17 Burst results for "Robert Dini"

"robert dini" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

07:23 min | 2 months ago

"robert dini" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"While that is a reflection of your relationship with those people when you think about what creating trust does trust is the greatest exceleron of ideas a lack of trust causes no movement at all and things are very very slow so when you look at the connection between culture which is very trust oriented by the way what you're talking about is you're talking about speed or execution versus literally just kind of dying on the vine so to speak so imagine if you had a culture where every time you had an appropriate idea that culture would absorb that idea and execute that idea. That's kind of a fantasy that any any leader have we. Will you say when we're talking. Trust is that would you say. Trust is the raider. Yeah so think about this. There was actually one of the covey's did an amazing book that i highly recommend and i give right. It's called the speed of trust and in that book. A key outlines. How an is really funny. The you know the first circle in that that that Diagram is self trust. So what's kind of funny is how we feel about our own abilities. Then is what transfers into relational trust. So there's one of the things about culture what you're really doing. Go back to save him. So the question is does a new recruit trust. That's that that sabin you get. What i'm saying is going to get him in the nfl. Well if you look at the stats you got a pretty good shot to get into the nfl right right. So the trust is a huge part. So what a lot of people don't realize is the reason you're team doesn't do what you ask them to do. And this is crazy is that they don't trust you and does it. Not that way. It's almost horrifying to think about. But that's actually what's going on. Well they always when you come back from a seminar on your all excited you say something male role there is because they know it's going to be just like it always has been Given enough time it's nothing. They always say well. Nothing's ever gonna change because they trust in that more than something else that goes back to the question of if you if you go back and you say we have a high performing right which means we don't allow low performers patient centric most of the changes like the thing. i look that whole system. I developed. You know that was completely based on what was best for the patient and nothing else patient does not want to him and hough when they call your office they wanna make an appointment and come in and that was always in continues to be my focus. Get yourself out of the way. Give the patient what the patient wants and the thing is going to do well but you gotta get a team member who trust. I mean. I have been called. It's a called jay. Geier is just about the money. I mean i've been called every terrible name. You possibly can by a person who didn't trust their doctor just to follow our system and they make it into something. It's not trust is important. And i'm i've always been accused of having Facial hair transplants and Muscle implants and that. I'm on steroids. I look at my body and think. Oh that's natural. You must be taken steroids muscles pig and be this hot our but you listen you have a lot of trust with your people and you you know and i know that that's probably one of the things that you if you stopped and said what are what are one or two of the things that you most are appreciative for win. That trust be pretty high on the list. It's everything and you know Journalists are always saying like We'll why do american people care. What a movie star like. Why do they care. What willie nelson things they should think about what. A scientists are a politician things. Well they obviously trust willie nelson if he told if he's if he's honest with any tells you everything they trust him so well. Hey now that the election is over or not over but still going on you know. We use robert Dini's six principles of influence. And there's one which is called liking where you intentionally get people to like you. I mean i think that one costs trump the election. He didn't do a very good job of getting people to like him. And you look at what the democrats did is they said. Let's hate trump and they did a very effective job of ringing. That bell is one of the things that get every doctor. We've got to think about you know why does a team member. Embezzle from doctor you know. Why does that happen. So he was my teacher at arizona state university when i got my mba Robert some sun all day reading. Yeah how do you say his name shall dini challe deny- and it's funny because what i liked the most about it whenever i email text moore some he always works in one of his quotes in the answer. Like i said does not wanted. He goes to use of boba but he lives. He lives right around the corner. But he'll say. I liked the way howard. You use blah blah blah. But i mean powerful guy. Yes we basic we have. We parted with him for a number of years and much of the way. We teach a doctor how to become more influential is based on his research. Yeah absolutely try to train them okay. Well here's what you gotta do. You know we're training young associate doctor. We're we're going through that list right. We're saying okay. How are we going to get you to have authority some glasses on you. Okay show me. Likeable all right. Oh man you're you're too stiff so we actually anyways great stuff by the way yeah. He's he's a very interesting man. I really like it so Do you think my guy my my average guy out there has got the tools they always say. This is like being a leader. They say are you born being a leader. I mean obviously in the nfl being fifa seven short fat irish guy. I was not born with what it takes to play in the nfl. I've never even touched the bottom of the net. Let alone the top of the nabet. Do you think you're born with this or do you think it's a trainable skill to be a leader and and have a culture that's intentionally designed as opposed default culture. It listen it.

nfl robert Dini willie nelson covey Facial hair hough Geier arizona state university boba bell moore howard
"robert dini" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

06:59 min | 5 months ago

"robert dini" Discussed on Accelerate!

"Value of your insights? N- offer maybe less important than when you actually present them. Robert also shares a surprising insight that alters the perception of bit of whole people buy from people they know like entrusting. Oh. There's actually a fourth element that he brings out in his book to that equation. It's. People. Buy from people they know like and. Come to stay tuned to find all this and much much more forget to Robert Dini. Remind you to subscribe to this podcast Raver listen to it. And if you subscribe, we certainly appreciate it if you could also give us your feedback about how we're doing in the form of a review. Thanks. All right. Let's jump into. Well I'm glad to be with you. Andy thank you for taking the time so Take a minute that very brief induction we had. But how'd you get into this business of studying influence? I actually. Say something about it. In the first paragraph of of the book influence. It's that all my life I I've been a soccer. I've always been a pushover for the appeals of. Sales people or fundraisers come to my door and I would stand in unwanted possession of things or recognizing that I contributed to causes I didn't really know about in. In. And it occurred to me. That there must be something other than the merits of the thing. That got me to say, yes or I didn't want those particular things I bought. But I was standing there with them and someone was walking away with my money which I did want. So so It must be the psychology. Of the way, the merits were presented. That won the day and I decided this is worth studying. Well, it's interesting influence I mean you more so than precision. In influence you. Spend as almost seems like almost as much time people how to resist. The methods of influence as much as on how how to implement them. Indeed that was the purpose of influence to inform people about how to recognize resist. Influence attempts that were used on them in an undue or unwelcome way not all influence attempts. That's very important. Influence that's that's done honestly and and informs people into consent. I. Am a big Fan of that kind of influence. But I did want to arm people against those individuals who counterfeited the process who? Who misguided people into sent and so the book was written for consumers in mind the interesting thing is that. No consumer group has ever called. To, say your clients people speak to are all on the other side of saying how do we implement this as opposed hardaway? Resistant. Precisely because. People want to know well, if you understand how the influence process works, how do we get to harness? It could we to harness that understanding so that we can be more effective in the process, and of course, that requires if I'm going to shift from from deflecting influence to employing it that does require a focus on the ethics of the process. So the people who. Who who use these influence strategies can feel good about it. Not, only can profit from it, but they can feel good about themselves in the way that they managed. To create that success. was interesting with that sort contrast between resisting post and planning that. Either way really requires a level of of conscious thought that that most people don't give us this idea about influence I think it's just about brute force persuasion. And influence are. Are. Almost. You know things that have been bred into US genetic, some genetic level in terms of how we react to certain like the reciprocity and so on. How do we react to that? It's almost like we're unless we're thinking about it. We're not at we were not able to resist. I think you're right and. And what has evolved for me in all of this is the recognition that those tendencies that are most primitive in us. are also the most powerful. So if we can tap into those fundamental motivations that are universal to the species. Then we've got a set of tools that will be most successful over the widest range of situations, widest range of populations. Laid out influence just quick. I want to spend a lot of influence, but you lay out the six. Precepts of of influence. So what are those Augusta refresh for them the listeners? Sure the the first is reciprocity. The idea that people want to say, yes to those who have I given them something. So, for example, research shows that if. The manager of a of a candy store gives people a piece of chocolate as they enter they become forty five percent more likely to buy something in the store. Because, they've received in it it requires something in return when you have received so that basic idea I mean suggests that we have to give I and most often it can be information that we can provide that informs people I have a friend WHO's. She's a speaking agent and she had A. Client who is a very slow pay you know? Six months to get paid from this, and that was true for all of her friends said the same thing about this guy? So here's what she did to cut in half. The return time when she sends in an invoice. Knows that this guy happens to be. an art fan She goes to her local art galleries and museums. And Biza little postcard of a piece of art. She includes it in the invoice and it's cut. His his response time.

