17 Burst results for "Robert Hook"

"robert hooke" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

04:00 min | 2 weeks ago

"robert hooke" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Robert Hooke first proposed it to Sir Isaac Newton, and it's been tossed about ever since. Imagine carving a tunnel from Houston to Dallas. A straight tunnel about 200, miles long standing at the entrance in Houston will see that the tunnel slopes slightly downhill about three degrees. Very gentle slope. Interstate highways aren't considered steep until they're about twice that. Standing at the exit in Dallas will also see a tunnel that goes downhill with the same slope upward if we're coming out of it Here's what we'll do will lay train track through the tunnel since the tunnel slopes downhill. We don't need an engine to get a train started at the station in Houston. We can just let gravity do the work. Gravity will cause the train to accelerate downhill until the middle of the tunnel, at which point it will decelerate as it rises to the other end. And by the conservation of energy. It will come to a stop. Just as it arrives in Dallas. We've traveled from Houston to Dallas, using nothing but gravitational energy. At its deepest, The tunnel is 1.5 Miles underground. At its fastest, the train travels 500 miles an hour and the length of time we're riding. Just over 42 minutes. What happens if we build a longer tunnel, say from Houston to Paris, the tunnel is steeper and deeper, reaching as far as 750 miles below the Earth's surface. The train also travels faster with a top speed of over 10,000 miles an hour faster than a speeding bullet. At the time we travel surprisingly, exactly the same as the trip from Houston to Dallas 42 minutes. In fact, the length of time between any two points on Earth turns out to be exactly the same. It's not hard to see why the idea keeps coming up. Unfortunately, engineering realities quickly set in. The Earth's crust is very thin. We can't tunnel through what lies below it. So about the longest tunnel that doesn't burrow beneath the crust would take us from, say, one side of Texas to the other. And that tunnel would already be far deeper than the world's deepest minds, posing all sorts of engineering challenges. But friction and air resistance are even bigger. Obstacles are mathematical abstractions assumed these problems away? In reality, they'd slow the train significantly. We'd need an engine to get us back to the surface, and the trip would take much longer than 42 minutes, even with our best technology. Still gravity trained spark our imagination. And that's where ingenious ideas are free to flourish. I'm anti Boyd at the University of Houston, where we're interested in the way inventive minds work. Transcript of this engines of our ingenuity. Episode number 27 03 is online at U H dot e d u slash engines. Additional episodes are available by podcast. Few clouds. 93 degrees. Relative humidity 52% when speed seven MPH, the barometer 29.81. I'm Garo Hagopian. Oil companies are slowly restarting. Some refineries in Louisiana and key fuel pipelines are now fully reopened, Giving hopeful signs that the regions crucial energy industry can soon recover from the blow of Hurricane Ida. Roughly a million people and businesses are without power in Louisiana, and it may be weeks before electricity has restored a huge fire fighting force gathers to defend Lake Tahoe from a raging wildfire..

Paris Dallas Houston Louisiana Robert Hooke 52% Earth 93 degrees 42 minutes Lake Tahoe 1.5 Miles 750 miles Texas University of Houston Hurricane Ida about 200, miles 500 miles an hour over 42 minutes seven MPH first
"robert hooke" Discussed on Akimbo: A Podcast from Seth Godin

Akimbo: A Podcast from Seth Godin

07:42 min | Last month

"robert hooke" Discussed on Akimbo: A Podcast from Seth Godin

"Aright with fingers on buzzers. Let's see who can i identify this scientists. He built some early vacuum tubes enabling robert boyle to do his groundbreaking work. He was one of the first people to describe the rotations of the planets mars and jupiter. He came up with some of the basic hypotheses of gravity in optics. He did groundbreaking work in light refraction. He had important things to say about the development of calculus and he was one of the first people to argue that fossils were actually remnants of creatures. That lived a long time ago and controversial papers. About how old. The earth actually is if you guessed robert hook with an e at the end. You're better at the history of science. Then i am. Hey it seth and this is akimbo. We'll be back in a second to talk about being a miser but first here's a message from our sponsor make things better. That's the goal. Make things better by making better things. That's marketing marketing works. It works because we show up in the with something that makes a change for the better. And we've discovered the single best way to learn marketing. It's called the marketing seminar an interactive ongoing discussion based project based workshop. That actually works. It's back it's back again at akimbo. Dot com slash. Go find all the details if you are serious about changing the culture if you're serious about showing up in a way that grows your project your business your 'cause i hope you'll check out the marketing seminar. It's at akimbo dot com slash go. It's back it works because you do. We'll see they're not only did robert hook. Come up with all that stuff. Granted he did it in a century where scientists were going crazy because there was so much stuff to come up with but he was also friends with christopher wren and more importantly the first head of the royal society where all of the great scientists in london regularly got together with each other to figure out how the natural world actually worked. He held that post for years and years and expanded it to become the person in charge of their experiments. As well as a result robert hook was in the middle of all of this and then something happened and what happened is isaac. Newton submitted a paper to the royal society and in that paper in which he argued. That light was a particle. He disagreed with robert hooke. No blows were exchanged but they weren't happy with each other and in newton's breakthrough principia mathematica. He gives hook almost no credit. For the inverse square law or for any of the other work get hooked did on developing our understanding of gravity as a result of these interactions. The two of them never got along again. And after hook's death newton took over the royal society and engaged in a lifelong campaign with some petty elements to it to eliminate hooks influence on science including destroying the only known portrait of robert hook. If you read most of the biographies that have been written in the last fifty years about robert hook well let me quote. He was melancholy mistrustful and jealous. He had an uneasy apprehensive vanity. He was cantankerous envious vengeful. He had a caustic tongue. His attitude was difficult suspicious and irritable. Well if someone wants to write about me like that in their biography of me. I'd rather they didn't might biography at all. It turns out in new revisionist biographies of hook that some of this was overstated. But how did it happen in the first place. Well let's think for a minute about what happened toward the end of rubber hooks life. He never married never had kids. But he did regularly sleep with his niece and often told people that he was going to bequeath all of his riches to the royal society enabling it to remain thriving independent for years to come but when he died they found eight thousand pounds of money and gold in his room and no will which meant that. All of the money went to a distant cousin. Instead robert hook was a miser robert hook who had been burned by. Newton decided to stop sharing instead of publishing his work with clarity. Instead all he did was post ciphers and anagrams short sentences that he thought he could use to prove years later that he had thought of an idea before anybody else he regularly stole or sort of took credit for the ideas that came to him in his position as the head of the royal society. He didn't go out of his way to enable the people around him to do better science and most importantly he didn't show his work. Because when you show your work when you're doing science someone could find an error. Someone could steal your idea but most important someone could build on your idea and robert hooke was so worried about getting credit about winning about defeating newton about proving that he was the better scientists that he forgot to actually do science. And the lesson for me when we think about the sad life of a miser who ends up alone in his room with his trunk full of money and his reputation gone. It's this we have the chance to show our work. It is tempting to bring a scarcity mindset to a culture of ideas but in fact if you share an idea you still have it and so does the person you gave it to. It is not the same as a bitcoin either. You have a bitcoin or you don't ideas that spread win. If someone can build on your idea all can adjust an idea to turn it from not very good to better then both of you come out ahead and robert hooke. Who had just about everything. A scientist in london could have three centuries ago. Blew it all. He blew it off because he decided he didn't have enough. And instead of bringing an abundance mindset the opportunity to share the work to other minds to other people who would be able to amplify it he courted it and the problem with being a miser. Is that while you might end up with a bunch of money when you're dead you don't need a bunch of money when you're dead. What we need is the chance to make things better and we do that by relentlessly giving away our best work over and over again feeding the culture feeding the system because then we get to live in a world that's filled with good ideas so that's a short rant about what we should do with our privilege and our insight. Thanks for listening. We'll be back in a second with answers to.

robert hooke royal society robert boyle newton christopher wren Newton seth isaac london
"robert hooke" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:51 min | 1 year ago

