35 Burst results for "Rob Schmitz"

"rob schmitz" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:08 min | Last month

"rob schmitz" Discussed on KCRW

"Last Monday, hundreds of protesters encircled the bronze monument, located across Pennsylvania Avenue from the White House. The ongoing national Movement for Racial Justice has targeted symbols associated with white supremacy, removing them in ways both sanctioned and not Andrew Jackson, the nation's seventh president, own slaves and signed the Indian removal Act into law. The prosecutor says the charges should serve as a warning to others seeking to desecrate monuments. Amy held NPR news Corona virus. Infections continue to climb in several states. Florida's reporting more than 10,600 new cases. Arizona confirms More than 3800 new cases in Arkansas Corona virus infections have jumped about 25% in the past week, and the state is pausing Phase three reopening plans. Arkansas's Republican governor, Asa Hutchinson tells ABC is this week more testing is needed. We've doubled the amount of our testing nationally. We've got to double it again. Hutchinson says he's not mandating masks in public, but when asked whether the president and vice president should wear them consistently, he says. There should be a consistent national message to take the virus seriously. President Trump is denying a report that he was told about an intelligence finding that Russia offered bounties to the Taliban to kill US troops in Afghanistan. The New York Times reports Trump was briefed in March. This is NPR. Malawi today inaugurated its newly elected president Lazarus Chuck, where of the opposition won a rerun election last week. In Poland Voters cast ballots today for their next president, NPR's Rob Smith's reports, The outcome could place significant curbs on the power of the country's nationalist government. The election was originally scheduled for May 10th but it was postponed at the last minute due to the Cove it 19. Pandemic President Ahn Jae doo dies an ally of the ruling Law and Justice Party. If he loses, the opposition could force a big change in Polish politics. His closest rival is the liberal center right Mayor of Warsaw, Rafael Paszkowski. Duda has been the clear favourite. But in the past month Paszkowski of the Civic Platform Party has shot up in the polls. The election boils down to a choice between what critics called the ruling party's increasing tilt toward autocracy or one that pursues democracy. It's a battle that is playing out across Europe with rise of right wing populist leaders in recent years if no candidate draws more than 50% of the vote, a runoff election will take place on July 12th. Rob Schmitz. NPR news Berlin The Rolling Stones are threatening to sue President Trump for using their songs at his campaign rallies. Despite cease and desist directives, they say their legal team is working with the music rights company B. Am I to stop the unauthorised use of their music? Trump's campaign played. You can't always get what you want at last week's rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma. I'm Barbara Klein..

President Trump president NPR Asa Hutchinson Andrew Jackson national Movement for Racial J White House vice president Ahn Jae doo Arkansas Justice Party prosecutor Civic Platform Party ABC Arizona Russia Rob Schmitz Tulsa Duda Barbara Klein
Germany to take stake in company working on virus vaccine

All Things Considered

00:33 sec | Last month

Germany to take stake in company working on virus vaccine

"The German government is acquiring a stake in a biotech firm that the trump administration attempted to take over in March as NPR's rob Schmitz reports the firm is working on a vaccine for the corona virus the unlisted biotech firm CureVac was in the news a few months ago in the U. S. attempted to acquire it stirring a backlash in Berlin today Germany's economy minister Peter Altmaier said Germany is purchasing a twenty three percent stake in the company for three hundred and thirty seven million dollars in major bodies government gave itself new powers to veto hostile foreign takeover bids for its health care

German Government NPR Rob Schmitz Curevac Berlin Germany Peter Altmaier
Germany confronts Russian ambassador over cyberattack

Morning Edition

00:30 sec | 2 months ago

Germany confronts Russian ambassador over cyberattack

"Germany has called in the Russian ambassador to officially condemn a twenty fifteen cyber attack on Germany's federal parliament and fears rob Schmitz reports from Berlin Germany's state secretary of the federal foreign office Miguel Berger told Russian ambassador to Germany Sir again and check if that he strongly condemned the hacker attack he also told the chair of the E. U. is candy is a cyber sanctions regime against those responsible for the attack Berlin has struggled with increasingly bold activities by Russian spies on German soil NPR's rob Schmitz

