifteen eighty seven a ship carrying ninety men. Seventeen women and eleven children landed on Roanoke island on the Outer Banks of modern day North Carolina a year before when these site was discovered. Fifteen men had volunteered to stay and hold down the proverbial fort, but they were nowhere to be found. So the one hundred and eighteen colonists disembarked and said about carbon colony out of the wilderness. There's much excitement when Eleanor dare the daughter of leader John White gave birth to the first English baby. Born in the new world and named her Virginia after time John White left, the settlers to return to England telling them he'd be back within the year with fresh supplies. However, England's war with Spain slowed the process considerably, and nobody was able to check on the settlement again. Until fifteen ninety when white returned his daughter granddaughter and everyone else was gone. They had dismantled the buildings carved the word Kroto in into a tree. The name of the friendly native American tribe on a nearby island and vanished. There was no sign of the cross white had told them to carve on a tree if they had left under duress. A frankly white didn't look very hard for his daughter and granddaughter before heading back to England for centuries. The story of the lost colony of Roanoke seemed pretty cut and dried to most historians. The settlers went to live with a Kroto and tribe. Whether they stayed there not nobody could say the thing they could say is that no definitive sign of any of the one hundred eighteen colonists was ever found despite rumors in the later established Jamestown colony of massacres and men wearing European clothes deep in the wilderness. No definitive sign that is until more than three centuries later when in nineteen thirty seven a produce dealer from California named L E Helmand showed up at Emory University in Atlanta with a stone. He found while hunting hickory nuts and recently cleared, North Carolina swamp, some fifty miles or eighty kilometers inland of Roanoke island. It was inscribed with a message. He wanted the experts at Emory to decipher turns out, the carved stone told story allegedly written by whites daughter Eleanor. The colonists. Endured two years of only misery and war after her father left for England ending with half. The settlers killed in armed combat and many of the others, including eleanor's husband daughter, slaughtered when a spiritual leader of the tribe. They lived with warned that the presence of the English. Settlers was angering the spirits, according to the stone only six men and one woman escaped. The stone was found to be offended by the experts at the time. It seems legitimate and better still it satisfied. Everyone's thirst foreclosure around to this dusty old riddle the story captured the imagination of the entire country and Emory professor Haywood J Pearce junior published a paper describing the stone in the refutable journal of southern history in nineteen thirty eight. But soon the plausibility of the stone came into question, we spoke with John Bence archivist at the rose library at Emory University. He said Emory became suspicious of Hammond after some professors and administrators traveled with him to Eden to North Carolina where he found the stone. The search for the original location of the stone was fruitless this attitude. The growing list of details about Hammond's discovery that we're hard to corroborate Emory had someone in California look into Hammond, but couldn't find much more than an address after Pierce and his father another academic paid him. And for the first stone and offered a five hundred dollar reward for any additional stones people might find. You can imagine. How many dare stones came out of the woodwork the pierces paid a man named Bill Eberhardt a stonecutter from Fulton County Georgia two thousand dollars for forty two forgeries. He brought them these stones had Eleanor marrying a Cherokee chief giving birth to another daughter named Agnes and eventually dying in a cave in Georgia. In April of nineteen forty one these Saturday Evening Post ran an expose on. The dare stones dismissing them all as forgeries citing an acronym. Stick language, and consistency of spelling that was unheard of at the time the Pierce's career suffered and the dare stones were stuffed in a basement at the father's university an embarrassment to everyone involved, but every so often academic interest turns again to the show on Riverstone. The original dare stone found by him. And in that North Carolina swamp, it's made of different rock than the others. A bright white quartzite interior and dark exterior that would have made a good choice for Eleanor dares missive to her father and in the nineteen thirties. The patina on the stone would have been difficult to chemically replicate. In addition. It doesn't contain the anachronistic language of the other stones some experts have determined. The only problem might be an Eleanor dares. Sign off the initials e WD, which would not have been typical signature in these sixth century. Many experts still dismissed the town Riverstone as an obvious phony. But it's possible that new research into Lisbeth in a pig Raphy chemical analysis and other rocket scriptures of the time period. Will yet shed light on the still unsolved mystery? Today. Episodes written by Jesulin shields and produced by Tyler claim for more on this and lots of other mysterious topics. Visit our home planet. How step works dot com. Hey Breen stuff listeners instead of an ad today. I wanted to tell you about new podcast. I think you might dig for my friends, Robert lamb, and Joe McCormack, you might already know them from the weird science podcast stuff to blow your mind. Their new show is called invention each episode of invention examines different technological turning point and the people and cultures the provoked the change they consider the origins and impact of everything from the guillotine to the vending machine. Chopsticks to sunglasses. Braille to rays and lots more new episodes of invention come out every Monday, listen and subscribe to invention on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you happen to find your podcasts.

