22 Burst results for "Robbie Robertson"

The Best Movie Soundtrack Songs Of 2019 | Movies

The Big Picture

05:24 min | 7 months ago

The Best Movie Soundtrack Songs Of 2019 | Movies

"I have a very special show today later. In this podcast I have an interview with Robbie Robertson one of the founding members of the band a significant figure in movie history as well. Who HAS COLLABORATED WITH? Martin Scorsese over the years. He has a new documentary that he participated in the basically tells the story of his life and the work of the band called. Once were brothers so I hope you'll stick around for that and inspired by that conversation. I had to invite on Ringer Staff Writer Rob Villa. Who is one of the funniest and smartest people I know about music? I Rob She's we'll thank you. It's an honor to be here of course alot rob you write about music and movies at the ringer as well and quite deftly and I think the use of music in movies has always been frankly an obsession of mine and I suspect that you are also a sophisticated thinker about this idea. Is that fair to say? Sophisticated is a strong word. But let's go with your role with your a guy who has a functioning brain that watches movies with music in them. Is that fair to say Aisha's? Amd during sonic the HEDGEHOG. That's the way I would describe my relationship with music and movies me I was that guy I feel like there's a lot we know there's a there's a conscientiousness about choosing songs in movies now because we grew up watching scorsese movies and then the movies of all the people who watched. Martin Scorsese movies and start making movies of their own and so the use of the pop song. We're not talking about score here. We're talking about pop music appearing in films you know what is your. What is your sense of? Who Does it well and sort of what goes into making a good choice for something that's really obvious or really obscure. I think the obviousness I see a lot more in prestige. Tv generally like that's the plate. Like any use of radiohead. Almost across the board. Like I I like a lot of Westworld but just the way that Westworld is uses those pop songs you know the old style piano version of pop songs. It's just you're just sort of leaching off that songs energy like the the cash that it already has and you're just sort of stealing and implanting it into your TV show or your movie like it's there's a difference between stealing a song soul and like taking a song and building a new universe around it like sort of recreating it in re-energizing it it's a it's a great point. I'll never forget the moment I watched the pilot of Ozark. Which is the last the last episode of ours. Ozark that I've ever watched and at the end of it Decks dark by radiohead began playing and I was like. Oh this is that JOE now. I mean no disrespect to say Chris Ryan. Who's a huge fan of that series but actually that choice indicated to me what the creators of the show thought they were doing and it wasn't for me you know it just didn't Didn't click with what despite liking radiohead and Jason Bateman and. I knew that there was a pretentiousness that I was not going to connect with their What do you think makes for a good song choice in a movie? I think it has to be at least a little unexpected. It has to re- contextual. Is it a little bit like I? There are instances where obviousness is what you need and I think there are a few of those and my list here but I I think. In general you need some element of surprise some just more gratuitous are just more surprising way of using it than what you would expect. Do you think it's important to saying something about character or the scene itself or because one of the things that that Robertson said when he and I talked which I thought was interesting was the he really likes the contrast he moments. That's the moment when you take a very sweet song. Said it against a very violent moment or you take a very sweet moment and give it something more braces and that's obviously a hallmark of a lot of the people that are best known for choosing songs and movies you know. Think of Quentin Tarantino or fincher. Scorsese are all these people that I talk about endlessly on this show. Do you think that the that music can play such a profound role in telling a story in that way? I think so. I mean you can go too far in that the phenomenon of every movie trailer now using like a really slow down creepy version of a pop song like you think. Fight THE FI. The fifty shades of grey beyond say series. You know like I suicide squad. I think did that. You know you can go too far in that direction and and just use it entirely as irony like. Here's a really sweet song to contrast with an ugly thing. But Yeah I mean. That's that's sort of an overused tropes at this point at the time in the heyday in the early reign of those people those directors like. Yeah that was a really effective use of contrast. So we're here to do a top five list. You'RE GONNA share your five favorite needle drops in movies and I'M GONNA share my five favorite needle drops. Now I don't know your picks and you don't know my picks you almost ruined this podcast by accidentally sharing those picks and I would like you. I'm I apologize profusely and I apologize for my choices. I think this is going to be yelling at me in the next twenty minutes. That's my concern. You know what my concern is is just being too basic right. There are some things that are sort of undeniably signature moments in movies and music especially in the last twenty to twenty five years when when I think this phenomenon has really picked up. Steam and my choices are not songs that were written for movies. They are entirely songs that had previously existed before the film came along. Is that true for you too? I think in all but one case my number five. That's not true but I think that's an important thing that you have to have a prior. Ideally you have a prior relationship with that song that the movie changes. That's what makes a really good moment for me. Not all of them but that's the platonic ideal. I absolutely love that. I probably have one song that that is out runs an opposition to that idea. But that's a great

Martin Scorsese Radiohead Robbie Robertson Ozark Westworld Rob Villa Staff Writer Aisha Jason Bateman Quentin Tarantino AMD Chris Ryan JOE Fincher
"robbie robertson" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

02:22 min | 7 months ago

"robbie robertson" Discussed on The Frame

"They got a house in the Hollywood hills. Sammy Davis junior sorrows and recorded an album. In the Pool House there the record company thought I was out of my mind alcohol drugs brotherhood and the making of some iconic music in a new documentary about Robbie Robertson and the band and Kerry Washington produces a documentary about four ACO. You attorneys fighting the trump administration I keep referring to these lawyers our avengers. They are really these superheroes taking on such powerful figures and they're doing it in such a heroic manner but superheroes are all people who tap into their extraordinary power. Plus presidential candidates make a Hollywood housecall frame weekend from the MON BROADCASTS CENTER AT KABC. I'm John Horn. We'll be right back. Welcome to the frame weekend. I'm John Horn. Thanks for joining US coming up later in the show. Democratic candidates and president trump have made trips to la. This week we take the pulse on who in Hollywood is backing which candidate for the White House. But we're going to start today with singer and Songwriter Robbie Robertson the story of his legendary group. The band is told in a new documentary. It's called once we're brothers. Here's a cut from the trailer. There's any American musicians dour comparable to what the Beatles were when they came together. Something miraculous occurred. We wanted to create something. You have nothing to compare the film features interviews with Bruce Springsteen and Eric Clapton as well as archival footage from the band's history you even get a peek of their iconic pink house in upstate New York where they made a lot of music last fall. When Robertson released a new album I went to see him as West L. A. Studio and we were surrounded by a dozen guitars hanging on the walls. I WANNA play bid of a song. Beautiful Madness.

Robbie Robertson John Horn Hollywood Hollywood hills Pool House US Sammy Davis Kerry Washington White House Bruce Springsteen New York Beatles Eric Clapton president la West L. A. Studio
Robbie Robertson remembers

The Frame

01:01 min | 7 months ago

Robbie Robertson remembers

"We're going to start today with singer and Songwriter Robbie Robertson the story of his legendary group. The band is told in a new documentary. It's called once we're brothers. Here's a cut from the trailer. There's any American musicians dour comparable to what the Beatles were when they came together. Something miraculous occurred. We wanted to create something. You have nothing to compare the film features interviews with Bruce Springsteen and Eric Clapton as well as archival footage from the band's history you even get a peek of their iconic pink house in upstate New York where they made a lot of music last fall. When Robertson released a new album I went to see him as West L. A. Studio and we were surrounded by a dozen guitars hanging on the walls. I WANNA play bid of a song. Beautiful Madness

Robbie Robertson Bruce Springsteen New York Eric Clapton Beatles West L. A. Studio
The Band Documentary ‘Once Were Brothers’ Chronicles Their Mythic And Heartbreaking Story

Pat Walsh

00:17 sec | 7 months ago

The Band Documentary ‘Once Were Brothers’ Chronicles Their Mythic And Heartbreaking Story