Robert Dini soccer Andy A. Client hardaway Biza us.
"robert dini" Discussed on The LEADx Show

The LEADx Show

07:34 min | 7 months ago

"robert dini" Discussed on The LEADx Show

"Vanya Mathis to introduce our guest and handed over to them. Enjoy thanks for watching how to effectively lead. Anada Gate stress in payoffs. Our next host is going to help you understand the origins and impact of straps explain how increased you can help you manage stress and provide a few different types of approaches that you can use to combat the feelings. Anxiety may have right now. He's also going to discuss a very simple practice that you can do every day to increase your wellbeing unresolved. Or host is the founder of emery leadership group has a masters in organizational leadership and as an expert on emotional intelligence. He's a member of the Forbes Coaches Council on Harvard Business Review Advisory Board. Please welcome. Patrick very new everyone? This is Patrick Baranov. I'm here to do a Webinar on how to effectively navigate stress and lead slash help others and the reason I have lead in there because to me as we go through this. I think you'll see that. This is not just a workshop on how to navigate stress internally, but to me this is about this is a leadership workshop where I spend most of. My time working with organizations so a little bit of background. Be Behind me. I run a podcast called lead like no other actions that inspire which will soon be changing to leadership reimagined, and that really is. Based on a lot of the work that I've been doing this podcast has been in existence for. Almost, two years now, but some of my background ice tablist, my business in two thousand eight, which, for those that remember that was our last financial crisis so I'm I'm familiar with the space for for what that's worth, and there are three areas that I focus. My work on one is on emotional intelligence. A model that I use is out of Australia. The group is called Genus, and it's a workplace model I also do a lot of work both disk in the five dysfunctions of a team. In combining those and then the last piece, it's like a three legged stool. Is Around Influence and bias research. And I was able to get certified and trained under a gentleman named Robert Dini down in Phoenix Arizona, the three of those for all of the work that I do and what we're GonNa talk about today in regards to leader stress, management and leading. Are All relevant and pieces. Those will come out throughout this. So. Here's some contact information for me as well. And I will start this out as I mentioned to me this leadership workshop. Even though we're talking about stress, management and I say that from this quote. John Quincy Adams said if your actions inspire someone. To Do to dream, more learn more do more and become more your leader. Nothing in here about a title and I think we really have an opportunity. It's our actions that will inspire others, and how we relate to stress and navigate stress, ourselves will have the ability to impact other people around us to, and that's why they're so important. So, the objectives here right explore the biological psychological and social aspects of the Human Stress Response, and it is a response and we're GONNA. Look at it really from a few different areas right the physical, emotional, spiritual and intellectual impact of stress, and it really does impact all of those. So then we'll look at understanding. What are some of the coping strategies that we can use to either increase, or what once damage our resilience? And this really is meant to be almost a buffet, even though you probably can't find buff as anymore because of the environment we're in. That this really will be an opportunity to take a look at what are some different strategies that I can use that fit in in my lifestyle. You don't need to choose them all. But there's something here for everybody in terms of how you can effectively navigate, stress yourself or help somebody else. And then from there, we'll look at a model that I put together and it's journal actually. Called the power. Journal, and there are a number of activities in that promote both wellbeing resilience. And this is based on a lot of research I will say foundationally. One of them is based on one that was done by gentleman named Sean Acre. WHO A HARVARD RESEARCHER! And he did what was called the twenty one day challenge, and he actually did this back in Glebe two thousand nine, so at that point of financial crisis before. And he actually did it with A. Group Company that was in the financial industry. And what they found when they when they did these activities that we'll talk about the end. That the the individuals that were able to follow through on this twenty one day challenge themselves to be in a happier place and to me if we can identify those things and find that and find a way to be happier, rebuild more resilient and well. Being I think all of us want that. Especially now. So a couple pieces of research talking about the origins of stress. If you weren't familiar before you probably are now in regards to the CDC their definition of stress, harmful, physical and psychological responses when job requirements don't match capabilities, skills, resources, or needs of the worker and I think in the environment that we're in now. Most of US probably feel stress in one of those areas. Now, what's important here is this. CDC's definition also goes on to say that this should not be confused with challenges and I've listed. You stress here. Because we need stress stresses important for us as well because it provides us an opportunity. To grow and improve. It's only when we lose control of it. That it becomes damaging to us and really that's what this workshop or webinars focused on. Undoing is providing ways that we can take the stress that we're dealing with the situations that we're dealing with and find ways to navigate those and I would say almost leverage these. So the next piece I'll talk about. Is this one that was done by the? American psychological, association. This was a survey. Twenty fourteen where they served. A little over three thousand individuals, and they ask them questions in four different areas, work money, family and health. I've only listed to here. Is it relates to both work in financial stress but I think if we were to take this today. We probably would all agree that? These would probably higher than sixty percent. But in this what they did was they asked individuals. Where are you on? This level and sixty percent felt that they'll work. Stress was significant. Sixty four percent of respondents felt their financial stress significance. And the fourth bullet here is I think so important in the environment. We're in right. Emotional support mattered. forty-three percent of those without emotional support said that their stress increased over the previous year. And forty three percent of those also said that they experience depression. Now, we look at that as it compares with those that felt they had emotional support. Twenty six percent of that group said that they're increase. Their stress increased over the previous year. And about a third, had experienced depression and I think that is so important to note because when we think about social distancing. The only place that social distancing is really a value to us right now. is as it relates to our physical health and not catching the virus other.