Germany Miguel Berger E. U. Berlin Rob Schmitz State Secretary
Germany, France reach deal on bailout

Morning Edition

03:26 min | 2 months ago

Germany, France reach deal on bailout

"Well let's talk about Europe or countries feats are tied together in ways and that the U. S. doesn't have to think about so German chancellor Angela Merkel and French president Emmanuel macron reached a deal on a relief package but it was a long time coming it didn't happen quickly No Way Out took awhile because European leaders have disagreed on how to fund this relief plan up to now Europe southern states have wanted to be funded by the entire E. U. S. sort of collective approach where member states would share the debt but a handful of countries known in some circles as the frugal five Austria Germany the Netherlands Denmark and Sweden they wanted a more individual push that each member state would take out a loan for its own needs now the proposal that the krona Mericle agreed on this week shows the southern states got their way under this plan the E. you would borrow half a trillion dollars and share the data month all member states even though the aid would primarily benefit southern states like Italy and Spain it's important member here that this package is only a proposal and all twenty seven EU members including their national parliaments will need to approve it so this is far from a done deal but the fact that angle Americal has agreed to the shows an interesting change of heart for her what's behind that why did she agree to this big relief package of it's not going to benefit Germany that much yeah one reason is this pandemic was not the fault of Italy or Spain it's a natural disaster and unlike the eurozone crisis a decade ago this is not rooted in the fiscal policies of southern U. member states secondly angle Americal is at the end of her tenure as chancellor and her management of this crisis has restored her popularity her approval ratings are skyrocketing in Germany so she now has the political capital to solidify her legacy by supporting a recovery package that aims to unify the easier not further separated what an interesting trajectory for her Scott we don't exactly know when recovery will happen everyone kind of admits that at this point do we know what it will look like you know what with the sign to be you know it depends on the path of the virus and also on public attitudes how quickly do people feel comfortable going back to the shopping mall how quickly they feel comfortable going to restaurants or getting on an airplane again there are some small signs of improvement if you squint hard to look at him but on the other hand there are also huge holes in state and local government budgets which could trigger another round of layoffs and of course all bets are off if we see another spike in infections okay so a lot we don't know here in the U. S. rob in Germany the country starting to slowly be open is the picture a little brighter where you are yeah a little you know Germany just announced it's officially in recession and its economy has shrunk by more than two percent the first quarter of this year but you know thanks to German Germany's government and its tradition of keeping a balanced budget the country is better positioned than others you know Germany ended last year with the surplus and spending that in more on an eight hundred billion dollar relief package Germany's been able to keep workers employed thanks to its Kurds are by program instead of the US approach of unemployment checks in Germany companies are subsidized to keep workers on the payroll so workers won't lose their jobs and companies don't have to retire after the crisis nearly a million German companies have applied for this program and much of the country's recovery package is going to radically into that to keep germs employed but the question going forward is how long can Germany for to pay into these programs before the money starts to dry up be interesting to see what each country learns from others when this is all over and here's rob Schmitz in Berlin and Scott Horsley in DC thanks you guys

Europe
EU calls for coronavirus investigation to focus on animal-to-human transmission

Morning Edition

00:32 sec | 3 months ago

EU calls for coronavirus investigation to focus on animal-to-human transmission

"The European Union is formally calling for an investigation into how the corona virus that started in China got from animals to humans here's NPR's rob Schmitz a resolution backed by fifty five countries also called for an evaluation of the world health organization's performance and for plants to improve global pandemic prevention all E. U. member states back the draft resolution as did Britain Australia Brazil Turkey Japan and South Korea the U. S. and China are not among the signatories the E. U. commission president Ursula founder line has urged China to cooperate with the

European Union China NPR Rob Schmitz South Korea Britain Australia Brazil Turke E. U. Commission President Trump Ursula Founder
WHO faces global call for investigation at general assembly