"In a brand new documentary called once were brothers Robbie Robertson and the band it's a Canadian documentary film directed by Daniel roar and it's it's a portrait of the the influential roots rock group the band and it's based in part on Robbie Robertson's two thousand and seventeen memoir

Robbie Robertson Daniel Roar
"robbie robertson" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

08:31 min | 8 months ago

"robbie robertson" Discussed on Broken Record

"So I heard this on the radio on some obscure streaming thing had no idea what it was and started researching trying to find out. Because I hadn't heard anything like this before it was it was fascinating to me and was fascinating because the the I was familiar with the music but not familiar enough to know what it was but I I feel like an heard the music before four and then I'm listening to the vocals thinking. The singer is unbelievable but it sounds like the singers not listening to the music. She singing to even though it fits. It's like it it. It clearly works. But there's a strange alien connection to it and it just sounds like magic to me. That sounds sounds like a brand new kind of music so when I saw the other day I asked him about it because I didn't know who made it. But I knew that it was in a soundtrack that he was involved involved in and asked him how it came to pass and he and tell us how came to pass I I was working on the music. Ah for Martin Scorsese's movie Shutter Island and And and I was It it I was on a roll of a certain kind of music that him and I hadn't really experimented with much before for With KRISTOFF pender Eski. Who is somebody that I've admired for years and I told I I've I've said the Mardi of someday sometime we've gotta find a way to use some Pendarovski and some John Cage a judge and some you know modern classical music's in a movie so when he decided he was going to directors directors film and he sent me the script and I and he said he give you any ideas ideas and I said this is it? This is the time this is when we can. I think we can. He said WHOO really league modern classical music and that he said interesting. Because it's a it's a movie about insanity and and modern classical music is fearless and expressing some of that part of of of the mind so in any way we did a lot of things in the movie and it was great fun on and so we all this stuff and then at the end it was like I said. I don't have anything figured out yet for the end of the movie and the end credits so I had heard this piece of music by this composer Max Richter I think it's called daylight something or But anyway I heard this piece of music and it was almost adagio. Jio Ish. You're all. There was something that really pulled on your heartstrings in it and and it fit in to the other world that we were experimenting and there was a song that I knew about free years that just that stayed with me by Dinah Washington who's always been a favorite of mine her sound Her interpretation and I've she's just one of my faves over the years so I'm thinking about this song this bitter earth that she's saying thing I'm thinking about this Max Richter classic or ps and I and there was a connection there for me so then I have them I check it. They're both in the same key So I then took the Dinah Washington peace and I cut out each of her lines in the song like you would a sample sample and hip hop in it. I so I had her whole performance. Now I've got the Max Richter piece so so I take her line by line and lay her in the way. I would have sung it on top of of the Max Richter thing. I just put her there and I do this thing and it's I don't even know if you're allowed to do that. s- Loyd can you. Can you do that with Dinah Washington and this great composer Max Richter. I don't know but I can't had help but do this so I lay this stuff fan. I send it to her Sassy and say I've tried something here but I've got to warn you. I don't know that this is okay But there's something about it and and see what so he's what do you mean not okay and I said I've taken a a liberty on this thing and I taking somebody's music and I'm putting it with somebody else's music and this is not like a little sample and hip hop to where we're playing a little riff of James Brown here for a moment and then we're on to something else is is the whole piece of these two artists so anyway I send the says. Oh Oh my God. This is beautiful and it's perfect at the end of this movie and Web did this thing and to have this bidder earth. Come on after this thing and So anyway so then I say well I'm not GONNA call them and ask them. It's okay somebody has to call Max Richter and Dinah Washington's family or kids or whoever however in see if it's okay that I've done this right and they called and they could come back and they said they heard it and they love pitch. I thought wow that's a really good sign you now because a lot of people are like you cannot mess with this You know you you know you can't cross that line. That's that's a SIM right. And that they said they they liked it it so anyway it ended up at the end of this movie and I was telling Rick the other day of some months ago. I'm watching in a French movie. That was curious about watching this movie and throughout the movie they use this piece of music. And so I'd I'd say to Martin Skirt Jesse. I said I was watching this movie. And they're using this throughout the movie. Not just once. They're using it. You know few times and he says they can't do that. I said they did. And it might be too late for us to object. And then they looked at the soundtrack. Nisa who's Morris Levy. Yeah it it makes your voice. Sounds kind of that voice. I never would have guessed. Never would've made the connection. It sends a marts. Exactly it's like it's so modern it felt so just completely avant garde but beautiful and unlike anything I heard before thanks to Robbie Robertson coming on the show and of course source for building. Shangri la can hear some of Robbie's music including Songs Office Twenty nineteen release cinematic by listening to our platelets for this episode at broken record. PODCASTS DOT COM. Aw and while you're there sign up for behind the scenes newsletter broken record producer health and Jason Gambro meal Lee Rose Pushing Industries. Our the theme music is by Kennedy. Beats I'm Justin Richmond. Thanks for listening..

Max Richter Dinah Washington Robbie Robertson Martin Scorsese John Cage James Brown Shutter Island Martin Skirt Jesse Lee Rose Pushing Industries Justin Richmond Kennedy producer Jason Gambro Rick Morris Levy Nisa
"robbie robertson" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

02:02 min | 8 months ago

"robbie robertson" Discussed on Broken Record

"Wrong what what am I wrong uh-huh uh-huh.

"robbie robertson" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

03:58 min | 8 months ago

"robbie robertson" Discussed on Broken Record

"I taught the song to the guys us and everybody was kind of enjoying they knew where I was coming from in some of these things The get a guys didn't care about Lou. Lewis Boone well or anything but I did and so anyway they they took the ride on it and as we were getting into it we kinda smiling to one another like that verse that Carmen and the Devil verse you know. That's pretty cool. And then all this thing and then it has like a conclusion that ties it together. Something like a movie would all of these things. I'm just a been a movie bug in so long so anyway I was making a little movie and And then we record the song and I have no idea except we got through. The whole song didn't make a mistake. Felt pretty good. We went and listen to it and I thought Holy Moly. That's a thing as a thing right there. That's a sound that's I. I haven't heard that before you know and all of those things then add up for you inside you know. Can you put your finger on what was so unique about that sound or is it just a kind of gestalt thing that no. That's part of the great holy mystery that you really. I don't know and if you think you do then you're not ready for a good surprise you know going in and I say guards wanted you play Piano Pinot on this and Richard you play Oregon and then when we get to this part of the song. Why don't we do this and wait? And then you come in and then you come in and then you come in together and then you know then that folds over on top of itself and all of these ideas no yeah no idea. Where if they were good ideas? I thought you know is enough to make you WANNA do something. Then we got the song I say. You don't want On this second last verse Rick. Why don't you take over the lead vocal on that? It just seemed like a good idea at the time and once again it wasn't until we went in that control room heard it over those speakers that garth playing the piano on that really made sense that leave on drums with these big tuned down. Tom Com that. I asked him if he'd be okay doing and his vocal. I wasn't even sure is the key I wrote it in. I don't know if it's a good key for you to sing it in. And he's like yeah no I think it's okay so all of these things are way up in the air in the idea really and then when you hear it all come together and those pieces of the puzzle actually fit. That's when you say I knew all along we'll be back with more from Robbie Robertson after the break we're back with more from Robbie Robertson. The band eventually broke up with one final concert. In nineteen seventy six it was filmed by. Martin Scorsese at least as the last waltz. It's become a legendary concert in kicked off a decades long working relationship between Robbie and Scorsese starting with raging bull. Robbie's down the music for almost all of the Scorsese films including his most recent. The Irishman not too long ago rick discovered a piece of music that he absolutely loved loved when he found out it was from a scorsese movie he had asked Robbie about his involvement. I let's hear some of the music..