Patrick Baranov depression CDC Vanya Mathis Harvard Business Review Anada Gate Forbes Coaches Council founder Australia HARVARD Advisory Board John Quincy Adams Robert Dini US A. Group Company Phoenix Arizona Sean Acre RESEARCHER
How To Navigate Stress

The LEADx Show

05:48 min | 7 months ago

How To Navigate Stress

"Everyone? This is Patrick Baranov. I'm here to do a Webinar on how to effectively navigate stress and lead slash help others and the reason I have lead in there because to me as we go through this. I think you'll see that. This is not just a workshop on how to navigate stress internally, but to me this is about this is a leadership workshop where I spend most of. My time working with organizations so a little bit of background. Be Behind me. I run a podcast called lead like no other actions that inspire which will soon be changing to leadership reimagined, and that really is. Based on a lot of the work that I've been doing this podcast has been in existence for. Almost, two years now, but some of my background ice tablist, my business in two thousand eight, which, for those that remember that was our last financial crisis so I'm I'm familiar with the space for for what that's worth, and there are three areas that I focus. My work on one is on emotional intelligence. A model that I use is out of Australia. The group is called Genus, and it's a workplace model I also do a lot of work both disk in the five dysfunctions of a team. In combining those and then the last piece, it's like a three legged stool. Is Around Influence and bias research. And I was able to get certified and trained under a gentleman named Robert Dini down in Phoenix Arizona, the three of those for all of the work that I do and what we're GonNa talk about today in regards to leader stress, management and leading. Are All relevant and pieces. Those will come out throughout this. So. Here's some contact information for me as well. And I will start this out as I mentioned to me this leadership workshop. Even though we're talking about stress, management and I say that from this quote. John Quincy Adams said if your actions inspire someone. To Do to dream, more learn more do more and become more your leader. Nothing in here about a title and I think we really have an opportunity. It's our actions that will inspire others, and how we relate to stress and navigate stress, ourselves will have the ability to impact other people around us to, and that's why they're so important. So, the objectives here right explore the biological psychological and social aspects of the Human Stress Response, and it is a response and we're GONNA. Look at it really from a few different areas right the physical, emotional, spiritual and intellectual impact of stress, and it really does impact all of those. So then we'll look at understanding. What are some of the coping strategies that we can use to either increase, or what once damage our resilience? And this really is meant to be almost a buffet, even though you probably can't find buff as anymore because of the environment we're in. That this really will be an opportunity to take a look at what are some different strategies that I can use that fit in in my lifestyle. You don't need to choose them all. But there's something here for everybody in terms of how you can effectively navigate, stress yourself or help somebody else. And then from there, we'll look at a model that I put together and it's journal actually. Called the power. Journal, and there are a number of activities in that promote both wellbeing resilience. And this is based on a lot of research I will say foundationally. One of them is based on one that was done by gentleman named Sean Acre. WHO A HARVARD RESEARCHER! And he did what was called the twenty one day challenge, and he actually did this back in Glebe two thousand nine, so at that point of financial crisis before. And he actually did it with A. Group Company that was in the financial industry. And what they found when they when they did these activities that we'll talk about the end. That the the individuals that were able to follow through on this twenty one day challenge themselves to be in a happier place and to me if we can identify those things and find that and find a way to be happier, rebuild more resilient and well. Being I think all of us want that. Especially now. So a couple pieces of research talking about the origins of stress. If you weren't familiar before you probably are now in regards to the CDC their definition of stress, harmful, physical and psychological responses when job requirements don't match capabilities, skills, resources, or needs of the worker and I think in the environment that we're in now. Most of US probably feel stress in one of those areas. Now, what's important here is this. CDC's definition also goes on to say that this should not be confused with challenges and I've listed. You stress here. Because we need stress stresses important for us as well because it provides us an opportunity. To grow and improve. It's only when we lose control of it. That it becomes damaging to us and really that's what this workshop or webinars focused on. Undoing is providing ways that we can take the stress that we're dealing with the situations that we're dealing with and find ways to navigate those and I would say almost leverage these. So the next piece I'll talk about. Is this one that was done by the? American psychological, association. This was a survey. Twenty fourteen where they served. A little over three thousand individuals, and they ask them questions in four different areas, work money, family and health. I've only listed to here. Is it relates to both work in financial stress but I think if we were to take this today. We probably would all agree that? These would probably higher than sixty percent.

CDC Patrick Baranov Australia Robert Dini John Quincy Adams Harvard Phoenix Arizona Sean Acre United States A. Group Company Researcher
"robert dini" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

08:18 min | 9 months ago

"robert dini" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"We'd love to get feedback you know. Please write us in. Tell us what you think of it. you we could pass it on to them but also for us. It's really good to know what you thought about that You know folks out there who are listening so all right back to the show now. It's time for book of the show. My Book of the show is influence by Robert Dini This is a really interesting book. Actually read it a while back But but it kind of stuck with me and It it goes through the thing. I love about this books. I recommended Another book by Scott Adams that was about influence but that book was written by someone who I just felt like. They had a lot of influence. This is actually written by a professor who studies influences studies like a social scientists and so They say a lot of the beginning. At least they say a lot of things that are kind of obvious But didn't they show actually just this ties in well with With our last news article of they kinda show why these things are what they are like. They kind of explained the causality there And then they are jumping into Yukon more dance topics things that you wouldn't really expect One of the things that really stood out for me was they said that if you let's say you're in a traffic accident and so you're on the highway and let's say you have. I don't know broken arm or something. You know someone much issue for behind your broken arm. And let's say that person sped off so So you're you're a bad spot right so I said what did you should do is is instead of like waving and trying to get all the cars attention at once. You should actually just stop a car or like pick one car and focus on them or imagine the same thing if you're in a line and you're feeling like you're going to pass out or something You pick one person in the line a you ask them directly for help and the reason why is is Basically there's this sort of weird tight namic with influence or if someone isn't totally sure you're trying to influence them or somebody else than that. Nobody takes you seriously and so If you pick one person even if that person doesn't help you by by focusing on them and getting rejected by that person you immediately build like a ton of influence with the people right around them And so you know. That was just one thing. I won't go through everything but it talks a lot about social. Science explains like why car salesmen do what they do. explains both good and bad influence And I thought the whole thing was really fascinating I think especially for introverts. This is a must read because you kind of see you for extroverts for people who are naturally Have a lot of influence You know I think Come naturally or feel naturally The only natural but but for everyone else. You're just getting the information being exposed to it is Is extraordinarily valuable. Now you can kind of see none of read the book. I kind of see You know the the attempt to influence in commercials and in when people right you know sales pitches and all of that you could kind of decomposes deconstructed Using all of this theory that has come out of this book. So it's it's a bit of a heavy read it's written for lay people like us. Oh you don't have to be Social scientists it doesn't use a lot of complicated terminology But it's a pretty deep dive so so keep that in mind but you know now's a good time hopefully for a lot of folks to To do some reading and I think this is a good one to pick up. You've influenced me. I feel the need to To read this book about influence all right so this book must be working so yeah so my My book the show is a science. Fiction book called Columbus Day which is part of a series Expeditionary Force by Craig. Allison and this. I read a lot of science fiction fantasy since the last time. We've done book of the show. I had actually pretty long list but a pick. This one is The most recent one I've read I really enjoyed this It was a pretty light hearted. Read well pretty easy. Read not in not as sort of deep deep sci-fi book but had some interesting ideas which is you know if the ball too much Amazon review and it's listed as sort of the summary But if earth was invaded by sort of an alien species and then some other alien species came and did battle with them and we sort of like Yay. They're our Savior's. They fought off the bad guys. We actually have no context for that. We don't know how or why they did what they did to sort of celebrate them at here as heroes makes sense but could be Rahm if if such people actually showed up we don't know the Grand Scheme of species aliens that would be out so if someone shot up with Asi Superior Technology to US would somewhat be subservient to them but if we had a choice we would have no broader context of the political scheme of where they came from like. Who are their enemies? Are we allying ourselves with like the really bad people of the universe and like are we going to become part of the axis of evil like we? Don't you wouldn't really know and it's sort of an interesting topic that we always think of ourselves as kind of knowing what's what if somebody I it's fiction right but if someone just popped into the sky there would be actually very little we would understand and what we were able to be communicated about might be very limited so we may not know is that they don't like the people who are trying to kill you. That's the only piece of information you have right right but the people trying to kill you. There are various levels of that right and so exactly what you can always spin it but then if he gets spun so they can say Oh. They only were destroying large cities. Right maybe they were trying to prevent You know make it less. You are less valuable target And so is that a kind hearted thing to do or a terrible thing. To do up your. They're trying to hurt you. So yes you're right. So if other people showed up and fought them off we know is that they fought them. Yeah I don't know I did. The bad guys. Good guys should be go with them. Should we fight them? Yeah that's kind of play on that team. Yeah I've always been curious. How PEOPLE And this is probably enormous engine but how how science fiction writers go about world building like do they usually start with Something that happened on earth like you know that they want to to explore and they just want to get rid of basically all the names and the places But it's really like something that could happen on earth between countries or or do they do they just start with a blank canvas and say I want planets made of sodium and then then they start exploring the implications of that. Yeah I mean I think it happens on different ways. If you're curious about this. I did stumble across a random. Read it the other day. Which is the world building? Read it so if you go to. Ready Dot com slash are slash world building. They actually have read where people give maps for places. They've invented people give feedback. Ask questions what do you think about this? Exactly that if the world was not mostly Silica based sand but sodium everywhere like what would be different And you know they kind of riff off each other each other through the implications generally. Just you know sort of help out creative people trying to think through what would happen to check out. Yeah it sounds awesome. It's time for. Oh well talking. That's GONNA show but I forgot. I haven't been driving in the car but you know I still find that. I haven't been actually reading the books either. I found downtime..

