18 Burst results for "Rob Steiner"

"rob steiner" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:44 min | 10 months ago

"rob steiner" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Weeks. That's why one protester named Ishai said she was determined to stay there. You're shy, declined to use her last name for fear of being targeted by police. This is assembling epicenter of everything that's going on in the city and the change that needs to be brought. State officials say they're worried. However, about the safety of protesters and people who live in the neighborhood with increased traffic vandalism and attempts to pull the statue down for NPR news. I'm Whitney Avenue, in Richmond, doctors are expressing optimism about a new gene editing technique that has benefited woman who has sickle cell disease. NPR's Rob Steiner reports that Victoria Gray. Who has suffered from the genetic blood disease? All her life is the first to receive this treatment. Doctors took sells out of Victoria's bone marrow rewrote a gene in the cells with the genetic crisper and infused billions of these modified cells back into a body, and it looks like a worked. She hasn't had any of those awful pain attacks and she got treated hasn't needed any blood transfusions. It's essentially transformed her life and ours rob. Stein, this is NPR. Mourners will hold a funeral for Rashard Brooks today in Atlanta. He was shot to death by Atlanta. Police officer, who was later fired and charged with murder French, pharmaceutical giant Sanofi says it expects to get approval for potential corona virus vaccine. It's developing this with Britain's GlaxoSmithKline and hopes to have it ready. By the first half of next year NPR's eleanor beardsley reports that is faster than expected. The two companies said their vaccine could be available. In the second half of twenty twenty one many drug makers are racing to come up with an effective vaccine that can be produced on a large scale. Sanofi's chief executive admitted some companies may be moving faster, but they're using existing work done for SARS. He said which won't be as efficient. Paul Hudson said Sanofi is being guided by regulatory authorities and its probability of success. Is Quote Higher Than anybody else? Hudson created an uproar in France this spring when he suggested that American patients could be. Be First in line for a vaccine because of US investment, he later backtracked. Saying vaccine would be available to everyone equally. Eleanor Beardsley NPR news Paris voters in the southeastern African nation of Malawi are holding a fresh presidential election today, the last vote a year ago was overturned by the Malawian Supreme Court. The justices cited ballot-fraud. The decision triggered political chaos in Malawi as President Peter. The Rica has been disputing with the country's judiciary and supporters of the Malawian opposition leader media report. The voting in Malawi has gotten off to a peaceful start. I'm KORVA COLEMAN NPR news..

NPR Sanofi Paul Hudson Malawi eleanor beardsley Rashard Brooks Ishai Victoria Gray Rob Steiner Atlanta vandalism Richmond Malawian Supreme Court Stein US chief executive officer
"rob steiner" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"rob steiner" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Live from NPR news. I'm Korva Coleman. The Labor Department says another three point two million Americans filing for unemployment last week over the past seven weeks more than thirty three and a half million people have filed claims and analysis by NPR. In researchers at Harvard finds that most. Us states are not doing the bare minimum of Corona virus testing that they need to do in order to safely reopen their economies. Npr's Rob Steiner reports. The Harvard analysis found nine states. Do seem to be doing at least the bare minimum of testing. They need to reopen. But the other forty one states plus the district of Columbia are still not doing enough testing according to this analysis and many aren't even close. That means it would be super risky to relax their shutouts to restart their economies. Npr's Rob Stein reporting analysis also notes. That states must be able to track down most of the people exposed to the virus to stop new outbreaks and few states have that ability officials in Russia say daily Corona virus infection rates reached record high. Today more than eleven thousand cases were reported. Npr's Charles Maine's tells us from Moscow. There's been a surge of infections and Russia has more than one hundred seventy seven thousand cases. The latest record spike comes as President Vladimir Putin endorsed a government task force plan to allow regional leaders to gradually lift current restrictions aimed at combating the virus in Moscow which remains the epicenter of the outbreak. Mayor Sergei Sagana argued. The recent jumping infections reflected widespread testing but that he would keep stay at home rules for city residents in place for now but San Announced. He will open up factories and construction sites early next week. Government critics questioned the wisdom of that. Move arguing the Kremlin's political and business interests were driving the calendar and putting lives at risk Charles means NPR news Moscow the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee. Joe Biden will head to Florida today. Virtually NPR's asked Mahala reports that this is part of a new Biden campaign strategy to focus on key battleground states including Florida. The Corona virus has grounded Joe Biden's campaign for the last couple of months. No rally since early March so his campaign is turning virtual. Travel days his wife. Jill Biden kicked it off on Wednesday. Today we're trying something new. A virtual visit to Michigan right here from our home here in Wilmington Delaware now Biden. We'll do the same Florida along. With an event in Jacksonville he'll do interviews with Florida media and host virtual rally in Tampa this attempt to recreate traditional campaign travel in stark contrast to his opponent. President trump flew in person to Arizona this week trump won that state in two thousand sixteen but polls suggest it will be competitive member. Us Mahad. Npr News. You're listening to NPR. News officials in southern India. Say That at least eleven people have died in a gas leak in a plastics manufacturing plant. Under of other people have been taken to the hospital. Nearby villages have been evacuated news. Footage from India has showed people near the factory lying on the ground just as it was beginning to open up. Kenya is now down. Neighborhoods with high corona virus infection rates. Npr's reports the government has ordered to important neighborhoods to be shutdown. Ministry of Health had actually begun the loosening some corona virus restrictions but over the past two days. The country has recorded its highest number of covert nineteen cases. So in order to huge business hubs in Nairobi and Mombasa Shutdown Eastleigh is one of my roby's most bustling neighborhoods full of street vendors. Who told local media? They were concerned about survival..

