17 Burst results for "Robert Bloch"

"robert bloch" Discussed on Find the Path Podcast

Find the Path Podcast

07:16 min | Last month

"robert bloch" Discussed on Find the Path Podcast

"The homemade protectionist. Which was robert bloch through is driven insane killed by the hunter of the dark Afterlife crafts death. robert bloch then wrote a third part of it. That's not fair lansley. Hey it's not my fault. He croaked. I did have a wonderful Dracula nod where there were panthers that had escaped from. 'as zoo and then when they show up to confront the guy that's being possessed by orlando tatt. He's flanked by two awesome panthers that like diesel as hands wise carry-on conversation evily stroking giant. Cats i remember that from psycho anytime. Anyone talks about animals looking hands. I think of that. Like horror story. Where story where. She has the dog and she puts her hand down. A dog. licks are handed. It makes her feel better but then it turns out that one time. It's not a dog it's instead the killer that's a killer like rights and not something that says humans can lick or something from the wall and her friends blood wild hitting on which version of the story but yeah that was like one of the best like scary stories to tell you like party. That's probably why. I never heard it before the popular child anyway. Oh ross we love you thank you it to my childhood but yeah everyone sindh. Ross scary stories that you would have told him to slumber party for the flashlight. Basically like this celebrity things were short clipper whatever whatever imagining if all these like little ten second clips of i feel a halloween special coming yes. That'd be cool. You guys at the end to send it down and while none of you been able to identify them had fought a quartet of lingle's yep lingle's are no fun i don't know i took them down pretty good. Not all of us were so fortunate. I have to save playing an archer. Also it's kind of nice to just be in the back and just i'm just plinking away over here you guys those where you're your back align. Then you're not getting torn apart. Or i was pretty happy to be fighting on data even if they were weird island dead. Yeah i was very worried about swirling abyss and that one. Because i was a visit valmir i was like ooh ouch. There was an interesting thing about the lingle's actually. I remember a crop backup cropped up during that and then It kind of threw me. But it wasn't pertinent at the time and i made a mention during that fight to bring it up during the after party. Something that i was. Unawares thing about lingle's so i wanna take a second to read their paralysis. Entry A successful dc twenty two fortitude save negates a lingle's paralysis at the end of each round. After the first the victim can attempt a new dc twenty two fortitude safety in the process effect semi-colon semicolon. The effect is otherwise permanent. Oh it lasts indefinitely until you can make the save. Assuming know you can make a dc twenty two forte first level commoner. Your allies forever friends have some sort of like boosts type situation paralyzed for about five seconds before the lingual tears. Your throat out need to your alone also really wasn't pertinent. That but i do appreciate that. They have a thirty foot speed. Borough speed and climb speed. Oh neat grains work straight with the whole Love crafty end goals. Making warren's underneath graveyards they in through the foot coffins and pull the bodies out after you've buried them for ghouls man so yep there's a cooler graveyard rats short story that was about that same similar thing except for like super tilton rats. Anyway they weren't the rats of them where they know are good. I know i know. I was just being silly. We when we started talking lovecraft. I start getting my brain into all the the wonderful wonderful weird fiction that i love creepy. Rats make you think of that. Play game that. I like tail. Innocence There's lots of many ran away with a as you walk through like battlefields and stuff. It's so from there. You guys continue down. At which point we had our two part episode six episode seven the episode six more or less just being the battle against the Possessed samir as well as various children of the swings and and chose. Yeah tap into pit tip of the boy weekly blair. Yes so yeah mechanically Again as far as the the horror. Inspirations such children do sphinx or at other love kathy and creation as far as the hybrid human salary with houdini. It's the one that he goes wrote for. Houdini okay i one. I'm not familiar with. Yeah lovecraft actually. Ghost wrote a story for houdini. Called under the sphinx are under the pyramids and houdini faints at one point. Like all of crafting characters do the real. Houdini didn't like that because he said he wouldn't have fainted. Yes so he tried to get them to remove that but they didn't and so it with him. Because it was all told from houdini perspective he was telling an actual story and like an esquire magazine. I never thought this would happen to me very strange. very strange. indeed but yeah you guys Had a fun exciting. Little fight there and then to defeat some ear and then had to fight the hunter and the dark and made some visible then made bow miramax invisible which just a great tactic it for a knife master rogue so back. I actually do have question about roy bear And this is probably about the only time that we can really bring it up What was the top like. What are the top two levels of repair spell list. What does he actually have. Because i'm very interested to now. Let's say his top spells where Some of these. I took knowing that. I really wouldn't have much of an option to To use a few of them l. It's greater visibility and rainbow pattern because i love rainbow pattern. It's interesting but he also had by charm monster Slow crushing despair thinks like wholesome stuff like that crushing despair crushing despair. Every millennial is probably immune to that because half also gave a tone just because it's wonderful crafty but hideous laughter. Yes not really pertinent in these few me. I'm not gonna lie. It would have been hilarious if you'd thrown a pie in the face of the hunter of the dark. Yeah that would've been in july here. You didn't live long enough. To get pied. He was only true. I think samir was ever there. I think he'd been time and was just a puppy. No saving him right not really.

lingle robert bloch valmir lansley paralysis panthers sindh orlando ross Ross esquire magazine warren roy bear Houdini miramax samir
"robert bloch" Discussed on Find the Path Podcast

Find the Path Podcast

08:38 min | Last month

"robert bloch" Discussed on Find the Path Podcast

"Welcome beth finders. The fight about podcasts. Actual play of the mummies mass site story done after party. The second after four episodes four a tradition breaking after party. If you will indeed. And i will. The after party shall not be repeated. Like all never happened again. I can think of as fiddler on the roof tradition tradition. So yeah we are back once again with ara our second after party covering faded tells episodes four five six and seven like it. You don't like the doing of every four now or or just the concept of seven. No seven's the best. I don't like the pattern breaking it's been years literal years in addition the hor- so yes suppose let's go and just jump back into things we'll cover these We've got some great emails to get to a little bit later on. So i'm excited for this so Kicking off with episode number four. The inventively named fada tells up four wherein our heroes finally united had exited. The temple of a new newbies gathered together. Some basic clues there and open up a box that unbeknownst to them initially had some attack. Ads the tuning rod of ling friend. Yeah that's talk with shan tech. I think it's somewhat audie obvious. Some of our audience that we have had previous encounters with shan tax. and they'll swear last shan tax. I want one as a pet. They're always so nice. I don't we only have the one bad experience with that. Yeah we're we're were sixty six percent good thirty three percent bad experiences with shan't yeah and this this arguably a good experience the attack. You didn't have to walk all the way to the mountain. Which would have taken some time imagining. It would attack in days if not weeks to walk to the mountain. This flies us through outerspace though which made me sad. Well you know. It's still cold up there. Plus balto guts. Try a neat trick of just drinking wine forever forever. Because you don't have to breathe is the most sacred of experiences for followers of kidding. I mean true have done really had a ring that gave me leader poison or something and then to balto sound like a frat boy disturbs into a drawer for like a couple of our wording. He was a member of the pathfinders and a follower of kedah and he definitely has trap boy memories. I'm sure does he ended up liver though. That's the question not anymore. He's gone soft and his somewhat middle-age. Nice nowhere near middle aged. Mid twenties twenties somewhat middle aged. She's in that like you know mid s where you can't party heart is used to when you were eighteen. I a middle age. But you guys get to ride on a shanta Sometimes known as a sham tech bird makes seem even less intimidating. I love them. they are terrifying. If you actually are terrified monstrosities. We have unusually good luck with interaction with them. They're just yet mode of transportation. Yeah the shantung kind of the the love crafty and really most love crafty and things can fall into two white categories which basically his dream cycle and then everything else the case they fall into the dream cycle which is much more like fantasy horror As they were introduced. I wanna say the drink west of an off why they're also like a knowable thing versus like one of those vague color out of space kind of unknowable horrors. They're a physical thing. Even if their motivations and thought processes are unknowable knows the thought process of a catfish either. But we are like fisher. Weird had that ready to go with the catfish analogy man. I was gonna say cats. And then i'll say well you of know what catcher thinking but then i was like fish and then i was halfway through saying cat when i thought fish because i was saying. We came home and i saw sophie sitting on a chair and i was like. She's thinking about murder. Yeah yeah. Cats are pretty straightforward. I think fish snows there. Just swim looking. What's one of those fun things where Most of the things that tend to be like unknowable or unable or so on and so forth again the whole idea of the high priest not to be described. It's not that he can't be described. You're just not supposed to You never see the whatever monster is whatever that's doing him and then when you do see it kinda like ruins all the horror for you. Yeah which is. It's the whole idea of something being unfilmable where it's really wants. You describe a physical the physicality of something or even a scene where some of the best horse when they opened up a door and they look inside and then you just seem like turnaround and throw up. And its whatever's inside of there is the worst thing you can possibly imagine as the viewer. But if they actually showed it. It's like oh yeah it's it's a deutz head on a spike or something like that or aliens ernie of hr geiger's treating though the league zone. We've an alien. You only saw bits and pieces until fairy in the big reveal toys as a kid. I really liked them. But anyway i wasn't surprised by that i was thinking of Signs like especially when he's like going no signs of scary except you. Racial there seems in signs that are scary like whenever he's like looking under the door when the aliens like locked in the pantry and he like uses the knife to see it. It's a freaky scene. Because you're just like was he gonna do what he walks out of. The bushes aren't a some freaky seen to be fair. The jump scare scene with the him walking between the kid's birthday party or whatever it was that was actually pretty freaky. That's a creature feature right. There seriously slept or the water bottle next to me the whole week. I was there do that all the time anyway. But that's just thursday in the middle of the night because you actually thinking aliens gonna come 'cause you're in nebraska usually camp of if the alien sneaks into my room and like gets me while i'm sleeping i mean what. Am i going to do about that. You know just stopped anyway. yeah Fatalism the end of episode for you guys had arrived at the base of the mountain whereupon the city of unknown kopf resides at the pinnacle of which over you and said had gone into the forgotten. Cigdem nobody else wanted to climb the mountain for some reason. We didn't want to climb the mountain. Yeah i wanted to climb the mountain. It's almost like we should leave. You know read some some lovecraft and know what's up stor and i know what's up and i wanted to climb the mountain person who thinks night all is a nice vacation spot. It is misunderstood guy. I never said that. So boys episode five got us into Actually exploring the tomb where you guys had found some evidence of the horrific well one the horrifying statue to the horrific transformations. It's transformation where beasts thing yeah tech is kind of these kind of a god of a variety of different things but including beasts. Yeah as far as the poems and such the poem. Laptop that the What is the creatures of the wild you know. Lick his hands and all the rest of that stuff that's in the poetry is actually really interesting parallel to that with Lovecraft famously had a back and forth with a writer by the name of robert bloch famous for writing the screenplay for the movie psycho. Okay yeah robert bloch wrote a story called I think it's called the lurker and the stars something like that. I'm probably off. But anyway that basically had a lovecraft insert. That was the mad poet that road horrifying fiction. That drove people crazy and Anyway he did that whole thing. I think he killed lovecraft in it and so lovecraft lovecraft in response wrote the hunter of the dark which was a story which had a robert blake in.