Robert Dini Yukon professor US Scott Adams Allison Craig Rahm Amazon Asi Superior Technology
"robert dini" Discussed on Authors In Chains

Authors In Chains

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"robert dini" Discussed on Authors In Chains

"And fans hosted by Robert. Dini's glitzy across and Raymond Bailey. Hang out and kick your feet up while they share their experiences failures and successes and becoming bestselling authors on the language of running the big fours. Four zero big four zero and a retro. Sorry six are going back and retro forty. We're going we're going back. Yes we're going back back to school who Yeah K- Eric. What are you? Are you sharing? Only you're doing share a table. I have I have my. You have killed my father have my rapier. I am an Eagle Montoya used. My coffee prepares to give Brim lead. You know what I'm GonNa do. I'm GONNA do a Goddamn Watch party. Who Doesn't love a watch party? Okay Watch so. We were discussing this earlier because this is six levels of retarded now you know who? Merrill Lynch's right you know. Lynch is the Investment Company. Yeah well I have recently. And actually she had a chance to watch me opening Merrill Edge Account. Because I hadn't done that I have my motif. I have my Robin Hood but I decided I already have. I WANNA integrate that three Maryland so I created the Merrill Edge. First thing they do is they send you. I kid you not a debit card for Jesmyn town. I'm trying to figure out how you're supposed to get money out of your stock account. Is it actually sell your stocks? Give you cash? So that is the most retarded thing heard in my life scattered being the worst. Hey I gotTa Watch party going in a billion different place so say hi to. Everybody was happy fortieth episode. We are talking about war building world building in case any of you guys boom world. You're talking about books and writing stuff. Anybody else checked out the new cool facebook they have that new. Beta thing later launched where you get a whole new screen as really electric push. Yeah I got. I'm part of the FAUCI BOOP DEVELOPERS NETWORKS. And maybe it's just that you're specials or special. Maybe it's just a matter of where the special arts I am. I right there little bus so I'm very special. He's okay right. Are we looking new glosses pumping well? I was on the day and now I'm feeling you know. Sometimes I drool on them. Sometimes I let them you know. Sometimes I might want the seat in the back of the bus you never know. He's a kid that had the Paisley met. I've got the Styrofoam Helmet. I wear just yeah signing. Sign your helmet. He's heads misshapen. He has to wear the helmet. It's not because they're not against the wall day. Here's circle you follow that circle all of the circle the circle don't stop until they.

Merrill Lynch Merrill Edge Raymond Bailey Dini Robin Hood Eagle Montoya Robert Brim Maryland Investment Company Jesmyn Paisley
"robert dini" Discussed on Authors In Chains

Authors In Chains

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"robert dini" Discussed on Authors In Chains

"Writers and Fans uh-huh hosted by Robert Dini's glossy across and Raymond Bailey. Hang out and kick your feet up while they share their experiences bransons failures and successes and becoming bestselling authors on running that textual imagery that they have to have that they going when they latch onto characters they want more inevitably. Evidently they want to see this person in their minds. I if we don't do it as a vehicle we do it the same way we set a scene that same way we micro build universes described raise win win going down the street. Belize's stepped out of his house. It's identical hello. Well we give character straights for different reasons. If you have a secondary care or throwaway here work he might have because your main fares gave us all and that our story of he might necessary if you want to give him a distinct distinct reason or the stink eye on that makes him him or you want to bowl something the stories that allows you to tell you more of US remain there is obviously a main Yorker. There's a reason why there's a story to develop your main era if you get your main here through three Olympic a list You know whatever it is you give their back easily hulst else define their eric. Sometimes they're bitter about sometimes there. Sometimes they have more of a worldly view of it but either way holster find bat. Eric Ritz boat is a is a trait it is. Is this an anomaly or does how far do we go. So I want you to do is is defined trait a limb a twitch. A is that go in two or three different directions. Those are anomalies. What about physical traits? That are just if I were to. If I were to describe either of you it wouldn't necessarily be a bad the thing I would describe what I see so physical traits. Don't have to be something extreme or out of the ordinary could be something as simple as a twitch or something as simple as a pronounced brow. Physical Freak doesn't have to be over the top. GotTa go really what we're talking talking about here to gain those not necessarily describing. What Acre looks like so much as as the things that he hit two point in character whether it is something that was acquired or adopted whereas just engines into the That we that we draw tensions so conditionally when I when I moved into this topic thinking about I was like. Oh Oh you're talking about things like stars you know friendliness but I mean really. There's nothing difference about inch scar on a curator's eyebrows. And how he writes that than there is from you. Know some someone's hooked nose or Lawrence fans or a a pronounced physical disability trade becomes Haro character who care. Let's say you rang horrible. It you have inadequacy Eric or has alleged. The when he walks walks is thought makes us now all of a sudden when you're later on in the book describing his all the sudden persons in the basement what year now exactly who's upstairs characterists that Lynn has all of the airdropped. Eric drunk because trade. It is a it's an identifier but do you. Also it's it's a way to see behind indepth. There's a reason why somebody has a limp. Maybe he got caught on his leg got torn off and the corn picker and they had to sell it back on the field then they didn't her `bout hung out with got beat up riot. She was exactly at the bus station or wherever that was so it is more than a prop. It's more than I. It's a communicator. It's a it's a method to see a little bit further beyond those veils. If we describe it properly especially if you right back to it later rate that is through the gracious got this you assholes are missing the point expression thinking about one specific character of mine who has an identifying traits That actually hasn't come the the explanation I wasn't like you're missing. Things I was like I was is like I had one that has had mentioned drawn to it but it hasn't been explained yet lay it. It's I have a character who has in a raw in his arm. I know they're on and it is the yet again. It will be significant. Everybody knows if they're there being attention he has. He has arrived in his on. Can you tell your rudd and your arm and he said okay so now. You're you're giving them enough to know that. He's got a rod in his arm. Are you deliberately delaying explaining this. Because it's important to describe it later. Yeah why do they not well. It's just awkward to explain it then. It was It made no sense. the scene was More about the character exposition. Who He is it was? It was a great way to see the type of person that he is because of an interaction that he has with. The Guy who's running security building is on And they have this little exchange about the thing is arm and and he's like you know he goes into this sort of mental Analysis of of what he is doing and how he's walking up and how he's going to lose this job or or get somebody curve. Because he's he's assuming because he knows grants the grant is safe and so when grant goes to. The metal detector has yarn from the game in. Grant's life Yiannis about a family. That has his walking away. He's like gamut. He shouldn't run along. No her agency concede money just dismissed me and that could have been mean bringing who knows what into experience but it's it's valuable double later because it disallows grandpa doing certain things. We don't really know that. Does it count as a trait though the that's that's artificial. That's like glasses. That are all scratched up on one of my characters because he's still cheap and lazy to get more glasses get searched up something about him. mm-hmm but Are So here. We're blurring the lines between this Raffaelo scratchy. But now I mean unless it's considered for the same thing where I got a sub character Hairs fallen tease out cases. Beautiful he walks in. He's got to live and he's got a lesbian she gave it. Jason was our story you know. And that's.