NPR Jill Biden Moscow Npr Harvard Charles Maine President Vladimir Putin Russia Korva Coleman Mayor Sergei Sagana Rob Steiner Florida Labor Department India Columbia Rob Stein Nairobi
"rob steiner" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"rob steiner" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Like a love note to Malania. It's the electric chair for Trump. Great. And again, third person, right? Yes. Love it. You can't for Trump, that's me. You mentioned this daisy, Trump was on Hannity last night. And he was the old man was on a heater man. He just going off and all sorts of tangents done. I'm giving you give get him on the phone. And he's let that guy that just won't you're like you wanna get off the phone. You know what I mean? You tell the Hannity was like trying to steer the conversation completely out of control. My favorite thing about Trump is he will get Roland and he'll go off topic. And he'll say things like stream of consciousness person would never say, never say how he says all the things he did it yesterday handy. And I love it, because I've always thought Sean Hannity, highly disingenuous, take a listen. Twitter say social media. If I don't use social media, I have outside of you and a few other great people, I pull them patriots actually, but you're not really patriots as much as you want rate, except me getting great ratings. All. Oh. Shuns reacting to that. You just you could tell that he was done. I just says all things all of them does he does. He not say Twitter leg is that thing where he won't say Twitter. Like the way I won't say, mayor apiece last name. I don't know. I've never says Twitter. I won't I won't say Twitter. I'll just say social media. No, no, no, no. I, I don't think he said it that wasn't the contact. Okay. It's not that he doesn't say Twitter. I think you just meant to be all encompassing. Yeah. Trump did was a patriot will I really appreciate it. You know, get terrific. The show is on about. Okay. We have to close with bad news. According to any. Governor air Kokomo formally announce his re-election bid next month. That's cool. That's like the most non of all non news. Why are we talking about this bad news? And it's not good news. Not even news. Just like okay expected that. That's what they do. Right. I'm gonna read you the message and then I'm gonna make. I'm going to a message. I'm gonna prop video games. You know, put it out a public, he texted, you personally. He doesn't have my good friend would not feel comfortable giving him my phone number. Okay. He hasn't rob. Does he know that he has, I'm sure he has like, once a day because you both have his phone number. Like number. We're not gonna be that quote. Join us on Saturday July thirteenth more details to come. But make sure to circle this date on your calendar. And hold it to join in the celebration of Indiana and our state's incredible momentum. I'd like to read that first sentence again. Join us on Saturday, July thirteenth, we should crash the announcement. I think the pub- is he saying the public is invited. Everybody knows everybody's crashing it if part of the public, you're gonna do you wanna do something crazy, like you wanna go naked streak into the flag. Is that what you wanna do crash a public event? Well, if he doesn't in rob Steiner like he does in fact, one ago streak into the quad and you'll be the only one. Rob. We've got a couple of weeks. I'm just saying have an open mind. I don't know what you're plotting, but I don't like curious though. I mean he's in all seriousness, he's going to run. Run for reelection. Who's going to run against him is going to be anybody that wants to run instead of him. I'm like, give give us the lowdown on that. He's gonna win easy because the Democrats are so inept in the state. Okay. All right. I'm just making sure that this is a an easy, smooth enough, kind of why it's like non news. Right. 'cause it's just a it's a given. All right. To make that clear who could derail him him the show's not about me. i'm bummed because i didn't have time this week to get one of those awesome scout massages at transitions it's one of my favorite things about our treatment plan it transitions it's like the best most relaxing of self-indulgence ever what's great about it.

Sean Hannity Twitter Trump Malania rob Steiner Roland Indiana Kokomo
"rob steiner" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"rob steiner" Discussed on KCRW

"Some prominent scientists and bioethicists are calling for a global moratorium on babies created using gene editing methods as NPR health correspondent, rob Steiner reports the calls aimed at preventing anymore. Scientists from misusing powerful new gene editing technologies. A scientists in China stunned the world last year when he announced he had created the world's first, gene edited babies, so eighteen scientists and bioethicists from seven countries are saying a moratorium is urgently needed to try to prevent any more scientists from going rogue, it's important to draw attention to the fact that nobody thinks we should be doing it. That's Eric Lander who runs the road, instituted MIT and Harvard, and some sense simply using the m word moratorium, it's time to use it. We all believe that we shouldn't be going forward and starting off by saying, we should have a moratorium brings important clarity. To the thing. The group says any nation that doesn't already prohibit genetically babies should declare a moratorium perhaps for five years. So the world can figure out how to proceed scientists need time to do more research to see food ever be possible to safely make gene edited babies and society needs time to debate whether anyone should and under what circumstances deciding should we be reshaping the human genetic code requires a water, really careful faud. Can it be done safely, but they're much deeper questions about is there a broad societal consensus in countries to use it at all? And if so for what purposes any country that might eventually decide to allow scientists to create genetic babies should give the public lots of advance notice. The group says maybe two years to debate such a momentous move the call for moratorium is being welcomed by many scientists and bioethicists Francis Collins heads to National Institute. Roots of health, the philosophical and theological consequences of rewriting our own instruction book are sufficiently major that somebody like me who generally as opposed to the idea of moratoriums feels that it's time to stop and look very carefully at the pros and cons and make a worldwide decision. Not to go forward until we have more information, but others while agreeing it's far too premature for anyone to try to make genetically babies right now worry about using the word moratorium, George dailies, the dean of the Harvard Medical School. I'm concerned a moratorium complicates future discussions rather than clarifies them. How long should a moratorium last man who gets to decide how? And when to rescind a moratorium is such a call going to prompt even more restrictive attempts to legislate, the science and prohibit any future clinical work, and maybe prevent the use of gene editing to treat and prevent terrible diseases. Some even worry moratorium would. Backfire and just drive rogue. Scientists deeper underground, rob Stein, NPR news. It's all things considered KCRW sponsors include Virgin Atlantic providing over three hundred hours of onboard, entertainment, fully flatbeds and afternoon tea. Virgin Atlantic offers daily nonstop.

