4 Burst results for "Robert Couric"

"robert couric" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

08:49 min | 3 years ago

"robert couric" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Trees some easy ways to do it with close, spins and toothpicks and speaking of a spell Ewing who showed up but Ed lives here as well. Hi, robert. Hey, how's it going? Pretty good, buddy. I was reading something on the way here today. You don't you realize I've known you for over forty years. I know. Amazing. You know, what I tolerate you? You tolerate me. So I mean, that's a great balance. So reading I know you've read his book ad breezed. And I just got it lasts. Did you breeze through the parts with close friends in toothpicks? No better than that. Okay. Better than that. What what year wasn't you taught the class at UC Davis. Oh that was in the nineties. I took that class. Okay. This is about four five. Yeah. Why took one of them? Yeah. I took one of them. And this is something that that Robert has has taught for many many many years. He had this isn't something. That's brand new. I mean, I've done it. You know, I learned their home. So congratulations. Brady in my research, but just last year six eight months ago. Oh, I forget the name of a good. Good fruit grower. They came out with a research study on what time of year is the best time to do the spreading in. Well, the notching actually talked about notching, but I I was watching trees in the eighties. And I don't know how I learned it, but may have been from this old friend of mine, a Molin Clift. I met him in the mid seventies. And he had a hundred and twenty five apple trees in the backyard of forty feet by forty feet, and he taught me how to notch. Well, robert. Now, you have to tell us what notching is well notching is when you take a file like around rat paedophile, and you score above a bud, and you get a brand or you score below bud. And you get a fruiting spur. And how successful you at that. I mean, what percentage do you have? Well, it works pretty pretty good as long as you score correctly. It's a high percentage number, but what they found in the research. They did you do it two to four weeks before the but opens up. It'll be the best time to do it as opposed to waiting until you have shooter. But how deep is that notch? Just enough to go through the Camby like violin halfway around. And it's not very deep at all. It just takes a tiny tiny bit too. Go through penetrate. The Campion what trees is at work best on. Well, I've only done on fruit. Trees, I did it mostly Annapolis. You don't need to do it on something like persimmon because he get fruit. Whether or not, you prune are not the way it works is when you Helen notch above a, bud. Keeps apiculture hormone from coming down and keeping the bud doorman. So the bud thinks it's at the top of the tree. So it sprouts. Notch below Abud. It allows a lot more carbohydrates to build up in the bud and the more carbohydrates. You had the more likely it is to be a fruiting. But so internist system you could do both one for support and one for fruiting would exactly exactly now, the the French method the Laurette Lorette method of French spell doesn't talk about notching. And yet, it's it's the fastest way. To get exactly what you want. We were trying to non cherries a lot. You know, when I was Dave Wilson we were trying to Don Cherry's lot on our. On the tree on the trees that we were just maintaining like we are maintaining most of four to five feet, right? And we were trying to to notch below to encourage of course, fruiting buds develop and our percentage kind of ran. I don't know. Maybe fifty percent. I wasn't really encouraged by it. But but I know it was really common with apple. So, but maybe it was timing. It might have been the timing. And I noticed that go ahead. Jerry's make a lot of flower, bud without doing anything. You know, those clusters. Yeah. No, do you want him down low? Well, that's true. Yeah. I wanted them all down. Just as a matter of fact, right after the page where you talk about close spends toothpicks, you talk