Eric Ritz Raymond Bailey US Robert Dini Belize Acre Grant Lynn Jason rudd Lawrence mental Analysis Haro
"robert dini" Discussed on Authors In Chains

Authors In Chains

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"robert dini" Discussed on Authors In Chains

"Authors Chiens podcast for writers and Fans uh-huh hosted by Robert Dini's glossy across and Raymond Bailey. Hang out and kick your feet up while they share their experiences France's failures and successes and becoming bestselling authors on language Bernini facebook. We're live Jubal I know. I'm actually looking at right now and I see us on facebook facebook over here on this screen so yes we are live on facebook. If you WANNA see people's comrade authors and Shades episode thirty seven we are talking about up often characters and yes. I have ice cream so bite me. Ice Cream Ginger Ale and coffee were just like we're like. Oh Yeah we're character promotion so I know our missing is heroin and we have all the addictions covered right. Is I tell you okay. So should glances idea. Make her start. Go Glacier glaciation. We're making you start there all your ideas that's true. Oh which reminds me did. Did you get anything from the digital universe from people who wanted a a topic for us to look at you ask yes. Have we mind the digital the universe properly go back and check that Probably do that is yes probably yes. We should mind the digital universe for tonight but at some point I think that was an excellent idea and I hope people responded and and some point my genius is out and we're going to have to go to know such thing. The genius will never wear out the gym. Is they look at that. You see I have something nice to somebody. And it's recorded and live on facebook documented. I said something nice and supportive. It can make me bucket. Prove it now exists in social security now all right I am only a partial deuce bag. And you're a part time do there's part I play one on TV. How's that wincing? It's a skill that needs to be cultivated debated it does. I need to home that skill so as we. We are good thirty seven killing characters. We have people coming coming on what you'd be watching this. Nobody's watching everybody. Say Hi say hi of baseball. Let us know you're here and you feel the love too narrow. Hi I'M GONNA kill.

facebook Raymond Bailey Robert Dini Jubal I France Go Glacier heroin Shades baseball
"robert dini" Discussed on Authors In Chains

Authors In Chains

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"robert dini" Discussed on Authors In Chains

"Writers and Fans uh-huh hosted by Robert Dini's glossy across and Raymond Bailey. Hang out and kick your feet up while they share their experiences France's failures and successes and becoming bestselling authors on Bernini five by five and live episode. Thirty six thirty Six I feel old right now. Not all episode. You don't down when you guys I swear to God Bruce We'll get you a walker. Don't worry you're you're killing me. Smalls a witch. I'm your wife. which and what do we do with the which sorry Earth Law grabbing hold shed salary I apologize apologize all right here? We go because it's it's in my mouth man you want You're the one who instigated this glaze. You need to take control start acting like an adult and get us going on the Damn Compaq take control and get us going without acting like an adult. Thank you very much row. Wants to act like an adult not me all right okay. Rem Welcome to the live version of authors and chains. PODCAST episode thirty. Six secs gets like this. That thirty six bagging digs Hagen digs thirty episodes. Yeah.

Robert Dini Raymond Bailey Bernini Smalls France Hagen Bruce
"robert dini" Discussed on Authors In Chains

Authors In Chains

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"robert dini" Discussed on Authors In Chains

"Authors Chiens podcast for writers and Fans uh-huh hosted by Robert Dini's glossy across and Raymond Bailey. Hang out and kick your feet up while they share their experiences France's failures and successes and becoming bestselling authors onerous Bernini by there. We are live in frame and not in focus. There we go focus. Give it a second. It was like always drunker. So what are we talking about stuff. We've got collaboration with other authors. The thing that I was incredibly nervous about that. Rae I can attest to you because the conversation first conversation we ever had the first one. How many first ones are there I don't know all of these questions about about what I was working on and I was like you know I was like I don't know if I want to tell about what I'm working. I mean I'm a very suspicious person anyway but I mean like let's start there right and we'll get into collaboration thing afterwards. Let's get into things like intellectual property menaul right it or getting people to start watching so hello everybody just starting to join us those of you who did I did not hear it yet. We are now broadcasting thirty two platforms. Live as we speak Using the troublemaker indie channels. So welcome this will also be available as the podcast normally is tomorrow evening and twenty nine twenty nine. Welcome to our live shows. You can see all the cramping the background with our technical difficulties and everything else now. We're going to start doing real and so if you miss the bull Sherie ooh that's a new one also uh if you missed the bullshit hurry for next week you think.