rob Steiner Virgin Atlantic NPR Eric Lander rob Stein Francis Collins Harvard Medical School Harvard China MIT KCRW George National Institute three hundred hours five years two years
"rob steiner" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"rob steiner" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Some prominent scientists and bioethicists are calling for a global moratorium on babies created using gene editing methods as NPR's correspondent, rob Steiner reports the calls aimed at preventing anymore. Scientists from misusing powerful new gene editing technologies. A scientists in China stunned the world last year when he announced he had created the world's first, gene edited babies, so eighteen scientists and bioethicists from seven countries are saying a moratorium is urgently needed to try to prevent any more scientists from going rogue, it's important to draw attention to the fact that nobody thinks we should be doing it. That's airi'q Lander who runs the road in student MIT and Harvard, and some sense simply using the m word moratorium, it's time to use it. We all believe that we shouldn't be going forward and starting off by saying, we should have a moratorium brings important clarity. To the thing. The group says any nation that doesn't already prohibit kinetically babies should declare a moratorium perhaps for five years. So the world can figure out how to proceed scientists need time to do more research to see food ever be possible to safely make gene edited babies and society needs time to debate whether anyone should and under what circumstances deciding should we be reshaping the human genetic code reprisal water, really careful thought can it be done safely, but they're much deeper questions about is there a broad societal consensus in countries to use it at all. And if so for what purposes any country that might eventually decide to allow scientists to create gene edited babies should give the public lots of advance. Notice. The group says maybe two years to debate such a momentous move the call for moratorium is being welcomed by many scientists and bioethicists Francis Collins heads the National Institute. Roots of health, the philosophical and theological consequences of rewriting our own instruction book are sufficiently major that somebody like me who generally as opposed to the idea of moratoriums feels that it's time to stop and look very carefully at the pros and cons and make a worldwide decision. Not to go forward until we have more information, but others while agreeing it's far too premature for anyone that try to make gene edited babies right now worry about using the word moratorium, George dailies, the dean of the Harvard Medical School. I'm concerned a moratorium complicates future discussions rather than clarifies them. How long should a moratorium last man who gets to decide how? And when to rescind a moratorium is such a call going to prompt even more restrictive attempts to legislate, the science and prohibit any future clinical work, and maybe prevent the use of gene editing to treat and prevent terrible diseases. Some even worry moratorium would. Backfire and just drive rogue. Scientists deeper underground, rob Stein, NPR news. It's all things.

rob Steiner NPR Harvard rob Stein Francis Collins Harvard Medical School China George National Institute five years two years
"rob steiner" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:23 min | 2 years ago

"rob steiner" Discussed on KCRW

"Should scientists be trying to edit the genes in human embryos? That's the question being raised again by new experiment. That NPR has discovered is underway in the United States. These scientists say they are not trying to create any genetically modified babies yet the world condemned scientists in China who recently announced he had done that. But this research is still controversial NPR health. Correspondent rob Stein broke the news about this experiment this morning, and he's here in the studio. Hi, rob. You report that this experiment is being conducted at Columbia University in New York. Give us the details. Yes. So the research is being led by scientists by the name of deeter Egli, and he's a developmental biologist at Columbia, and the first thing to make clear as you said is he not trying to make any gene edited babies right now, he is doing something. Right. That would be irresponsible and unethical. He says he's just trying to do the basic research to find out if it's really possible to some day use this powerful new, gene editing technique is called crisper to safely repair genetic mutations in human embryos, and the idea is that doctors. Someday might be able to use this to prevent diseases and other disorders in this case Eglise trying to fix mutation that causes blindness. So this is very different from what happened in China. Remind us how these two experiments differ from each other. Yeah. That that one was a real shocker a scientist in China's name was her Zhen quay. He announced that two twin girls have been born using embryos that he had edited in his lab. And he said he did it to enhance their immune systems to make them immunity aids virus, but that was widely condemned. And the reason is is most scientists thinks that he just rushed ahead and did this way too soon that nobody knows if this thing works, and if it safe so people are really worried about the health of these two little girls. Okay. So the scientists in New York says he's trying to answer those underlying questions that he says the scientists in China did not answer. Explain why even that is controversial. Yes. So the critics say even just doing the basic research, these kinds of experiments could encourage other scientists that go rogue, and that these kinds of experiments are just kind of like laying out a road map for how. It could be abused, for example, to make, you know, designer babies in that raises all kinds of scary. Brave. New world scenarios about IVF clinics popping up all over the place offering to create genetic super babies, and here's Ben Hurlbert. He's a bio ethicist at Arizona State University. And this is what he says about this. If we've learned anything from what's happened in China. It's that the urge to race ahead pushes science tissue first and ask questions later, but this is a domain where we should be asking questions. I and maybe never shooting. I know you visited the researcher at Columbia University in his lab. How does he respond to this? Critique so he defends what he's doing. He says, look I'm not trying to make any Jeanette of the babies any designer babies. I'm doing the opposite of what happened in China be very careful and very methodical. Let's listen to a little bit about what he told me the research is absolutely needed to determine what are the risks. What is the potential benefit and without research will never be able to make that judgment. And he's being very open about what he's doing. Even let me. Spend some time in his lab recently as he injected human eggs with sperm carrying this blindness mutation he's trying to fix and then did his experiment where he then injected this crisper, gene editing tool to see if it would repair the mutation. Here's a moment from that experiment. Just pierced yank now and injecting the sperm. Insight along with the crisper tool so fast. It's amazing to listen to advancements in science happening there in that audio. So what happens next so Eglise now analyzing the results of his experiments is to see if it's working and major scientific organizations around the world are trying to come up with some kind of uniform standard to see how scientists could ethically uses powerful new, gene editing technology to make changes in human, DNA and human embryos. That's NPR health. Correspondent rob Steiner? Thank you. Nice to be Ari. Joe morgenstern? The film critic of the Wall Street Journal, the situation is simple to describe and hard to resolve in Joe Penn debut feature Arctic with much Mickelson in the only speaking role a pilot has crashed his single engine plane in the middle of a snowy nowhere. The film tells us nothing about the man except his name. It's over guard. According to a patch on his Parker, and it shows his struggle to stay alive entirely in the present tense. No flashbacks no cutter was just him there in a solo survival saga in the tradition of castaway the Martian or Robert Redford, sailboats go all is lost. Everything depends on the pilots, courage and resourcefulness just as everything in the John Reid depends on the filmmakers skill which in this case is exceptional. Panic comes to feature films by an unu-. Usual route he was a YouTube phenomenon from Brazil with millions of international followers a performing musician before he started making TV commercials. Tv shows and shorts is lack of feature. Experience. Makes it all the more impressive that he's succeeded at a daunting task holding an audience for more than an hour and a half with an austere story about an initially opaque character in the most minimalist of settings deep-frozen version of the track Lewis. It helps to have a great actor the star Mads Mikkelsen gives a masterclass in minimalist acting but acting alone cat sustained a one man show or rather a one man show, plus an unconscious. Young woman who has suffered critical injuries in an attempt to rescue the hero. What does the trick? Here is a whole concatenation of elements elegantly spare cinematography by Tomas on Thomason. An eloquent score by Joseph Trump in knees and a screenplay written by the director with Ryan marris, but sets up a basic and suspenseful dilemma over guard his radio disposition, but there's been no response either. He waits help in the relatively safe. Utilized is plane or he heads out with the injured woman on across country trek, tune emergency station that may or may not be whereas map puts. There's no pretending the allusion of reality is complete it threatens to shatter now. And then and the ending is contrivance pure and simple yet, Joe Penn is film is notable for how much we learn about the pilot and the young woman without being told how much we care about them. She has a husband and child in a photo. She's brought with her she's been happy in the past. Maybe she'll be happy. Again. He is practical by habit and generous by nature with an instinctive empathy that leads to the memorable sight of him hugging her tightly to keep her warm. Are it gives a lesson in lessons? Cruelly observed and warmly..