"robert hooke" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Can you give me you know, one of the big things. They did, where these experiments sometimes a little Harry and body kinds of things. But can you give me a sense of some of the experiments that were done early on that, like different folks at the Royal Society were doing often for each other. Yeah. I mean, the early on there's a preponderance of medical man in the early World society, So a lot of the experiments were medical ones. And, Yeah, they were awful awful. That being that there There are things done to dogs and cats and puppies and kittens. Vivisection, you know, without benefit of Ah of anesthetic. So Robert Hooke, who was thie Chief experiment of the curation experiments. The rules society mean he performed an experiment on a dog where he inserted a tube into district Takiya. And kept it alive where he could stop basically. And even here, you know, in that less sensitive eight Even he was pulled at the suffering of the animal on Dummies would never do the experiment again. He did do it again, but he's forward. Never do it again. You've got Robert Boyle, Another early member. I found a member whose experiments without pumps were used to sort of, you know, Let's see how how the airport works. But let's get a sparrow and just stick in the vacuum and see if it does. Yes, indeed it does die. Let's experiment with poisons and puppies. Let's see what happens. Well, you know that there's a very public things going on. But you're talking about an age when, for example, when the sections were public event hangings, right? Yeah. Hang criminals were just given over to doctors. Dissection on people kind of came in to watch. You wouldn't catch me watching Good Lord. But Sensibilities were different. You know, they were different. And were there things that came from these experiments that changed medicine or that changed what people were able to do, Are you? No, no going forward. Oh, absolutely. I mean the problem. I suppose the most famous is thie early experiments with blood transfusions. Building on Renzo. Early work with, you know, with intravenous injection. Some of the early experiments in the 16 sixties were all society involved, transfusing a sheep's blood into a human being. Andi. I mean, remarkably human being survived. I suspect it was because the process was so inefficient, but he probably just got a teaspoonful of blood rather than a pint. But those kind of experiments you know they pioneered the way for a blood transfusion. You're listening to innovation Hub. I'm Karen Miller. I'm talking to Adrian Tennis, would he's the author of the Royal Society and the Invention of modern science. Okay, so probably the most famous president. I'm guessing of the royal society was Isaac Newton. Can you just give me a sense of how Newton's life intersected with the society and these and these kind of amazing contributions that he made to math into physics? Yeah. I mean, he had a he had a rocky start, Actually, a cz Quite a young man. He presented papers to the Royal Society and Robert Hooke, who was a very difficult man. Robert Hooke dismissed a Newton's contributions on the reflecting telescope. Indeed, when Newton presented his theories, there's of light Hope just said, Well, I thought of that. Don't you remember that this is a time when when presidents and priority A really important you know that whenever anyone came up with the discovery, somebody else not necessarily hooked, But somebody was simple. I thought that ages ago, which is one reason why the rule society established its journalists, philosophical transactions. To set down dated records of when things were first discovered. But Newton had a rough time that he fell out with hook on DH Ho could be very, very difficult. Indeed. It was a genius, but he was a very difficult man. So Newton steered clear of the Royal Society for much of his career. It was only in 17 03 when Robert Hooke died. That Newton felt he could become really involved with roll society and he became president of the On DH revolutionized, Andi. You know, he is. He is the most famous president. The rules is not in golly, they have very famous. They've had If I was president, but he is the most illustrious of them all. I think this giant it said that you know the famous phrase about if I have seen further. It is from standing on the shoulders of giants. Yes. On the Robert Hooke, who was Really was quite paranoid. Robert Hooke even took umbrage at that. He took offence at that because Hooke was very short. And if he thought that Newton was making us a snide remark about his stature around the shoulders of giants, it was that petty What do you think we're the most important ideas that came out of the royal society at any time. You know up till today from its founding till today and who were some of the most important people That we might know about, but not realize the role that the society played in their lives. Wow. That's a big one, because I mean, if you think about it, you know it's times of her. The role society. Really, Rutherford was president the atomic scientists he was president. Through all society. Darwin was a fellow of the Royal Society. Newton with exception of those society. Joseph Banks, the famous botanist was president. Through all started forthe two years. Christopher Wren, who ahs I would argue, was the greatest architect that Britain produced was the president, the Royal Society for a couple of years. You know, you've got bored. You've got hook. You've got so many people. And it's a two way street you know, they gained from Being made fellows of the royal Society they gained in status from that on the Royal Society itself. Gain status from having these prestigious scientists know onboard if you like. The role of society still exists close to I think 300 members of one Nobel prizes at this point and and the no prizes were only started in the 19 hundreds. What is its role now? It's rolls a lot more complicated. I think because in a way, you know, over the last 200 years, you've seen specialists society's carve off bits and pieces of its original remit. So, for example, the Royal Astronomical Society Now you know you would publish papers on astronomy in that proceeding, drawing the rules society, so it now has a moral role. In a sense, no looking Looking over the shoulder of science on DH In an age when you've got governments and big corporations taking on scientific endeavor, you know as they should, which is fine. You need an independent body to just say Hey, You sure That's right. Are you sure this is the way you ought to be going? An independent voice in the scientific community is more important now than it has ever been. Do you think as we look back and think about the society that has existed? I mean, now getting close to 400 years. What are their lessons that we can learn from? The establishment from the development of the royal Society and what they aim to Dio. I don't think that's a difficult on college. I mean, the lessons in away have Bean learned. The approach to the world that they pioneered. Is now one that we take for granted, you know, And that's that's a mark of success for the world's one. You know, it's now part of our world view that idea ofthe ocular inspection that idea of taking nobody's word for it, looking for yourself of experiment to prove or disprove hypothesis, the experimental method You know, that's what they invented on DH. Now we just do it. It's part of our life. I think the world will be a much greater place thrill son had never existed. I I think that we wouldn't be as far advanced as we are. That's very dangerous thing to say. But my sense is that they moved. They moved knowledge forward in a way that wouldn't have happened if it weren't for the institution with, you know, with a continuing existence Slither all society..

Royal Society Robert Hooke president Isaac Newton Royal Astronomical Society Robert Boyle DH Ho Karen Miller Joseph Banks Christopher Wren Adrian Tennis Bean Rutherford Britain
"robert hooke" Discussed on A Moment of Science

A Moment of Science

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"robert hooke" Discussed on A Moment of Science

"Seeing cells through a microscope for the first time in this moment of science the seventeenth century English physicist Robert Hooke was curious about the remarkable properties of Cork. Its ability to float has spring. Equality is usefulness usefulness in sealing bottles hook investigated the structure of Cork with a new scientific instrument. He was very enthusiastic about the microscope. Hookah cut a thin slice of Cork with a penknife. Put it under. His microscope focused sunlight on it with a thick lens and look through the. Ip's what hooks all look like a piece of honeycomb. The Cork was full of small empty compartments separated by thin walls. He called the compartments pores or cells. He estimated summating that every cubic inch of Cork had about twelve hundred million of these cells. Robert Hook had discovered the small-scale structure of Cork and he concluded the small scale structure of Cork explained. It's large scale. Properties Cork Floats Hook Reason. Because the air is sealed in the cells that air springs brings back after being compressed and that's why Cork is spring and that spring is combined with the fact that the sales sealed off from each other explains why a piece of Orcas so well suited for sealing bottle hooks observation not only explain the properties of Cork gave a hint that all living tissue might be made a small. The building blocks our understanding of what those building blocks are has changed since hoax time. Today we'd say that what. Hook observed were dead walls. That had been created by living cells in the cork was still part of the tree. But we still use the word. Cell and usage can be traced back to the microscopic observations of Cork Mark made over three hundred years ago by Robert Hooke. This moment of science comes from Indiana University. I'm Don Glass..