Eleanor North Carolina England Emory University Roanoke Island John White Capital One Pierce Emory Professor Haywood J Pear Emory Hammond California Lauren Bogle Roanoke John Bence Virginia Breen Atlanta Refutable Journal Of Southern Apple
Why Do Scorpions Glow Under Black Light?

BrainStuff

04:36 min | 3 years ago

Why Do Scorpions Glow Under Black Light?

"Hey, brain stuff listeners for all you fans of true crime investigations. There's a new podcast from glamour, and how stuff works Marcus Hanna. Devante Abigail, Jeremiah and Sierra were all black children adopted by two white women, Sarah and Jennifer heart. It looked as if the hearts were the perfect family, but their lives ended in a murder suicide. Car crash shocked their friends and made national headlines starting Semper forth with new episodes every Tuesday co host Justin and Elizabeth follow. The families beta journey. You can listen subscribe to broken hearts spelled H A R T S on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren vocal bomb here. Some animals are just over the top take scorpions is it not enough that these stinging arachnids can survive some of the harshest climates in the world and live twenty five times longer than your average cockroach or that some species don't need males to reproduce and can live up to forty eight hours without oxygen and that all of them will eat almost anything. They can subdue even other scorpions. No, it's apparently not enough because scorpions also glow electric Siam green under ultra violet light. Why they do? This is a bit of a mystery. But it makes them pretty easy to study all scorpion researcher has to do to find scorpions go out into the desert at night with the black light and watch those suckers light up like Christmas. Trees, chemically speaking. Nobody's exactly sure. What causes scorpions to glow? But we know it's powerful stuff. When a scorpion is preserved in alcohol. The alcohol itself will floor s scorpion fossils have even been induced to glow under black light after hundreds of millions of years. What we do know is the chemicals that make a scorpion. So rave ready are in the outer layer or cuticle of its excess skeleton scientists call it the Highland layer scorpions their Xs skeleton every so often in order to grow and researchers have observed that intil the slightly mushy outer shell has entirely hardened. The Highland layer does not Flores under UV light. This is all pretty weird. Why would an animal Volve to glow under ultraviolet light? Researchers have posited a bunch of different ideas. Scorpion. Fluorescence might help them. Find each other in the dark protect them from sunlight or even confused their prey, but there's another promising theory that scorpions are somehow using their fluorescence to detect UV light mostly because they want to avoid it. There might hunters after all and a scorpion will always find the darkest place to hang out during the day or even in the moonlight. A study published in the journal of Iraq -nology in two thousand ten tested normal chorusing scorpions, and a group of scorpions that they had produced the fluorescence of with prolonged exposure to UV light, the normal scorpions, then reacted more strongly and negatively to UV light than the desensitized scorpions. But wait, you might be thinking scorpions still have is. And as it turns out, they can visually see light within the ultra violet part of the spectrum. But it doesn't seem like the scorpions were reacting visually a. Britt study published in animal behavior in two thousand twelve basically blindfolded a group of scorpions and found that the critters still reacted to the presence of ultraviolet light. So it seems that they're using their entire bodies as giant UV seeking eyeballs. And that if they sense that they're glowing at all it's time to scurry off somewhere darker. Today's episode was written by just windshields produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other glowing topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. You know, people say necessity is the mother of invention. But that's not always true. Sometimes the mother of invention is advertising. Yeah. Or pure accident. How about ego maniacal delusion? Absolutely. Or just a desperate longing. To be cool. I'm Robert lamb, and I'm Joe McCormick. We're the host of the science podcasts stuff to blow your mind. And now we're branching off into the exploration of invention. Invention is the story of human history told one piece of technology at a time the things we made and how they made us

Marcus Hanna Murder Devante Abigail Semper Iraq Apple Researcher Justin Flores Jeremiah Robert Lamb Sarah Tyler Clang Joe Mccormick Jennifer Heart Elizabeth Sierra Britt
BrainStuff Classics: Does Eating Before Bed Give You Nightmares?