scientist China NPR New York Columbia University Eglise Joe Penn rob Stein United States rob Steiner Joe morgenstern Arizona State University Mads Mikkelsen Columbia Robert Redford Ben Hurlbert Wall Street Journal deeter Egli
"rob steiner" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"rob steiner" Discussed on KCRW

"From NPR news in Washington. I'm Louise Schiavone. The White House is celebrating and other blockbuster jobs report and PR Scott Horsely reports the Labor Department estimates US employers added more than three hundred thousand workers in January the January jobs figure is considerably higher than most. Forecasters were expecting and suggest the US economy is gaining strength is a begins the new year. The economy has now been adding jobs for a record one hundred months in a row, ordinarily employers might have trouble finding workers matters such a long stretch of growth, but White House economist Kevin Hassett says that hasn't put the brakes on hiring people are coming back into the labor force in droves, Ed so we're able to sustain their really really high job growth because people who were on the sidelines are coming back in the unemployment rate did inch up in January two four percent. Analysts say much of that increase was the result of the government shutdown when hundreds of thousands of federal employees. Stories were temporarily out of work, Scott Horsely, NPR news, Washington. Russian officials are reacting with resignation after the Trump administration announced his withdrawal from a nineteen eighty-seven arms control treaty. NPR's? Lucian Kim reports the Kremlin charges the US long ago decided to exit the agreement even before the announcement Kremlin spokesman Dmitry peskov expressed certainty the US would withdraw from the IMF treaty seeing. The Trump administration was unwilling to listen to arguments that Russia's actually incompliance. The Kremlin has said it won't respond to American ultimatums and at the end of the IMF treaty could cause a new arms race in Europe. NPR's Lucian Kim in Moscow NPR has learned that a scientist, New York is conducting experiments aimed at editing the DNA in human embryos, NPR's rob Steiner tells us the scientists work is in early stage embryos with no prospect for implantation, the scientists deeter Egli of Colombo. Korea University isn't trying to create any gene edited babies. A scientists in China sparked international outrage recently when he announced he had created the world's first gene edited babies Egli says he's just trying to do the basic laboratory research necessary to see if editing the genes in human embryos can work and is safe to maybe someday prevention diseases, he stopping any of his edited embryos from developing so he can study them, but critics worry this kind of research could encourage more scientists to go rogue many scientists, however say such basic research is crucial rob Stein. NPR news Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey is seeking the democratic presidential nomination. He announced on ABC's the view we need to. A sense of civic grace in our country. We need to not be so quick to judge each other. And we need to begin to see that. We are in this together. He was previously a two term mayor of Newark Wall Street, the Dow down twelve this is NPR good afternoon. It's twelve oh four. I'm Eric Roy with California headlines some KCRW.