Cork Robert Hooke physicist Don Glass Indiana University
"robert hooke" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

10:18 min | 2 years ago

"robert hooke" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"To coast George nori with you our special guest for the next couple hours professor error gas bog web back with us it was last with me about eight years ago world renowned lunar and planetary laboratory expert at the university of Arizona Tucson previously he was the Ronald the Greenlee chairperson of planetary sciences at Arizona State University professor of earth and planetary sciences at UC Santa Cruz as well the first mission he worked on was the Galileo the flag ship that had been launched when he was teaching high school and was approaching the Jupiter system when he started his post doctorate at NASA he has since been on the science teams of several past and present missions to the moon and might or minor planets as well Eric welcome back can is a really been eight years you know I would try to remember George and I remember that phone call really well and enjoy your show a lot thank you and I give you have been eight years there were good thing we don't get any older my gosh you're right and let's not let eight more years go by after this before we get your back on again Eric agreed great book Ted two moons fascinating I mean I could put it down interesting theory let's let's first of all talk a little bit about what's going on in the world of science and we'll get into your work in a very big way here anything revolutionary going on these days well you know we're we're at this point where we've the industrial revolution is kinda lead to bigger and bigger telescopes yeah you you know like the gravity wave monitors and space telescopes that are bigger than your house and you know so we're like get this cuts it's very interesting you know we're at this point where we're starting to observe things that we've never seen before and you know in it in it the sparks the curiosity because we're not really you know our our brains are wired to handle a lot of the a lot of change with reality a year by year but I guess the biggest news is just all the planets that we know of in like four thousand of them now are you a believer in life out there I am I am actually good yeah I'd love to do that they visited us we're staying there I'm I'm a good scientist my day job is to be a skeptic okay and you nothing wrong with that nothing wrong with that because if there weren't skeptics you'd never know what the truth was right it it's it's like is that the defendant if the murder doesn't have a good lawyer you won't know for sure that he was a murderer right lots of strange things going on up there were you know I I check it all out I I mean not all of it I I the Nimitz videos oh my god yeah yeah these these are quite interesting to me and you know I I should say that the most well the response of scientists is usually either a knee jerk reaction to discount all of that you know and say that it always turns out to be something else which usually is the case most most things do turn out to be something else but then the other side you're starting to see more and more scientists the look at these things with a little bit of an open on my you know for for example the the Nimitz the videos from the from the fighter jets and then this the asteroid the overall mood very interstellar or whatever it is whatever that is and you have people like the chairman of astronomy at Harvard University writing a serious paper on that this thing could have been a piece of an alien spaceship which is fascinated and they call it a Dyson sphere and the god who knows what this thing could be that's probably a big goal space rock but you know what the imagination does wonders doesn't it now is the title of this book of course is when the earth had two moons which tells me that you think we had to moans what happened well it kind of in a pocket of title you know it's it's it's meant to sell books well you're doing a good job with that and and and and the notion of two moons we had this theory that we published but gosh in twenty eleven I guess it was and the thinking that it's it's still an unsolved mystery why does the moon have two sides we have the near side that everybody stares at every night except for tonight at the new moon you can only see the you can just barely see little crescent exactly people were observing it and but the man in the moon the bunny rabbit in the moon whatever you call it from whatever culture these are all big lava flows that a filled in all these low basins and it's all this dark basalt all over the near side and then in nineteen fifty nine with the first time humans that ever seen the far side thanks to a robotic mission sent by the Russians in nineteen fifty nine the lunar three mission and use you don't see any of that stuff you just see high mountains and then the subsequent missions show that the park side of the moon the questions about twenty miles sticker than the crest is on the near side and so we came up with kind of a you know kind of a crazy idea but all the pieces fit together really well that the moon is actually two moons that collided and one of the moon splattered against the other kinda like to snowballs splendid together he is the second moon totally encompassed by the the the first mon or did they it for sport parts of these fragments fly off into space somewhere it would be kind of like pie in the face the physics of the bouncing back same physics it was kind of funny because you see you think about things as a one thing it's another in planetary science and you're supposed to think I'm gonna make an impact crater or I'm going to demolish it but here the if if if you have two moons orbiting around the earth and they actually do collide which which basically means the orbits when unstable and they got in trouble and they hate each other you know these collisional velocities are pretty slow and so it's kind of like a a big landslide or a big car or you know pilot it's just all this so the second moon is kind of flattened like a pancake and becomes the far side highlands it becomes all those mountains and so another theory the far side of the moon really is this other man flattened out and splattered into place what would happen the planet earth if we didn't have a moon at all that's a great question I I think could be the most significant effect would be apart from the fact that the impact we we think a giant impact made the moon there's a lot of evidence for that and then that probably set the stage for the earth being the kind of plan it that it is so the moon being you know part of the formation processes of the earth could could be part of what makes to have a planet that takes the way than ours six you know it has plate Tektronix it has ocean basins that open up it has this certain composition and certain amount of water we don't know the answer that for sure but we do know we can play the thought experiment take them in a way just go pick it up put it somewhere else what what is the earth to do the axis is no longer stabilized you can think of the moon is kind of like a can we or something you know something that stabilizes the rotation and if you took the man away the earth would actually have seasons that would point all over the place instead of pointing you know the earth's axis is twenty three and a half degrees from due north and I'd give this spring summer winter and fall as we go around the sun if you know the north points towards the sun in the summer the north point away from the sun in the northern winter you might have times where the North Pole points directly at the sun and the equator of the earth could become the cold part of you with us we also lose that gorgeous full moon would away we have a my gosh you you you know I mean I I think the when I said you know there's like a little crescent moon tonight I'll bet you you know like a third of the listeners probably thought and you know every every that for me that's the thing that's amazing about the moon is that everybody has some kind of a relationship with them and we we've seen it since we were babies we have you know it's it's something that's always up there if you're having your worst day ever you can look at the moon there it is it's never gonna change it sort of follows you around so I I I think it's a very potent thing for the human psyche this is first thing I looked at with a telescope that my parents bought me they they bought me a little three inch refractor when I was a kid in the the owner of the telescope shop but took my wooden tripod legs painted in black and then took white paint and speckled that like little stars and I all it's all just never forget it but the first thing I looked at was the moon of course and art gosh Eric I mean I had never seen anything so intriguing and all my life I mean I must've been about ten or eleven years old and you're looking at the moon with this telescope well much better than you could with your naked eye and I couldn't believe it I mean looking at those craters and stuff it was just fascinating and I was hooked right after that I mean you go kind of through people who have had that experience with little telescope I mean it's the experience that you know Galileo had and Robert Hooke and another astronomer more gin sundered they they there's something about seeing something three times bigger all of a sudden everything that you thought was one way is is is richer and and and the more we look with more more powerful instruments the richer it all becomes and I looked at Saturn and saw the rings him that got me to what hold on Eric we're gonna take a quick break then we'll come back and talk more about your work when the earth at two moons also did we have a binary star system in the solar system to will check in next hour we'll take your phone.