BrainStuff

06:08 min | 3 years ago

BrainStuff Classics: Does Eating Before Bed Give You Nightmares?

"You know, people say necessity is the mother of invention. But that's not always true. Sometimes the mother of invention is advertising. Yeah. Or pure accident. How about ego maniacal delusion? Absolutely. Or just a desperate longing. To be cool. I'm Robert lamb, and I'm Joe McCormick. You're the host of the science podcasts stuff to blow your mind. And now we're branching off into the exploration of invention. Invention is the story of human history told one piece of technology at a time the things we made and how they made us invention publishes every Monday, listen and subscribe to invention on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you find your podcasts. Welcome to bring stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Bogle bomb here with another classic episode from our former host Christian Sager. Today's topic gets to the bottom of an old wives tale will eating before bed. Really give you nightmares. What's up brain stuff? I'm Christian Sager. And it is time for some brain stuff. Have you ever been up alone at night scarfing down some buffalo wings dipped in kimchi and Vindaloo? But you fall asleep on the couch and you start having these terrible nightmares. What is up with that? Why does some foods? Make us have such weird dreams. Well, so far scientists yet to find a direct correlation between certain types of foods, and how we dream, but an excessive amount of rich nocturnal eating can interrupt your sleep in a variety of ways really any type of physical discomfort while you're sleeping can lead to bad dreams. But when you're tummy's a rumbling. That's when the monsters really comes scurrying out of that trap door in the back of your head, for instance, late night snacks increased both your body's metabolism and temperature which makes you hot and sweaty, especially when you have a high carbohydrate meal, Ditto if you have. A bunch of donuts or candy bars before you pass out. A recent study shows that seven out of ten people who junk food before bed are more likely to have nightmares. These researchers hypothesized that the high levels of sugar led to physical sleep discomfort which brought the monsters out from under their beds. Another type of upset stomach that leads to a bad night's sleep is acid reflux also known as GERD or just plain old heartburn more than a third of Americans have this condition. I'm one of them where burning acidic bile comes creeping up your SAFA gifts. If you've had this happen doctors recommend that you don't eat within three hours of bedtime. And that you try lifting your head forty five degrees to keep the acid down. Also, you probably shouldn't have citrus onions, carbonated drinks meant alcohol or cigarettes before you go to sleep. I know I know boring, right? But cutting down on this stuff will keep the sleep goblins away. So it's either be careful what you eat or back to a pit of. Spare filled with evil clowns for you. Actually. There's an interesting food connection between general anxieties and why we sleep poorly when our bodies are stressed. They flush out the mineral magnesium, which increases are mental burden. So we sleep poorly. You can head this off if you eat healthy prior to and during stressful periods, your retained some magnesium helping you maintain a normal sleeping pattern, and there's our old friend insomnia, which can be caused by a variety of food and drinks how about meat or other high protein foods. Well, it turns out protein supplies, your brain with the amino acid tyrosine, which makes you more alert and food high in protein is usually also high in fat which digests slowly causing a rumble in the Bronx. If the Bronx is what you call your belly. Plus remember how carbohydrates bring on the night sweats. Will they also speed up trip to fan and amino acid in your brain that helps you sleep? So if you don't eat enough carbs. Before bed. It's harder to get to sleep my recommendation, a small carbohydrate snack in the evening will promote calmness and help you catch. Some Z's finally alcohol and caffeine before bed can make insomnia even worse. So no, double fist in coffee and beer, and you probably shouldn't drink energy booze drinks, like juice, four Loko or fusion either. In fact, I'd recommend staying away from drinks with purposely. Misspelled names is just a general rule, even the United States food and Drug administration called these drinks. A public health concern back in two thousand and ten and the center for disease control has an entire factsheet about the dangers of mixing alcohol and energy drinks. And it doesn't even get into the whole not being able to get to sleep thing. So there you have it food doesn't necessarily give us nightmares. But the uncomfortable feelings that come with eating certain meals. Episode was written by Christian and produced by Tyler clang. If you miss Christian, check out his pop culture podcast super context available wherever you listen to podcasts. And of course for more on this and lots of other topics that will help you sleep better. Visit our home planet house to works dot com. You know, people say necessity is the mother of invention. But that's not always true. Sometimes the mother of invention is advertising. Yeah. Or pure accident. How about ego maniacal delusion? Absolutely. Or just a desperate longing. To be cool. I'm Robert lamb, and I'm Joe McCormick. You're the host of the science podcasts stuff to blow your mind. And now we're branching off into the exploration of invention. Invention is the story of human history told one piece of technology to time the things we made and how they made us invention publishes every Monday, listen and subscribe to invention on apple