Morning Edition

00:31 sec | 3 months ago

WHO faces global call for investigation at general assembly

"The European Union wants an investigation into how the virus is transmitted from animals to humans percent P. R.'s rob Schmitz a resolution backed by fifty five countries also called for an evaluation of the world health organization's performance and for plants to improve global pandemic prevention all E. U. member states back the draft resolution as did Britain Australia Brazil Turkey Japan and South Korea the U. S. and China are not among the signatories the E. U. commission president Ursula founder line has urged China to cooperate with

European Union P. R. South Korea China Rob Schmitz Britain Australia Brazil Turke E. U. Commission President Trump Ursula Founder
Coronavirus Impact: EU Economy May Shrink By 7.5% This Year, Worst Showing Since Great Depression

Here & Now

00:52 sec | 3 months ago

Coronavirus Impact: EU Economy May Shrink By 7.5% This Year, Worst Showing Since Great Depression

"European Union officials say the E. U.'s economy is set to shrink more than seven percent this year because of the pandemic NPR's rob Schmitz has the latest from Berlin the European Commission forecast the economy will shrink by seven and a half percent investment will collapse and unemployment rates debts and deficits will balloon in the aftermath of the corona virus pandemic prior to bend I make the economy had been projected to grow by one point two percent what's worse the head of the commission's economic unit says the danger of a deeper and more protracted recession is very real Italy and Spain the two countries hit worst by the virus will see their economy shrink by more than nine percent the U's biggest economy Germany will also be hammered its economy is projected to shrink by six and a half percent the E. U. is home to more than four hundred million people and is a key trading partner with the U. S.

E. U. Berlin Italy Germany Partner European Union Rob Schmitz European Commission Spain
Eurozone economy suffers record contraction, steeper than U.S.

Morning Edition

00:32 sec | 3 months ago

Eurozone economy suffers record contraction, steeper than U.S.

"Like the US the economy of the nineteen eurozone countries contracted sharply in the first quarter of the year as the corona virus began to spread here's NPR's rob Schmitz measures to contain the corona virus pandemic froze business and household activity throughout the continent in the first quarter spring eurozone's economy to decline by three point eight percent compared to last quarter this is the largest economic decline since nineteen ninety five the head of the European central bank Christine Lagarde warned you leaders last week that the eurozone GDP could fall fifteen percent by the end of the

United States NPR Christine Lagarde Rob Schmitz
German company begins human trials of coronavirus vaccine

Morning Edition

00:35 sec | 3 months ago

German company begins human trials of coronavirus vaccine

"A German pharmaceutical company says it has begun to test a potential vaccine for the coronavirus and peers rob Schmitz has more from Berlin in the global race survey accion to stop the coronavirus German pharmaceutical company bio and tech has begun testing a potential vaccine on volunteers the German company is working with US pharmaceutical company Fizer it says it has given twelve participants doses of the vaccine candidate since April twenty third bio and tech said it expects to receive regulatory approval to begin trials for its potential vaccine in the U. S. soon NPR's rob Schmitz

Berlin Fizer Rob Schmitz United States
Nearly Half A Million Companies In Germany File For State Funds To Pay Workers

Morning Edition

00:51 sec | 4 months ago

Nearly Half A Million Companies In Germany File For State Funds To Pay Workers

"In Germany nearly half a million companies have applied for funds from the German government's reduced hours work program and here's rob Schmitz reports from Berlin it's due to the pandemic four hundred and seventy thousand German companies applied for the government program known as Kurds Arbeiten March twenty times more than the previous record set during the financial crisis more than a decade ago massive restrictions on public life a slump in export markets to the global lockdowns and broken supply chains throughout industry event millions of workers are eligible for per terabyte the government program allows firms to reduce employees hours while the state makes up the difference in their income Germany's federal employment minister about us Hiles says unemployment will increase in Germany for the first time in many years but that the country's courts are bite system should soften the blow rob Schmitz NPR news

Germany German Government Berlin Rob Schmitz Government
Poland hit by bird flu outbreak on turkey farms