"robert hooke" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

05:50 min | 2 years ago

"robert hooke" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The near side that everybody stares at every night expert tonight if the new moon you can only see the you can just barely see little crescent exactly people were observing it and but the man in the moon the bunny rabbit in the moon whatever you call it from whatever culture these are all big lava flows that are filled in all these low basins and it's all this dark basalt all over the near side and then in nineteen fifty nine with the first time humans ever seen the far side thanks to a robotic mission sent by the Russians in nineteen fifty nine the lunar three mission and if you you don't see any of that stuff you just see high mountains and then the subsequent missions to show that the park side of the moon the questions about twenty miles sticker then the question is on the near side and so we came up with kind of a you know kind of a crazy idea but all the pieces fit together really well that the moon is actually two moons that collided and one of the moons splattered against the other kind of like to snowballs spotted together he is the second moon totally encompassed by the the the first mon or did it for sport parts of these fragments fly off into space somewhere because I don't like pie in the face the perfect about the vaccine physics it was kind of funny because you think you think about things as a one thing it's another in planetary science and you're supposed to think I'm gonna make an impact crater or I'm going to demolish it but here the if if if you have two moons orbiting around the earth and they actually do collide which which basically means the orbits when unstable and they got in trouble and they hate each other you know these collisional velocities are pretty slow and so it's kind of like a a big landslide or a big car or you know pilot they're just all this so the second moon is kind of flattened like a pancake and becomes the far side highlands it becomes all of mountains and so another theory of the far side of me really is this other man flattened out and splattered into place what would happen the planet earth if we didn't have a moon at all that's a great question I I think could be the most significant effect would be apart from the fact that the impact we we think a giant impact made the moon there's a lot of evidence for that and then that probably set the stage for the earth being the kind of plan is that it is so the moon being you know part of the formation processes of the earth could could be part of what it makes to have a planet that picks the way than ours six you know would have plate tectonics it has ocean basins that open up that has this certain composition and certain amount of water we don't know the answer that for sure but we do know we can play the thought experiment take them in a way discover the get up put it somewhere else now what what is the earth to do the axis is no longer stabilized you can think of the moon it's kind of like a cam wheel or something you know something that stabilizes the rotation and if you took the man away the earth would actually have seasons that would point all over the place instead of pointing you know your taxes to twenty three and a half degrees from due north and I'd give this spring summer winter and fall as we go around the sun it you know the north points towards the sign in the summer the north point away from the sun in the northern winter you might have times where the North Pole points directly at the sun and the equator of the earth could become the cold part of you with us we also lose that gorgeous full moon would anyway we have a my gosh you you you know I mean I I think the when I said you know there's like a little crescent moon tonight I'll bet you you know like a third of the listeners probably thought and you know every every that for me that's the thing that's amazing about the man is that everybody has some kind of a relationship with the mayor and we we've seen it since we were babies we have you know it's it's something that's always up there if you're having your worst day ever you can look at the moon there it is it's never gonna change it sort of follows you around so I I I think it's a very potent thing for the human psyche this is the first thing I looked at with a telescope that my parents bought me they they bought me a little three inch refractor when I was a kid in the the owner of the telescope shop took my wooden tripod legs painted them black and then took white paint and speckled that like little stars and not all it's all just never forget it but the first thing I looked at was the moon of course and Ardashir Rick I mean I had never seen anything so intriguing and all my life I mean I must've been about ten or eleven years old and you're looking at the moon with this telescope well much better than you could with your naked eye and I couldn't believe it I mean looking at those craters and stuff it was just fascinating and I was hooked right after that I mean you go kind of through people who have had that experience with little telescope the minute the experience that you know Galileo had and Robert Hooke and another astronomer who were just standard they they there's something about seeing something three times bigger all of a sudden everything that you thought was one way is is is richer and and and the more we look with more more powerful instruments the richer it all becomes and I looked at Saturn and saw the rings him that got me to what hold on Eric we're gonna take a quick break then we'll come back.

"robert hooke" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

10:18 min | 2 years ago

"robert hooke" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"George nori with you our special guest for the next couple hours professor error gas bog web back with us it was last with me about eight years ago world renowned lunar and planetary laboratory expert at the university of Arizona Tucson previously he was the Ronald the Greenlee chairperson of planetary sciences at Arizona State University professor of earth and planetary sciences at UC Santa Cruz as well the first mission he worked on was the Galileo the flag ship that had been launched when he was teaching high school and was approaching the Jupiter system when he started his post doctorate at NASA he has since been on the science teams of several past and present missions to the moon and might or minor planets as well Eric welcome back can is a really been eight years you know I would try to remember George and I remember that phone call really well and enjoy your show a lot thank you and I give them a good eight years there were good thing we don't get any older my gosh you're right and let's not let eight more years go by after this before we get your back on again Eric agreed great book Ted two moons fascinating I mean I could put it down interesting theory let's let's first of all talk a little bit about what's going on in the world of science and we'll get into your work in a very big way here anything revolutionary going on these days well you know we're we're at this point where we've the industrial revolution is kinda lead to bigger and bigger telescopes the you know like the gravity wave monitors and space telescopes that are bigger than your house and you know so we're like get this cuts it's very interesting you know we're at this point where we're starting to observe things that we've never seen before and you know it it it sparks the curiosity because we're not really you know our our brains are wired to handle a lot of the a lot of change with reality a year by year but I guess the biggest news is just all the planets that we know of in like four thousand of them now are you a believer in life out there I am I am actually good yeah above that they visited us we're staying on there I'm I'm I'm a good scientist my day job is to be a skeptic okay and you nothing wrong with that nothing wrong with that because if there weren't skeptics you'd never know what the truth was right it it's it's like is that the defendant if the murder doesn't have a good lawyer you won't know for sure that he was a murderer right lots of strange things going on up there were you know I I check it all out I I mean not all of it I I the Nimitz videos oh my god yeah yeah these these are quite interesting to me and you know I I should say that most well the response of scientists is usually either a knee jerk reaction to discount all that you know and say that it always turns out to be something else which usually is the case most most things do turn out to be something else but then the other side you're starting to see more and more scientists the look at these things with a little bit of an open on my you know for for example the the Nimitz videos from the from the fighter jets and then this the asteroid the overall mood very interstellar or whatever it is whatever that is and you have people like the chairman of astronomy at Harvard University writing a serious paper on that this thing could have been a piece of an alien spaceship which is fascinated and now they call it a Dyson sphere and the god who knows what this thing could be that's probably a big goal space rock but you know what the imagination does wonders doesn't now is the title of this book of course is when the earth had two moons which tells me that you think we had to moans what happened well it kind of in a pocket of title you know it's it's it's meant to sell books well you're doing a good job with that and and and and the notion of two moons we had this theory that we published but gosh in twenty eleven I guess it was and the thinking that it's it's still an unsolved mystery why does the moon have two sides we have the near side that everybody stares at every night except for tonight if the new moon you can only see the you can just barely see little crescent exactly people were observing it and but the man in the moon the bunny rabbit in the moon whatever you call it from whatever culture these are all big lava flows that are filled in all these low basins and it's all this dark basalt all over the near side and then in nineteen fifty nine with the first time humans that ever seen the far side thanks to a robotic mission sent by the Russians in nineteen fifty nine the lunar three mission and use you don't see any of that stuff you just see high mountains and then the subsequent missions show that the park side of the moon the questions about twenty miles thicker than the crest is on the near side and so we came up with kind of a you know kind of a crazy idea but all the pieces fit together really well that the moon is actually two moons that collided and one of the moon splattered against the other kinda like to snowballs splendid together he is the second moon totally encompassed by the the the first morning or did the it for sport parts of these fragments fly off in the space somewhere it would be kind of like a a party in the face the physics of the bouncing back same physics it was kind of funny because you see you think about things as a one thing it's another in planetary science and you're supposed to think I'm gonna make an impact crater or I'm going to demolish it but here the if if if you have two moons orbiting around the earth and they actually do collide which which basically means the orbits when unstable and they got in trouble and they hate each other you know these collisional velocities are pretty slow and so it's kind of like a a big landslide or a big car you know pilot it's just all this so the second moon is kind of flattened like a pancake and becomes the far side highlands it becomes all those mountains and so in our theory the far side of the moon really is this other man flattened out and splattered into place what would happen the planet earth if we didn't have a moon at all all that's a great question I I think could be the most significant effect would be apart from the fact that the impact we we think a giant impact made the moon there's a lot of evidence for that and then that probably set the stage for the earth being the kind of plan it that it is so the moon being you know part of the formation process of the earth could could be part of what makes to have a planet that picks the way than ours six you know would have plate Tektronix it has ocean basins that open up that has this certain composition and certain amount of water we don't know the answer that for sure but we do know we can play the thought experiment take them in a way just go pick it up put it somewhere else what what is the earth to do of the earth axis is no longer stabilized you can think of the moon is kind of like a can we or something you know something that's stabilizes the rotation and if you took the man away the earth would actually have seasons that would point all over the place instead of pointing you know the earth's axis is twenty three and a half degrees from due north and I'd give this spring summer winter and fall as we go around the sun if you know the north points towards the sun in the summer the north point away from the sun in the northern winter you might have times where's the North Pole points directly at the sun and the equator of the earth could become the cold part of you with us we also lose that gorgeous full moon would weigh we have a my gosh you you you know I mean I I think the when I said you know there's like a little crescent moon tonight I'll bet you you know like a third of the listeners probably thought and you know every every that for me that's the thing that's amazing about the moon is that everybody has some kind of a relationship with them and we we've seen it since we were babies we have you know it's it's something that's always up there if you're having your worst day ever you can look at the moon there it is it's never gonna change it sort of follows you around so I I I think it's a very potent thing for the human psyche this is the first thing I looked at with a telescope that my parents bought me they they bought me a little three inch refractor when I was a kid in the the owner of the telescope shop took my wooden tripod legs painted in black and then took white paint and speckled that like little stars and not all it's all just never forget it but the first thing I looked at was the moon of course and art gosh Eric I mean I had never seen anything so intriguing and all my life I mean I must've been about ten or eleven years old and you're looking at the moon with this telescope well much better than you could with your naked eye and I couldn't believe it I mean looking at those craters and stuff it was just fascinating and I was hooked right after that I mean you go kind of through people who have had that experience with little telescope I mean that's the experience that you know Galileo had and Robert Hooke and another astronomer more gin sundered they they there's something about seeing something three times bigger all of a sudden everything that you thought was one way is is is richer and and and the more we look with more more powerful instruments the richer it all becomes and I looked at Saturn and saw the rings him that got me to what hold on Eric we're gonna take a quick break then we'll come back and talk more about your work when the earth at two moons also did we have a binary star system in the solar system to will check in next hour we'll take your phone calls with.