Robbie Robertson Martin Scorsese rick Richard Lewis Boone Lou Tom Com Carmen garth Oregon
"robbie robertson" Discussed on Broken Record

Broken Record

11:04 min | 8 months ago

"robbie robertson" Discussed on Broken Record

"To mention that everyone in the band is Canadian except for drummer and singer. Leave on Hallam. Who was from Arkansas? This episode is also big for us because Shangri la the spiritual home of the podcast and musical home for Rick Rubin was jumped of and built by Robbie Robertson which is where they start the conversation reminiscing about the seventy s and why Robbie decided to convert a home in Malibu into a recording studio before before. Moving onto discussing the band's early days as backup for rockabilly singer. And they're known as the hawks they also discussed Robbie's longtime work with director. Martin Scorsese we should also note that if you like this episode. There's a brand new documentary called once we're brothers Robbie Robertson and the band that'll be coming out in theaters February twenty first. This is broken record season. Three liner notes for the digital age. I'm Justin Richmond. Here's Rick Rubin Malcolm Glad Well Bruce Adam from Shangrila speaking with the studios architect Robbie Robertson. We had a fantastic take the other day a year. And I'm when I was telling the stories of Shangri la you know stories he envisioned this place and built it and it was unbelievable and it was mine it it you know the other guys in the band thought this was a good. Hi Dear but from big pink to. Sammy Davis Junior's house to the worcester. We made these records in not not in studios in other places where there was an atmosphere and it could be our atmosphere and ours. Sounds you know now and every thing was not on somebody else's will way of doing of somebody else's wave likes. You know you would go into the studio Rodeo. And there'd be these used to be these union guys they'd be like Oh looks like it's lunchtime or like what are you talking about lunchtime. We're we're you know we're about to do something something and and they'd be an IV. Like I I don't know this should be louder than don't touch that you know. Yeah so I don't want that I. Ah I don't WanNa do that so I said what we're going to do is we're going to make these clubhouse these workshop these studios does things that is our world and arm music are sound and whether it was true or not. I believed that that it gave it a character and a saying which it did for better or worse. What's what's interesting about? That too. Is that now. It's become more the norm. Yeah Ah that that said when you did it technologically. It was much more difficult to do like when you did it. You needed big studio equipment like today. People people can do it on their laptops so they can. It's easier to make that jump but when you did it. The infrastructure involved was not easy to pull off. It was unheard of except for Les. Paul Les Paul said. I'm going to build studio at my house and I'm GonNa Build an Echo Chamber into the side of this hill right. And he was going to do all of these things. I had an argument demint the other day with Van Morrison about being able to do this kind of thing and because he was saying I only liked the play live just with my band and I go in and we sing and they play this song and we can capture a moment. We've all done that. I know it really well. I played Ricksen music the other day. That was all like first or second takes in it. Was You know songs you've heard. Yeah sounds you've heard a lot so so anyway so van saying it's gotta be live and it's got to be governed by and that's the way it used to be in a way of being I said what about less paw. Aw He overdubbed. He made things he played on top of himself. He doubled tracked. Things invented it so so van says I know but he was magic you recorded at. Sammy Davis Junior House. Yes we made the band album. The brown album And we rented. Sammy Davis Junior House in the Hollywood sunset is at plaza in the Hollywood hills. And we all stayed in the House for the family and we turn the pool house where he used to have have his. Party's with Frank Sinatra the rat back and all these people we turn that Pool House into his studio and the record company Penny thought. This was the worst idea they ever heard. I thought this was ridiculous. He said Dr Fifteen minutes. We have the best studio in the world here. Franks not for records year right all of this stuff and I was like no no no. This is a different thing and finally finally they were like okay. Okay I guess I don't know what you're doing and it's probably going to be bad but serious June didn't show up in another another. Sammy Davis Junior. He owned he still owned the House. He didn't live there so the magic him like he lived there. Stepping in on one of your according to what the House was built lower. You go into the the bathroom in the sink was down here and it was. Everything was built to his specifications you know and and I it seemed like this is great. This is great. Sammy's world's amazing. And so we recorded the album there and then we mix it or we're going to mix the record and there's this guy in New York. Toni Mae was his name and he had mixed the is the brothers. It's your thing. Do what you WanNa they do. So it was such a great sounding record we said wow. Let's see we can get Tony Maiden Mick says and he worked with Phil Ramone and all these people are which so anyway comes in and he puts up the tapes and everything and he says These tapes are awful. I'm going to have to do a lot of work. Arcand this and I thought I don't know if I like that. So anyway. He did a mix. There was not what I wanted at all. It's not the way I heard it all so anyway we're like thanks. Tony See You know and on which songs with these these were on the band album was the night they drove old. DIXIE DOWN UP ON CRIPPLE CREEK Whispering Pines on was wrong with his mixes his mixes were a trying to make this slick and bright and end and there was a witness to it. There was a muddiness to it that that suited the music it was earthy and I I want it that right. But he didn't get the joke so that was okay so I went and mixed the album with guy another another guy at the at the the old Jerry Ragavan said factory in New York this guy of mixed the album we mixed at the guys in the band. We were all in their the in God at the way that that I wanted so we get it and then it's like okay. The guy the mastering in guy his name is Bob Ludwig. You GotTa get him to master your record. So we take the record to Bob. Ludwig and and He puts you know he puts on the tape the mixes and everything and he says Oh boy is like Toni. May He's like I don't know I'm GONNA try see if I can fix this or save this and I'm like That's really depressing. So I go on I tell the other guys I said. I don't know we might have done this all wrong. Everybody's saying it's it's terrible and that you know so the net. I don't know a couple of days later. Bob Ludwig calls me and he says I am such an an idiot. I am such a fool. I didn't get it I so get it. This is maybe be the most interesting record I've ever heard. He said I'm so sorry. And he told me Bob Ludwig he said I made the same mistake when sly stone brought me. There's a riot going on. I thought that that was a big mistake. Sue Two and he said and then I realized it you know I had to accept it the way that I accepted your record and So I was like 'cause I thought he was right hit on and if he had a state with that I don't know what would have happened. So he you you know he mastered at hardly did anything to it in in the mastering and it was just one of those things it was a homemade saying it did have that character to it and that was part of its specialness in very close to ruining to the great masterpieces et Cetera. Yeah well I remember. Actually the first songs he wrote goes for Ronnie Hawkins What were are they like? What what were they? Well one of the reasons he hired me. I wrote a couple of songs for him when I was fifteen years old because I heard him say that I need some songs and I was trying to figure out how I could crash into this world of southern rock and roll. That's the real thing. These guys are from the Holy Land in the south where this music grows out of the ground. So I've got this whole whole fantasy in my mind and everything and these guys can do it and they were all from the sows and and they sounded that way and all of it. It's just okay. We and I'm up in Canada so you know what I mean. It feels like such a distance and I'm trying to figure out away. How can I be come apart of this? How can I get into this club and will accept me so I hear him say I need awesome.