NPR Senator Cory Booker US deeter Egli scientist Lucian Kim Scott Horsely IMF Washington Labor Department Louise Schiavone White House Kremlin Trump Kevin Hassett Dmitry peskov rob Steiner
"rob steiner" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"rob steiner" Discussed on KCRW

"It's six twenty two. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin. A Chinese scientist stunned the world last year when he announced that he had created the first gene edited babies now NPR has learned about a new experiment aimed at creating gene edited human embryos. It's being conducted by scientists in the United States. Let's be clear he is not trying to make genetically modified babies yet. But that could be the ultimate goal NPR health. Correspondent rob Stein. Brings us this exclusive story from inside the scientists lap. It's early in the morning at one of Columbia University's research towers in New York City, I meet deeter Eglin his office on the sixth floor. Hi, rob Steiner from NPR. You come the migrant. Sorry. I guess that's your job. Yeah. We have to kind of record every little thing. Very stories. Egli leads me down the hall to a tiny windowless room. It's jammed with scientific equipment to microscopes lab dishes. He's going to show me how he's trying to fix mutations in human embryos. Wear because we want to keep things clean Egli wants to know. It's really possible to use the revolutionary gene editing technique known as crisper to safely repair genes in human embryos. Begley is trying to repair genetic defect that causes blindness to maybe someday help blind people carrying the mutation have children who can see preventing inherited forms of blindness would be wonderful, very important for affected families. One big reason the world condemned the Chinese scientists is he rushed ahead without doing enough careful research I to prove it works and is safe. We conscious do the editing, and then hope everything goes, right? Any plan that into a home if that's not responsible we have to. I do the basic research to see what happens. That's what we're doing here. But even just doing the basic research to see this might be possible is really controversial. But more about that later. Right now, Egli is ready to start his editing experiment. He turns to a big black microscope behind him and slides around glass dish under the lens. That dish contains the crisper gene editing tool along with sperm from a blind man who carries the defect that Eglise trying to fix Egli gently adds a human egg to the dish starting with just one egg. You'll be able to see shortly. Once I go to higher magnification. I can see everything he's doing under the microscope magnified on a computer monitor ground thing is. Egg the moon. Yeah. I some beautiful sale. I would say it's one of the most beautiful sales Egli maneuvers a tiny glass needle towards one of the sperm. So you can see moving sperm over here. And picking it up in the needle now and dipping it in the crisper tool. Once this berm is inside the needle with the crisper, gene editing tool a glee points the needles tip at the edge. No, no. Once that runaway sperms back in the needle Egli pierces the egg membrane is broken breached begun spending crisper to India. Oh, you did it. Nerve wracking. The idea is that crisper will slice out the mutation the sperm and the healthy DNA, we'll fix it or play the crisper tool will cut the mutation. And then the eg replace that with a version that no longer causes disease genome from the modern would be rescuing mutant genome from the father scientists in Oregon or developed. This approach.

Egli NPR scientist Begley Steve Inskeep Rachel Martin rob Steiner rob Stein Nerve wracking United States Columbia University India New York City Oregon Eglin Eglise
"rob steiner" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"rob steiner" Discussed on KCRW

"Occasion, it's five twenty NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Mary Louise Kelley. Chang, an international summit on gene editing has formally condemned. The claims of Chinese scientists who says he's created the world's first gene edited babies, but as inter health correspondent, rob Steiner reports. The Senate rejected calls for a global moratorium on the creation of more, gene. Edited children the hundreds of scientists who gathered this week in Hong Kong were shocked by the Chinese scientists claim that he had created genetically edited twin girls he says he edited their DNA when they were embryos in his lab to protect them from the aids virus at this summit. We heard an unexpected and deeply disturbing claim that human embryos had been edited an implanted resulting in a pregnancy and the birth of twins. That's David Baltimore a Nobel prize winning biologist to chair the summit. The procedure was irresponsible and failed to conform with international norms for. For lots of reasons it was done secretly and way before most scientists think it's safe to try this sort of thing, and it may only have partially worked. If at all the Chinese scientists says only one of the twins had both copies of retargeted, gene called CCR five edited. And so only one of the girls could actually be protected from HIV and the scientists who John quay made another startling claim during questioning at the summit yesterday. Are there any.

Chang Mary Louise Kelley NPR rob Steiner Hong Kong Nobel prize John quay David Baltimore Senate
Science Summit Denounces Gene-Edited Babies Claim, But Rejects Moratorium

NPR's World Story of the Day

03:20 min | 2 years ago

Science Summit Denounces Gene-Edited Babies Claim, But Rejects Moratorium

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from internet essentials from Comcast. Connecting more than six million low income people to low cost high speed internet at home. So students are ready for homework class graduation and more. Now, they're ready for anything and international summit on gene editing has formally condemned. The claims of a Chinese scientist who says he's created the world's first gene edited babies, but as into your health correspondent, rob Steiner reports. The summit rejected calls for a global moratorium on the creation of more, gene. Edited children the hundreds of scientists who gathered this week at Hong Kong were shocked by the Chinese scientists claim that he had created genetically edited twin girls he says he edited their DNA when they were embryos in his lab to protect them from the aids virus at this summit. We heard an unexpected and deeply disturbing claim that human embryos had been. Did an implanted resulting in a pregnancy and the birth of twins. That's David Baltimore, a Nobel prize winning biologist to chair the summit the procedure was responsible and failed to conform with international norms for lots of reasons it was done secretly and way before most scientists think it's safe to try this sort of thing, and it may only have partially worked. If at all the Chinese scientists says only one of the twins had both copies over targeted gene called CCR five edited. And so only one of the girls could actually be protected from HIV and the scientists who John quay made another startling claim during questioning if the summit yesterday are there any current pregnancies with embryos that have been genome edited as part of your clinical trials? There is a another one, but tend to mater, there's another potential practices, but it's unclear what happened to it. The summit. Organizers are calling for a formal investigation to try to find out whether any of the scientists claims are true, but they stressed they hoped the Chinese experiment does not setback work by responsible. Scientists and reject calls for a worldwide more Tory Amman any efforts to ever create keen edited babies, here's David Baltimore. Again. There have already been statements made. Are very worrisome because they suggest Coney and bans which is really endothelial to the goals of science. If it someday proven to be safe and ethical Baltimore says, genetically edited human embryos could prevent a long list of terrible genetic diseases. Critics however denounce the some incision to endorse continued research saying it just opens the door for more unethical experiments by more rogue, scientists Marci. Dr NAS key is with the center for genetics and society. Once you open this Pandora's box, a crack all the bad genie's fly out, and they're really hard to get back in. There's nothing stopping other scientists from editing human embryos for other reasons, he says, including to create designer babies, rob Stein. NPR news.