"robert hooke" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

No Such Thing As A Fish

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"robert hooke" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

"Designed for people who find normal serial too inconvenient and too much of a hassle and the more sound quite good idea. Yeah. So you've got on the train with your breakfast. And you just pour out your cereal into the Poland. Anyway, basically, they hid neglected to realize that cereal is one of the most easy things to prepare and. And was. Was testing which went on. And it showed the preparing cereal the traditional way took one second longer than breakfast mates. It adds up. Okay. It's time for fact, number three. And that is chosen ski this week. Is that the scientist Robert Hooke recorded in his diary, every time he had an orgasm. So this is. You might remember about her from school. You learn about hooks Lord about this. Well, you do what hoops law of Ila, which is available friends today. He was a polymath. He was an unbelievably high achieving scientists around at the same time, it's Niessen, and he wrote extensive diaries where he recorded every detail of his life, including his orgasms than had a sign for when he had an orgasm which was the sign of Pisces, which is kind of so of like a backward. See and then a C back to back, and we're we actually are not hundred percent sure, it was all of them. But we kind of people have used this as a basis of his sex drive was so for instance, in one of his diaries says played with Nell Pisces sign hurt small of buck. That could have been twister. He was. Another one when light to bed Pisces sign. Inslee. Sweat much undisturbed run. Then another one that made wormwood wine Pisces sign Pisces sign. Night. Oh my goodness. But yeah, he was into it had a weird sex life actually hook. So he didn't really have relationships was kind of Santi never had sex with someone who wasn't so financially dependent on him dependent for a home. So it used to have a lot of reasons we servants and shot them alone like Nell. And then he had this weird relationship with grace his niece who was sent to live with him by his brother who was live with him when she was ten and then, but she pretty much turned sixteen and he was like, all right? Get off Pisces you You wanna play wanna play. see sign? He was incredible. I mean, he he sort of someone described him as Leonardo Davinci, but without the paintings. Yeah. Which sounds pretty crab doesn't it? It was sort of he works on all these different fields. Like, he invented a microscope, and he used that to to draw incredibly tiny things before he designed the moment as he came up with telescope. So we invented the word sell to mean a tiny cell in a body. Pretty he saw them. Didn't he looked at his microscope is some car Kennesaw saw these little inane them after the cells that monks lived in. But he didn't know what they did. He thought it was to send liquid around the body or something like that. So we didn't really know what they were. But he did give the name which is quite good invented some fly machines in his diary. See drew them. He he invented the first pressure cooker cool. That's very he's off claimed to have flowed. He experimented with lots of flying machines on the grounds of what college where he went to Uni with his friends. He built these machines. And then he did ROY in his diary, insects, teen seventy four told Sarobi southern his friend told him I could fly, but I didn't tell him how. Ten cans of red bull. He was a proper scientist. And he did a lot of measurements and stuff like that. And in those days, it was long thought that masturbation is extremely bad for you. And so one reason that he always mentioned it in his diaries is because it was like an ongoing appraisal of his health. So he'll be able to see how often it happens. And then he'd be able to see how he's feeling because he was a hypochondriac as well. No, I'm just conducting an ongoing appraising with my health. Experiment. He when you say he's likely in order without the paintings. Interestingly we don't know what he looks like we have no idea there were no surviving paintings of Robert hook..

Nell Pisces scientist Leonardo Davinci Robert Hooke Sarobi Poland Santi ROY hundred percent one second
"robert hooke" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"robert hooke" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"More charismatic much better communicator in some ways much more ambitious and shoved him aside, just like Isaac Newton was headed out of skills that the other guy didn't have Steve Jobs. A great synthesizer could bring in marketing and motivate people the way that Jeff Raskin couldn't realize we're going on really long tangent here. Okay. But Isaac Newton also had some better skills, but he was really fed this early ideas by guy named Robert hook. So for creativity. What I found speed attention and courage because you have to say the idea of comparing Steve Jobs, and Jeff Raskin with Isaac Newton, and Robert Hooke sounds nuts who would ever do that. But you have to have some balls to go after it strikes me also that it's one could look at it not just as a potential sequence. But also as a hierarchy in the sense that if you don't have speed, you're not going to be able to develop the three hundred sixty degree view to have the attention yield any fruits, you need to have that as almost a precursor to the attention. The attention is precursor to to current which is sort of the excavation on what you find. That little red specter. That's executive it's an order speed attention, courage. And that's kind of what I found for me was the secret of creating wacky shit. And. If we. If we if we cut again to look at the world of of business and not fooling yourself or not confusing process and outcome in and trying to really have. To read something correctly. And I should note also that these different hats, and these different heuristic is for being clear on your purpose before say reading a book or selecting a book in the first place is is really really really important and. Give it give an example that illustrates this in a very different context. Tony Robbins doesn't exercise at some of his events where ask people to scan the room, and they'll say before you scan the room, I want you to know anything read of reddish, hue remotely close, and they do that for sixty seconds. And all right run through the list of all the things that you saw that red. And then he asks people now note without looking around the room. What you saw that was blue, right and people can't do it. Right. And it's it's to have that search function sort of set in place before reading a book before editing right is really really really really critical. Let's talk about I think the term that you use is false failures or false failure. Right. Let's talk about that for a second. Because it also might tie into someone. We mentioned at the very beginning conversation who who is Peter Thiel. But key talk about what what a what a what a false fail or false failure is fallacy idea. Let's say you're nurturing some crazy idea that everything says knots, which I for lack of a better word, I call that a loon shot rather than a moonshine moonshine. Everybody knows what a big goal and exciting destination. But the the big ideas that really make a transform whether it's an industry or science or even world history. Almost never arrived as Ling everybody with their brilliance. There tend to be the ones that are floating around for years or sometimes decades and that. People championing them are written office nuts in the revisionist history. Looking back. It's like, oh, it's obvious that it was right. Sort of a natural tendency is -ssume that and that guy was obviously genius. But most people don't talk about the fact that everyone said he was an idiot for twenty years, including the most famous people and famous discoveries. We know of but what you see with loon shots with these crazy ideas is very often people give up on them because of what you might call a false fail because by false fail. I mean, it was a flaw in the experiment rather than the idea the outcome is the same. You know, the experiment gave a negative result and everybody walks away and science experience negative result. Everybody walks away. But the problem is not with the idea with the experiment..