about notching and using the round files. So people want more information about this. They ought to pick up your book. Lazy ass gardening. Yeah. And they can get it from me on sale. We have a pre publication or technically the official world premieres April. I know fooling and before then team bucks. And then after April first it goes up to twenty that's a joke. There you go. Get them cheap. Yeah. Get them while you all right. So, but after April, I will be on Amazon, but if you want if you want a good bargain, you can order it. I bet through your website, Robert, correct dot com. You got kale U R? I K Robert Kirk dot com. The name of the book lazy ass gardening maximize your soil minimize your toil. And while you're there, in fact, if you pick up lazy ass gardening, you can read about his other books too. A lot of people. Enjoy the drip irrigation for every landscape and all climates. And you're a understanding routes book is an eye opener. A lot of people that those are fascinating books. Yes. Those greatest Robert Couric a thanks for your time and talking about your new book lazy ass gardening. Thanks. Robert. Yeah. Yeah. Robert has been the contrarian in garden circles for a long time. That's why I love him. We get along. So well. Exactly, he's. His and the diagrams that he has put in his book over the years, and he has gone back and studied in libraries and look for these old drawings of like roots of plants and how deep they can go. Yeah. You all the ones that pulled out a Germany just fascinated. Yeah. Incredible stuff. I mean, I I try to tell people, you know, the the route is not the simplest part of the plan. Yeah. And the know that you know, to really understand that gives you a better idea of why you have to pay so much attention to where you plan things, and how you treat them once you get them in the ground. I would then think that a lot of the things that he talks about as far as training fruit. Trees, you're employing in your lectures, these days about a spraying fruit trees. Oh, absolutely. Yeah. You bet and to tell you the truth. You know, we taught I was kidding that we met forty years. He was over forty years ago because he kinda tooled into the urban tree farm when I was a manager of the urban tree farm back in around nineteen seventy nine and. You know, I I had heard his name people had talked about him locally as being you know, this guy who is really big into edible landscaping. Well, I was picking that edible landscaping at the time the things that he was really into at the time were promoting high density planting and getting trees, the fruit and keeping them down under control. So you know it played right? Into kind of where I was at at the time as well. So yeah, you bet we his his there's a lot of influence Robert Corp in my in my presentations. Yeah, we have to take a break for news here in a minute or so, but we have enough time to point out that I mentioned earlier, I'll be speaking at one thirty over at the San Francisco flower and garden show at Cal expo. I'll be talking about the good bug hotel. But you're talking right after me at two thirty and talking about A spraying fruit. Trees, correct. Yeah. You bet. Yeah. We'll have some fun with that. And then yeah, I'll share some of the some of the things that I'll be sharing their which are kind of exciting as well. You know, lots of Chuck Ingles work. Oh, good. Which is really cool. Right. The late Chuck angles, the Sacramento county farm advisor, the person responsible for a lot of the intricate designs of fruit trees and other structures at the oaks horticulture center. Yeah. And just you know, the science. You can't you don't wanna take in and discount. You know, how much you know, Chuck took that place and looked at it from a scientific standpoint and legitimized it for the home gardener from a scientific standpoint. So he was brilliant that he was willing to take your wacky theories and try them out wrec. Yes, you bet. That's exactly what it was. All right. Here. We're going to talk about fruit. Trees got a fruit. Tree question. You ought to give us a call..