David Baltimore Scientist Comcast Rob Steiner Nobel Prize NPR Hong Kong Marci Tory Amman Rob Stein John Quay Coney
"rob steiner" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"rob steiner" Discussed on KCRW

"Think that it was medically necessary. So he near David. I mean, how insensitive was and that was pretty much the tone overnight at this meeting in Hong Kong. We'll tell us more about this meeting where this is all taking place. Yes. So this this is an international summit that was organized for this very reason to try to reach a global consensus on whether when and how it might be ethical someday to use this powerful new, gene editing techniques to create genetically modified people. But no one had any idea that he was gonna make this claim the very start of the meeting. So everybody was pretty stunned in the one scientist after another and this after another stood up and really grilled about. You know, why did he choose HIV to do this? And where the parents who volunteered. Jisr informed about today really understand what they're getting into. And how does he know that this is safe in these kids aren't going to suffer? Some terrible complications down the road. Well, so we'll we'll facing a very skeptical even angry crowd of peers, how did he present his work? You know, he's a pretty go. Low key kind of guy, and he, you know, very carefully walk through the details of his research, which used this powerful new, gene editing technical crisper, he says he first studied might and monkeys and then he decided to try to genetically modify human embryos from seven couples in his lab in China. And finally, he produced these two twin girls a few weeks ago. He says their names are Lulu and Nana and they're home with their parents. And he says, you know, they appear healthy and one of the girls he says now appears to be immune from the aids virus. And he said he did this in hopes of protecting these girls in lots of other kids from aids down the road. Now, you know, if true these girls would be the world's first genetically edited human beings, and that would be a landmark in human biology that many scientists are compared to the birth of the first test tube baby Louise Brown and arguably this could be even more groundbreaking. Because it alters the human genetic blueprint for generations. And you know, also revealed that he has another pregnancy early on that's already underway allows he's doing more of this work. What do we do? I mean, when you first reported this there were some questions about whether he actually did what he said he did or there still questions. Oh, yeah. They're still really big questions. I mean, you know, he completely ignored all the usual rules of science by making claims in a series of YouTube videos, instead of letting scientists scrutinises data I and you know, so everybody's still waiting to really examine the details to know whether he did what he said he did. And he also could be a big legal trouble when he gets back to China NPR health correspondent, rob Steiner. Appreciate rob. Thanks, sharon. Nice to be here. David some residents of Tijuana have a demand for migrants at the nearby US border. Their demand is for the migrants to go home several thousand central Americans are stuck in Mexico applying for legal asylum in the United States and Mexicans. Do not want to host them. NPR's? David welna reports forty nine year old block ISA bell replay, the knows what it's like to be a bike. Different fourteen years ago, she and her family moved from Mexico's southern border in Chiapas up to one which hugs its northern border. But she's had it with the recently arrived central Americans some of whom tried to breach the US border on Sunday. John, okay. Podcastone.

Jisr David welna Mexico Hong Kong sharon United States scientist NPR Louise Brown rob Steiner Tijuana China John Chiapas YouTube China NPR Lulu
"rob steiner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"rob steiner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Survivor on the stand in front of a jury. Let alone. The American people without a full investigation. So that I know what the facts are before I start asking questions, but that full FBI investigation doesn't appear to becoming the department of Justice said in a in a statement today that they view their job is complete. They did a background check of cavenaugh, and they have appended this letter that came into their report to the White House, and it seems to be that they feel their job is done at this point. And in the meantime, we should remind people that Brad Kavanagh has denied these allegations. Right. And what else have we heard from the White House and some of his defenders? That's right Cavanaugh says this did not happen earlier today. President Trump said Cavanaugh still has his full support. But it's hard to not underscore how much of a severe term. This is Kevin looked to be almost a done deal after those confirmation hearings. Now, there's going to be a very ugly public hearing. He said she said, and it's it looks like it could be a replay of that info. Thomas toxic nineteen Ninety-one Clarence Thomas confirmation hearing. That's NPR's Scott detro-. Thank you for your reporting. Thank you. A big news study found the risks of taking a low dose aspirin every day outweighs the benefits this is for otherwise healthy older people. What about the rest of us NPR health? Correspondent rob Stein joins us now to talk about welcome to the studio. Rob. Hi, what exactly did researchers actually look at? And then what did they find? So. Yes. So this study looked at a very specific group as you mentioned, otherwise healthy older people and what I mean by that specifically African Americans and Hispanics ages sixty five and older and Caucasians ages seventeen older and the study looked at more than nineteen thousand of these older folks in the United States in Australia who took either a low dose aspirin every day or a placebo. And after about five years on average, the researchers found no evidence that taking aspirin actually helped it didn't protect against dementia or any other disabling health problems. And that was a big surprise. Well, what are the risks though? So the risks of taking aspirin are actually pretty well known. It can increase your risk for serious, sometimes even life threatening bleed. Leading. And that's what they found. This study that people who took the aspirin. We're more likely to experience pleading that wasn't a surprise. What was this prize is that there was actually a hint that the people took aspirin overall were more likely to die apparently looks like from cancer? Now, the research is really don't know what to make of that a clip in a fluke. So they have to do more research to really figure out what's going on with that. Okay. So what about people hearing this thinking that? Okay. Basically, no one should take aspirin every day right now there is really good evidence for some people to take a daily low dose aspirin. And those people are people who've already had a heart attack or stroke should take an aspirin Alertus aspirin every day to reduce the risk of having another Arctic or stroke. And now the after that it gets a little complicated is group known as a US preventative services task force. And what they recommend is anyone in their fifties. Who has at least a ten percent elevated risk of having a heart attack or stroke, like they have high blood pressure or high cholesterol, they should take a daily aspirin to reduce the risk of having a heart attack or stroke in the first place. And anyone in their sixties or at increased risk for heart attack or stroke. They should talk to their doctor because they might benefit from taking loaders aspirin every day to any other caveats. Yeah. The caveat is that as I mentioned that, you know, aspirin can cause bleeding so anybody who is at risk for bleeding should really think twice in those groups about taking aspirin because it could be dangerous, and they should only take aspirin if they have a life expectancy of at least ten years, and are and think they can take it for ten years because that's how long it takes to get the benefits. Can we go back to the bit about cancer? Which is the other thing that aspirin supposedly do. Yes. Yeah. So that's confusing too. Because this study found that people might be at greater risk of dying from cancer. But there is a lot of good evidence that taking low dose aspirin every day can reduce the risk for colorectal cancer. So the researchers who did this study they're planning to follow this people in the study for longer to see if that benefit shows up might just take more time, and the there's other research going on to see if taking a daily aspirin might have other benefits from comes asked for maybe helping to treat breast. Cancer and prostate cancer, for example, that's NPR health. Correspondent rob Steiner? Thank you for explaining it. Oh, sure. Nice to be here..