Isaac Newton Robert hook Jeff Raskin Steve Jobs Tony Robbins Peter Thiel executive three hundred sixty degree sixty seconds twenty years
"robert hooke" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"robert hooke" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"You're listening to the naked scientists would make Christmas and also with Georgia mills and for the next twenty five minutes or so we're going to be exploring the science of art and the art in science from preserving the past to finding forgeries and creating colors with us is Palo Ricciardi. She's a research scientist of the fitzwilliam museum in Cambridge. And Stewart simple who's a contemporary artist. And also, a creator of a rainbow of very interesting. New pigments, I out the art in science scientific illustrations have always been vital to scientists history. Charles, Darwin was a scientific illustrator. And so it was author Beatrix Potter at a Murphy's been learning. More about why scientists might want to pick up a pencil. Today, we have photos films and even virtual reality to show us our science. But these things weren't always about before. Then scientists had to use incredibly perfectly detailed drawings of the things they wanted to discuss I took a trip to the Whipple librarian Cambridge to learn about this from Katie Reinhard and ca Franson. I Katie told me about the overlap between science and art I can't give you sort of exact numbers. But but there are instances of both. So some of the fellows like Robert hook were themselves made many images, we know that Robert hook apprenticed with Peter Lilley, the painter so many of the things in the archives. He made himself many of the drawings. He did, but many fellows didn't we also know that they worked with craftsmen and artists who made images for them, particularly for their published works because making wood blocks or making engraved images, cutting a copperplate for an engraved image was a specialized skill. So there you need to go to someone who had the training to do that. But how important was art to these scientists since guff Ronson told me more, it was part of a gentleman's education to learn to drew, and that is not only for science, but also understanding art, so we know from handbooks in December eighteenth century that people were told to look at engravings of famous portrait's or other paintings and copy them to learn to see and that is of course, very important skill. So within science then we moved into the library archive starting with a book by Robert Hooke contemporary and rival of Isaac Newton. And the book of his that. I was shown was very very interesting to this history over this is the first edition from sixteen sixty five of the micro Graphia, which was hooks book about the things he saw through the microscope. One of the things you see is this is this a flea giant image of. Absolutely. It's exactly. China fli? I had this image coma. Both how did he actually get this? So we know that we're talk was address Minnesota. We already said, so he probably drew the image himself, and then had copperplate cutters or copperplate engraver is to make the actually Mitch forty publication and one really important thing to realize is looking at this image, which is almost to a four pages in current size. It is a compound image. So if you look through microscope through the seventeenth century microscope. You can never see an entire flee like this. So it means he had to look several times he had to move to flee and see through the lens. And then all these things that he saw and connect into one image images. Today are commonplace in science. What was so revolutionary about these ones? I think the revolutionary thing that everyone has seen a flea before because they were really more common than now. So they were jumping on us and on on the animals around. But no one had ever seen them so close by. So they didn't realize that. We're, hey. Chairs on the legs, for example, other than drawing pictures of tiny things where else was this. So important one thing that we've really found in this research, we've been doing is that images were used in every discipline of science. So we see images of astronomical observations of stars and comets of things seen through the telescope..

Robert hook Katie Reinhard research scientist fitzwilliam museum Whipple librarian Cambridge Charles Beatrix Potter Ronson Stewart Cambridge Isaac Newton Georgia Minnesota Peter Lilley China Mitch Murphy
"robert hooke" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

04:06 min | 3 years ago

"robert hooke" Discussed on In Our Time

"You're right. Did did Newton's you probably didn't. Didn't you? Say gravity was going to go governor Jack. He didn't. They didn't say either the real, the real cause of all the things that happened in the world is God because it's neither material nor spiritual causing. I think in private, he does think that the cause of gravitation is God, but gravity is not go get this quote from it. I misread it or. Newton said the gold soda somehow permeates the universe is this little quick soundbite to say, go discrepancy, but it's not actually, but it'd be terrible, rather light the seashore. I mean, he's he doesn't. He doesn't do eloquent son. Eighteenth century. Leave out with a colossal round. He had with vela's about telescopes and and whether or not you should use lenses in the IP of whether you should use the naked eye on the the last plate in microgravity. This marvelous show of picture of a crater on the moon, and there's a great big bit, which is how hook sees it through his telescope. MS these tiny little dots have alias and someone else see through telescope. And then he goes into a long soliloquy about how will create a looks like a pair and the earth and the moon must be similar. And the next thing he's got this short vegetable coat by which he means gross short, vegetable coke, growing on the moon, like it doesn't souls. We plans don't quite get the sheep out there, but you can see them coming. And then he said, he says he had publicizes that there is a force like gravity up on the moon, like there is done on the earth force, like gravity on the moon is there and Copernicus opponent. 'cause it's quite clear that that that that would need to be a pattern of attraction, but have, let's defend values from. Various has some of the most wonderful telescopes have Elliot's simply believes that for measuring the location of bodies in the heavens, naturalized site instruments of the site, sorta Lebanese by taco Broadway better than anything. Because if you try and put the lens in what you'll get, you'll get vibration and you'll you're, you won't be able to calibrate your properties. She's going to interrupt this broadcast and producer, very news. Tea or coffee coffee piece. Good question. Studied on the show joins being generous. No, he's not being too hokey. If I have been, you know, if I've seen. He's because I've be standing on the shoulders of John. I'm basing further than others. He saying, I've seen. That was always interested in little step and you did a bit more in the previous life says, he's just say shoulders of giants. Are you not not you and take in the previous luxuries? Just said, you stole everything from Descartes, and I destroy what you didn't take from Descartes. Yeah, yeah, yeah. But in razor, I've stood on the shoulder giant. Does he mean hook? Yes. Let's hope so. No, some wrong. A little guy, he's being sarcastic. He's trying. He's did you get from Sean if you knew about the way. Robert Merton on. Quill. Wonderful. Aren't you. I agree. I don't think he he, I mean, unless. We've got golden images time make remote like that to someone who's totally bent over and getting has been since he was sixteen. It's getting worse and worse and worse because hook apparently had some inherited disease in our time with Melvyn Bragg is produced by Simon Tillotson. Hello, I'm Dan solid. You know, if you enjoyed that program, you might also enjoy the food program where each week we bring you stories from around the UK and around the world stories of people and places, cooking and culture, politics and pleasure. There are hundreds of episodes available and it's easy to subscribe wherever you get your podcasts..

Newton vela John Elliot Robert Merton governor Jack Melvyn Bragg producer UK Sean Simon Tillotson
"robert hooke" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

04:21 min | 3 years ago

"robert hooke" Discussed on In Our Time

"He also was resurrected around about the time of hook at the end of the twentieth century. So there's quite a few historical characters like that. Who who now in recently historians costing former Reten. Listen to roll hundreds is reputation stand now as being rediscovered house reputations on. I think in the last thirty years he's been rehabilitated I think he's a remarkable man. He's just very unfortunate. First of all to have been giving doing his best work it verbally as it were about it being recorded. As soon as he gets the chance, he publishes all his own stuff as as lectures. But he's also obviously unfortunate to be born in the same year resides at Newton, and we've Newton's triumphs everyone else with with one or two exceptions Christian hooligans. They're all liberated and I don't think Newton has Newton is certainly one for holding grudges, definitely. He's great at that, but he doesn't have to do anything. I mean, the triumph of his work, the work of his own disciples and acolytes serves to obliterate the memory of Robert Hooke David. David, the his central problem is he's not really a great mathematician, but the difference between Hooker Newton is that hook is a great experiment. He's a wonderful genius at devising experiments, explaining things through experiments, but he's not a great mathematician, and the new science is being made by the mathematicians by Galileo by Keppler by Newton, and he can't keep up with them. Absolutely masses. So central to modern science. We inevitably heroin is Newton rather than experimentalist, but they're both absolutely crucial for the development of science. Thank you very much portrayal, Patricia Fara, David, wooden robot. If next week we were talking about Mary Magdalene sometimes called the apostles apostle. Thank you for listening and the inner time podcast, get some extra time now with a few minutes of BOTAS material for Melvin and his guests. Now, what did you miss out on your own comparing Newton hook? It's quite interesting to think of them. Geographically the hook basically lived in the isle of white, Oxford and London. A Newton only ever live. In and soap and Cambridge in London. So both of them had these very sedentary lines based in three places when the great plague was on and they both escaped and went to the countries, I Newton went back to Warsaw and that was when supposedly the apple fell. He did all his great experiments with the prison. At the same time, he was doing all that hook was staying with a friend up on the dance near Banstead and he found seashells and that was what he was thinking about how the earth was created in how how the fl the temporary flood doesn't make sense in terms of developing MIR, these two men whose lives intertwined in three different places doing similar things. Think that you pick up the show. If you mean you think. Think if not literally ubiquitous issue, if you hook you let come from. And if you're always like you stand on the shore and you say, I little boy. But but Boston. On the shore, picking up a pebble. Learn the better than all the others. But what does he before me is the great. I should've never have said that he could never accept it. What do you think. Emotional touch to it. You despise. Yeah, but well. Comes from there. Lots of fossils what's extrordinary about him in a way that carries the memory of those fossils through his life. He'd looks petrified wood through his microscope and says, this is this is would, but it's turned to stone standard view at the time is that fossils are some are made by nature and they just look like they've been live in creatures and they aren't really living creatures. Hook following Leonardo before him says, these are real, the remains of real live creatures, and then he makes us extraordinary step is saying, well, some of these things no longer exists. So some creatures must have disappeared. And this is I think the brilliant move. He says, maybe the recruiters life now the use not to exist. And in that sense, he has a notion of the population of living beings has changed over time. He's the first person I think to be clear about that doesn't mean it's evolution. That does is it could be continuous separate reactions by God..