Robbie Robertson Bob Ludwig Sammy Davis Davis Junior House Van Morrison Tony Maiden Mick Rick Rubin New York Martin Scorsese Pool House Arkansas Paul Les Paul Justin Richmond Rick Rubin Malcolm Malibu Ronnie Hawkins director Shangrila Frank Sinatra
Robbie Robertson: Leader of The Band and Architect of Shangri La

Broken Record

08:55 min | 8 months ago

Robbie Robertson: Leader of The Band and Architect of Shangri La

"Here's Rick Rubin Malcolm Glad Well Bruce Adam from Shangrila speaking with the studios architect Robbie Robertson. We had a fantastic take the other day a year. And I'm when I was telling the stories of Shangri la you know stories he envisioned this place and built it and it was unbelievable and it was mine it it you know the other guys in the band thought this was a good. Hi Dear but from big pink to. Sammy Davis Junior's house to the worcester. We made these records in not not in studios in other places where there was an atmosphere and it could be our atmosphere and ours. Sounds you know now and every thing was not on somebody else's will way of doing of somebody else's wave likes. You know you would go into the studio Rodeo. And there'd be these used to be these union guys they'd be like Oh looks like it's lunchtime or like what are you talking about lunchtime. We're we're you know we're about to do something something and and they'd be an IV. Like I I don't know this should be louder than don't touch that you know. Yeah so I don't want that I. Ah I don't WanNa do that so I said what we're going to do is we're going to make these clubhouse these workshop these studios does things that is our world and arm music are sound and whether it was true or not. I believed that that it gave it a character and a saying which it did for better or worse. What's what's interesting about? That too. Is that now. It's become more the norm. Yeah Ah that that said when you did it technologically. It was much more difficult to do like when you did it. You needed big studio equipment like today. People people can do it on their laptops so they can. It's easier to make that jump but when you did it. The infrastructure involved was not easy to pull off. It was unheard of except for Les. Paul Les Paul said. I'm going to build studio at my house and I'm GonNa Build an Echo Chamber into the side of this hill right. And he was going to do all of these things. I had an argument demint the other day with Van Morrison about being able to do this kind of thing and because he was saying I only liked the play live just with my band and I go in and we sing and they play this song and we can capture a moment. We've all done that. I know it really well. I played Ricksen music the other day. That was all like first or second takes in it. Was You know songs you've heard. Yeah sounds you've heard a lot so so anyway so van saying it's gotta be live and it's got to be governed by and that's the way it used to be in a way of being I said what about less paw. Aw He overdubbed. He made things he played on top of himself. He doubled tracked. Things invented it so so van says I know but he was magic you recorded at. Sammy Davis Junior House. Yes we made the band album. The brown album And we rented. Sammy Davis Junior House in the Hollywood sunset is at plaza in the Hollywood hills. And we all stayed in the House for the family and we turn the pool house where he used to have have his. Party's with Frank Sinatra the rat back and all these people we turn that Pool House into his studio and the record company Penny thought. This was the worst idea they ever heard. I thought this was ridiculous. He said Dr Fifteen minutes. We have the best studio in the world here. Franks not for records year right all of this stuff and I was like no no no. This is a different thing and finally finally they were like okay. Okay I guess I don't know what you're doing and it's probably going to be bad but serious June didn't show up in another another. Sammy Davis Junior. He owned he still owned the House. He didn't live there so the magic him like he lived there. Stepping in on one of your according to what the House was built lower. You go into the the bathroom in the sink was down here and it was. Everything was built to his specifications you know and and I it seemed like this is great. This is great. Sammy's world's amazing. And so we recorded the album there and then we mix it or we're going to mix the record and there's this guy in New York. Toni Mae was his name and he had mixed the is the brothers. It's your thing. Do what you WanNa they do. So it was such a great sounding record we said wow. Let's see we can get Tony Maiden Mick says and he worked with Phil Ramone and all these people are which so anyway comes in and he puts up the tapes and everything and he says These tapes are awful. I'm going to have to do a lot of work. Arcand this and I thought I don't know if I like that. So anyway. He did a mix. There was not what I wanted at all. It's not the way I heard it all so anyway we're like thanks. Tony See You know and on which songs with these these were on the band album was the night they drove old. DIXIE DOWN UP ON CRIPPLE CREEK Whispering Pines on was wrong with his mixes his mixes were a trying to make this slick and bright and end and there was a witness to it. There was a muddiness to it that that suited the music it was earthy and I I want it that right. But he didn't get the joke so that was okay so I went and mixed the album with guy another another guy at the at the the old Jerry Ragavan said factory in New York this guy of mixed the album we mixed at the guys in the band. We were all in their the in God at the way that that I wanted so we get it and then it's like okay. The guy the mastering in guy his name is Bob Ludwig. You GotTa get him to master your record. So we take the record to Bob. Ludwig and and He puts you know he puts on the tape the mixes and everything and he says Oh boy is like Toni. May He's like I don't know I'm GONNA try see if I can fix this or save this and I'm like That's really depressing. So I go on I tell the other guys I said. I don't know we might have done this all wrong. Everybody's saying it's it's terrible and that you know so the net. I don't know a couple of days later. Bob Ludwig calls me and he says I am such an an idiot. I am such a fool. I didn't get it I so get it. This is maybe be the most interesting record I've ever heard. He said I'm so sorry. And he told me Bob Ludwig he said I made the same mistake when sly stone brought me. There's a riot going on. I thought that that was a big mistake. Sue Two and he said and then I realized it you know I had to accept it the way that I accepted your record and So I was like 'cause I thought he was right hit on and if he had a state with that I don't know what would have happened. So he you you know he mastered at hardly did anything to it in in the mastering and it was just one of those things it was a homemade saying it did have that character to it and that was part of its

Sammy Davis Bob Ludwig Davis Junior House Van Morrison Pool House New York Paul Les Paul Robbie Robertson Tony Maiden Mick Rick Rubin Malcolm Shangrila Worcester Frank Sinatra Toni Mae Phil Ramone Dr Fifteen Sue Two Demint Franks
"robbie robertson" Discussed on KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

01:37 min | 9 months ago

"robbie robertson" Discussed on KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

"Robbie Robertson Ringo Starr market skiing and a cast of many many other fine musicians all around the world and of course this is the band's classic the wait an eerie piece of footage out of Colombia appears to capture a wailing woman seemingly standing atop a tree and some sauce and some suspect a she could be the infamous lout low rona the strange scene was reportedly filled in the town of mony toes at some point last month became something of a viral sensation in the country shortly before Christmas or shortly after Christmas rather although the details surrounding the video are scanned at best one story that has been attached to the incident as it has spread online is that residents in the community or afraid to leave their homes due to the ghost sightings specifically it's been suggested the entity in the video is a frightening figure from Latin American folklore known as lower now or the weeping woman and legend has it that this proverbial wandering spirit was a woman who was spurned by your husband and in response drowned their children and then herself refused entry into heaven due to our misdeeds Lorna is set to now walk the earth in the spirit form crying about a predicament and killing any youngsters who are unfortunate enough to encounter and you can check out the video that's right there's video of this wailing woman in the you can check that on the highlight carousel that's a bit coast to coast AM dot com have you checked out the newest feature for coast insiders it's the.

Colombia Lorna Robbie Robertson Ringo Starr
"robbie robertson" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

22:54 min | 1 year ago

"robbie robertson" Discussed on Amanpour

"Talks to me about executive overreach then and now and about living in the shadow of Jimmy Hoffa loss mine Montus was years earlier and he wasn't so bad I also had my own children there's really when I had my own children understood how my break with him how much painting of figuring all that out one evening I decided that I was going to try to seek his forgiveness we were watching Seinfeld one evening thing and I just turned to him and I said I'm so sorry for what I did for the last twenty years it was wrong and I love you and I hope for give me and it was completely out of the blue and he looked at me with a puzzled expression and his face with Ashen because he wasn't well and he started crying and he said he basically forgave me he goes I forgive you sign I'm not mad at you I know why you did what you did and basically that was it from that point on we grew over the next fifteen years basically very very close and does he have any idea where HOFFA's body might be he says he doesn't I don't believe that he does I think he knows more than he told me but I don't think he knows we're Hoffa's body is now and just also you go back to our original premise. What do you make of the whistle blowers who remain anonymous the ones over Ukraine in the United States but just going forward did you know they've been denigrated by the president and by the administration it's it is tough to be a whistle blower in government and because it's tough to be a whistle blower in government today because every single thing becomes immediately politicized the person whoever it was acted bravely tried to follow the procedures of the whistle blower stat- shoot almost certainly doesn't deserve the hell that he or she is getting from the White House and I it seemed like it sparked going forward we'll see what the consequences are Jack Goldsmith thank you so much thank you very much hey guys this is connor rogers I live in active lifestyle with tons of travel during football season constantly on the go I can't sacrifice style for comfort and thanks Amac well I don't have to anymore I'm sure you guys can't stand shopping but it's easy and takes no time to place an order on their website the underwear arts and sweats are all perfect for workouts or when you're on the move this is the most comfortable clothing I own making it hard to go back to anything else and if you think I'm lying give it a try hi you can keep the first pair of underwear and they'll still refund you no questions asked for twenty percent off your first order visit Mac Weldon dot com and your Promo Code Warner W. A. R. N. E. R. Warner Stop Wasting your weekends in stores make it easy and get premium topnotch fabric with MAC WELLMAN DOT com? Don't forget that Promo Code Warner for a sweet twenty percent discount you know what kind of depressing being thirty nine and reading an article about money milestones to hit by age forty we weren't even close to having enough cash to cover three months of living expenses or paying off credit card debt so we met with the joe planner who helped us create a budget but as coolest financial hack what's it consolidate all our credit card debt into one low rate loan we shopped around and chose best dot com for three reasons great interest rates four point eight stars on consumer affairs and alone APP that literally took about a minute really smart best egg had the Astronaut Bank account in about twenty four hours we paid off all of our credit card debt bank to three month cash cushion and even saved enough for sweet vacation it's a great feeling finances are difficult getting personal loan from best egg dot com isn't visit best egg dot com slash fall that's best egg dot com slash fall fast egg dot com slash fall subject to credit approval actual rates phasing approval times vary remember to create an ad like this one visit pure winning dot com slash CNN so we said whistle blows the heart of the trump impeached it prob- what makes someone risk everything to expose government wrongdoing our next guest knows that only too well the Iraq war whistle blower twin gun working for the UK government intelligence agency.