beth finders fada shan tech kedah united fisher sophie kopf geiger nebraska robert bloch Lovecraft robert blake
"robert bloch" Discussed on Find the Path Podcast

Find the Path Podcast

07:27 min | 2 months ago

"robert bloch" Discussed on Find the Path Podcast

"Have rounded. I was a victorian Female literature fan girl so british women writers at my college was like the best class ever and to be perfectly out. I never felt anyone for that. Lovecraft works can be very difficult to get into and his writing style. Does you have to accepted. Massive amount of purple prose is very good at coming up with some really interesting concepts writing style mostly because he did not think he could write dialogue in there for it was never included also no female characters and pretty much anything ever one time but that was also woman that was possessed by her grandfather. Guess so take that for what you will so yeah. The group showed up there at which point the. I'm just going to go with like team. Team photo and teams aguirre just to make so team photo had been stopped at the front gate by a trio of wrote figures of which they had determined. I think rawson jordan determined far before their characters did that they were dealing with a trio of denizens of ling. Yes absolutely made that immediately Nuts run kansas city. More which the Team photo thoroughly trounced okay. I think fulton unleashed a kansas something. Because i was gonna say he was whipping up was suppose as far as the fight. Outside was concerned. Yes one photo delivered because high little swashbuckler are amazing yet. I like hands down. high level. Swashbuckler are devastating combat. and then you know ross's reliably hitting. I think jordan even got a good even got some hits in which was pretty impressive. We're talking about Holy might i believe gosh what. Yeah which is one of those is either orders wrath. Always always might. Yeah you identified. They were evil. Outsiders and therefore slight is particularly effective. In fact i think blinded two of them. Yeah so that was that was part of the reason why we were hoping because we add next around on a couple of them and finished that fight rather quickly all things considered you guys actually got as far as the. I think in large part because there was two of us players as opposed to three players. You guys actually got to the location in less time and therefore your fight was in the tail end of that whereas sixteen secure a with an additional person. It took a little bit more time role. Play all the rest of that stuff for you guys to get out there and then rolled into the fight against a pair of chemical goals as well as sack. The high priest not to be described So in answer to actually add jessica's statement though. And i think this kind of plays into again the whole sometimes the dice really decide the difficulty mechanically speaking the exact same challenge reading for both fights are one of those things that sometimes don't feel like they're challenging. The reason i think the fight against the denizens point so quickly because denizens have an innate fifty-six six sneak attack yup when two of them were blinded by a single poor dice roll. Yeah and then got really messed up at the beginning of that fight true. That's true once. It started rolling to there. It was just lucky. Dice rolls left right and center. The map that i chose. I wanted something that you guys would be so far separated that if i decided to run the two fights concurrently depending on how quickly you got through things. It really wouldn't matter because you wouldn't be able to easily reach one another and that played into episode three which was basically the fight inside of the the heart of the sanctum there. Against the twin. How can we goal and hyper. He's not to be described which is another nod to The dream cycle Drink could off the fight that ensued which tint actually tend to be pretty difficult in large part because the adamantine damage reduction of the goal homes and the fact that teams aguirre had no way to identify the golam so was unfortunate. Golan bain scarab. Y'all trio once again paying dividends. It's true they are always worth purchasing. Is well especially in this adventure path like they way more than any other adventure breath we played. They have paid out technically. This has nothing to do with the adventure path. Well okay this is on brand for like there were a bunch of golan's and i also find something that'll be interesting as far as the fact that The story the idea a lot of the stuff behind orlando tab is that he gives people access to things it's part of the expanded cannon but there's robert bloch wrote a A follow up to the hunter the dark where basically new orleans tap is responsible for forwarding at the manhattan project and giving humanity access to nuclear weapons as the expanded mythos stuff. And so it is that i did that. North tip does have this like access in provides people technology beyond their means and galeria gnarly author tap gave the dwarves of whatever place the knowledge to create firearms so firearms your injuries. Yeah yep thanks charlotta at so the whole idea of including out chemical golem. Sierra was like it's it's a fun you know. It's that steam punky vibe where it's like. Yeah we'll we'll take the technology at one step further forward. I also worked pretty well with the whole like. Why are they getting all these like. What are they building there. Why are they getting all these weird pipes and glass files and all the rest of that so Do you say and taking those from like they do like a random element normally to doing. Just electricity does that. Like drop the cr or anything or is that was. I just like flavorful. I would argue that. It probably would however. I decided that it really wouldn't make a difference at the very least for secures group because none of your casting brazelle make hollis had been here. Just been like okay. Master completely negated the danger of these things. I will have called the darkest shelter readings down. But yeah which was sad. Because i do have that spell on my list so i was like i was like oh if i could just get their cash that on them so that's fine but at the end of that all of you had joined together. Finally creating the largest. If entering party we've ever had in the show of eight people which more fun yeah am. I do make up a full. Full three eighths of that group which i did make a point to roberson's spell caster but at the very least the other two are thought and so rogues and swashbuckler are pretty easy to run without having to worry too much about having to to balance too many plates spinning plates. And doing that thing where you have to go through all the different specialists and be like okay. What does this one casting which this when casting yes. There was a short period of time whereas basically fighting against myself. The first fight was half of the four main as half the party. It makes sense that you're doing like more than fifty percent of the like interactions so Isn't that doesn't mean that can include substantially harder fights because you guys need double the number of enemies to equal the same challenge reading for the group so yeah pretty much super super storm..