Hooker Newton Robert Hooke David Leonardo Reten Mary Magdalene Patricia Fara heroin Banstead Melvin London Boston apple Oxford Cambridge Warsaw thirty years
"robert hooke" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

03:23 min | 3 years ago

"robert hooke" Discussed on In Our Time

"Someone he's churches, foot, thirteen thousand houses in, but sixty. Five thousand people have been made. Homeless hook is the man in charge of rebuilding London and fats. I think as far as we can tell where the nine thousand pounds got nine month just over a million in modern money makes him. He dies as riches as Boyle. He's always regarded through his life as being enormously rich. He dies, his richest John Locke has rates successful investor and as a fantastically successful career. Now. His chest underneath his bed. He inherits his chest from his father. I suspect it's probably the same chest. Harry zone behaving as if he's still poor. He doesn't adapt to having changed his own life and it's true that he never finishes things. One thing he never fails to finish his building works. He becomes an architect. He does all that stuff efficiently and on time, meanwhile, the Royal Society saying coming to do some experiments Verson. He's too busy making money. We haven't done it in the geology and everything I was. It was very interesting about these old bones discovered about jewelry and managed tried to fit that into the short four thousand year span of creation of the earth. Rob, you're looking impatient. I think he's remarkably innovative in in the field of thinking about bones. Mammoths from Siberia, the famous Kentish hippopotamus. So he he's very unlike some of his contemporaries. He's prepared to think that things like ammonites, belemnites trial bites are the remains and shells are the remains of living things, but that makes that makes the four thousand year six thousand year history of the world. Very, very difficult to sustain. And he is prepared to think the unthinkable. He's prepared to think almost uniquely in his time that the four thousand six thousand year history of can't be right. The other thing that's interesting is he looks at the coastlines of islands. Africa I to the coastlines of what's known of the North America and South American. He says they, they fit into Gela. You know, and you can make some inferences from that about how the history of the world has come about. You know, that kind of theory of continental drift is is put about in the twentieth century and we could go on about the things you just kept inventing, but his reputation declined steeply in the last fifty was Newton. Partly hewn seemed to get it in from. There's not a portrait of him. Newton fill is plus with poachers Bill, but not single portrait to hook remaining Newton when. Well, we don't know if there ever was one, but certainly one of the first things that Newton did when he became president of the Royal Society. So as in his own large portrait and had his name put on it in gold letters. And when he got all the other fellows portrayed in and hooks portrait, if there was one somehow, miraculous didn't find its way to the Royal Society who died in in seventeen or three and seventy four Newton publishers his book about optics. And then he was president for over twenty years. And if if you're president of the Royal Society is pretty easy to suppress somebody's reputation, if I similar thing happened at the end of the eighteenth early nineteenth century with Joseph banks, his Victorian successes didn't like the way he governed the Royal Society for forty two forty three years, and his reputation was suppressed them..

Royal Society president president of the Royal Society Boyle Rob Newton London Joseph banks Africa Harry Gela Siberia North America John Locke four thousand year four thousand six thousand yea forty two forty three years nine thousand pounds seventy four Newton six thousand year
"robert hooke" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"robert hooke" Discussed on In Our Time

"Once you've got a university degree, you are by definition a gentlemen, he's moved up in social status and and he and he begins to regard himself and it begins to some degree to be treated as an equal with other people. So one of the things hook is doing is he's moving up in social status, and there's an awkwardness about whether people will recognize this, which isn't helped by the fact that he's founding awkward character himself. Rogue can like, can I just say it hooked dis where in seventeen three with nine thousand five hundred pounds, which is an unbelievable Lance of money. He's already quite wealthy by the early sixteenth seventy s he doesn't have to work for hire in the body 'cause insists on getting paid for everything and particularly after the great fire makes a lot of money read housing London, but he's throwing himself into the world. He leads this active life, this feta activity, the bacon enjoins and he can't stop himself. And one of the problems is because he's pulled in so many directions. He can't finish anything. The other problem, which is related to one of the projects he's got to to undo the damage of the fall is is to create an infrastructure so that you can memorialize or make a memory a recording of all the things that have been done. But his main problem is that all the great things he's done. He's done great things were given us lectures and demonstrations to the Royal Society. So when Henry Oldenburg the secretary died in sixteen seventy seven. The first. Thing hooked does after he's elected as the secretaries. He goes back over the records and he finds out what he already wants to find, which is the Odenberg is a rascal or a dog who has deliberately refused to record hoax. Great discoveries and the the hook folio that's online, I think is available to the listeners shows hooks efforts over a period of what fifteen twenty years to do right by himself and. You put him out. That's a very good question. In the sense, gave it all societies international status by having these transactions. I'm gonna print like a go to Germany and all and until the end zone America, of course. But practically until the hook, I was discovered seven, eight years ago, ten years ago. Now, time flies. We we had no evidence that Odenberg deliberately excluded hope from the records, but that shows conclusively did. And I think it derives particularly the last two years of autumn Berg's life when there is this dispute with Christiane Oregon's over the invention of a balance spring watch because that's the great invention for for hook. He wants that badly. An Oldenburg effectively stops him from getting the credit for that. Killers against him. He was doing nothing but help them. Off to say after obstacle cloud of London when he became the sixties and he was working very closely with ran in rebuilding the city. I think he paid less than we had less and less time to spend at the Royal Society. So he was quite often, so recycling, old experiments, and and old ideas. And yes, I mean, he was one of the extraordinary things that he was incredibly wealthy at this huge amount of money, but he, he just didn't show it. He didn't spend it. He had the reputation of being a miser, and he was always very shabbily dressed. And he was an another thing that we haven't talked about it. He was constantly taking drugs. He was constantly constantly medicating himself. He's left history. He was absolutely obsessed with every sniffly was particularly obsessed with his bounce. Like a lot of eighteenth seventeenth and eighteenth century gentlemen were, and he had this idea that the the more times he was sick. The more purgatory took the clearer his mind became. So he was constantly though stop, right. Well, we'll go to. Is there any sense of a constant philosophy behind his there were, or is it? Is it just consonant invention on total work? The philosophy, I hook designs machines, but he also thinks that the universe is machine and what he thinks he's seen through his microscope is how creatures like fees a little machines. So in that sense, his philosophies and mechanical philosophy, you use machines to explore world that's been created by God as a great machine, an and that's a fundamental understanding that enables him to see a coherence between his own practical task. God himself has done when he's made made the universe, but can I just go back to the fire Monday?.