Jimmy Hoffa Ashen Montus Warner W. A. R. N. E. R. Warne Jack Goldsmith executive Seinfeld connor rogers White House Ukraine Iraq president CNN MAC United States Astronaut Bank UK twenty percent twenty four hours
"robbie robertson" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

11:03 min | 1 year ago

"robbie robertson" Discussed on Amanpour

"Listed up to him on a lot of matters his own justice department has stood up to him on a lot of matters extraordinarily including as a political opponents the fact that the investigation was allowed to reach it is played by Al Pacino and it is remarkable film have you seen the film by the way I have not seen the film yet all right well as you know of course what happened to him it's assumed he was kidnapped and killed but his body has never been found and his right hand man was none other than a gentleman by the name of Chunky O'Brien your stepfather and culture up until now history has sort of kind of blamed him they've said perhaps he drove offer to his death tell me about what what's in the public eye and what you sought to find out as you wrote the Book sure the conventional wisdom since one thousand nine hundred seventy five since just a week after the disappearance was my stepfather chuckie. O'Brien picked up offer and drove him to his death and this was a theory that the FBI put out in nineteen seventy five there were some leaked documents at the time and that narrative nine hundred seventy five Jackie was involved has persisted in the public mind to this day I think it's the theory of the movie that's about come out at least the book it's based on one of the things I said to do it in this book was to see if in fact he was guilty of what he was accused of because I suspected for a whole bunch of reasons that he wasn't and so for seven years I poured over every doctor human I could find including lot that have never been looked at in the public realm I spoke to every agent involved in the case to make a long story short I came to the conclusion I think are very persuasive conclusion everyone who's read the book I said so that he in fact was not involved in the disappearance that it was an moreover that the f. b. i. has known this for twenty years they came very close to exonerating him about five years ago and then they got cold feet but the story the FBI put out forty five years ago about the off Gatien and the one that's still feels convict conventional wisdom it's just has no basis to it so how did Chuckie O'Brien come into your life you speak about him yoga Ah I think say he was my for third father and the best yes so my birth father was neglectful to put it kindly and never around in left permanently when I seven than it had a stepfather who wasn't a very good step father and when I was twelve years old suddenly from nowhere my mom had met okay and they got married in June of nineteen seventy five and it turned out that he was Jimmy Hoffa's longtime right hand man it turned out the teamsters union official it turned out out that he had many close connections with organized crime but in addition to all of that he was just an extraordinary father he was just gave me a love and attention and affection and everything good for me and everything he could with me and during my teenage years I really idolized him so he was a great father at the same time that he does the leading suspect in the office appearance in the circus surrounding that and not only that I mean you write some pretty hair raising and toe-curling variances the chucky the amiably named Chuckie our did for Jimmy Hoffa like how did he wants intimidate the editor the Detroit newspaper so Hoffa in the early sixties was furious that Martin Hayden who is the editor of the Detroit news was just killing him in the press and ask you to do something about it stop them so chucky who didn't always have the best ideas I don't know if this was a good idea or not he went to the mortgage at Wayne State and he purchased a cadaver repurchase the head of a cadaver he put it in a box wrapped up as Christmas president and Senate to Martin Hayden I don't know what the consequences were but I know that story that actually happened I you know I mean extraordinary I think he was your stepfather did you talk about him about the head in the box of course I did that so that's where I learned about the story I was later able to confirm it after a lot of work but yes he told me about that and a lot of the things that he did some violent some illegal we he was pretty candid with me about his life well let let's talk about the interface yes if I could put it that way between Jimmy Hoffa and obviously Chuckie O'Brien you'll stepfather and the mob he was no fan of the Mafia you say about Hoffer but he worked with them and he was not shy of criminality this is Hoffa speaking to reporters in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine he's had twenty years ago the employers had hoodlums working for them as strikebreakers now we've got a few and everybody's screaming was that him trying to let himself off the hook was as real relationship with the mob that was not him trying to hug that was his true belief Hoffa was a lot of things but he wasn't a hypocrite he's basically admitted being there that he has relations with organized crimes with organized crime in nineteen fifty nine and is really explaining why he didn't think it was a big deal because it's true in the thirties when the teamsters were in violent confrontations with management and the state the employers did hire organized crime officials to fight with them and that's where off I kind of learned his lessons about what it took to to confront the government with union power so he wasn't he was being very candid there about his relationship with nice crime and he was always he never hit really he said it was exaggerated but he never hit but one of the things chucky taught me also Hoffa had extremely dense relations is with organized crime figures especially through the loans that he gave from the teamsters pension fund but there are always at arm's length often never really hung out with the mob mobsters it didn't understand them he didn't understand their rituals and for him the mob was just another way of getting power just like when he paid off politicians ages and he would do anything he could to enhance his power to enhance the Union's power and he saw his transactions with the mob is just another set of transactions to enhance its power I'm sort of really sort of difficult part of your relationship with Chucky at one point after you'd gone to college a new one maybe be a lawyer and you're getting more conservative I mean you are a conservative and you kind of decided once you heard more about his story in about hoffer that you're going to break up with your stepfather you change your name back from O'Brien you've taken his Goldsmith and you wrote him a letter that you thought was living and kind and you know get you off the hook while you take back your your birth father's name and he wrote back to you can can you a little of that extract of his letter to you to think that you do not want the O'Brien name for whatever reason hurts makes me sad even makes me angry at times but I still love you I cannot say that the name change will not affect our relationship it cannot help but affect the relationship that hurt will not go I easily the pain will be there each time I see or hear Goldsmith it will be ever present I can handle it I've had to handle many many unpleasant things in my life I've endured heartache and sorrow and although it won't be easy I can handle this one more burden so to speak it's really can feel the pain and you actually did not see you really broke up with him for more than two decades and it took you a long time to go back and make up with him and ask His forgiveness how did he take that and how do you feel now when you think of of the pain that break-up caused him so when I was twenty years old I was the he about myself and my career and I was the he about him and he and his letter didn't move me as I got older and wiser and had more experience and really grew empathetic with him because one of the things that I was accused of groups empathetic with him and sympathetic with him and also came to see that perhaps I wasn't so virtuous as I thought twenty host and through a long process.