aspirin cancer NPR White House Cavanaugh Brad Kavanagh colorectal cancer FBI rob Steiner Kevin United States rob Stein department of Justice Clarence Thomas President Scott detro Trump
"rob steiner" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:56 min | 3 years ago

"rob steiner" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Okay disco legends nile rodgers and bernard edwards were denied entry inspiring one of their biggest hit songs no no village sheikh oh okay so even though there are signs for must play on the dance for they found themselves unable to clear the ultra strict door policy new year's eve nineteen seventy seven they were invited to join grace jones at studio fifty four she wanted to interview us about recording their next album and at at the time our music was popular dance dance dance kit but grace jones didn't leave their name at the door and the doorman wouldn't let them in they waited and waited long as we could but it just got too cold we felt horrible totally dejected they walk back to now rogers apartment we grabbed a couple a champagne and we plug dinner music and we just for yelling obscenities bleep studio fifty four bleeping bleep off bleep them bleep we're laughing finally what were they're like hey let's we changed it from bleep off to freak off and then we're like freak out that is how freak that september first number one biggest hits that's funny okay one gate cash gatecrasher tried to died sinking in through an air vent oh my front door rejects i guess the bouncers took all kinds of crap all i'm sure because there were truly two nations club goers who were trying to get in and they had this situation where people would climb down from the building next door in full mountain climbing gear with rob steiner on the shoulders crying hysterical and anyway one guy got second inherent and his body was discovered in black tie attire died in their oh no now they did all kinds of private parties and after the bianca jagger and karl lagerfeld add a candlelit eighteenth century party with the staff in court dress and powdered wigs elizabeth taylor had a performance by the rockets would she viewed while perched on a float of gardenias fun she was later presented with a life size portrait of herself elizabeth taylor meet of cake and one of the most memorable parties was held in honor of dolly parton she visited looked at it this city for concert dates in me seventy eight and he steve rebel wanted to create a rural farm setting to help her feel more at home and they had haystacks.

grace jones rob steiner karl lagerfeld elizabeth taylor steve rebel bernard edwards rogers bianca jagger dolly parton
"rob steiner" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"rob steiner" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Chief medical examiner aaron barnhart says your office work through the weekend to finish the autopsies we certainly made every effort to work as much as possible and as quickly as possible to get these victims back to their families as soon as possible bernhardt says two of the victims had single shotgun wounds but most of them had multiple wounds on zee luang npr news santa fe texas in the wall cape release chief alphonso morale is polish ising over the arrest of an nba player morale assist drilling brown at the milwaukee bucks was abused by officers to approached him about a parking violation during the counter mr brown was decentralized taste and arrested art department conducted in investigation into the incident which revealed members acted inappropriately and those members were recently disciplined morale is speaking with reporters following the release of police body cam footage of the january twenty sixth incident the milwaukee bucks released a statement calling the situation inexcusable this is npr news geologists are closely monitoring the puna geothermal plant on hawaii's big island the facility was closed after kilowatt volcano began erupting earlier this month and the last of the production wells there have been plunged since alava that opened near the property scientists say hardened lava is creating a protective barrier around the facility the us food and drug administration has trying to protect babies from teething products at the agency says can be dangerous as npr's rob steiner reports the products are sold under various brand names the fda says some companies are selling gels sprays whitman's and lozenges that contain the pain reliever benz o'kane but the fda says they're dangerous because ben's okay can cause rare but potentially deadly complications especially for young children so the fda is asking company selling these products to take them off the market and is warning parents not to buy them the products are sold under our.