All Things Considered

00:31 sec | 7 months ago

Poland hit by bird flu outbreak on turkey farms

"In Turkey authorities in Poland say bird flu has been detected in the eastern part of the country and be as rob and pears rob Schmitz reports local authorities and liver task a county said in a press release that the virus detected as a sub type of the highly pathogenic H. five N. eight avian flu that can also threaten people Poland Europe's largest poultry producer has not had an outbreak of bird flu since twenty seventeen the president of the country's association of breeders and poultry producers says three farms might be affected with up to three and fifty thousand birds at risk in a three kilometer

Poland Rob Schmitz Europe Producer President Trump Turkey
Poland hit by bird flu outbreak on turkey farms

NPR News Now

00:45 sec | 7 months ago

Poland hit by bird flu outbreak on turkey farms

"In Poland report. That bird flu has been detected and Turkeys in the eastern part of that country. NPR's Rob Schmitz reports Holand Europe's largest poultry producer. Sure as not had an outbreak of bird flu since two thousand seventeen. The president of the country's Association of breeders and Poultry Producers says three farms might be affected with up to three hundred and fifty thousand birds at risk in a three kilometer radius local media reporting that the outbreak could require up to forty thousand birds to be slaughtered local authorities and Lubar townscape county said in a press release at the virus detected is a subtype of the highly pathogenic h five n eight. Avian flu can also threaten people Polish authorities. You say crisis meetings have been held while local. TV showed police cars blocking a road in the area.

Lubar Townscape County Poultry Producers Rob Schmitz Holand Europe Poland NPR Association Of Breeders President Trump Producer
Poland hit by bird flu outbreak on turkey farms

Morning Edition

00:45 sec | 7 months ago

Poland hit by bird flu outbreak on turkey farms

"Authorities in Poland reported bird flu has been detected in Turkey is in the eastern part of that country and peers rob Schmitz reports Poland Europe's largest poultry producer has not had an outbreak of bird flu since twenty seventeen the president of the country's association of breeders and poultry producers says three farms might be affected with up to three hundred and fifty thousand birds at risk in a three kilometer radius local media reporting that the outbreak could require to forty thousand birds to be slaughtered local authorities in the bar tells the county said in a press release of the virus detected as a sub type of the highly pathogenic H. five N. eight avian flu I can also threaten people Polish authorities say crisis meetings have been held while local TV showed police cars blocking a road in

Poland Turkey Poland Europe Producer President Trump Rob Schmitz
Eurowings strike forces 170 flight cancellations

Morning Edition

00:25 sec | 8 months ago

Eurowings strike forces 170 flight cancellations

"Flight attendants are on strike at Lufthansa's low cost carrier euro wings and P. R.'s rob Schmitz says the walk out is canceling at least one hundred seventy flights cancellations will impact flights within Germany from airports that include Cologne Hamburg Munich and Stuttgart is expected to last three days until January second and may include more than two hundred flights in Germany Germany's flight attendants

Lufthansa P. R. Rob Schmitz Germany Cologne Hamburg Munich Stuttgart
Operating manual for Xinjiang's massive re-education camps allegedly revealed in leaked Chinese documents

Morning Edition

07:14 min | 9 months ago

Operating manual for Xinjiang's massive re-education camps allegedly revealed in leaked Chinese documents