K Robert Kirk Chuck Ingles Helen notch Ewing Robert Couric Annapolis Molin Clift Laurette Lorette Ed Robert Corp UC Davis Germany Camby Brady Sacramento county Abud apple Dave Wilson Jerry
"robert couric" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

09:07 min | 3 years ago

"robert couric" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Soil minimize your toil. And it's by Robert Kirk, and it's a wonderful book filled with all sorts of great garden nuggets things that I never knew before. But then that's what Robert does for a living. He surprises all with his very thorough research, and what he finds and Robert it's a pleasure talking with you. Good morning. Well, let's talk about the Lisi gardening book. What was the inspiration for this? Well, actually, I was sitting around a table with a friend about five years ago or more. And she's you ought to do a lazy but gardening book. I'd changed the title. Okay. Well, that's that's fine. And it's got all sorts of great time savers in the book, and the chapters include just about everything you need to know about gardening about ornamental plants edibles tilling, although I would think the tilles chapter would be kind of short because there's not too many people recommending tilling anymore. Well, it starts after tilling and works its way towards the talking about not ill. Right. So covers the whole range. But spends more time on though till does until it, and I would imagine too that cover crops play a role in that. Yeah. The what I did is I did a cover cropping in the chapter until age. But then in the Knicks I have green manure being because it's a next step up in the effort you've got to actually turn the soil over. So I decided well, including the book, even though it's not the laziest way. It's a garden. Well, there's there's just so much in the book. We're talking about including lots of chapters on fruit trees, fruit, tree care and some good, pruning and shaping tips. Which is what I wanted to talk about today since Ed live, oh is going to be here. Talking about aspiring fruit trees, it is somewhere in the building. I think he's lost in the building. And hasn't found it to the studio yet. A gardener. Not a radio person. I think is I I need to put a tracking device on him to find him. Missing something interesting, sir. I tried to do an ad on Facebook. And they turn me down. They said it was too too much like the guidelines for -fensive. So I can't do an ad on Facebook for my book. They have a few other offensive sites as far as I can tell from here. I yeah. You can incite riots. That's okay. But don't don't say. Lazy ass gardening. Exactly. Wow. Right there. I I still want to know I wish was here because he was talking about something that you would posted on Facebook about the folly of rain water catchment as far as does it really work. Well, it works in sense. You can catch rainy, and you can do a fifty five gallon drums of fifty five gallon drum is really only appropriate. I I can see for house plants. I mean, the house plans love having no chlorine or no minerals and having rain water, but in California. You know, there's no rain in the summer, and you have to have an enormous sister. And I call them sister and rain water catchment in order to get through the summer and most people can't afford it. They're doing rainwater catchment in my county. And basically, it's quite wealthy people that are doing it. But that's not bad. I mean, that's how a lot of trends. Start the people with a lot of money start at first and then over time the costs come down per unit. So I think that's what's going to happen. Time. I think too that a lot of people and especially with an aging population. Maybe they installed swimming pools in the backyard when the kids were younger, but the kids are gone. They've got this high maintenance item now, well, why not change that into your rain catchment system right in nineteen seventy five drought. I covered a swimming pool for a client, and we put the I called elephant hose that black six inch tubing that's corrugated very out really put that from the downspouts of the house to the swimming pool and the collective water in the winter. And then we use that to pump out with a sump pump. So it works, but it's ugly. Yeah. It's ugly. Well, you'd have to engineer it. So it wasn't ugly. If you want to do it on a permanent basis, but that seems like a good idea for water storage. But I think the reason we all gathered here today was to hear about your ideas of using close, spins and toothpicks in the garden. Yeah. A lot of people. Don't you think of that? As a tool. Yeah. And it has to do with fruit tree training. And it makes perfect sense. If you're trying to get some truly lateral branches, and you go into the science of the benefit of having laterally league growing branches. Basically, the ideal angle for branch is about forty five sixty degrees for a compromiser healthy compromise between vertical growth or extension growth and fruiting. If you have a branch, that's totally flat ninety degrees. The tip stops growing a pickle bun. And then a lot of buds on the ranch go straight up to be what we call suckers water sprouts. And then if you have a totally vertical you get a tremendous amount of vertical growth of shoot, but not much fruit not as much fruit. So this is something I did back in nineteen eighty with experimental orchard of Asian pears twenty trees on trellis trying to do it in the French method of spell ya. And then twenty trees on the toothpicks and clothes pins in one year. I gave up the. French met because it was so easy on the toothpicks into clothes pins. But the trees are wider, the tradeoff not the only, but the major trade off is that my trellis system if you look down the row was almost four feet wide. But it took almost no effort compared to the French French intensive what I call the French intensive method of spell. Yeah. Talk about the benefit of having branches that are growing horizontally, horizontally, okay? Horizontally instead of vertically, well, it's not so much horizontal in ninety degrees at an angle about forty five degrees. So that's the way when you put a clothes pin on the tip of that shoot. It bends it down into an arch. And the outer third arch makes a lot more fruit buds. And so you get more fruiting. That way and you slow down the tip grossly control the width of the tree. So I had a couple maybe a hundred clothes pins or more. And I use them to clip on new growth when it gets about six to twelve inches. And if I had to I would add more than one closed Pendle weighted down and then the next year or that fall take them off in the next year, use them elsewhere. So I never had to buy more clothes pins. I just rotate them so to speak to the new growth, and it's interesting that you can put so a quite a number of close spins on a branch to to get it to grow at that wider angle. Yeah. Yeah. So sometimes they're stiff enough if you wait too long, you need to have two three of them to get the tip to grow to bend down. But if you catch it earlier in the season that you'll take just one clothes pin. So we're talking about I don't know. Maybe may when the growth is about. Six inches or more little bit more. And it's real supple when it's even younger you can use a toothpick. You spread the branch to about ninety degrees. Put a toothpick between the vertical or the the main shooting in the new suit, and it stiffens up. And when you knock off the toothpick in the fall branch kinda springs up a little bit. But it doesn't spring up much past forty five degrees. So you get again that ideal angle forty five degrees using toothpicks on very young shoots. All right. Do you stick around for a few minutes? Yeah. Great ro Robert Kirk will stick around for a few minutes because we we did deploy a boy scout troop to find Ed wandering the building. We did find him. And I know he has questions for you. So I'll put you on hold Robert. And when we come back, we will untie Ed and let them talk. Great. All right. We're talking with Robert Couric, author of the book lazy ass gardening, maximizing your soil, minimizing your toil. We have more and Ed level. Join us as well. When we.