rawson jordan aguirre Lovecraft Golan bain fulton kansas city ross charlotta kansas jordan robert bloch jessica orlando manhattan new orleans Sierra hollis roberson
"robert bloch" Discussed on MonsterTalk

MonsterTalk

09:24 min | 2 months ago

"robert bloch" Discussed on MonsterTalk

"In terms of how it's conceptually put together Not so much. Calvin t back. Who was the editor publisher but more the writers like The late bob. Stewart and that's spelled b. h. obese stewart yeah. I've seen joe dante junior. I mean they really taught me how to think about and how to write about cinema. And that all came from castle frankenstein and That's why tripled cinema is what it is so i just. We just did an episode yesterday. We recorded about the texas chainsaw massacre. Because we weren't doing we're doing a series called d. based on a true story where we're looking at the the lead whatever the facts are behind the legends thing and of course everybody says robert bloch based norma bates on again the Minnesota also based on calvin t back exactly exactly. That's exactly what i was going to say. That's jess just calvin. But also calvin mother yes exactly. That is such an amazing story. I found it through. Tom weavers blog and read all about it. I was like oh so that's the astounding b-movie months jar guide. So i have to say if anybody's listening this you haven't read that store you need to read. It is really interesting so are in robert. Bloch wrote about it in science fiction fanzines. I've tracked down a couple of reprint editions. I may be able to reach run right here. Yes here we go. This is robert blocks The eighth stage of phantom. This is a book that was put together in. I'd say the mid sixties collecting someone who's fancying essays for science fiction fanzines. 'cause block was writing for science fiction. Fanzines going back to the thirties. And forties in here is an essay about calvin teabag calvin t beck's on other and psycho by robert bly near read that. That is fantastic. Okay i i've just been. I found this out about a month ago two months ago. And it's just been stuck in my head. i wanna know more. we'll get your hands on And and these are not plugged that i benefit from it. Anyway so please. Don't think of it that way I just love sharing information Dick clemson's richard clemson editor publisher little shop of horror. One of the great fanzines dedicate the hammer. Films has been running a series of articles in each new issue about some aspect of monster magazine culture and he reprinted with permission. Ted white the science fiction author and editor 's essay about visiting calvin beck's home and working on laying out an issue of castle frankenstein. While so he wanted to know more blake. You and that was like Three issues ago. Faurecia little shop reporters. I would like to read that for multiple reasons. I'm old enough. That i i got into writing in print right at the time when the switch was being made to digital so I i my original work in high school. My high school newspaper we would like go and they would print out the sheets and we do the wax layout right. You'll laying down. So you're exactly by the time i got to college. They have started switching to using macs. And so i. I'm fascinated by the way the zine magazines were done back then i think maybe the the sort of the line between professionals and amateurs was a little bit blurry in kind of is now some ways. Yeah well yeah. But those those techniques that fanzine editors were using certainly by the seventies and eighties were almost identical to how professional magazines were put together. A local newspapers weekly. The free weeklies that that every pocket of america has in some way shape or form so together the same way. And you see you go like i do. A lot of newspapers dot com archive research for the search of stops alda's articles in the seventies irrelevant to the show But you can see into local papers like especially around. They didn't put a lot of effort into the tv lineup in the movie ads. There's these are skew. Know there's it's it's it's it's i love it i love is it feels very refreshing to see how that's the feeling we wanted to get encrypted cinema. Yeah right did you know a tim does incredibly professional layouts and designs. But tim totally gets you know about tim and i are going through the stage now with with the second cryptic cinema book which is called scripted. Cinema the boggy creek bequest not to electric boggle olu it. That's that'll be the film issues so the second one is called scripted cinema. The boggy creek bequest. That'll be fantastic. We're at the same. We're we're still feeling out. How are we going to shape the material. I've turned in all the texts material which is massive. We may have to break this into two volumes. That will come out at the same time. Because there is a lot of material in this in this volume But we're feeling out what it's going be now that first book the one that you just held up that we'll be talking about primarily here We knew we wanted to look and feel like castle frankenstein. That was our our conscious model What was harder for me articulate. Originally to tim was that i saw the book. As sort of a conceptual origami. I wanted the book to kind of fold around the reader's mind regardless order. You read it in. They go guys. It's not a linear book. the i cooked. It's i ended up writing books backwards. What is going to be the third volume next year. should have been the first But i you know. I was just starting. I was just beginning to feel my way around. Okay what is scripted cinema. So this first book is sort of putting the boundary lines up and some people justifiably right from the start complained that some of the stuff i wrote about aren't classic cryptos while aji right yes. Argument is cryptic cinema like horror. Cinema like like all genres and cinema is quite diverse. It's quite big and i was. I was trying to hit. The furthest reaches of these are the things that that are sort of defined the boundaries the parameters of what i think crafted cinema is and the second book which is focused primarily on the legend boggy creek the nineteen seventy-two charles. B pierce film is just about one movie and what it spawned when it caused what. What the legacy. That followed the legend of boggy. Creek is because and so. It's a more focused book than that. First volume is like our shotgun blast. Yes magazine. good yes yes in a good way. Yeah and it was also about. There's a log of Films that i like you know do do do films about urban legends fit. Well that's why my long right up of this obscure elmira new york shot independent movie. The glass had is in the first book. What about hp lovecraft. You know i mean is when hp lovecraft referred to the yeti for one of the first times in popular american fiction he wasn't referring to the classical yeti that you and i think of today he was linking it with these creatures from beyond the stars and and putting it in the context of these sort of crustaceans that that show up in vermont in his story. Whisper in the darkness. But he's talking about the yeti he is referring to lower that in the late nineteen twenty s was pretty obscure. Yes not known the way. It wasn't a nineteen fifties where it had entered the popular imagination. So you know. I was testing the boundaries. I lotta people argued with me. About including equinoxes. Nineteen seventy film equinox in there. But you know. I got a whole stack of paperbacks over here in my library from the nineteen seventies of books that mash up ufo sightings and bigfoot sightings. You know there's this weird. Blurring that happened in crypto. Zoology in the late sixties and throughout the seventy s. Were they were they from another dimension. Oh that's not gone. that's john. John keel was one of the exactly the dimension theory and now it's like so that first book was really about let me have some fun talking about the films that are at the far edges. Let me hit the grace notes. I made sure creature from the black lagoon. King kong that classic bigfoot movies legend boggy creek. They're all mentioned and pictured in cricket cinema but the focus really begins with a second volume. The first book is meant to be a fun monster magazine and it is..

calvin norma bates Tom weavers boggy creek calvin teabag calvin t beck Dick clemson richard clemson Ted white calvin beck Faurecia joe dante robert bloch robert robert bly tim Bloch Calvin jess Stewart stewart
"robert bloch" Discussed on Whores Talk Horror

Whores Talk Horror

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"robert bloch" Discussed on Whores Talk Horror

"It was just he's so fascinating and you learn a little bit about his backstory through like that long Exposition at the song. It was another thing Spencer was like I don't really think he said all that information to the cough extrapolated routing this month suspension of disbelief, but I also I was like, well, he's a cop so he probably was not given all that information. But he you know, that's what a cop does or detective they fill in the blanks from the information. So he he probably put more of a picture together in his head then what was actually given to him by Norman Bates. Well, he was a psychologist or a psychiatrist or something right who was giving the whole explanation of the murder. Oh, yeah, or doctor somebody else. You know what you're probably right? I was like doing a little bit of other things while I was watching it. I could do that. I've seen it a couple of times that I was like, all right. I want to re-watch this just to have it like more fresh in my head, but you are probably right. We'll see you watch it again. So a lot of people consider psycho to be one of the first slasher films ever made. Certainly. I think it's one of the first American slashers ever made. There's a movie called dog. Ping time that I have not seen that's from the UK that's considered to be the first slasher movie by many people definitely going to have to put that on my list that movie looks really interesting a few other choice fun facts about psycho. I'm sure you might have heard this before but psycho was really controversial for its times for many reasons. It was just one of the first movies, I believe that showed a shot of an unwed man and woman in bed together, right Angeles So Scandalous so many Pearl so Monday pearl-clutching happening. Oh my God, and he was divorced. Right? Right. It also had a shot of an uncovered female bottom. Yeah, which is not actually belong to gently his body double and that was actually censored in some versions of the film and perhaps the most hilarious is the image of a toilet being flushed psycho is said to be one off First films where a toilet is shown being flushed in a movie. Which yeah, that's cool. Okay Heavens to Betsy. But yeah, that's and also home either, you know, that psycho was based on a book because I just found this out yesterday. I heard that but never really looked it up. So I not really I mean what book is it back to us? Well, so it actually says if you pay attention to the credits, it says that it's based on the book or novel by Robert Bloch, which was written in nineteen fifty-nine. The office is also titled psycho. And it's Loosely inspired by the.