Al Pacino O'Brien FBI Jackie twenty years forty five years twelve years seven years two decades five years
"robbie robertson" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"robbie robertson" Discussed on The Frame

"You've worked with Marty alive. How would you describe your partnership with filmmaker or like Martin Scorsese. It's always different on the movies that I've worked on with him starting back with raging bull every every time it's a different challenge most of the Times I read a version of the script and then when they have usually a rough off cut of it. I'll see what it is and during the process there's many times that we bounce ideas back and forth and the most interesting thing that he says to me in most cases and most of the films whatever you're doing as long as it doesn't sound like movie music and so that eliminates a lot bobby thanks so much for come on. Robbie Robertson's album cinematic is out now that Irishman arrives on Net flakes and in theaters later this year and it's not always easy for a composer and a director to get along so every year a group of tomorrow's John Williams Liam's and Hans Zimmer's or even Robbie Robertson's head up to skywalker ranch in northern California. They're there for lab that pairs the film composers with Indie film film directors for two weeks of concentrated collaboration the frame contributor Tim Grieving drove upstate for the last day of camp and he sent us is this report skywalker ranch named for Luke skywalker since it was built by his creative Daddy George Lucas is a pastoral Paradise Nice just north of San Francisco. It's a state of the art post production facility where most major Hollywood movies get their final sound mixes. This is outgrowth of a frustrated Australia architecture more money than he needs. Is this idea paradise way it is I need a rural environment wish to work. Get my best ideas walk around and for the past seven years it's a campground for the Sundance Institute film music and Sound Design Design lab the lab itself started more than twenty years ago when BMI the performing rights organization with a clientele of famous composers teamed up with Robert Redford's indie incubator Batur Redford and his people were starting this incredible film institute that was all about developing original voices and working to support with a very inclusive agenda. All kinds of developing artists Doreen Ringer Ross is the vice president of film and Media Music at Bmi our platform became Kim very akin to there's except it was all about music alumni of the lab include riverdale composer Sherry Chung and Greenberg composer Chris bowers this year eight composers selected out of more than seven hundred applicants from all around the world. These are composers with some scores under their belts with a career already on the runway who see it as a chance to really take off. I've actually Ashley always been artist on making my own music. Oscar Matsumura is a composer from Japan. I got into film score music because on one of my song I wrote was used as a theme song for a short film called. I'm here by Spike Jones..

Martin Scorsese Robbie Robertson George Lucas skywalker ranch Robert Redford Oscar Matsumura Kim Luke skywalker Tim Grieving Marty Spike Jones Sundance Institute Sound Design Design California bobby San Francisco Hollywood John Williams Liam Hans Zimmer Doreen Ringer Ross
"robbie robertson" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"robbie robertson" Discussed on The Frame

"I to record. She put out kind of sound like Michael Jackson off the wall besides they they really don't have a sonic personality. We've come to associate specifically with Janet Jackson and I think that to develop that particular sound that's just very almost militant really hard driving crystalline since pimps and that really hard edge percussion that almost comes from a hip hop point of view she had two break away from her family's influence a little bit and work with these outside producers to on differentiate herself as Jackson and I believe it was Jimmy Jam very rightfully pointed out and one of the interviews reviews I quote in the piece that there's something rhythmic and almost rapper like about some of Janet's cadences on these songs. She really had a good good sense of her voice. As a percussion instrument women were sort of expected to be soft and crooning in this more seductive way at the time in pop music and not on sounding quite as hard as she does at times on this record. We're talking with Lindsay's lads at the ringer about Janet Anna Jackson. She had not been terribly political before rhythm nation. How was it received at the time and how did she respond to any pushback from critics critics there was a sense 'cause this. This record was a huge success and there was a lot of publicity behind it was a real blockbuster at the time and as with anything thing that big there was you know there were skeptics and there is some cynicism of just oh does. She think she's going to change the world with these pop songs and she in a rolling stone interview around a little bit after the record came out she kind of address that and was like look I don't. I'm not expecting this music to to change the world but I do want to bring more of a conscious to pop music. She said my audience is different than a little younger and maybe not as aware of what's going on in the world so to start from this basic element of of telling people to educate themselves. I think at the time for for Pop Music Radio Pop music that that was pretty radical. How would you say her work. Influenced contemporary artists like beyond say or childish Gambino especially in terms of incorporating in political themes into pop hits. Yeah I hear Jena. Docs ended particularly this era of Doksan all over the place in modern pop music. I think obviously beyond say and her aesthetic her choreography her emphasis on the visuals that I think you think I've with their them nation album but I think even someone like Liz. Oh just really conversational sort of Sassy nature of her music. I hear Janet in that even in someone like Arianna Guerande who is really kind of in conversation with the the headlines in the pop world because there's there's plenty of that in January music too. It's not all the state of the world but playing around with the tabloid image of herself which I think is something she did more on control within this record but that was really pioneering for her and you know I think almost any female pop artist of the last thirty years owes something to her into these records Lindsey. Lads is a writer at the ringer. Her article is called. Rhythm nation at thirty Khow Janet Jackson Pioneer dance pop with a purpose Lindsey. Thanks so much for coming on the show thanks for having coming up how Robbie Robertson talks with Martin Scorsese about the songs that he writes for the director's movies the most interesting thing and that he says to me in most cases and most of the films whatever you're doing as long as that's an sound like movie music. You're listening to the frame weekend and I'm John Horn..

Janet Anna Jackson Michael Jackson Janet Janet Jackson Arianna Guerande Martin Scorsese writer Robbie Robertson Jimmy Jam Lindsey Gambino John Horn Lindsay Liz director thirty years
The "Transparent Musicale Finale" is a fitting eulogy for a wacky, messy series

The Frame

01:28 min | 1 year ago

The "Transparent Musicale Finale" is a fitting eulogy for a wacky, messy series

"The last episode of the Amazon series transparent created by Jill Solloway the show premiered in the fall of two thousand fourteen before the Marvelous Mrs Mazel before fleabag that's back when Amazon was still mostly known for selling boxes of stuff not for winning emmys before transparent arrived arrived stories about Trans people were largely untold on TV. Show was lauded but also criticized for casting Jeffrey tambor assists gendered man to play the parent who transitions instead of a trans actor Solloway wants defended the choice by saying that the part was written based on the true story Uppsala ways parent who transitioned in two thousand fifteen solloway one emmy for outstanding directing in a comedy thank you to the Trans Community for your lived saved lives to stop violence against transgender women and toppled the Patriarchy top two years later when the fourth season dropped Tambour was accused of sexual harassment by to Trans Women on the show. The series went on Hiatus Gatiss. An investigation followed and timber was fired in the finale. The tambour character Moore Dies offscreen within the first few minutes and and the rest of the show is a celebration complete with a funeral and a whole lot of song and Dance

Trans Women Trans Community Amazon Jill Solloway Show Tambour Mrs Mazel Jeffrey Tambor Harassment Moore Two Years
"robbie robertson" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