Joe Mccormick Robert Lamb Apple Christian Sager Bronx Lauren Bogle Gerd Insomnia United States Caffeine Tyler Clang Heartburn Drug Administration Forty Five Degrees Three Hours
What Exactly Are Frankincense and Myrrh?

BrainStuff

06:42 min | 3 years ago

What Exactly Are Frankincense and Myrrh?

"Support. For brain stuff comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans are excited to introduce their all new rate shield approval. If you're in the market to buy a home rate shield approval is a real game changer. And here's why first Quicken Loans will lock your rate for up to ninety days while you shop, but here's the crucial part every up your rate stays the same. But if rates go down your rate also drops either way you win. It's the kind of thinking you'd expect from America's largest mortgage lender. To get started. Go to rocketmortgage dot com slash brain stuff rate shield approval. Only valid on certain thirty year purchase transactions. Additional conditions or exclusions may apply based on Quicken Loans. Data in comparison to public data records, equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states and m s consumer access dot org number three zero three zero. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, bring stuff Lauren Vogel bomb here. If you've heard of frankencense and Moore, it's probably thanks to the biblical account of the birth of Jesus. According to the book of Matthew chapter, two wise men. Followed a bright star in the east of Bethlehem to where Jesus had been born and presented him with gifts of gold frankencense and Moore during the Christmas season depictions of this event, Argub it quits in American culture, decorating, churches, and shopping, malls alike. But don't let the shiny tinsel and festive candidates distract you from our question today. What exactly are frankencense and mirror? Both frankencense are derived from tree sap or gum resin and are prized for their lowering fragrances frankencense is a milky white resin extracted from species of the genus bus. We Leah which thrive in arid cool areas of the Arabian peninsula, east Africa and India the finest and most aromatic of the species is bus willia- sacra, a small tree that grows in Somalia, Oman and Yemen, these plants which grow to a height of about. Sixteen feet or five meters have papery bark sparse branches of paired leaves and flowers with white petals and a yellow or red center murder is a reddish resin the comes from species of the genus come four, which are native to northeast Africa. And the adjacent areas of the Arabian peninsula. Come a foreign Mira a tree commonly used in the production of Moore can be found in the shallow. Rocky soils of Ethiopia Kenya. Amman Saudi Arabia and small it boasts shiny branches was sparsely that grow in groups of three and can reach a height of nine feet or about three meters. The process for extracting, the sap of these trees is essentially identical harvesters make a longitudinal cut in the tree's trunk which pierces gun resin reservoirs located within the bark the sap slowly uses out from the cut and drips down the tree forming tear-shaped droplets, they're left to harden on the side of the tree. These beans are collected after two weeks people in east Africa and the Arabian peninsula, had produced frankencense and Merv for some five thousand years for much of this time these. Medic resins were the region's most important commodity with a trade network that reached across Africa, Asia and Europe today. Demand for frankencense and Moore has subsided a bit, but numerous Chinese Greek Latin