Raymond Bailey Robert Dini Bernini Rae France
"robert dini" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

13:02 min | 1 year ago

"robert dini" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

"Through productivity rather than self-destruction yeah there's two thing man I mean one just learning more about the body in general helped I mean you read you'll still read that'd be like Ali now you've got to burn more calories earning sold under exercise. Yeah those weird books at told you like what a chicken sandwich at Hardee's had reno and bright and you know it's just information wasn't like it is now so you have a lot of just like I just listened to a lot of music and I learned how to deal with my shit in different ways and I was just like you know what like I gotta get out of this man I think a big issue demanded just never really related to my high school I felt like at a young age I was a really serious kid because I saw a lot of my family dire early and so I think it was ingrained in me takes to lead and coach others effectively than consider joining us and tapping into the conversation and self development too management skills stoicism you name it we've likely covered it or we will in the very near future if you WANNA learn more and lock in your spot to this exclusive hood join us at order of Man Dot Com Slash Iron Council again that's order man dot com slash iron council you can do that after the show for now let's get back to the conversation oh yeah hundred percent I guess the the natural progression of this is how do you take that because the way that you approach well let me back up yeah you're what in what roles did you serve with the teams and the organizations that you worked with strength and conditioning but it seems like there's more to it than simply getting strong yeah one hundred percent I mean I think when I learned you know a little bit distracting formal strengthening conditioning is you know you're always looking for ways to make your programs better but I learned after a while is the limiting factor to any program is one's willingness to buy into it right like what kept one athlete who enjoy away training like if two people are on the same program and let's say you know their nutrition let's say all things being equal for the most part the person that likes training and understand the why A. and enjoys straining and gets the transfer and purpose of it is going to get better results from the same program somebody that's how and he thought like you saw you know we had an athlete from Saint Louis The kid had always been naturally gifted I didn't like the Weight Room you've heard a lot of times before in the weight room and so when coach would say hey we got heavy squad today this kids just kind of doing what he needs to do to get done with this workout where you know alignment from Rural Iowa who who he loves that right He's GonNa get under an have higher output and so when I learned just the limiting factor in anything in life is engagement by in consistent see and not compliance as much as commitment so that's when I started getting into the head space like all right I got one hundred ten athletes are one hundred and five or fifteen or whatever it is I need to get them locked in from a psychological side and once I have that the physical trainings easy just to do so let's take this example with the this this young man you're talking about did you change the programming or did the programming status same and once you kind of back into it from the psychological motivations standpoint the programming became an issue in this incidence of the programming stay the same how I spoke to it was different right like so this just cared about speed and he wanted like emc friend that got injured with a devastating ACL injury so he kind of had this drive to acquire a certain status wanted to be the fastest guy on the team but he also had this loss aversion kind of dynamic to get hurt right yes so now you target everything to their right the linemen like that just likes getting strong so my hey by get a push them wait eighties like geeking out this guy I'm just like listen dude like I know this isn't your favorite thing this is GonNa help you get faster and then forever one percent increasing quad strength which squads are going to help you with the three percent decrease in ACL and that kind of statistic really you know per pizzas interest so there's a lot of influence doubt takes you can use Oldham ethical influence just means to bring about change in one psychological environment yeah it's no different than a hammer right a hammer can be used to bludgeon somebody or can be used to build a house for the homeless so people tend to hear influence and manipulate and they think a negative connotation well guess what everybody listening to this manipulated the volume or Manipur aided their air conditioner it's all context relevant so what I learned is there's through the research is there's a Lebanon primary different influence tactics you can use when dealing with other sin so I'd stumbled on this and I'd be like wow I already do these things now I can period is my interactions with people Just like I can my Graham and so yeah just changing the way you speak to things learning how to talk and color yeah not make sense there's there's a book by Robert Dini called persuasion are regular yeah okay well that's the newest one influence was kind of influence and he talks about that of course now he's study in Con Artists is what he's studying right but he's teaching you the manipulation or influence tactics now the way that you use them as is what makes them moral or not one hundred percent and that is about that it is about influence about getting people to respond in the way that you want them to respond right and it was really important because my my doctorate my doctoral work now focuses on this because I went from working with athletes than are working with teams and organizations in dealing with this so I'd gone and spoke about this at Microsoft special forces communities different things but I knew I needed to get really clear about what the definition so when we look at power outside a training context let's say power dynamics months people who power is defined through the research as the ability to bring about a change in one psychologically fireman influence is the use of that power to bring about change right so the ultimate objective or the or the the outcome of the influence used is very well put and put it in a training perspective right we know that the definition of strength is the neuromuscular system's ability to produce force bats that's the true definition of strength now is it just say I'm going to back up here or slow down a little bit on that you say the say that again strength is the what strength is our neuromuscular system's ability to produce force okay so it's it's not just narrow mind or brain but it's the it's dizzy logical to as far as how big the muscle is or how dense it is to that what you're saying sheriff right and that's yeah that's why you've got to have the neuromuscular component because of the enroll right is the signal impulse to facilitate muscle contraction right the muscular part is obviously we have to have a cross sectional area and certain things that allow us news for some leverage but because you're not gonNA will yourself into strength that's not how it works side right there's will yourself into do some squats but you're not gonNA will yourself to be stronger right and just like that so I'm trying to draw the like the similarity between like you said the power is a byproduct of the influence tactics that we use just like strength is a byproduct or outcome of the training tactics that use and so that's where I started to get really clear about right if we're teaching people ethical use of these strategies to get better engagement to drive better outcomes to help them from themselves to open up conversation we need to really get clear on the definition of those thanks so that we don't demonize them you know Enlai literature or like you know it's just like people again they think power and influence and manipulation are bad I'm studying in trying to bring I- ethical use of those things and show that's really every day every day somebody asked somebody to do something for now that's that's some form of influence yesterday I have to do this why that you make a deal with somebody hey could you come lunch today I'll get it tomorrow that's an exchange influence tactic this stuff is it's just maybe don't know what it's called yeah and I think understanding the meaning behind it his critical words are nothing more than noises that our bodies make we we assign the meaning to it collectively we assign the meaning to it and if we're gonNA have a discussion for example this podcast then we need to get clear and make sure we're talking about the same things over using the same the definition for the words that each of us or the noises each of us are are making right I agree I mean I got a lot of heat because of the word Bienne is part of my book title and there was some buddy who was like wow this term it insinuates that we're trying to sell somebody on something and I go yeah you are trying to do if I'm coaching athlete who just signed a thirty million dollar deal and he steps in front of me and sees a five eight white kid from Omaha Nebraska right like I'm telling him hey I'm going to be able to make you stronger faster Aja what have you I'm selling this individual on a future result he can't see or feel yet right I detest driving vehicle and you can get behind the wheel there's a lot of trust and so in the book I make it very clear Bienne is synonymous with trust Like you have your right you have to get really clear on nomenclature somebody's on in that means there's a level of trust there there's commitment it's not just compliance compliance Ryan right like somebody will do somebody's compliant they'll do something they're probably not going to feel good about that and through their full weight with my kids like I asked him to do the chores and they're compliant 'cause I'm the Dad your doubt now I tried to develop trust so they they see that doing chores although may not be pleasurable is part of being a member of the family and and the the I wouldn't say downside but the responsibility of having a beautiful home to live in I try to get those things but yes compliance is sometimes the way it goes right commitment is like Yes dad I will this and with bells on their locked in and even that Ryan is like Hey do this because I said so that's what's known as a legitimating influence tactic you're using a formal kind of authority to facilitate an outcome so there are what are called hard influenced tactics the do this or else or these are the rules the hard nose and then there are soft ones were it's like hey like that's exchange it's reciprocity or hey I'm gonNA tell you why rational persuasion or I'm GonNa give you an inspirational appeal like Iraq there's there's an influence tactics on all ends uh spectrum is just knowing how to serve the curve yeah and this goes back to what you were saying earlier is being able to listen and be curious about other people like this is not gonNa work work I imagine if your gaming the system you don't actually really care about your athletes or employees or family members you just want them to do what you want them to do actually have to care it's sad to.