Norman Bates Spencer Robert Bloch murder Betsy UK Angeles
"robert bloch" Discussed on Strange Brew Podcast!

Strange Brew Podcast!

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"robert bloch" Discussed on Strange Brew Podcast!

"Six, nine, hundred, eighty, four at the age of seventy, seven over the years souvenirs. So a souvenir when people used to do what they would chip pieces from his gravestone. The place feel cemetery until the stone itself was stolen in two thousand. Two Thousand Jack that story that crazy and it was recovered in June two, thousand one near Seattle is only which is your ear an Golfer. Seattle as someone's like I just got to bring him to this place they satanic. Trying to sell it to be honest. They're probably trying to sell makes. Fuck you. So it was placed in storage at the cares shouting department sheriff's department the Gravesite. Now unmarked but they it's unknown but he's with near near his parents and shared oh? But, I want you burn alive? Yes. Food. So the story of Ed Geene as lasted in effect on the American population in American pop culture pop culture as evidenced by numerous appearance in film music and literature like there's there's bans early based on alternate. Sure. Egging cruncher. hate my mother and I made. fucking. Hillbilly. The detail came widespread public attention and the fixed night fictionalized Asian version presented by Robert Bloch and his to air block lex. What is it French? I don't know to be L. A.. C. H.. Block Block Jen. His first suspense suspense novel and Nineteen fifty-nine Okay. It's called psycho and then Auburn. Hitchcock literally bought the rights of a year later and made the film psycho. He must have like heard about the story probably inspired but also read the book case. Gabia. Fucking, fucked up movie and the if you know any psycho is based on, you know he guy runs this motel then you think he mother screaming and like living with his mother if you've never fucking scene which is weird flicks and shit now, and then you find out that I, don't think I'm watch rest up black mother. There's like the original version is really good. I like all Birch Cop. One of the first come on nineteen sixty. The thing is they had I think at the time they had color but are keen. Albert Hitchcock. Liked. White. It's a really good movie like Norman Bates callups accused Sushi watch it. But Guess what there was a reincarnate are a remake and guess who was a psycho Norman Bates. No you just said the cycle. No. But who played him in the nineties, I oh, Shit. No. INS fawn. No. Way. You should watch because I. Really. It's actually pretty good. He's pretty fucked up in the movie it's on prime or something like that. I? Think. So check it out a Vince Vaughn get the fuck. Netflix. Because this is he was doing more serious roles. I. Think it was eight, nine, hundred, eighty, nine, or nine, hundred, ninety something. You should. Check it out. It's actually it's actually pretty decent for fucking him a a serious rule, and so gain story was loosely adapted in numerous other films including deranged in nineteen seventy four to see that I kinda WanNa Watch it I've heard about it egging the butcher of Plainfield, two, thousand seven and then Rob Zombie Films House thousand corpses and its sequel like Devil's rejects Connick Guy? Inspiration? Should. They fucking put faces on like? Rob Zombie fucked up Shit God, the fucking army. Again why does she keep coming back? That's the second time like literally in two days as mentioned, the Devil's rejects to me too. Boss just bought one of their fucking like dope like he he likes to collect records. So it got record and it's like the devil rejects record. That's actually kind of coolie Shipman. This looks so cool like it's all like blood-stained and shit. Sick Kurds out there and I. I just watched house dozen corpses and we just watch the three from Hal recently, and then I kinda to watch devils reaching. Quarantine kind of bullshit and now I WANNA fuck and go back and up was reject seventy, the other two now I really liked the fucking new people taking. We'll get. there. So obviously, he also inspired fictional serial killers most notably Norman Bates right? But you also have What's the other one? Patrick Bateman. American psycho never see. fucking American. Psycho. psychos my favorite fucking through Thriller Films Fuck in the Christian. Bale. Maybe I'll watch it when you watch. Okay. Well, I'm saying for all the fans have never seen American psycho just on netflix summer. She died in crime watching that Shit fucking I think we all at this point I think it's almost canceled enough looks descriptions. Agree fucking Wanson. So then obviously got leather face exchange massacre and then you've got Buffalo Bill from the Saas lambs below been over. Woman was. Fat.

Norman Bates Albert Hitchcock Netflix Seattle Vince Vaughn Robert Bloch Rob Zombie Birch Cop Hal Ed Geene Rob Zombie Films Auburn Plainfield coolie Shipman Bale Connick Guy Patrick Bateman Sushi
"robert bloch" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