Henry Oldenburg Berg Royal Society London Odenberg Germany secretary Christiane Oregon America nine thousand five hundred pou fifteen twenty years eight years ten years two years
"robert hooke" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

03:36 min | 3 years ago

"robert hooke" Discussed on In Our Time

"That's who teaches him and that is what hook. Once he also wants the inverse square law, he wants Newton impr- gear to reference the inverse quello. And he also wants neaten to reference the fact that the earth is an Oblate spheroid because I, it's flattened to the polls, which for hook is extremely important because hook has a theory of how the. Earth has changed over time, and it's a brilliant theory. It's a remarkable theory. So hook wants that and he, he gets nothing. He gets nothing from the a Newton accident incredible bad faith in sixty Ninety-six eighty-seven. Just as the Principia has published. Here, but what Newton certainly didn't understand until he reads this from hook is how you describe how you explain orbital motion. But in fact, all that hook us down there is take Garrett Galileo's principles of what's happening if you firing accountable that trying to go in a straight line. And then it's also fulling it's doing two things at once traveling in a straight line and falling simultaneously apply that to orbital motion of planets. So in a sense, hookers only told Newton something that Newton already knew and that everybody has already known. He showed him how to apply Galileo to the heavens. And Consequently, I think there's a sense in which Newton must've thought, oh, that's obvious. I don't have to attributed to hook because we've already known, but bringing those ideas together hook is actually the first person to do Newton should've said I wouldn't have seen it or it hadn't seen it until pointed it out. 'cause you're gonna give us some idea. We got the ROY society. We all think of goodness me. And then there was light. Israel sense that this row is going on between a dozen men and and people in London are writing stage plays making fun of these scientists anyway. And so on. The most famous example of that is Thomas chat, wills play the virtuoso which the central character nNcholas game crack is based on hook and they have farcical scenes on that where. One of the most famous is where Kim cracks lying on a table and he's being taught how to swim, but he never will actually be able to swim in water. He number will become a frog who was furious when he was in the audience and that was how well known he was. He knew the everybody in that fear to was laughing at him. The raw society was a source of mockery because a lot of people were just sitting around discussing, what's the nature of the air will. Let's not much help I can breathe. I don't need to know what's in the air. So there are a lot of jokes of that's sort. There was a lot of mockery at hook himself, self. Something that was a compounder mockery wasn't he? We're told you as a small man and Pepsi seemed to be constantly ill. He was not a wealthy man because of his personal first, Gresham professor, he was not allowed to marry. I lived in rooms with a couple of times. And so was there a sense was somewhat some more and people were independent in wealthy what was going on. Disregarded. So why was he disregarded? He's crooked. He's small. He starts off being poor. He starts, he's an employee. His blows in play, which is, which is by think ball initiate, doesn't feel yesterday, recognize him because hooks his fancy lab assistant. So the survey, he's yes, he's a seven, and he becomes the servant of the Royal Society, and they treat them like a seven. But then a remarkably said he didn't matriculated Oxford and didn't study for his degree. But in sixteen sixty two, I think it is the university of Oxford gives him an an off. He's been given an EMMY for nothing. He's elected a fellow of the Royal. But he's not. He can take you stopped taking any exams. He's he's done, elected a fellow of the Royal Society..

Newton Garrett Galileo Royal Society Oxford ROY society university of Oxford EMMY Principia Kim Pepsi Israel Thomas Gresham professor London
"robert hooke" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"robert hooke" Discussed on In Our Time

"Yes, I think yes, just chummy with you. He comes up with the word and he and he's, he says this to Newton and knew this is when you can writes back same cassette of correspondence, pastor a standing on the shoulders of chance. Now. Because hook has never seen anyone. Explain what gravity isn't Thompson nearby scrape before. I'm because Newton comes along later and set makes us the foundation of his theory of gravity hook throughout the rest of his life. Believed he'd given this idea to Newton and Newton had stolen it insofar as Newton publishes it without technology. His debt talk. In fact, we know that unit already come up with this idea already wasn't telling you anything, he didn't know, but you can understand it from hooks punter view. It looks as if his idea is being stolen and he's furious when he's dealing with the most secretive man in the universe at that time Newton, Disney indeed. And this is a world in which everybody is engaged in piracy. Disputes every Newton later on falls. I would live nuts ever who's invented calculus. Everybody is saying you've stolen. My idea, hook isn't alone in being acutely sensitive to. This is similar as with the lens who can vote. I suggest that the part of the pundits ellipses if there were an inverse square law, but. What Newton did was bluffed say yet? Yes, the patent would be an ellipse. And then he spent the next two years dedicating himself to doing the mathematics to prove Muslim ellipse. Again, it's so similar sort of priority debate about ideas and working out the months. I think the key thing here is Newton's mother died in sixteen seventy nine. He tended to six months. He came back in November, sixteen seventy. Nine hundred found hoax letters on his on his desk. And what hooked says in that initial letter which is a remarkable letter, referring back to a book, the who could publish five years earlier book called an attempt to prove the motion of the earth. What hoax that is all about all berries attract or all celestial bodies attract centrally. So they track things to themselves. The second thing is that you can compound Mushin so you can analyze the orbits of planets by thinking of them as rectilinear motion in a tangent. So the so you can think of plummets as moving in a way that they would move in a straight line except they're constantly pulled back by this attractive force. It just two very simple ideas. And the third thing is the the inverse square or the one over ask, wait law now need knows this as David is just said, he's noted for for a long period of time. But what he doesn't know is that you can analyze orbital motion through rectilinear motion plus central attractive force..

Newton hook Mushin Thompson David Disney five years six months two years
"robert hooke" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

03:46 min | 3 years ago

"robert hooke" Discussed on In Our Time

"The the wave is hit that the pulse as he calls hit this other medium, but combinations of these things can give rise. For example, when white light hits a prison, they give rise to the colors of the rainbow. So the in the case of the dispute with Newton as hook sees it, the the prison is a refracting, refracting, medium that modifies the white light into a series of constituent colors. And of course for Newton that's not right because in a sense, the colors were in the white light or they constituted the white light before it hit the prison. And that's, that's one of the main differences between them. It's a very big difference. Serious wrong. I mean, we're talking about minority others throats. Throw throw. I don't think that the wave corpuscle thing between his biggest Laker Roger made now it's not as big as later rows, but I think in terms of the theory of light that that's the, that's the key issue. It certainly certainly an issue of intellectual property relationship versus particles in later on. If you centuries down the line people saying, well, let's both, yes, yeah, that wasn't really available to them at the time. David. The brownwood Newton is partly about the father. Newton says, I've got the right answer. Hook says you if that's a good answer, but I've got a good answer. Hook wants to say their alternative hypotheses that might make sense of this Newton was to say, I've done experiment, which tells you the right answer is and running through hooks early work. There's this fundamental tension between different views of songs. On the one hand, he he thinks following bacon, the science will be based upon acquiring new information. You look through the microscope, you draw exactly what you see. You build up a buddy of information. On the other hand, he thinks is about coming up with clever explanations for things. Why are there craters on the moon? It's being bombarded from outer space. He's considered that possibility says it's impossible. So he builds a little tub of plaster bubbles it up and shows that popping could cause craters and he says, that's what's causing the craters on them. So he comes up with very building explanations that our hypothesis and he's one of the I use the word hypothesis comes from takeout in this sort of way row society is supposed to be opposed to in. Venting. Explanations and hook can't stop himself. Jane Newton says, I'm not in benching expressions. I'm giving you the right answer. So you've got a sort of conflict about what the methodology of science is also practical thing in micrographics. Hook developed something which now rather annoyingly from hooks point of view is called Newton's rings that it was hooked that discovered it. There's if you have to. Two plates of glass with a little gap there between them, you get you get rings. So Newton did was to get a flat plate of glass and put a very, very shallow lens on top. And he worked out mathematically how the rings of form. There's a dark spot at the center where the lens touches the glass and then there's colored rings around it. And what hook did, who could show knit and micrographics, but then Newton took it over and provided a mathematical explanation. And that's quite a pattern in their relationship as we regretted David. Not so we can maybe get usual rescued me partly from word right? Which which, which rob challenge, but. There's a distinct difference in gravity. Does a great difference? Yes, no, udon a fallen out of the question of light, then they don't communicate with each other for many years in sixteen seventy seven hook is you become the secretary of the Royal Society who've rights to Newton, and he says, have you got any suggestions about the speculative force that's holding the universe together? I've been thinking about this and I've come up with the inverse and what we now call the inverse square law which explains how gravity gets weaker as you go farther away from the source of the of gravitational the word he he comes up with a formula. Yeah. Not gravity. Uh-huh..

Jane Newton hook Newton David micrographics Royal Society Roger secretary rob challenge one hand