Ali one hundred percent thirty million dollar hundred percent three percent one percent
"robert dini" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"robert dini" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Very confident that the sanctions that will be reimposed this Monday, not only the oil sanctions financial sanctions that are being put in place by the treasury department over six hundred designations of individuals and companies in Iran, we'll have the intended effect Iranians took to the streets in protest today. I'm Ann Cates. And I'm Susanna Palmer from Bloomberg world headquarters. Wall Street seems to be putting the murder of a Saudi journalist behind it a month after the murder of government critic Jamal kashogi in the Saudi consulate in Istanbul bankers say the rewards of doing business with the oil-rich kingdom, far outweigh the risks. Three bankers who currently do business with the Saudis, and who attended an investment conference their last month said that exiting the country's market was out of the question. But they have little doubt lenders would demand. Better terms spokesman for Saudi Arabia's finance ministry. Didn't respond to requests for comment Wall Street Journal reports Goldman Sachs group is likely to announce this week that fewer than sixty five people will be promoted to be new partners the journal cited. Unidentified people familiar with the matter chief executive officer, David Solomon presiding over the first group of promotions since taking the top job told the banks manage. To be extra selective this year. It would be the smallest class of new partners since nineteen ninety eight when Goldman was a private company Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell in written responses to a democratic Senator said reducing immigration could slow the economy over the longer run by limiting growth in the US labor force more from Bloomberg's Charlie Pellett. Look comments came in a written response to Senator Catherine Cortez maskco, a Nevada democrat who asked Powell if he agreed with pro immigration comments by Minneapolis fed, president Neil cash carry Kashkari whose parents came from India, and whose wife is from the Philippines called immigration, quote as close to a free lunches. There is for the American economy this, according to a Wall Street Journal opinion column in January Charlie Pellett, Bloomberg radio. Global news twenty four hours a day on air and it picked up on Twitter powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than. One hundred twenty countries, I'm Susanna Palmer. This is Bloomberg. I'm Barry ritholtz. You're listening to masters in business on Bloomberg radio. My special guest today is Dr Robert Dini. He.

Bloomberg Wall Street Journal Susanna Palmer Bloomberg world Saudi Arabia Dr Robert Dini Jerome Powell Saudi consulate Goldman Sachs Senator Catherine Cortez maskc murder Ann Cates Charlie Pellett Iran Barry ritholtz treasury department chief executive officer Goldman Twitter Jamal kashogi
"robert dini" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:33 min | 2 years ago

"robert dini" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Extra special guest is Dr Robert Dini he received his PHD from the university of North Carolina and did some post doc work at Columbia. He is currently the regents professor emeritus of psychology and marketing at Arizona State University. He is perhaps best known as the author of the book influence, the psychology of persuasion that book is sold three million copies in over thirty languages. He is also a co author of fifty scientifically proven ways to be persuasive. His latest book is pre suasion a revolutionary way to influence and persuade Robert shell Dini. Welcome to Bloomberg. Thank you, very very glad to be with you and your listeners same here. I'm excited to talk to you. Because everybody I know who works in the field of sales and marketing when I just casually. Mentioned. Oh, by the way. My guest this week is going to be a doctor genie professor professors Dini, they like what from influence so there were very excited to to here. We were having this conversation, and I have to begin with the story of the original research. You did for the book influence it. Almost sounds like an urban legend you spent three years undercover working as a used car salesman. A telemarketer. A fundraiser. What what was that period? Like, and how instructive was it? It was the most instructive and most entertaining research enterprise I've ever engaged in because not only was it fun to mix up. The I mix up with the ideas of people who were actually practitioners who were in the business of getting us to say, yes, not just the study of it. But also I learned so much as a consequence of how they employed psychology, which is my field to move others in their direction. Did you go into that research expecting? I'll get a book out of it. Or was it really let me get some practical. Grounding in the field before I become pure academic. No, that's really a good question. I went into it to get some ideas for doing research in my laboratories. Where I would say something this way versus that way. And see how many people agreed with it was the same thing. I would just say it in different ways. But I realized that by staying located in laboratory with college students says my subjects I was missing the power of these techniques to really make a difference outside of the laboratory in the real world. Will there were professions dedicated to getting others to say yes to them? And it seemed to me there was a lot to learn if I- infiltrated their training programs and learned what they were teaching their prospective professionals. When did you decide? Hey, you know, there could be a book in this while you know, that's exactly what happened to me about three months in. Because what I was learning was telling me there are universal principles. Of persuasion in a limited number not just hundreds or thousands of tactics. They could be they could be categorized under six basic categories tendency human tendencies that inclined people toward yes. And so I thought I could put each one as a chapter in a book and tell the story of what are the fundamental reasons that people say, yes to requests as as I was rereading influence and reading pre suasion, I couldn't help notice the parallels to behavioral finance so you were doing your work in the early eighties around the same time as some of the early work in behavioral finance when you're doing your research or the academic side of it. Did you ever come across the works of controversy? Thaler Schiller all the behavioral scientists of that era were these two completely different paths. They were parallel paths that converged about five or ten years later when I realized oh, wait a minute. The work that was coming out of the practitioners who were in the streets was comparable to the work. That was coming out of the scholars who were in the avenues. Would I did was to move from the from my university position the avenues into the streets. That was the smartest thing I ever did. So there are some examples that are just simply amazing, and I want to give a few examples can we increase voter turnout, simply by serving people and asking them not who they're going to vote, but asking them to make a prediction whether or not they're gonna vote what what's the impact of that? In fact, there is research to show that that's the case because people then set a path in their mind in a time in their mind in the then. Can use those features as cues that spur them into action or if it's just left ambiguous. There are really no queues in their mind that Sinn them into a behavior change, so simply asking people, and when you ask people, hey, do you think you're going to vote this year? Most people are going to say, yeah, I expected vote that simple act then gets them committed to actually vote it. And if you say where in when will you vote? Bullshit levels it. So my local polling places the library or the school around the corner and just re and it's November sixth hypothetically this year that has an impact does that that's quite astonishing. So when you were writing the book after your three year experience in the trenches, did you have any idea how successful this was going to be as a book. Did you have any idea sort of reaction? This has been in gender. I could not have sensibly known berry because there were no books like this coming up. We continue our conversation with social psychologist Robert.