15:33 min | 1 year ago

"robert bloch" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Though this chemical still unregulated the U. S. CPA in the state pretty much don't even know what's out there you may think wait a minute how does this happen right well that law that came out in nineteen seventy six the toxic substances control act federal laws to regulate new chemicals going on the market well it's focused on new ones ones that come out after nineteen seventy six what about these existing chemicals like PFOA and PFOS that've been out there since the fifties the law says essentially the company's using or manufacturing those chemicals they're the ones who have to then tell EPA if they think the chemical presents a risk to human health or the environment and despite all of these internal studies I'm seeing cancer being caused in the animals there's repeated discussion internally within the company to report this to the EPA an unfortunate decision was now and then when it's found in the public water supply that's also not reported so I'm seeing all of this information and I'm realizing as I'm sitting there going through these documents not only is this chemical one it's a massive amount being used at the property at the at the at the manufacturing plant when dupont found it was getting into the public water supply in West Virginia they thought it was coming from those pets where they had had all dumped all the sludge was seeping down into the groundwater so in the eighties they had dug up seven thousand tons of this CD eight PFOA soaked sludge and dumped it and guess where it was dumped the landfill and what does this stuff to do when it hits the water it foams and do pot actually gone out and sample the water coming out of that creek by nineteen ninety they were were monitoring that dupont was aware it was in the landfill in the creek water in the public water and remember this is still the big government agencies are aware of this dupont scientists though say what would be a safe level of this for people who are exposed to it in nineteen eighty eight their own scientists sat down and said no more than zero point six parts per billion you think okay what does that mean all right the relevance of that is at the time the lowest you could probably even find in the water under dupont's own method for looking for this was zero point six parts per billion in other words if it's in the water you need to get filtered out because of this toxicity the persistence the bioaccumulation of fact in other words this stuff it's sitting in people take a ticking time bomb okay dupont took that number rounded up to one part per billion and then they compared it to the levels they were finding in the public water supply public water was two to three sometimes five times above that level community wasn't told government regulators weren't told for example the creek that the cows were drinking from a thousand times that level okay and there's analysis what would this do to cal's okay so it's pretty clear what was going on at the landfill after I saw all of this we were able to settle the case for Mr Tennant and his family but at that point where then stuck with we now know I'm looking at information showing this chemical is in the drinking water of tens of thousands of people around that plant is likely been there for years decades nobody knows the public hasn't been told we have draft press releases what would we say if we're asked about this they never went out the government agencies hadn't been told so in two thousand and one I sat down and decided this is a massive public health threat because I realize this chemical wasn't just used in making teflon in Parkersburg this chemical has been used in a wide variety of products we're talking about PFOA that's been used to make things like fast food wrappers stain resistant carpeting and clothing fire fighting foams a wide variety of different consumer products and the fact that it was being found in human blood across the country was very concerning in the fact that nobody knew about this to me was equally concerning so at that point I put together a massive letter and send it to the U. S. EPA is Mister tenet was so convinced him was telling me people just need to see what's really going on when you sit down to look at these facts it's clear and he was right when I sat down and looked at what he brought me clearly there was a problem so in two thousand one I assumed I just need to lay this out for the U. S. environmental protection agency catch all these documents and surely they'll they'll come in and set appropriate drinking water standards I cited all the different federal laws everything that EPA could do to stop this that was March of two thousand and one nineteen years ago unfortunately crickets all right but when that letter went out the community finally found out this was in their water in the community came to us and said we wanted out if this is if it'll cause these effects in these animals it could potentially be carcinogenic we wanted filtered out of our water we want to know what will it do to us in the long term well remember this is as a lawyer I'm sitting here looking at this thinking how do we do this because it's not regulated there are no state or federal standards bringing a lawsuit against dupont as a class action for the entire community trying to seek water filtration inappropriate testing and studies to tell these people exactly what it will do to them over time that was in two thousand and one ended up through that's through that lawsuit we found out through additional testing seventy thousand people were being affected by this case by this chemical in their drinking water communities all up and down the Ohio River outside of the Parkersburg plant I continue to find all that information to the U. S. EPA as I was getting from dupont internally to to try to warn this is a public health threat you need to do something in two thousand two the U. S. EPA did step in and said we're gonna Nishida priority review of this chemical this seems to be something that went completely unregulated we think we may have to ban this okay that's two thousand two in two thousand four USEPA actually then sued dupont saying you withheld information from us about the toxicity of this chemical the fact it was in drinking water the fact that this chemical process of crosses the placenta from mothers to children in children are born with this chemical in their blood you should have provided that information to us that lawsuit gets filed in two thousand four and at this point one of the five what something happens that hadn't happened yet the media starts for the first time publishing articles and actually information starts to trickle out to the public about what's going on with this chemical you start seeing headlines like teflon chemical linked to cancer ABC's twenty twenty ran a show about it environmental attorney Robert Bloch discussing his book exposure so information started to finally come out at that point dupont settled their lawsuit in West Virginia they settled the case that the U. S. A. P. P. A. brought he was claimed to be the largest civil administrative penalty in the history of the EPA sixteen million dollars okay interview with our member the company was making hundreds of millions a year off this product so the EPA said it's been settled in fact then there's an announcement dupont will stop making the chemical over the next ten years well you may think well wait a minute dupont was making I thought three AM is making it about three AM was originally making PFOA and PFOS in two thousand they announced they were going to stop making both of them and dupont rather than also stop using PFOA at that point saw a market opportunity stepped in and started making it and stem cells so they had been making PF away during this time so in two thousand six there's a commitment to possible stop will phase out PF away into to the public it's as if this all went away all right the Catholic chemicals being phased out the set the clock and lawsuits have been settled in fact most people in the public didn't hear another thing about these chemicals for the next ten fifteen years you think well what what what what what what what is going on there right think about it all of these all of the chemical that's been pumped out into the environment the preceding fifty sixty years was still there agreeing not to make more was great but it didn't address what was already out there in our environment that was going to stay there for ever in soil and water in landfills probably all over the country yet the EPA backed off the press went away you never heard anything more about this and under our settlement in West Virginia one of the things we agreed to do was not only filter the water but we've we've created this really unique process dupont was saying despite what we were seeing in the animal studies does animal that animal data including the cancer data was completely irrelevant because rats aren't humans even though keep in mind the only reason you're doing the rat studies is to protect human effects right nobody's caring whether the rats are getting cancer okay you're doing it to protect human effects so then we said okay we'll look at your worker data well those are such highly expose people that human data is not relevant to the people that are drinking it so when we sat down and did our settlement what we did is we created an independent panel of scientists that both coupons and and us both sides sat down and said we want independent scientists to look at the levels people are actually drinking it in this community and tell us is that in fact link to these diseases including cancer we set that up in two thousand and five that took seven years to do over those seven years that's when PFOA is being phased out right you're not hearing anything about this and every time we try to push this issue what we're told is well the science is uncertain after all your science panels looking at and they haven't reached any conclusions yet we ended up getting sixty nine thousand people from that community that came forward gave blood provided medical information this independent panel ended up doing some of the most comprehensive human studies ever done on any chemical in a twenty twelve they finish their work and they announce the drinking this chemical was linked with six different diseases including kidney cancer testicular cancer ulcerative colitis thyroid disease pre eclampsia and high cholesterol when that data came out I thought certainly things are gonna move forward will have federal standards now I mean after all you have more data than you could ever want any chemical no at that point E. P. A. says well now we have to determine whether this chemical exist anywhere else whether this is really a federal problem so testing began for the really the first time in this country twenty thirteen twenty fourteen public water supplies were required to start testing sure enough is being found everywhere but there were still no federal guideline then a dramatic thing happened in twenty sixteen a New York times magazine article came out that summarize the history of this and it's it's basically went through the history and it pointed out the fact that this testing was occurring across the country and this was found in other places within just a couple months after that USEPA came out with their first guideline ever for these chemicals in drinking water guideline no more than seventy parts per trillion now that triggered massive sampling all over the country because the department of defense realize that these chemicals PFOA and PFOS had been used in firefighting foams which we've talked about outside military bases and airports all across the country they started systematically going down the list and sampling for those chemicals sure enough it's being was being found everywhere during twenty sixteen twenty seventeen almost every day some new community across the United States and worldwide sampling began in other countries as well started realizing these chemicals were in their water to and under our settlement one of the things that also happened was once those links were found everybody in the community got medical testing paid for by dupont for these diseases and the people who had one of those linked diseases they were able to go forward and pursue damage claims against dupont into pot would not dispute under our agreement drinking that water at those levels can cause those diseases we had thirty five hundred people in that community that had one of those six diseases they brought their claims the first one went to trial in twenty fifteen so the first time ever all of this information was laid out to to the jury to the public verdict against dupont for having caused the woman's kidney cancer two more trials both verdicts against dupont ever increasing verdict amounts including jury saying acted with conscious disregard of the risks and what they did as this is happening as this information is coming out the New York times magazine articles finally out there juries are seeing this they're still relatively little being reported about this there are there's most people in the country still completely unaware this chemicals out there in their water when communities are finding out it's in their water it's as if this emerging chemical we've never heard of is now here I guess we need to study it and what we then hear from folks as they start learning about this we just don't know what these chemicals will do and the companies come forward and say well there's there's no evidence yet of what these chemicals will do to you and so it was incredibly frustrating as I'm watching this happen as this all of what we've tried to do to get this information out to the public keep in mind once we knew about PFOA mean it took twenty years to get this information out about what PF away does what it's been known to be able to do internally by the company's finally getting this information out well during that ten years of the phase out of PFOA replacement chemicals have been brought out on to the market ones with maybe one or two fewer carbon atoms and suddenly those are new and what we're hearing from the companies are well there's no all that and all that bad science about PFOA didn't relate to these these are different new chemicals there's no evidence that any of those cause any adverse human health effects so it's almost as.

U. S. CPA PFOS
"robert bloch" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

04:52 min | 2 years ago

"robert bloch" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"And donate today I look at six forty five right now looking to bring home movie movie in town was shot here about local attorney has called dark waters made its premiere last night in the tri state at the the merry month theater for now it's a limited release that's the only place that the movie will be showing locally till it gets more extended release later on this is the story of Cincinnati attorney Robert Bloch he works for Taft NESN Hollister pretty much corporate attorney that defends big companies until he took a case out of West Virginia where he took on dupont chemical a part of the conflict of this movie is him going up against his partners is yeah tennis in Hollister and whether they really want to do this kind of suit since they have the reputation of being on the other side and in the alley one seventy million dollar settlement for the people of Parker's burger basically poisoned by dupont where they were making teflon and the material that that would help everything from your skillet your carpet the story is told in the movie and then you get to see some courses I landmarks and process they say there's some good shots of the skyline scene integrators fountain square even o'malley's in the alley really featured in this that's the old Ogden's we were down fourth street yeah wing third fourth street have you been in there since they blew out the back and I have one time I think like opening day maybe two three years ago but that's it yeah it does they look the back out in that overlooks probably now you got it all back overlooking though yeah I mean it's way out it's it's not twice as big as all our lives at least three times the size it used if not four times what it used to be but yeah back when it was August that we now one of the scenes I guess is him and one of his attorneys discussing strategy there right coming up on news seven o'clock we will talk about the high winds hitting the tristate today and the bad weather in other parts of the country that could affect travel more in fifteen minutes newsradio seven W. O. W. doesn't my screen is called the blind pay what's called a blind pick the back part the other side of it okay you go out the back low mileage it's called blind pig sorry for me it's all but now we know yeah I know although the place was great that was like that of the hidden gem when we worked on fourth street is like we were the only people knew it was there it seemed like there was one time I went in I ordered a sandwich for lunch or forgot about this I want to eat the sandwich and the twist tie from the bag had come off in the sandwich maybe it was a tuna melt or something the meeting and I got a twist tie the pullout didn't sanding them maybe I did but I mention it on the air maybe the next day the color and I wasn't bad mouthing them it was yeah we knew the moves from a job with a twist tie the next time I went in for lunch they had saved all these twist ties for me and brought out a side I placed most vin fifty twist ties on the thing here we put him on the side this time those funny swing on by no they have a it sounds weird but looks pretty good they look a chandelier in the back part the chandelier made of Jameson bottles might even have more than one was pretty interesting looking all right six forty eight six forty eight let's get to grow here yourselves taxpaying dot fighting sentence and miss grant and read our streets of another's this is not a crime stoppers update on seven hundred W. L. W. E. A. S. all right we're looking for John Phillips not the one we used to know and love around here John Phillips the convicted sex offender wanted by the head of the county sheriff's office for failure to register a change of address and felony probation violation well this is John Phillips the first time in John Phelps the second time okay we'll go with Phillips PH I. L. P. S. is is the third time anyway look of this picture he looks like that guy it's on Facebook he's a white male fifty three years old five seven one seventy five filled spelled sloops has a history of rape robbery theft in drugs western live on Anderson ferry and dell hi okay there it is against with Phillips PH I. L. P. S. with info on John Phillips call crime stoppers at three five to thirty forty or do it online a crime that stoppers dot U. S. and view his face on Facebook a greater Cincinnati northern Kentucky crime stoppers thank you very much a B. B. John Phillips it is six fifty in the morning traffic weather little money talk coming up a whole lot more metro has the best deal on wireless switch today and get one for Amazon prime membership included in select plans at no extra charge so you can enjoy your favorite movies shows and music all included at metro.