Robert it Facebook Ed Robert Kirk Robert Knicks Lisi Robert Couric California engineer Pendle forty five degrees ninety degrees fifty five gallon forty five sixty degrees twelve inches Six inches five years four feet
"robert couric" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"robert couric" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Rene cookbook and the seed catalog just go to Rene garden dot com. That's Rene with two ease. Well, threes, technically R E N E E S G A R D E, N Rene, garden dot com and get the cookbook order your seats that is seat ordering season, folks. So go for it. There's a lot of good products in that Cadillac. I get my rain garden seeds every year. And I always have great luck with them. So Rene Sheppard once again, thank you for spending some time with the pressure, and thank you very much. All right. Have a great day Bye-bye by by the way, carrots, you can plant something like seven months out of our year here and the best months for planting carrots from seed include February March, April may and then as the summer cools down August September and October. So that's a a long growing season. You can basically have carrots. Growing year round because you can be harvesting them in the summertime as well. All right. We'll take a short break when we come back. We'll delve into the Email you've been sending to Fred at farmer. Fred dot com. As we continue with the KFI garden show here on NewsRadio KF PK where podcasts are always available. You can either scream it from the iheartradio app. You can go to your favorite third party podcast aggregate, or like, apple music, or itunes, or whatever they call themselves. These days or Google podcasts, Stitcher. Not spotify. What else? Beyond pod. The usual places you can find the KF bouquet gardens show. You can find get growing with farmer Fred, and you can find the KFI farm. Our all those railways podcast, I'm talking to more and more people who love the podcast, fine and dandy and this one today show, and if you want to learn more about aspiring fruit trees, and you don't have time to listen because church starts in a few minutes. Then listen to the podcast because Ed live, oh will be here from nine to ten o'clock talking about aspiring fruit trees, and we're also gonna talk with garden, author Robert Couric to who has some very interesting garden ideas that'll be coming up in a few minutes as well. It's all happening right here on the garden show on NewsRadio KF became ninety three point one FM fifteen thirty AM and the iheartradio app. Whatever party, you dream party city will help you bring it to life. So we say dream big.

Rene Sheppard farmer Fred iheartradio KFI E N E E S G A R D Robert Couric Cadillac spotify Google apple Ed seven months
"robert couric" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"robert couric" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Areas of fog and then sun. Anybody who's lived here any length of time and spend the winters here knows what that means depending upon the persistency of the fog, you may only see the sun for about fifteen minutes somewhere around three o'clock. Other areas may clear out a little bit sooner. This is actually a good thing. And we'll talk on fill per cell gets here. We'll talk to him about the need for chill hours and chill units. So that you have a bountiful fruit crop in two thousand nineteen and foggy days. Do a lot to help preserve and increase chill units and chill hours as opposed to yesterday. The temperature got up to what the mid sixties. That's not a good thing for fruit. Trees in January. Also, I'm wondering if nurseries got their first wave of customers in on a sunny Saturday like yesterday asking for tomato plants, I hope not. But. Customer's. Always right. Wrong. Don't buy your tomato. Plants in January. Thank you. Or February could you wait till March. Yeah. Yeah. I know climate change. No, wait till March, April, even better, the warmer, the soil the better. All right. So the weather looking like a drive, but possibly foggy week ahead. Right. All right. A little tip. I picked up from the master food preservers newsletter from San Joaquin county and their winter newsletter regarding persimmons we've talked about this before about the foo versus the Chia persimmon persimmons are in season right now, if you go to a farmer's market, you'll probably find several vendors that are carrying persimmons, but no you're persimmons because you could be in for a rude awakening. The Fuyu versus the the food is kind of a light orange round piece of fruit. The Chia is a little bit of a darker, orange or red. And it's sorta heart or acorn shaped much bigger than an acorn. But let that be your guide because you can bite into a Fuyu and good bite into a Chia. That's still firm. And I think I mentioned this on Twitter. Speaking of old man, ranting. If you know somebody that's about to take a bite out of a firm had Chia whip out your cell phone, turn the video on and aimed at their face and watch the contortions their face goes through after they take a bite out of a firm had Chia. It is to say a stringent it's sort of like swallowing listerine if you will. And people sometimes don't have the patience waiting for the Chia to soften up to become sweet. And that's what you have to do. If you buy is you have to basically leave him out or put them on a clothesline or something like that until they're like almost drippy soft the software. They are the sweeter. They're going to be but in the master food preservers newsletter put out by the San Joaquin county master food preservers, they say you can put a Chia persimmon in a paper bag or next to pairs or bananas, and they give off ethylene gas and that'll help it ripen quicker. So on something you might wanna think about or probably an apple two for that matter. So if you want to get it to ripen a little bit quicker, those Chia persimmons stick it in something that gives off ethylene gas like a piece of fruit and stick it in a bag. All right. Okay. Why don't we come back? Let's talk to Robert Couric about Beirut trees, and how to choose them as we continue with the KFI garden show on this January twentieth on NewsRadio KF PK ninety three point one FM fifteen thirty AM and the iheartradio.

Chia San Joaquin county Fuyu Twitter San Joaquin Robert Couric apple KFI NewsRadio Beirut fifteen minutes