and sanskrit texts reminders of their past importance frankencense and Moore were desired for personal religious and medicinal use in a time before daily bathing people would use the sweet smoke from the resins to make themselves. Smell better. Egyptian women would mix frankencense ash into their I shadow these substances were also widely used in religious ceremonies and burials, according to the Greek writer here notice Egyptians used both frankencense and myrrh in preparation of animals sacrifices and human mummies Jews incorporated them into their religious ceremonies by the third century, BC and Christians by the fourth century, CE the residents also had medical uses in the papyrus Ebbers from fifteen hundred BC priests recommended both resins for the treatment of wounds other ailments. They were once reported to cure included, hemlock poisoning leprosy were. Terms snake bites? Diarrhea plague scurvy and even bald this the high demand for frankencense and Moore created a booming trade in the Middle East lasting several hundred years in the first century, CE around the height of this trade. Plenty the elder claims that Arabia produced approximately one thousand six hundred eighty tonnes about fifteen hundred metric tonnes a frankencense and around four hundred forty eight tons or four hundred metric tons of mir- each year, one of the most important trade centers surrounded and a waste and modern day. Southern Oman this outpost exported frankencense across best Petya India and China for about three hundred BC e to the third century. See the ruins of the settlement remain as UNESCO world. Heritage site known as the land of frankencense, clearly frankencense and Moore were widely available when the wise men visited the baby Jesus around five BC and would have been considered practical gifts with many uses the expensive resins were symbolic as well. A frankencense which was often burned symbolized prayer rising to the heavens like smoke. While mirror, which was often used in bombing symbolized death. So scholars think that frankencense was presented to the infant Jesus to symbolize his later role as a high priest for believers while Mur symbolized, his later, death and burial frankencense and Moore may not be as popular as they once were. But they're still used today in some ways that you might not expect their common ingredients in modern, perfumes, and cosmetics. Continuing a tradition that's lasted years. Scientists are finding new uses for the substances as well. Recent studies suggest that frankencense or its extracts may help intriguing asthma. Rheumatoid arthritis Crohn's disease, and osteoarthritis researchers have also discovered possible benefits of murder in the treatment of gastric ulcers tumors and parasites. This episode was written by Clint pump free and produced by Tyler claim for more on this and lots of other spicy topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. You know, people say necessity is the mother of invention. But that's not always true. Sometimes the mother of invention is advertising. Yeah. Or pure accident. How about ego maniacal delusion? Absolutely. Or just a desperate longing. To be cool. I'm Robert lamb, and I'm Joe McCormick. You're the host of the science podcasts stuff to blow your mind. And now we're branching off into the exploration of invention. Invention is the story of human history told one piece of technology at a time the things we made and how they made us invention publishes every Monday, listen and subscribe to invention on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever

Frankencense Moore Quicken Loans Murder Oman Jesus Amman Saudi Arabia America East Africa Lauren Vogel Bethlehem Leah Africa Gastric Ulcers Ethiopia Matthew Middle East Arabia
Why Do We Sing in the Shower?

BrainStuff

04:09 min | 3 years ago

Why Do We Sing in the Shower?

"Hey, Matt I have yet to ride one of those birds scooters 'cause I hate those things that does not surprise me at all Joel. But you know, I've been getting Instagram adds to give me to become a bird charger to join that gig economy. Oh, that's right. Just like Hoover folks are getting targeted to start side hustles to make an extra buck or even to try to make a career out of it. But should you? Do it not all side hustles created equally exactly every week? We dive into practical money topics like this on our podcast. Listen subscribe to our show on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcast. Just search for how to money. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff. I'm Lauren vocal bomb. And I think we can all admit that. We've pulled a Peirce bueller once or twice while lathered up in the shower, everyone, sometimes grabs a handy bottle of shampoo was an improv microphone and busts out a tune or two there's just something completely satisfying about singing in the shower. Even celebrities do it, according to people magazine after Jack black likes to belt out Led Zeppelin and Wycliffe Sean digs a little Bruce Springsteen. Everyone's a rockstar in the bathroom, whether you have a voice like Aretha Franklin or couldn't carry a melody if it had a handle, but have you ever wondered about this non some of us wouldn't sing in public? If someone paid us will sing in the shower without embarrassment. Believe it or not there is a scientific explanation behind our soapy musical stylings first. Let's look at why we're relaxed enough in the shower to bust into song. I think about it. You don't sing when you're sad unless you're singing, the blues, maybe for many people shower time is the only time they're alone all day, you're in a warm small safe in. Environment. You're comfortable enough to be in the buff stress. Literally washes off of you when you relax, your brain releases dopamine, which can give your creative juices, a jump start warm waters rushing over you. And now, you're relaxed and feeling good. It turns out that singing makes you feel even better singing because of the breeding that you put into it gets more oxygen into the blood. This gives you better circulation which in turn improves, your body and mood, and because you have to breathe a little deeper to belt out a song. You get some of the same relaxation and mind clearing benefits as meditation. Another neat thing is that when you're singing, you can't really think about your problems more stress relief. But the best thing about sending in the shower, the acoustics you couldn't ask for a better sound system than a bathroom because bathroom tiles, don't absorb sound. Your voice bounces back and forth around the room before fading away. And because the shower is a small space. It boosts your voice and even adds a little base making your singing sound more powerful. The sound bouncing also. As your vocal styling, a reverse effect, which mixer voice hang in the air longer and evens out variations in your singing, think of it as a primitive auto tune. It makes you sound better than you normally would which is a confidence boost we don't sing in the shower simply because we have that song. Stuck in our heads. You know, the one it turns out, we do it for many reasons. Stress relief happiness, great acoustics or maybe just because we like to hear our own voices. No matter what the reason keep it up. It's good for you. And if you've never tried it put the song and put on your own private concert. Today's episode was written by Deborah Ronca and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other rock and topics are home planet has two forks dot com. You know, people say necessity is the mother of invention. But that's not always true. Sometimes the mother of invention is advertising. Yeah. Or pure accident. How about ego maniacal delusion? Absolutely. Or just a desperate longing. To be cool. I'm Robert lamb, and I'm Joe McCormick. We're the host of the science podcasts stuff to blow your mind. And now we're branching off into the exploration of invention. Invention is the story of human history told one piece of technology at a time the things we made and how they made us invention publishes every

Matt Aretha Franklin Jack Black Apple Dopamine Robert Lamb Bruce Springsteen Joel Joe Mccormick Wycliffe Sean Deborah Ronca Tyler Clang
Do Dogs Get Embarrassed When We Put Them in Costumes?

BrainStuff

06:05 min | 3 years ago

Do Dogs Get Embarrassed When We Put Them in Costumes?