attorney one seventy million dollar fifty three years fifteen minutes seven hundred W two three years seven W
"robert bloch" Discussed on X96

X96

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"robert bloch" Discussed on X96

"Should be Colorado maybe that's Colorado on that one up there that's Wyoming is it Colorado I got a mixed up there they're not labeled I'm going all the map yeah I'm just looking at the map New Mexico aliens really well and Arizona aliens know when a couple's backwards so I think it's probably well as aliens let's see aliens and then Arizona is alien scary yeah perfect blue in California nineteen ninety seven perfect blue rotten tomatoes rating of seventy seven percent no idea I don't have any I guess yeah I kind of question this one new I heard a podcast yesterday about how psycho was made of the movie paramount now this is this is Hitchcock at the height of his popularity he goes to paramount and says this is the one that I want to do next no paramount what are we don't think so now yeah it was it was a book by Robert Bloch yeah and I don't know if the book I think the book was fit did very fairly well looked at okay they did a lot and made a lot of changes from the book for this one because Hitchcock felt like it was too obvious you know that wasn't enough of a surprise right so so paramount said no so Herrmann said noted the script that he had come up with with the writer of the book you know that that was the new version so while he and somebody else produces no he went back to paramount said tell you what I'll pay for it and the deal is you let me shoot it on your lot I alone sixty percent of the negative and then you guys can take the rest Martin guy and they went sh whatever we don't like it anyway so go go but have fun go play them guess who got millions and millions of dollars because he was right yeah I'm trying to think of you know after psycho I guess there was the birds which did pretty well but what did you do after that we had a ton of a ton of stuff but after the after cycle yeah the head of yeah that was only like toward the end of his career he still had like another five or six films after them I just can't think of anything that was but he he will change the story too and he says he says I want someone like Anthony Hopkins to play my killer because nobody else see that coming yeah he had to the birds torn curtain topaz friends friends the family plot family plot was his last one friends he was the only one of those movies and the birds that are that this is this is while he's got his TV show going they'll offer Hitchcock presents right is extremely popular and there were magazines and comics and all that stuff I know he a he made the perfect choice for me Anthony Hopkins you didn't get booked up Tony Perkins was perfect for them because because he was so Anthony Tony Perkins told me that I see at three in the hot I met Tony Burke he wanted that he wanted he wanted Tony Perkins they said no because they he does look like a killer in the civil rights act that's the point I'm trying to surprise people also I'm gonna kill Janet Leigh halfway through the movie and they went last you know the fruits line who did a movie called am was the first movie that both are built in you know and it was right you know you read reviews buys me or you can make a you know yeah Peter Laurie thank you it was Peter Laurie's first film and it was a German expressionist film silent film about a child murderer and he played this child murder and the reason for its long cost cast him is because he.

"robert bloch" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"robert bloch" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Shin White House spokesman Hogan Gidley tells the Salem radio network this is an admission by speaker Pelosi that what you've been doing to this point has been a complete sham and in a written statement White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham says the decision to hold a floor vote is proof that Democrats have been conducting an on off the rise proceeding Greg Clarkston Washington there on the first current White House official to testify in the secretive impeachment investigation expected to do so later today lieutenant colonel Alexander been men is due on Capitol Hill the is the national security council's director of European affairs the massive wildfire this destroyed fifty seven homes in northern California's wine country is now fifteen percent contained firefighters racing the clock to battle the flames for the winds pick up again the fire broke out last week near the town of guys were built the Chicago teachers strike now in its ninth day classes canceled for some three hundred thousand students teachers union general counsel Robert Bloch says union has an offer on the table and offer that provides real class size guarantees America has said that she should she supports and protection for our lowest paid members and a veteran members is folk with Chicago's ABC seven Boeing CEO testified today before a Senate committee today the anniversary of the first of two deadly crashes involving Boeing Max jetliners total of three hundred forty six people were killed in the two crashes on Wall Street Dow futures down about thirty five points nasdaq futures five points higher more of these stories scenthound hall dot com the following is not an actor but.

"robert bloch" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

05:16 min | 2 years ago

"robert bloch" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Anderson he is a as a lot of knowledge about Wisconsin I want to read Frank I gotta ask you I want to go off on a tangent here I got a text or on sports poll this is Chuck from the south side he says that's true brewer fans aren't saying that the brewers can't win a championship it's just so hard with injuries trades and all the players need to have good years it's very hard realistically the Bucks are set up to win for a while and even a couple of players get injured if even a couple of players get injured or death is awesome Frank do you have an opinion on the next it was Constantine to win a title it'll be the badgers it'll be hopeful so that would be great this is a good year for them so far and I I'm gonna I'm gonna hold you to that if they don't win would there be retribution okay so let's jump back into since we're talking about it yeah I want I want and need to be headliner I wanna quick divert to you have something in Wisconsin ology dot com called the ghosts of the past fire which really creeped me out I live near Peshtigo and they talk about every time the fire comes up someone from Peshtigo says kill more people than the Chicago fire I think they're proud of it and it's it's bizarre but it is true we are that way we're that way about it being too right I mean we turn them into a lovable character what he's one thing though people do not understand he was not a serial killer he was not okay everybody jump to that serial killers and I would say that's for other states ed was more original than that now when his mother died and had a very well we cannot talk about a Dean without talking about cycle which we were right so they're doing at a very close relationship with this religion insane mother and they were very close when she died he went on his tangent that made him world famous which is he was a serial grave robber and he sought to recreate his mother for inhabit her skin through body suits that he made from the skin of the people who's the grades he robbed and all of them had a resemblance to his mother that was the one key so he murdered one person that he's actually guilty of somebody told me three four five but everything I've read maybe two and maybe his brother that would be the the the third all right I mean that if three yeah but you know one or two when you compare that to these other people that are knocking off twenty thirty forty fifty anything out of bed for three people yeah I think it was at the just wanted the the the burial park you know and and get to it did you column eighty yeah I told okay you're on a different level it was a baby sitter a trusted babysitter in was a good friend and very helpful neighbor we had people appreciated him they wanted to Lynch him on the other the night he was arrested but up until the end user beloved local character now thirty miles away from ad was Robert block the great Wisconsin writer of weird fiction and he was starting a novel he knew he was going to call it cycle but when it happened and broke all over the world headline news at game Robert Bloch used that inspiration to finish his novel psycho Alfred Hitchcock utterly obsessed with it clean by the way psycho right off the line Michael happened biggest movie it changed the way Hollywood did business and it broke down all the censorship wall it literally did a one hundred percent change in the way movies are and what we know is horror today we can all look back to cycle is the moment that the the trigger was pulled all because of our Eddie all I just got another tax on the tax line it's is Texas chainsaw massacre also based on a game that is correct that is very correct Toby Hooper the director of Texas chainsaw massacre had cousins in Wisconsin now growing up they'd come you know they'd visit for a in the summertime and they would tell him tales he said they scared the crap out of him of this person in that game and as you know every Wisconsin I has their own version of yet game Kelso it entered folklore and it was embellished and embellished embellished but when you read and study the real at king case it is so frightening I don't know embellishment can improve generality his insanity okay so you know what let's let's pause there Frank can you stick around for a couple more minutes of course gonna take a quick break please don't leave Frank Anderson as you're talking again and Wisconsin **** and we have another great story coming up after the break.