06:16 min | 1 year ago

"robbie robertson" Discussed on The Frame

"But we hadn't played hardly any concerts as the band so then there was cameraman running around the stage and sticking a camera up in your face while you're doing it but our manager. Albert Grossman said no cameras on the stage we are not going to have this is a different kind of thing and so Martin Scorsese who was the assistant director on the film and was working on that he was like Oh. No we gotTA shoot it from way back here up next on the frame more my conversation with musician Robbie Robertson. He tells me about his longtime collaboration with director Martin Scorsese. Let's get back to my conversation with musician Robbie Robertson from the band in addition to his new Solo Solo Record Robertson wrote the score for Martin Scorsese's upcoming film the Irishman we pick up with a collaborative process between him and Scorsese. You know it's always different on the movies that I've worked on with him. I mean starting back with raging bull and every time I mean one of the interesting I think things for me. Is that every time it's a different challenge most of the Times you know I I read a version of the script craft and then when they have usually a rough cut of it. I'll see what it is and during the process there's many eight times that we bounce ideas back and forth and the most interesting thing that he says to me in in most cases and most of the films whatever you're doing as long as doesn't sound like movie music and so that eliminates a lodge watch it candidate can't like somebody tells you just relax. Don't get so uptight and the more you think about that the more nervous you get yeah. Do you think there's anything you learn as a musician that you do in film work that you can apply to your own album work. Is there any carry over or they just completely distinct kinds of work. No I think they're all the same as a matter of fact and that's why my new record is called cinematic matic within esmine you but on this particular record especially I was writing any music for the Irishman I was working on the film wants for brothers documentary all of these things for mixing together and I was also putting Together the fiftieth anniversary of the band album that we're putting together the box except for that so all of these things were bleeding into one another and even at the same time I was doing paintings and those paintings started to reflect the songs that I was writing in the movies. I was working on and all of it so it turned out to be like a a big bowl of Gumbo. I WanNa ask you about your the people you collaborate with now people like Van Morrison. Dj How he be citizen Cope Glen Hansard third. What do you look for in partners now creatively. What are they give you that. Maybe you wouldn't get if you're working solo. He in collaboration is a magical saying in movies in music in anything and because I come from this brotherhood of the band I always think you know one and one can make three and to be able to do a song a duet with Van Morrison I don't know if it gets much better better than that experience and I love and I was working on the Irish weren't so van comes to town. He's an Irishman so all of a sudden the all these things are fitting together. Glen Hansard comes to town. He's from Ireland too so a lot of it has to do with casting and the same thing being you know whether I'm using Chris Dave on drums or Jim Kelch ner or Pino Palladino on Bass and everything I just. I think this is the right casting for what I'm trying to create. Do you think there's a point in any songwriters career and maybe your own where we're the songs change from being prospective like this is what I hope is GonNa Happen and this is what's going to be in my future versus reflective. This is my past and this has made me the person I have become because it feels like in this new record a lot of it has kind of looking back the things that made you and your friends the people they are. I feel like I'm doing what I need to do today and looking at tomorrow but I carry this baggage with me I carry these stories with I carry these experiences in all of these things they all end up up you know playing a part in it and and that's life when I watched the documentary I was thinking not only about how the band sounded rounded but about how they were a family in many ways and to watch the film and think about the early deaths of some of your friends and the more recent deaths of people likely on home. What does it feel like to lose a family that way because the band breaks apart you go off and do your thing but then to lose. These people were so close to you. You're still here. You're still doing music. How does that affect you well. I wrote a song called once where brothers because the idea is hard for me to imagine that I could have lost Richard Manual Rick Danko and leave Yvonne. Helm that I see that part of the Brotherhood is gone forever.

Martin Scorsese Robbie Robertson Van Morrison Glen Hansard Albert Grossman Times assistant director director Richard Manual Rick Danko Ireland Pino Palladino Yvonne Chris Dave Jim Kelch
"robbie robertson" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"robbie robertson" Discussed on The Frame

"And when you guys made big pink band it was a novel idea to leave the city hall up someplace and make music there and I'm wondering if you've retained any of that to isolate yourself from outside noise and figure out where you do your best creative work. We're in your studio. Now is it. Here's at somewhere else. How do you insulate yourself in a way that seemed to work so well on that album that was a a dream of mine to have sanctuary because I found early on when we would go from the basement of of big pink where we made the basement tapes and then we would go into a recording studio. We were in somebody else's house us. There was a big clock on the wall. There was guys there that said well. You know my shift is GONNA be up in an hour so we better get this has done and I didn't think that we could do our best work on that circumstance. So the next record we made made the band we got a house in the Hollywood hills. Sammy Davis JR junior's house and recorded an album in the pool house there the record company thought I was out of my mind but I knew something about these guys that nobody else in the world did and I knew that if we had our true unique surroundings that we could go to a place and when we came came out of that place we had made music unlike anybody else in the world and now I'm putting together the fiftieth anniversary anniversary of that extrordinary experience. That isn't the only thing that happened fifty years ago. You guys played a little concert at Woodstock back and people who've seen the Woodstock concert movie probably don't know the band played woodstock. How come you guys didn't make the cut of that movie and are you on the multi title by thirty some odd CDs at the came out when we went in played. It was at nine o'clock. The last night of the festival it was the height of the festival. There was a half a million people in the audience and when we he got there you could see that everybody was out there. They wanted to rock. They wanted to rip off their shirts. They wanted to roll in the mud. They wanted they get crazy and when we went and played it was like somebody coming in doing hymns. It was more of a spiritual old so you saw this go out over the crowd and everybody completely go to a different zone.

woodstock Sammy Davis Hollywood hills fifty years
"robbie robertson" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"robbie robertson" Discussed on The Frame

"Robbie Robertson Studio occupies a private section of the renowned village studios radio's in West L. A. and all the walls hang more than a dozen guitars electric and acoustic including a pretty scuffed up one that he used to write this Song Robertson along along with Garth Hudson are the last surviving members of the ban. That's the Super Group that backed Bob Dylan went electric and recorded classic songs like up on Cripple Creek and the night. They drove old dixie down. Robertson is a subject of an upcoming documentary titled. Once we're brothers. It's about his musical physical career. Including his time with the Band Robertson was sitting on his studio couch and he and I discussed his latest record which is called cinematic. It's inspired by the band and his Childhood in Toronto and on the six nations reserve in Canada. You know it's just storytelling to me and a lot of a lot of times you know I feel like I'm just going to be as honest as I can about this and here's what what happened now. I'm GonNa tell it in you know in a certain rhythmic way. I'm gonNA tell it in a way that is i. I hope is good storytelling so all of those things enter into it but I try not to examine things under the microscope too much because what happens to them when you do. I don't know it just gets a little bit contrived. Perhaps you're just getting too deep into into your own madness. I WANNA play a bed of the Song de Kid..

Robertson Robbie Robertson Studio Bob Dylan Cripple Creek Garth Hudson Toronto West L. A. Canada
"robbie robertson" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"robbie robertson" Discussed on The Frame