Dr Robert Dini Robert shell Dini regents professor university of North Carolina Bloomberg Dini Arizona State University Columbia I professor Thaler Schiller salesman Sinn three months three years three year ten years
"robert dini" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"robert dini" Discussed on Mixergy

"Dot com slash mixer. Gee, let's get back into the conversation. I interview you remember the very first interview was a guy named Michael Dorosh who happened to come to an event that I did, and he was a chiropractor who was just killing it in in the SEO world. People knew about him back when people didn't even care. That search engine optimization SEO was thing. And I said, if everyone knew who was coming to my events because I was organizing events using my invitation software, they wanna come to my vents. They'd want organize events want to get to know people. So I interviewed him. I liked it and then I just kept interviewing other people. The one that turned me though was. After this collection of software companies, I created an online invitation and Email marketing company. We got to over twenty million Email addresses. We were doing about four hundred thousand online invitations day, greeting card today, people are just greeting cards. And one of the people who who I don't know how many millions and sales she did for us. But Roslin Resnick would represent our Email list and sell it to companies like IBM. And I was wanting to know how she got where she was, and I got a little bit of a sense of it, but it's kind of weird in conversation at dinner to say, so how'd you get so rich? But in the interview, I gotta ask Roslyn about how she started. And I got to ask her about how she built up and she figured out her business model and at the end of it, I remember Livy and I were still dating and she happened to be in my house at the time. And I said, Olivia, I know I called her because I was so excited. I said a Livia. I know what I want to do with the rest of my life. I just loved that. I got to understand all this about a woman who I known for years. So how do you have the courage to ask certain questions that many other people wouldn't dare ask? I think this is why many people come to you when they want to listen to other entrepreneurs in their stories because you feel I don't know if you're comfortable, but it seems like you're comfortable asking those kinds of questions where with me, I worry about a response. A person might have if I were to kind of poke a little bit further than you You know. know, I should. I tell the guests my reason and I get by ahead of time. So throughout the interviews, you can see that. I say, I want to understand how you failed because sometimes I feel like a failure and I can't snap out of it. I want to understand how how big this business got, because I wanna know how big a business like that can get. I tell them the reason I give the answer, we all know about the Robert Dini book influence where he talks about how someone cut in line and the copier by saying, I need to cut in line because whatever. And if you say the reason people are more likely to give it to you. The thing that I discovered was I read. Baby books after we had our first child about four years ago and in some of them, they say, even if the kid is a year, even if they're a year and a half, just tell them the reason. And I said, this is my wife, and my wife is very into like to chill Brita book until actually implemented. So she went into our kids from one time when he was sleeping and shepherd was a kid with scream alive if he didn't get his way. And she went in, she said, now, shepherd, I need you to sleep because you need to have your energy. So tomorrow morning, you'll have energy to play with your friend Callan..

Michael Dorosh Roslyn Roslin Resnick Olivia IBM Callan Robert Dini four years
"robert dini" Discussed on College Info Geek

College Info Geek

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"robert dini" Discussed on College Info Geek

"Yeah it makes sense but in a lot of cases as we are going to uh illuminating this episode people can exploit pretty well and in addition to the exploiting stuff um social proof can lead to some pretty bad consequences just in and of itself because of something called the bystander affect oh yes oh we're gonna talk about yes pluralistic but uh yeah pluralistic ends that's the quality but basically uncertainty is the main factor here when you don't know what to do you're gonna look around and see what people are doing uh the other factor is similarity people are a lot more persuaded by the social queues of people that they think are like them rather than people who may be seem different so a really good example of this was the author's son loved being in pools but were never get in a pool without having his the low energy thing around his waist and uh robert dini spent all this time like weeks a week's trying to get him to swim in the pool learn how this woman out this thing and he just refuse to do it and then he's like i know what i'll do i'll bring over this 21yearold grad student of mine who's a lot younger than me and whose big and muscular and strapping and he'll probably look really cool and my son he'll still get him to to not use the inner tube and that didn't work so he's off frustrated he takes his kid a summer camp drops him off comes back the next day and as is coming to pick up he sees him dive off the diving board into the pool without the inner tube a freaks out thinking that the kids get a drown and as his running over to the police as kids swimming without the inner tube and gets out and turns out it was because he had seen another three year old kid swimming nia without the inner tube so because he saw somebody else who is similar to him doing that now he thought okay if he can do it i can do it.

robert dini three year
"robert dini" Discussed on College Info Geek

College Info Geek

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"robert dini" Discussed on College Info Geek

"Yeah it makes sense but in a lot of cases as we are going to uh illuminating this episode people can exploit pretty well and in addition to the exploiting stuff um social proof can lead to some pretty bad consequences just in and of itself because of something called the bystander affect oh yes oh we're gonna talk about yes pluralistic but uh yeah pluralistic ends that's the quality but basically uncertainty is the main factor here when you don't know what to do you're gonna look around and see what people are doing uh the other factor is similarity people are a lot more persuaded by the social queues of people that they think are like them rather than people who may be seem different so a really good example of this was the author's son loved being in pools but were never get in a pool without having his the low energy thing around his waist and uh robert dini spent all this time like weeks a week's trying to get him to swim in the pool learn how this woman out this thing and he just refuse to do it and then he's like i know what i'll do i'll bring over this 21yearold grad student of mine who's a lot younger than me and whose big and muscular and strapping and he'll probably look really cool and my son he'll still get him to to not use the inner tube and that didn't work so he's off frustrated he takes his kid a summer camp drops him off comes back the next day and as is coming to pick up he sees him dive off the diving board into the pool without the inner tube a freaks out thinking that the kids get a drown and as his running over to the police as kids swimming without the inner tube and gets out and turns out it was because he had seen another three year old kid swimming nia without the inner tube so because he saw somebody else who is similar to him doing that now he thought okay if he can do it i can do it.

robert dini three year
"robert dini" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"robert dini" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"The world's coming to an end and here's what carlsson wrote about that the world has a strange way of not ending a figure despite the prognostications for the end of days by a number of cult leaders over the years one such false prophecy was actually stuck lead by a group of researchers from the university of minnesota who actually joined cult i've always wanted to do that you know go undercover join a cult incognito to study it from the inside the leader of this cult marian keetch whom i hadn't heard about told her followers she was being contacted by a group of spiritual beings from space called the guardians miskeyed said the guardians were telling her there was a great impending flood that would eventually engulf the entire world that already happaranda it already happened and god setting undo that do it that way this time anyway she informed her followers but as long as they followed her teachings they would be spared as spacemen in flying saucers would carry them off to another planet making you believe this people were actually buying this baloney yeah stru this group of roughly thirty people was extremely committed to the cause as they sold all their possessions quit their jobs or stop going to school to prepare when the day keetch predicted the flood would hit came and went a funny thing happened to these believers they didn't have a sudden realization that they'd been duped they would be admitting that their entire belief system was wrong so they simply shifted those believes by becoming missionaries to tell others that the end would be coming soon if they could convince others of their message then surely that message would have to be correct hm does this sound familiar from an investment perspective robert dini my pete's explained why this happened in the book influence the power of persuasion quote so massive was their commitment to their beliefs that no other truth was tolerable yet that set of boys are just taken a merciless pounding from physical reality no saucer landed no space man had knocked no flooded come nothing happened prophesied since the only acceptable form of truth had been undercut by physical proof there was but one way out of the corner for the group they had to establish another type of fruit for the validity of their own beliefs social proof fascinating isn't it because it's the idea that we look to us others to figure out what the correct me 'have your should be and here's the.

carlsson robert dini pete university of minnesota miskeyed