"Support. For brain stuff comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by Quicken Loans are excited to introduce their all new rate shield approval. If you're in the market to buy a home rate shield approval is a real game changer. And here's why first Quicken Loans will lock your rate for up to ninety days while you shop, but here's the crucial part every up your rate stays the same. But if rates go down your rate also drops either way you win. It's the kind of thinking you'd expect from America's largest mortgage lender. To get started. Go to rocketmortgage dot com slash brain stuff rate shield approval. Only valid on certain thirty year purchase transactions. Additional conditions or exclusions may apply based on Quicken Loans. Data in comparison to public data records, equal housing lender. Licensed in all fifty states and m s consumer access dot org number three zero three zero. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, I'm Lauren Vogel bomb, and I suspect that some of you love dogs. Some of you might even like dressing them up for warmth or fun Hellene costumes holiday outfits birthday dresses, boots, scarves, wigs painted nails. More boots. Some of these outfits are decidedly sillier than anything. Their owners would wear which leads us to the question of the day do dogs get embarrassed. When we dress them up in humans embarrassment is an emotion, just like love, guilt, sadness, fear or happiness, when someone we know dies. We feel sorrow when people make fun of us. We feel humiliated or embarrassed when something good happens, we feel happiness humans have six basic, emotions, love joy, surprise, anger, sadness, and fear. Some researchers argue that we display only four basics. Happy sad a combo of afraid surprised and a combo of angry and disgusted, but that's a topic for another day, whichever set you go by these. Primary emotions then branch out to secondary, motions such as pride relief and optimism tertiary emotions include excitement, loneliness and embarrassment yet, emotions are fleeting they last for only a brief time. We don't stay embarrassed forever. Or at the very least we shouldn't in humans embarrassment is a so called self conscious emotion, just like guilt. We get embarrassed. When we tripper fall when we burp at the dinner table or spill a Cup of coffee on a nice white shirt as a crowd of people look on. But do dogs feel the same emotions that we do. It's a good question and one that scientists have been mulling over for years if your dog owner, there's no question that dogs become emotional. They wag their tail when they're happy. They look guilty years back had down when they pee on the rug or to a book to shreds. We also know that they can get jealous of a new addition to the house like a baby or another dog or the cat who claims their favorite person's lap. Still many scientists have yet to come to grips with the idea that dogs experience emotions like humans while some argue that dogs do feel a range of emotions guilt may not be one of them. Instead dogs may simply be reacting to their owner's body language in the opinion of some dogs, experienced only instant reaction, emotions, fear, joy, sadness, and anger, which brings us back to whether dogs get embarrassed their scale is certainly different if they do given that they don't have our hangups, and thus aren't embarrassed by things that would mortified most humans like getting caught scratching or licking decidedly delicate itches in public. We spoke by Email with Dr Jessica Pierce, a bioethicist who has written extensively on these Ikoyi of dogs and cats she said as far as I know there's been no systematic research into whether or not dogs feel embarrassment. But I would guess they do that said when we dress them up as lobsters Donald Trump for Halloween, and they put their ears back and tuck their tails down it may not be embarrassment. That they're feeling they might simply find the costumes uncomfortable or unfamiliar, and they might be upset by or reacting to the fact that all the people around them are laughing and acting excited if she had to bet on it Pierce things dogs, probably experienced the same basic emotions as humans. She said dogs. Most certainly experienced what are called the primary emotions such as anger, fear, sadness, and joy, they also likely experience a whole range of secondary, motions, including empathy guilt and embarrassment as for which emotions dogs lack. I wouldn't feel confident putting anything on that list. My guess is that the more closely scientists studied emotional experiences and passages of dogs the more they will find so should you dress your dog up to put it bluntly? If you would feel humiliated dressed up as a lobster or Donald Trump. Then chances are your dog will to appear said when people ask me whether it's mean to dress our dogs up in costumes or fancy sweaters. My answer is ask your dog. If your dog seems uncomfortable then take the cost. Hmm off after quickly taking that cute photograph to post on social media. If your dog doesn't seem to care or perhaps even seems to like being fancied up, then it's fine. Today's episode was by John Pera, Tanno and produced by Tyler claim for more on this and lots of other emotional, topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. You know, people say necessity is the mother of invention. But that's not always true. Sometimes the mother of invention is advertising. Yeah. Or pure accident. How about ego maniacal delusion? Absolutely. Or just a desperate longing. To be cool. I'm Robert lamb, and I'm Joe McCormick. You're the host of the science podcasts stuff to blow your mind. And now we're branching off into the exploration of invention. Invention is the story of human history told one piece of technology at a time the things we made and how they made us invention publishes every Monday, listen and subscribe to invention on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever

Quicken Loans Donald Trump Dr Jessica Pierce America Lauren Vogel Hellene Robert Lamb Apple Joe Mccormick John Pera Tanno Tyler Ninety Days Thirty Year
Could We Build A Real Gundam?

BrainStuff

06:51 min | 3 years ago

Could We Build A Real Gundam?