npr nba ben benz o'kane whitman fda rob steiner aaron barnhart us hawaii mr brown parking violation milwaukee alphonso morale texas bernhardt
"rob steiner" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"rob steiner" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Oof spoiler by the way i talked about the malapropisms of sandra bullock earlier and she reminds me in those are very cute to me and i almost wish that there were more of those throughout the movie but she always reminds me of the white cop from sanford and son do you guys remember that guy where he would be like right off and his partner or i guess like david ogden steers in better off dead lane mellow off i mean it's a brand new year understand his news eve dance at your school you kids love this disco thing you are really bringing me over man lower you mentioned judge dredd and the rob steiner connection and as i'm watching this movie and they start to thaw all the other criminals especially towards the end i'm totally thinking of the new judges that they're making in that his brother is making in judge dredd and i think between that and rob schneider my mom's third husband he used to always get judge dredd and demolition man mixed up and i was very personally affronted by that and he we would start to talk about something it'd be like oh yeah judged right that'd be like no no no demolition man and then you know i'd say something else and be like yeah yeah just like demolition it'd be like no no that's judge dredd so much to the point where i actually bought him both of those movies as a christmas gift once like one of the most smart ass christmas gifts that he didn't know was the smartest christmas gift so then he got that and then he said end to the story he passed away good end to the story i inherited his dvd's so now.

sandra bullock sanford partner dredd rob schneider david ogden rob steiner
"rob steiner" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"rob steiner" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"And that's that's what matters is is this massive group thing i was i was reading over the weekend rob schneider oh was an interesting character i met him god some twenty plus years ago twenty five years ago he just filmed what was rob steiner and him were in judge dredd together it was it was rob schneider and silvester stallone they were in in that together and and i met him and he was very nice guy but he was talking about saturday night live and how bad it saturday night live has gotten and how people don't even clap because they think it's funny they just clap because they think it's the right thing to do it's it's that group think we've talked about you know like people look around the room and if you're all you're not clapping oh you must be bad probably bad better clap better and that's what that's what it's become and they've done the same thing to to konya and i find it to be entertaining because if there's one guy who does not care it's that guy that guy does not care at all three two three five three eight twenty four twenty three at chadbensonshow is your twitter you can tweet along with us following along the whole thing with i said it i've been saying it for two or three weeks i've been asking a question i've asked a question to a bunch of i've asked the gordon chang have cord louis douse guy i've asked to to a lot of people and now i feel like it's picking up steam and dan if if this happens i want a piece of this lindsey graham speaking over the weekend about north korea and trump it is historic to say the two leaders walk into each other's country i never thought that would happen yeah and he says what he wants from the us and from trump is he's going to give up his nukes but i he wants to know that we will not invade him and take him out militarily and that we along with south korea will end the war and that it'll be finally over and then he will denuclearize the probably all the same time and i've.

rob steiner dredd rob schneider konya twitter gordon chang lindsey graham north korea us trump south korea silvester stallone twenty five years three weeks
"rob steiner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"rob steiner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Vows to retaliate larry miller reporting the food and drug administration today announced plans to start trying to reduce the amount of nicotine in cigarettes npr's rob steiner reports the fda is moving forward with the agency's plans to cut nicotine in cigarettes the idea is to help wayne millions of americans addicted to nicotine off cigarettes by cutting nicotine to non addictive levels and make it harder for future generations become addicted in the first place the agency isn't saying yet how much it wants to cut nicotine and how quickly but the fda says one scenario could help about five million us adults quit smoking within one year and prevent thirty three million from starting to smoke that would slash the us smoking rate and saved more than eight million lives by the end of the century according to the f fda rob stein npr news former trump campaign chairman paul manafort is asking a judge to dismiss the indictment against him npr's carrie johnson reports manafort accuses the special counsel of exceeding his authority paul manafort now faces conspiracy and fraud cases centered on his lobbying work for the pro russia government in ukraine if he's convicted manafort could spend the rest of his life in prison in a new court filing he says the charges should be thrown out because special counsel robert muller doesn't have the power to investigate things far afield of the trump campaign manafort's s the justice department gave me a blank check he's cashing repeatedly the justice department has called that argument frivolous deputy attorney general rod rosenstein who supervises muller says he's approved key steps in the probe rosenstein says he's confident in the integrity of.

larry miller nicotine rob steiner fda paul manafort special counsel ukraine robert muller justice department rod rosenstein wayne chairman carrie johnson fraud russia deputy attorney general one year
"rob steiner" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"rob steiner" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Pierre correspondent rob steiner is here with details arabs oh are health officials did warn us about this so just how bad is it it's pretty bad there are a you know the flu season started early and that's never a good sign in a really took off early in the south and spread quickly round the country and the latest data released today from the cdc shows that it's really pretty much everywhere the flu's pretty much everywhere in the country right now in it's really in tents and dozens of states and its reach epidemic levels so the proportion of people who are rushing to their doctors to get treated for the flu is as high as it ever gets in a really bad flu season ready and the percentage of people who are now in the hospital to get treated for the fluid doubled in the last week alone so you know we're here reports about yours being overrun in california farmers ces pharmacies running out of antiviral drugs and at least 20 kids have already died from the flu this year what makes a bad flu season more intense than a regular one yes so starting early that's one factor but a big factor this year is the particular strain of flu that's dominating it's called the h three had to strain and it's notoriously nasty it's a kind of bug that make more people sick when they get sick they get sicker and it's especially dangerous for the people who are the most vulnerable to the food like kids in older people does this mean that most people didn't get the flu vaccine no the proportion of people who are getting who've gotten back into so far this year's pretty much on track for what it is most here's the problem again is this a tree and to shrink the flu it tends to mutate when the vaccine is being made and that's exactly what happened this year because of the vaccine doesn't work as well and in australia which has its flu season right before ours it looks like it may have only been about 10 effective against this strain only 10 effective yeah only 10 now officials in this country are secular we think it's going to work better is in this country.

rob steiner cdc flu flu vaccine Pierre california australia