"robert bloch" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

16:01 min | 2 years ago

"robert bloch" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"We've talked with less the clicker before on coast to coast I enjoy his work quite a bit I think the last time was for crimes stories was it like yes they're classic American crime fiction collection I think which you annotated in edited the along with many other collections that you have annotated an edited such as Sherlock Holmes some day they're going to do an annotated edited to less Clinger think of that well I I'll be interested to read maybe I'll do that so but I I really this is so great so for like let's let's talk a little bit about the love craft thing because I identified last hour that there's kind of a difference between it love craft Lovecraftian Lovecraftian influences from this it in his lifetime failed writer continue to reverberate in we can identify their all sorts of different you know threads in in a pop culture but also I think it he just had an impact on our culture at large in the way in which we look at things and how he influenced perhaps a lot of people even think about the world so so if you would let's give it give a thumbnail of the the the brief life of of H. P. Lovecraft and then we'll we'll get into some of the finer points sure so the most essential part of it is born and raised in Providence Rhode Island born in eighteen ninety born to Shelby genteel families yes I saw the description I thought that was a pretty good way of describing yeah the you know very early in Lovecraft's life when he was three his father was committed to a mental institution and he died five years later low quick then live with his mother's family he was taken care of by relatives his grandfather died in nineteen oh four and at that point they were actually pretty poor he dropped out of high school but he was that he was an avid student he was prolific reader Greek and Latin it was fascinated by mythology and especially by astronomy and begin to write an astronomy column for the local newspaper he was very interested in science in the middle of the teens he's a very important the development in this life occurred when he joined the amateur press association now this is something I'm not quite sure what the modern counterpart would be in those days people were self publishing pamphlets magazines and sharing them with each other these were being printed on you know home printing presses early reproduction kind of machines Xerox machines insured and look we have started to become part of the community of writers they wrote for each other mainly they weren't writing for a commercial success his mother was institutionalized in nineteen nineteen when he was in his twenties and she didn't last very long she died two years later and at that point his life changed dramatically he suddenly felt free to pursue his own interests he met a a young woman named Sonya green very much press convention they core to do they married they moved to New York City now this was a disaster we only put a pin and everything to to say that may have been like courting and marrying and living in New York City to start a new life together as newlyweds that might have been that what could have been the most normal period of love crafts life yeah except that he hated yeah see this being in New York down here because downhill from there but there was a moment he was like a little to be a normal person he turned down actually the job of being the editor of weird tales will come back weird tales in a minute yeah but he decided trying publish abuse to be in the publishing industry personal career as a writer in New York that was a disaster but he just loads being surrounded by the residents of New York the immigrant populations the people of color and the Jews even though Sonya by the way was Jewish right let's speaks again so I'm I'm so glad you brought this up so let's just addresses could you do it absolutely artfully you do it so well in the book because this is where a lot of people leave love craft right there he is he is such a virulent racist and ed ed and anti semite who seem to accept if I you know going by the annotated love craft seem to accept Sonya because she was a non practicing assimilated Jews use a cultural Jew I I I told I told the export of with forgive me for a really bad joke about the three red backs to find a a magic lantern and the genie appears in the first ones as well I wish that all the blacks be relocated to Africa Darden says the genie at what would you like to search for the second one second ones as well I wish that all the Hispanics would be relocated to South America done says the genie and what would you like services to the third red deck diet coke so that's kind of love craft he he was a separatist I guess is the proper term he was very much opposed to the idea of racial mixing in fact more than opposed he was frightened and he felt that well he didn't want a radically the Jews and the blacks in the Filipinos in the Italians he basically thought they should live in their own communities way from him and their own ethnicities yeah America for the water yeah and that's the key part it was for the lost so wasn't even like he was accepting of Catholics per se although he may have had a higher tolerance for that but he he was he was that kind of price and so intolerant that he almost it seems like he couldn't function in New York because everybody else was otherwise getting along and mixing together in the great stew of a you know of American history but for him yeah so when you moved left New York to take a job opportunity in another city and love craft took that opportunity to return home growing on the train as it pulled in Providence I am proud of it and he was there for the rest of his life the rest of his life was very long he died in nineteen forty three I'm sorry in nineteen thirty seven of stomach cancer very sadly at the age of forty seven as you said a dismal commercial failure yeah having published the story in an anthology having one book which was essentially a a pamphlet published including one of the stories published in his career what do you know if I if I was a B. Lovecraftian about love craft I would I would make what would be an otherwise obvious suggestion that he died of stomach cancer because of all the hatred he was holding inside maybe so vote you don't so he wrote may be sixty to seventy stories he wrote dozens of poems three of the stories are what we're there to label novels they're sort of novella they're short novels and the thousands and thousands of letters and dousing maybe a hundred thousand letters during his lifetime long long letters he had a wide circle of correspondence and it's not really fair to calm a recluse he did travel he traveled up and down the east coast you went to visit friends in in other cities you travel to Canada briefly but he was isolated the he lived for his letters he lives through communicating with people through letters ended in a very unusual guy but he had a tight circle of friend is lawyers yeah your wrists and after his death they began to build its reputation and to collect his work in publishing and bring it to the attention of critics and slowly it built by the nineteen seventies there were serious academic studies of Lovecraft's work and more and more widespread publication the first real major recognition of his work was when the library of America put out an addition of these stories maybe ten years ago now yeah we knew she speaks to how recent and a lot of ways he has broad cultural impact you know was made but really going even back to the sixties and the naming of Arkham asylum and Batman lore after in honor of arc of Massachusetts the mythical town in in in love crass work each with a with a certain amount of the literati they were already all over I mean among his disciples were writers like Fritz Leiber and Robert Bloch and if he was the usual work was deeply influential and writers like Steven king Clive Barker Neil Gaiman Peter Straub these are all writers who read his work when they were young and found it spoke to them as an added with them one of the things I think that people forget about Lovecraft do is his intense interest in science and he was writing at a time when Einstein's theories were just being published and they were just that the reviews at the time based travel with being talked about Pluto was discovered right and these things fascinated love craft and became part of the fabric of his fiction was very early if you're in terms of science fiction and some loose stories are much worse by fictional than they are at war yeah and I I think this is it or suspend the I think we could even call them suspense to it and and even in stories like rats of the the rats in the walls it's it beats building it's all it's a mood it's a it's a feeling it's a creepiness that starts to come over you as the reader yeah there are there are there is a lot of action well no so in in love crest audience as as I mentioned earlier was weird tales so weird tales with a magazine founded in the early nineteen twenties with the whole sold for ten cents a didn't pay writers very much but it yields an audience was part of the monthly magazine group and there were a number of magazines like that Argosy black mask and others that were outlets for writers who couldn't find what they wanted in what we might call mainstream literature course black mask give birth to dead how Hamid of the other great great Tennessee Williams the rose for black mask and I think actually Weird Tales story early on really and Tennessee Williams so weird tales love creek was one of the major stars of weird tales but even so you know he just he couldn't make a living they just weren't paying much yeah he was the of the writer he he also did a number of what are known as revisions he would to hire out of services to edit stories for other people and in some cases rewrite yeah and that's sort of how we scrape by but I think this idea that there was this community of admirers adopted issues ideas Clark Ashton Smith Robert Howard these are people who I have built their own would worry reputations in part on some of the ideas that Lovecraft was espousing I want to come back to the science thing because I love Chris felt his philosophy of his story was that they had to be one ninety nine percent realistic one percent could have that supernatural element in and and by the way he was a great scholar of supernatural literature so naturally enough he was very interested in the science of the day and and would work it in and then might have that one all right so we get we're talking with the less clear the new book that he has out is the new annotated H. P. Lovecraft the on Arkham let me let me frame this book he wrote quickly for people who are looking ahead at holiday gift giving this is a perfect book for somebody who a young reader of weird tales like fiction or people who like if you know if somebody in your family some of these big Stephen King fan there's there's just a there's these are the core stories in the in in the H. P. Lovecraft library that are annotated explained in ways which would bring it helps bring greater detail almost like you're both like it's like having an alternative sound track right I mean if you have a rental rector's track it's a director's track but what I really like about it is the you know less Klinger and and then the guy who wrote the foreword you just you never stepped away from the fact that okay he still ranks so we like I think that's important because I've I don't want to ever soft sell that because part of what horror fight him is the same thing that influenced the way in which he made it his stories it horrified him to be in New York around mixed race people and that was part of what created the sort of this idea of them of their maybe mixing of of people from into different human forms are non human forms that it informed of that to which is part of what made love craft so hugely influential absolutely now it's easy it might my editor who had never read Lovecraft for she started working on this book when she read his biography and realize that not only his father died insane in in in a sanitarium but his mother also died in the same sanitarium that Lovecraft was petrified of going crazy himself had replied that he had in him some bad blood something inside him that was wrong and when you combine that with his ideas about the universe and his interest in science he came up.