"Morning leaked documents offer an inside look at China's detention of Uighurs Uighurs are members of a minority ethnic group mainly in western China they are predominantly Muslim and have been held with other Muslims as a security threat Chinese authorities of ident have denied the authenticity of the so called China cables but let's talk about them with Adrian sands who is study the weaker camps he is a China researcher with the victims of communism memorial foundation he's also been working with the international consortium of investigative journalist to review these leaked documents he joins us via Skype walking the program good morning what are these documents exactly these documents are classified cables that are internal to the government issued by deputy party secretary to highland they are marked as confidential and extremely urgent these documents really speak to what's how to manage the so called suppose advocation a training centers managing more they're more like presence are there so many words that I think we need to define your first when you talk about cables that's it that's kind of a term of art from the days of telegraphs right this is official communications from one part of a government to another and when you said vocational training centers that's something with defining as well this is what China says it is putting very large numbers of Uighurs into right yes supposedly in order to train them in a vocational skill and give them a job so that they don't fall prey to I'm radical extremist Islamic ideas arm and there's been a lot of reporting about these things and also a lot of outside descriptions of them we had NPR have interviewed people have been in the camps and left them and left the country our correspondent rob Schmitz has even been taken by Chinese authorities to some of them highly controlled circumstances of course but there's a certain reality that's difficult to hide their people are being detained in large numbers one of the cables add to that description the cable say that these are highly guarded facilities that must have dedicated police stations dedicated police units twenty four Aug are it's an extensive anti escape measures so that the quote unquote students cannot escape cannot get out before they graduate which is off at least one year of intensive brainwashing and that's what's actually happening is brainwashing yes what hours of Chinese study hours of self confessions confessing even the slightest involvement in your Islamic religion am confessing having practiced your culture confessing not speaking Chinese well enough and having to learn Chinese flowers you can just imagine that for the seventy five year old who they put in these camps that's a very hard task this when you say self confession I mean this is what police all over the world do it's what intelligence agencies all over the world do and there's also a special Chinese tradition of self criticism of forcing people to bring the hammer down upon themselves that's what's happening here yes it's just like on the mountains cultural revolution where people have to extensively confessed the sins which basically was not following the ideology is there any doubt in your mind that what these really are are are prisons and no it is not in fact I knew that and I have extensive other sources of information a bunch of data that proved that the local counties where point twice as many police forces as teachers to got these camps other government documents that extensively spoke about these camps performing brain washing washing clean the brains and washing the hearts of evil why do you think it matters to Chinese authorities whether Uighurs are able to speak Chinese very well or not it's a matter of cultural assimilation they want these minorities to be much more similar to the Han so they did don't do their own thing don't have to own identity to on religion their own language on customs they want him to be more or less just like the Hon when you say the Han I guess we should define that for people that's the ethnic group that is the vast bulk of China's population right correct over ninety percent of Han Chinese we should also mention that when Chinese authorities talk about these camps they talk of Uighurs or of Muslims as a security threat they talk of concern of terrorism and there actually have been violent incidents of various kinds in western China over the years do the cables offer any justification for that point of view the cable simply state that the week is must be re educated that they must be put in these facilities and how these facilities must be wrong they do not discuss the details however the details we have seen in the speech us especially off Mr xi Jinping which were leaked by the New York times last week in addition to the cables I have also been able to obtain another cash of local files which is not not delete when I was able to obtain it in these files our local government spreadsheets is spreadsheets lists thousands tens of thousands of Uighurs in their families and their children in a mock who is in detention who is in prison who is in a re education camp often times you see families both parents are taking no you have left is elderly grandparents oftentimes ill or unable to work in very young children to cancel that is dramatic news you're giving us because of the specificity in our reporting we've encountered a lot of people who have some family member that they think is in a camp a family member who has disappeared do you have information there that might help some people to find their missing relations and loved ones I do find it state names addresses ID numbers age us every conceivable detail they also proof that this is absolutely not a companion trying to educate and give jobs to young people because by far the target group of disinterment campaign I did the heads of households it trying to take out the authority figures does that influence over families in some villages fifty percent of household heads have been detained the most likely demographic group to be in an internment camp our men between the ages of thirty and fifty nine he briefly does the leakage of these documents suggest some kind of internal concern or dissent about this policy that is entirely possible we've already seen from The New York Times Xinjiang pay posted released last week that there is this content I have been arrested government officials have been arrested for not detaining in

China Seventy Five Year Ninety Percent Fifty Percent One Year
Hong Kong protesters refuse to back down over extradition bill

NPR News Now

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Hong Kong protesters refuse to back down over extradition bill