"Hello earth. Actually. Hello universe. Yeah. We are here to tell you that. In addition to Tuesdays and Thursdays when you can get your regular stuff. You should know episodes. Just as you always have the last ten thousand years await tenure seniors. We're now adding a whole new episode of a spin off show. That's really the same show. It's just a shorter episode. It's called short stuff. Yeah. We said, hey, sometimes we have topics that maybe aren't robust enough to fill out a full forty five minutes stuff. You shouldn't episode though. We don't want to shortchange these topics these people, and so let's just make them short. Get over here. Short stuff and Trump in our feet, right? Exactly. It's kind of like the Roper to our three's company. Yeah. Or it's kinda like after mash to mash exactly, although it's like neither one of those. We're regular links. This is shorter everybody. Yep. So you can go to apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. Or just look for it in your feet every Wednesday from your friends. Josh chuck. Jerry at stuff, you should know shorter is sometimes better. Welcome to bring stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff on Lauren vocal bomb. And if science fiction has taught us anything it's that giant piloted robotic humanoids will eventually be essential to the protection of everything we hold dear invading Taiji from another dimension, sending the acres rubies from planet, doomed better assemble voltron, and as James Cameron's aliens, toughtested nine hundred eighty six even a non-combat next suit can make all the difference against an extraterrestrial threat. Another influential example is our x seventy eight dash to Gundem the titular piloted giant robot entered the world in nineteen seventy nine as part of Yoshiyuki Tomino mobile suit Gundem franchise, which remains popular today. But could we build our own Gundem's? The simple answer is. Yes. In fact, scientists have been tackling various aspects of the technology since at least the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries during that time both Russian and American inventors explored the possibility of mechanically enhanced excess skeletons to eight humans in various. Physical movements since that time we've continued to see X skeleton advancements aimed at injury rehabilitation space travel industrial labor, and yes, even military combat and okay power armor is nice and all, but it's hardly a giant robot that stomps around and punches monsters in the face. What about true towering meccas? Well, the answer here is also a yes. Within the field of robotics. We've seen tremendous achievements in the creation of remote control autonomous and semi autonomous machines today. Military drones haunt the skies over various global combat zones and space exploration probes have delivered wheeled Rovers to other worlds, we've even given our wheeled robots arms for tasks from bomb dispersal to Martian soil, sampling and deep sea exploration. But none of these mechanical minions boasts legs, even the humanoid robot developed by Nasr's Lyndon, B Johnson space center didn't acquire climbing legs until its second iteration for proper Gundem's. One day walked the planet will need proper robot legs and this to his featured into the work of various robotics programs. The most famous of these is Boston dynamics military funded Walker programs such as big dog and cheetah and not just because they inspired the killer robots in the black mirror episode metalhead because while aerial and nautical robots can get by just fine without a leg to stand on terrestrial, robots are a different matter. A wheels are great on the road and unobstructed landscapes but legs provide the most versatility for diverse. Environments true. We like structures only rarely occur in biology such as the bacterial Jehlum a structure found in such species as the bacterium e coli legs on the other hand are natural selections primary solution to terrestrial transportation. So it makes sense to copy evolution in this regard. And biomedical engineers have looked to all manner of leg arrangements for inspiration from humans to millipedes. But here's the catch led to me. Movement requires a great deal of programming complexity and power it made feel easy for most of us. But our minds and bodies are highly evolved for the task even fully piloted Gunda say one where it's movements are mapped on those of the pilot would require a tremendous amount of biometric engineering and semi autonomous units would require the dexterity and spatial awareness to avoid the pitfalls of for example, the ED two oh nine in RoboCop which stomped around on two feet, but was incapable of navigating stairs. But the mecca dream is strong while various robotics companies continue to develop the necessary technology. Fi fans also go at it alone. Functional mecca suits have strolled the Playa at burning man and paraded at various conventions and Japanese engineer Masaaki Nagumo built a working life size model of a gun Gundem in two thousand eighteen the mecca dubbed L W Mona no FU stands twenty eight feet tall. That's about eight point five meters and weighs seven point seven tons or about. Seven metric tons. It's too. Big to leave the factory space that it calls home. But Ngubane rinse it and other meccas out for a little under a thousand bucks an hour. It's not protecting the world from alien attacks. But it's quite a hit for kids birthday parties. Though, one note here if alliens or giant monsters do attack well meccas might not be the best option. Anyway, as was pointed out in the magazine, popular mechanics, the acres from the Pacific rim films are entirely outclassed by existing aerial bombers and attack helicopters. Today's episode was written by Robert lamb and produced by Tyler clang. It was also suggested to us by Lucas twelve years of age from on -tario Canada. Lucas we hope that answer was satisfactory exemplary listeners if you have a question you'd like us to answer send it to us. You can Email us at brain stuff at how stuff works dot com or find us on social media by searching, brain stuff on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram, and of course, for more on this and lots of other mechanically advanced, topics. Visit our home planet has stuff works dot com. Hello. I'm Anna Marie, and I'm Laurin Vogel bomb, and our show foodstuff all about these ions history and culture food entering is relaunching as saver re along with our super producer, dealing Fagin are hitting the road to find the stories behind all the things we like to eat and drink. We will be talking to the culinary creators and eaters of the world to get to the bottom of why we like what we like. And how we can find more of those things on our first trip. We went to Asheville North Carolina a city that

Gundem Lucas James Cameron Donald Trump Asheville Josh Chuck Rovers Canada North Carolina Boston Lauren Apple Jerry Gunda Anna Marie Laurin Vogel Twitter