"robert bloch" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"robert bloch" Discussed on WDRC

"Our this is Hollywood three sixty a radio show that presents the Bastin classic radio this hour on Hollywood three sixty will rocket off into the distant future on a radio as fast science fiction series minus one from nineteen fifty five then can heal the see into the future the find out on our one of the great Gildersleeve starring Harold Harry from nineteen forty two with me to help present these radio classics as my co host Lisa walls and my executive producer Mike Estella but right now let's rock it off into the distant future with the axe minus one this story called almost human is written by Robert Bloch and Robert blocked roads site let's go back to August eleventh nineteen fifty five X. minus one three one fire the unknown come transcribed tales of new dimensions in time and space these are stories of the future adventures in which you live in a million could be years on a thousand maybe work minus story.

"robert bloch" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

05:01 min | 3 years ago

"robert bloch" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"Mean kids believe in everything they believe in santa claus able even the tooth fairy they believe in the easter bunny and i thought to myself well of course we're an adult would probably say oh it can't be a monster that looks like a car the kids would because they live their lives without metaphor so i saw them trying to get away and for me the scariest part of the story is in the monster car but it's when these two hundred children are trying to walk up the breakdown lane of a busy interstate highway and then third child and najib new child with a magnifying glass is the one who saves the day the lives they everything yeah i like to write about kids for adults and i think for a long time i had that feel pretty much to myself so wonderful story that william golding talks about the genesis of his novel classic novel lord of the file he says that one night he was sitting beside the fire with his wife and he said what would you think if i were to write a story about boys not idealized boys like in juvenile novels but the way that boys really are and his wife said i think that would be a wonderful idea bill and he wrote the lord of the flies and i've always tried to write about kids the way that kids really are so that when the boy who's the real here grow pete of mile eighty one when he gets into this abandoned rest stop that the big kids have been using make out spot and a place to drink and that sort of thing he finds half a bottle of vodka and he has some vodka and he looks at pinups in magazines and you know so it's not an idealized picture of childhood but at the same time pizza good kid and when it when it becomes necessary for him to rescue these two smaller shoulder he does what he's supposed to do so i i love that story and i like to i like the kids tell me when you wrote your very first scary story at what age well i was probably let's see i started writing stories when i was six or seven because my mother would pay me a quarter a piece for them real and those were kind of fanciful stories about a rabbit in a bear and i think there was a maybe a squirrel and they had adventures in an old car and they say people they were kind of sweet stories and even then i was sort of writing to market because i knew what my mother like and i wanted those quarters so i was careful to stick to that but i think around eleven or twelve i started to write stories under the influence of the things that i was reading like hp lovecraft and robert bloch weird tales and the horror comics like tales from the crypt and the haunt fear and those were stories about the usually had some kind of immoral you know or the old which would say the story is full of irony it's good for your blood kitties so so that if a man murdered his wife she would come out of the grave that she would be sort of rotted and clotted with dirt and she would hunt down her husband and and kill him in some gruesome way so that everything even out in the end they were horrible stories but they were moral too so i'd say around ten or twelve i started to write horror fiction what i also love about this book the bazaar have bad dreams is that before each bad dream if you will you write a little about how and why you got there and a little about your writing process and i wonder if you would read for stu heavier book there i do if you would read for us page eighty one because i think it says so much about how you approach your work okay this is the head note to a story called the dune which is one of my favorite in the in the book because well let me read the head note that thing yeah as i said in the note to batman and robin sometimes once in a great while you get the cup with the handle already attached god how i love that you just going about your business thinking of nothing in particular and then caboose a story arrives special delivery perfect and complete the only thing you have to do is transcribe.

"robert bloch" Discussed on Inside The Exorcist

Inside The Exorcist

02:06 min | 4 years ago

"robert bloch" Discussed on Inside The Exorcist

"Without seeing the spectre of ed gain staring back it's blocks agent on the phone hello he has good news really that's great that is great what's the price but his is that a good price she we take it okay all right let's do it and with that the deal was done for the first time robert blocks writing had been option for the movies but who was done by her oh who cares the blind bid was nine thousand dollars that's more than seventy four thousand dollars today for a writer that's a payday what robert bloch didn't know is that another novel the haunting of hill house by shirley jackson was also option that year it would be renamed the haunting and directed by robert wise in 1963 the rights when four sixty seven thousand five hundred dollars more than seven times with block would be paid almost six hundred thousand dollars today black was in a mood to celebrate as he pop the champagne he knew none of this he didn't even know the buyer was at that bargainprice it literally could have been any one but he was not anyone it was one of the most famous directors in hollywood and that director had just acquired the rights to what would become the most important film of his career for next for nothing eventually force bloc would find out and he would always always for presented for his deal with the publisher included no points on any sailed to hollywood.

the deal robert blocks writer shirley jackson robert wise hollywood director publisher robert bloch four sixty seven thousand five seventy four thousand dollars six hundred thousand dollars nine thousand dollars
"robert bloch" Discussed on Inside The Exorcist

Inside The Exorcist

01:48 min | 4 years ago

"robert bloch" Discussed on Inside The Exorcist

"There's an old fable that speaks to the seoul of everyone who chooses the struggling solitary life of a writer a gaunt wolf was almost dead with hunger when he met a house donald who was passing by a cousin said the dog look at you your irregular life would be the ruin of you why do you not work steadily as i do and get your food regularly given to you i would love that said the wear follow me said the dog come with me to my master in you shall share mind work of wealth and the dog went towards the town together on the way the wolf noticed that the care around the dog's neck was worn away how did that happen ask them oh it is nothing said the dog that is only the place where the caller is put on at night to keep me chained up it shapes a bit but one soon gets used to it is that all said the wolf then goodbye to you master dog when he was a kid robert bloch devoured every issue of a fantasy and horror fiction magazine called weird tales one of the leading writers for that magazine was horror legend hp love crowder what was it about love crafted captured blocks imagination was it the sense that the ordinary all around us mask something dark and dangerous something.

seoul writer donald robert bloch horror fiction magazine crowder
"robert bloch" Discussed on Inside The Exorcist

Inside The Exorcist

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"robert bloch" Discussed on Inside The Exorcist

"Word spread fast about the hell unleashed in plainfield from there if you take wisconsin 22 to us 10 east to wisconsin won ten north about thirty five miles you come to the town of we away go they're a writer robert bloch devoured every detail he had a couple of books to his name already but the story of this strange man in plain field gave him an idea and that idea became a book a book which was option by a famous hollywood director and became a legendary movie ig too late that's what they asked at gain why do you do it well she reminded me of my mother this is the story of a movie that almost didn't get made a movie wear the star dies after only forty seven minutes a movie it's studio hated a movie the new york times called a blot on an honorable career a movie now regarded as one of the finest ever made a movie the changed everything from wondering this is a six part deep dive inspired by the story behind an unforgettable classic movie this is inside psycho we'd like to learn more about you please complete a short survey of one rebel com slash survey and subscribe to the show on aikman's stitcher the laundry up an android or wherever you listen free for more information and to comment on this show visit our website wondering dot com slash inside psycho.

plainfield wisconsin robert bloch director the new york times aikman writer hollywood android forty seven minutes