"Leader, Kerry, lamp has ignored today's deadline set by protesters to withdraw a controversial extradition. Bill. NPR's rob Schmitz reports that lamb, I promoted it, but then postponed, it after hundreds of thousands of citizens hit the streets to protest a controversial Bill that could lead to the extradition of criminal suspects to me in that China Hong Kong chief executive Carrie lamb suspended the Bill. But some student groups called under to Axat altogether by Thursday afternoon. Now that lamb has ignored their plea. They've pledged to surround the city's legislative council building on Friday which could reignite tensions between demonstrators and police. The Hong Kong returned to Chinese rule in nineteen Ninety-seven. Beijing allowed it to be governed by a one country. Two systems formula allowing freedom's, not enjoyed in China. Beijing says it respects and supports lamb's decision to suspend the extradition Bill, but has been angered by criticism from western capitals, including Washington. Rob

Carrie Lamb Beijing China Hong Kong Hong Kong Rob Schmitz Kerry China Chief Executive Axat NPR Washington
 Taiwan confirms request for US tanks, air defense systems

Morning Edition

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Taiwan confirms request for US tanks, air defense systems

"Taiwan is seeking to buy military tanks air defense missile systems from the US NPR's, rob Schmitz, says it's a major arms deal that threatens to raise tension between the Trump administration and China Taiwan's defense ministry said in a statement that has requested more than one hundred Abrams tanks and hundreds of anti-tank and air defense missiles from the United States, it wasn't clear when the official request was issued after which the US has one hundred and twenty days to respond if US is the main supplier, defensive weapons to Taiwan which China considers its own territory to be brought under its control by force if necessary, the Abrams tanks would make a significant upgrade from the aging tanks Taiwan's army now uses while the missiles would help Taipei. Lord, an attempt by Beijing the land tanks and troops across the Taiwan Strait. Taiwan's announcement comes as the US and China or engage in an increasingly tense

China Taiwan Taiwan Strait Abrams Rob Schmitz United States Trump Administration Taipei Beijing Lord NPR Official Twenty Days
Higher China tariffs could cost Americans hundreds each year

Morning Edition

02:17 min | 1 year ago

Higher China tariffs could cost Americans hundreds each year

"Good morning facing a threat of higher tariffs from the United States. Chinese trade delegation tries to make a deal this week there in Washington for two days of talks before those talks could begin President Trump's administration announced higher tariffs on Chinese imports. Take effect at the end of this week these taxes, which are largely paid by US firms and consumers that import the goods are meant to respond after China allegedly backed off some of the terms of a possible trade deal. What's going on here? NPR's? Rob Schmitz is in Shanghai. Rob good morning. Steve how did the Chinese delegation get into this situation? Yeah. I think it's a very complicated. And I don't envy, Leo hood Chinese lead negotiator. He sort of become the hapless mediator between two leaders who have both have lofty expectations from these trade talks on the Beijing side. It appears leader Xi Jinping was behind the refusal to commit or the backtracking on commitments. We're not sure which that anger the US. There are reports that she himself vetoed many sections of a draft agreement angering President Trump who then of course, took to Twitter to announce his retaliation. So Leo has a stressful trip ahead of him. He's going to have to explain to his American counterparts. What happened and what exactly Beijing is willing to commit to? And they're going to hash this out while the clock is ticking significant terrify that will likely have a big impact on global market. I want understand how much pressure China's actually under our chief economics. Correspondent Scott Horsely has noted for us that when these tariffs are charged. It's actually US consumers and businesses that pay most of the cost not China. But even with that being the case does China face negative. Effects from all these tariffs. Of course, it does. It's a global economy, and these effect all imports coming from China exports from the Chinese perspective and at the same time. China's economy has been slipping lately the auto industry has slipped twenty percent alone. So it's not great timing for Beijing. Okay. So they've got economic trouble. And even if Americans consumers pay the price, they might buy Chinese goods overtime. So how's all of this being described to the general public in China where there's not a free media? It's being described with a lot of caution China's government controls. The media Twitter's blocked and Beijing has been working hard to ensure the news of Trump's angry tweet threatening more tariffs were nowhere to be

China Beijing President Trump United States Twitter Xi Jinping Rob Schmitz Washington NPR LEO Shanghai Steve Scott Horsely Twenty Percent Two Days
US-China Trade Talks to Resume Despite Trump's Tariff Threat