"From the Mon Broadcast Center at KPCC This is the frame. I'm John Horn today. Show the Toronto Film Festival is over wrapping up after festivals in Venice and telluride so how is award season now shaping up then I hang out with Robbie Robertson at his studio in West. La He shares the inspiration behind his latest record and recalls when his group the band played it with talk. They wanted the role of the they they wanted to get crazy and when we went played it was like somebody coming in doing him and we say farewell to. Rick case all that coming up on the frame the Toronto International Film Festival ended last Night Brett Threat Langa variety has been in Canada covering the influential festival and he joins me now so Brent which film won the coveted people's choice award winner the winner was Joe Joe Rabbit and I think a lot of people were pretty surprised that that was selected because coming out of Toronto the the reviews weren't that great they were pretty mixed and and there was a consensus that that Fox searchlight might have stumbled a bit out of the gate this morning it looks like they may actually have a really viable all awards contender this Taika. YTD's film about a young boy in Germany who thinks he wants to be a member of the Hitler Youth Brigade and his his assumptions about Hitler. Nazis are challenged. I was a big fan of the film but it was obviously incredibly polarizing but I think it does has proved that something can happen at Toronto that can be really beneficial for a film and I'm really thinking about Hustler's Laurine Skafar film with with Jennifer Lopez that opened this weekend. Did great business has attracted really good reviews. It really feels like Toronto helped launch that movie. Do you buy that theory. Absolutely I think what's interesting about Toronto is like unlike can or some of the other film festivals. There's a real populist undercurrent went and the people who are there really want to love films. You can sort of feel it in the audience when when people sit down there so rooting for the filmmaker and can Dan. It's you know it's the opposite you almost feel like they're almost excited to be able to throw tomatoes or beg or whatever at the screen so it's a very different feeling thing and I think that's often reflected and the kinds of movies like hustlers like Joe Joe Rabbit that are really embraced there and yet if a movie doesn't play well. Toronto is probably never going to play well anywhere and it feels like the Goldfinch is a good example of that. Oh boy yeah that one really stumbled out of the festival festival just huffing and puffing and weasing and indeed look at the box office less than three million dollar opening weekend. That was a film that just really collapsed. I'm going to ask you about a a couple of films that played other festivals including telluride. Two of these movies are from net flicks. The two popes and marriage story it does feel that unlike canton on Toronto welcomes movies made by streaming services how did marriage story and two popes come out of. Toronto bit came out looking like Oscar front runner and what's really interesting is Netflix is is starting to come into its own. I mean that sounds strange because it's not like they haven't had awards contenders in the past like Roma or mudbound. Those movies were almost acquisitions. These are more heard of netflix productions from from inception to to win. They actually make it to the big screen so I think you're seeing a much higher degree of quality and that's very important for Netflix because when you look ahead Disney pluses launching in a couple of months. You've got warner media launching a stream service. That's going to get a lot more competitive so they quality needs to be there and and they should be feeling much more confident after Toronto in January the Sundance Dance. Film Festival is a big market for movies that are made outside of the studio system. It felt like there wasn't that much action among sales. The agents at Toronto is that because there weren't that many movies for sale or people were looking at some of the films that sold at Sundance like late night and blinded by the light. That didn't do a lot of business where maybe a little more tentative. I think it's a bit of both I think there were plenty of films for sale. I'm not sure there were plenty of films the for sale that we're terribly cinematic and that scared off a lot of buyers and then I think a lot of people were also wary of of making the same mistakes is that some of the companies did it sense where they really overpaid for movies like blinded by the light like late night like unfortunately it appears. Brittany rents marathon the town is also going to be one of these movies that just have kind of iffy commercial prospects even if they play fantastic at a film festival and Toronto like other festivals Voles can help elevate films in terms of the awards raise but I also think they can start to separate films from the pack and I'm wondering about movies like Joker with Joaquin Phoenix or judy with Renee Zellweger or just mercy a Warner Brothers movie about the criminal justice system do films like that that come out of Toronto with a little bit of goodwill that maybe can help them succeed in a very crowded marketplace because he's outside of joker. These are not films that are part of any big franchise. I think that's really important for them to to emerge from the film festival with the with their profiles raised because it's so difficult to get attention if if you're not part of a pre existing franchise so if you're just mercy if you're a hustler so you need this kind of attention so you can break through one thing that I think is interesting. Though Oh is if you look at the reception of Joker at Toronto compared to the reception at Venice at Venice the reception was completely rhapsodic and well well. There were a lot of people who loved Joker at Toronto. I think people are very concerned about that movie. I think they're concerned about the kind of portrait of mental illness that portrays trays and the way that it deals with violence at a time when gun violence is such a social issue. I I expect that film to be extremely controversial when it opens and and there are probably other movies at Tronto that will be equally polarizing but when you think about crowd pleasers I think of a movie like Ford versus Ferrari a was there a movie that really struck you that surprised you that you came back from Toronto recommending to a lot of your friends and colleagues for me that that movie was waves which was filmed that on paper I was reading about and that sounded so just frankly depressing. I thought you know am I. GonNa be be able to sit through this. It's it's fairly late at night that the screening starts and and it was just electrifying the the way it was directed was so fresh and an innovative the performances were were really deeply moving and and I thought it had a lot of profound things to say about grief and tragedy that is the film from filmmaker trae Edward Scholtz whose last movie was a very scary film called. It comes at night Brett. Lang is the executive editor for film and Media at variety bred. Thanks for coming on the show. Thanks for having me coming up next on the frame Robbie Robertson from the band the band he's got a new record and a new documentary.

Toronto Robbie Robertson Joe Joe Rabbit Netflix telluride Brett Venice Mon Broadcast Center John Horn trae Edward Scholtz Germany Jennifer Lopez Fox searchlight Laurine Skafar West Sundance Hitler Youth Brigade canton warner media Dan
"robbie robertson" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"robbie robertson" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"Is there i watched sarah i watched the show time at the apollo harvey steve harvey is they had somebody who is a metal that's where i caught it there's somebody who bend spoons like arenas and i couldn't get the guy's name but very interesting how harvey but harvey is so popular and doing so much stuff but he's he deserves the accolades he's getting so good next up musically bob dylan the nineteen sixty five fender telecaster bob dylan used during his first electric tour putting up on the auction block he is as a part of julien's auctions there's a music icon sale set take place next month and it'll bring between four hundred and six hundred grand while could god part of the proceeds will go to the american indian college fund he used this guitar during his first electric tour and sixty six with the hawks they were later renamed the band he played this guitar through the sixties and seventies through the guitarist robbie robertson remains its owner i don't know why why i don't understand how he got it from dylan how do you think bob dylan's oh all right eric clapton played this guitar it's got a lot of history guitar is different from the stratocaster that he played spent his infamous newport folk festival in sixty five thousand sold at auction.

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"robbie robertson" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

Sodajerker On Songwriting

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"robbie robertson" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

"Really commands the stage the band called it quits soon enough that but the friendship august struck up with go says he during the making of the last waltzes joy to this day in fact robbie's collaborates done the soundtracks of a number of scorsese movies including raging bull the king of comedy colour of monte cassino on the recently released silence both sourcing on composing original music is also acted in movies has knee most notably 1980's me in which he stopped we gary be seen jodie foster is actually quite some time before he went it alone as a recording artists is faced selftitled solo album came in 1987 reaching contributions malek's of you to pc gabriel the new orleans inspired grammynominated story bill followed in ninety one is also great was an music for the native americans quoted as the soundtrack to a pbs documentary series was released the 1994 while experimental contact from the on the world of red boy arrived in 1998 most recent solo aphisit 2011 how to become clairvoyance his highest charting solo records the days are one of his most personal unreflective works you can he selections from robbie time at the bond unease solo korea if you check out saw spotify playlists for this episode had to so dejected dot com slash podcast select robbie show on you'll find the link beneath the episode player you can keep up to date with our guest at robbi dash robertson dot com on facebookcom t j robbie robertson as always you can find us at facebookcom so j k and twittercomkfqd jecha wherever always on hand to list your feedback take you get suggestions or consolidate your debts into one easy payments okay is our challenge will be estimable miss the robby roberts.

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"robbie robertson" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

Sodajerker On Songwriting

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"robbie robertson" Discussed on Sodajerker On Songwriting

"Hello and welcome everyone to episode ninety ace of so dejected on song rising thanks to all of you for your patience during our brief hiatus leave or so it was a real wrench to be away from your wall for those few months what can i say ingrowing toenail surgery is very invasive and traumatic procedure it was actually touch and go for one wither a poll through however i'm well on the road to recovery an it's lovely to be back behind the microphone here at so jackets house feels go brian like he's still alive certainly those giannis anyway joining us to celebrate all returns the podcasting fray is a truly legendary canadian songwriter musician film composer an author whose lustrous career respond just shy of six decades he's a member of the rock and roll canadian music and canadian songwriters holes of fame and this principle some rights if one of the most influential rock group to the '60s and '70s the band he's the man responsible for such timeless gems as the ways the night they drove old dixie down the shape i main and upon cripple creek to name several in november 2016 he published his wonderful memoir testimony a vivid accounts of his forms of years and this time with the bond the lived in style by a must the storyteller with thrill to welcome the grades robbie robertson to the show it really is terrific testimony testimonies an up there with the best rock or the biographies i'd say definitely i mean it's so evocative it's all rows along and it's packed with these great stories about his adventures on misadventures enjoy not paid of his life not to mention all those so of significant cultural figures that he seemed to bump into along the way they is almost the kansas zelic vigorously ravi and the book also go some way to explain the unique chemistry of the ban the now almost telepathic ins play the how does musicians various byron in that way too you know the the work ethic they had this abandon the dedication to answer the craft just shooting themselves away from the outside world in and the voting themselves the creative process and and just be in the past the bay staring stuff indeed robbie was born in toronto and 1943 and raised.

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