Morning Edition

02:37 min | 1 year ago

US-China Trade Talks to Resume Despite Trump's Tariff Threat

"Good morning facing a threat of higher tariffs from the United States. Chinese trade delegation tries to make a deal this week there in Washington for two days of talks before those talks could begin President Trump's administration announced higher tariffs on Chinese imports. Take effect at the end of this week these taxes, which are largely paid by US firms and consumers that import the goods are meant to respond after China allegedly backed off some of the terms of a possible trade deal. What's going on here? NPR's rob Schmitz is in Shanghai either. Rob good morning, Steve how did the Chinese delegation get into this situation? Yeah. I think it's a very complicated. And I don't envy, Leo hood, China's leading Goshi eater. He's sort of become the hapless mediator between two leaders have both have lofty expectations from these trade talks on the Beijing side appears leader Xi Jinping was behind the refusal to commit or the backtracking on commitments. We're not sure which that anger the US. There are reports that she himself vetoed many sections of a draft agreement angering President Trump who then of course, took to Twitter to announce his retaliation. So Lille has a stressful trip ahead of him. He's going to have to explain to his American counterparts. What happened and what exactly Beijing is willing to commit to? And they're going to ask the while the clock is ticking significant terrified that will likely have a big impact on global market. I wanna understand how much pressure China's actually under our chief economics. Correspondent Scott Horsely has noted for us that when these tariffs are charged. It's actually US consumers and businesses that pay most of the cost not China. But even with that being the case does China face negative. Effects from all these tariffs. Of course, it does. It's a global economy, and these effect all imports coming from China exports from the Chinese perspective and at the same time. China's economy has been slipping lately the auto industry has slipped twenty percent alone. So it's not great timing for Beijing. Okay. So they've got economic trouble. And even if Americans consumers pay the price, they might buy Chinese goods overtime. So how all of this being described the general public in China where there's not a free media. It's being described it with a lot of caution China's government controls the media Twitter's blocked and Beijing has been working hard to ensure the news of Trump's angry tweets threatening more tariffs were nowhere to be seen this week. And social media sites were deleting any mention of them, I went downstairs from the NPR bureau today to talk to people on the street to try and get a sense of what they knew about the negotiations. Most people I spoke to answer my questions like this gentleman. He's a Forty-five year old, man. His name is Joe, Jim. I

China Beijing President Trump United States NPR Twitter Xi Jinping Washington Lille Rob Schmitz Shanghai Leo Hood Scott Horsely Steve Goshi JOE
"rob schmitz" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Noel king. And I'm Steve Inskeep. A group of mid level US. Trade officials has begun talks today in Beijing. They're working toward a trade agreement the United States wants concessions in Chinese business practices and in exchange. The US would eliminate tariffs recently imposed on Chinese goods NPR's. Rob Schmitz joins us from Shanghai either. Rob good morning. I guess we should bear in mind. They're talking about getting rid of these tariffs. But tariffs could also go up, right? That's right. President Trump in Chinese leader Xi Jinping agreed a month ago at dinner meeting at the g twenty in Argentina that they'd hash out their differences over a ninety day period in the hopes that they reach a deal in that time that ninety day period ends on March second, and if the two sides don't come to an a trade agreement by then the Trump administration plans to increase tariffs on two hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese imports from ten to twenty five percent. Both countries have had tariffs on Honey. Uh-huh. Billions of dollars worth of each other's good sense. Last summer. Would you just remind us for people who are coming back to the news after the holidays, what are the sticking points here. Well, the Trump administration has a list of demands it wants Beijing end its practice of forcing American companies to hand over key technology in return for doing business in China. It also wants China to buy more products from the US in order to reduce the trade deficit. And it wants a fairer playing field for US companies inside of China now Beijing's prepared to buy more American products, that's easy enough to meet the demands of hundreds of millions of consumers here, but what's going to be difficult for the Chinese side is to level the playing field for US companies inside of China into do that properly would require significant changes in how China manages its economy changes that would put the Chinese government, and it stayed on China's government and it stayed on enterprises in vulnerable position. So that is the big sticking point from Beijing's perspective. Well, let's think that through you have to assume that China would only do that. If. They faced enormous pressure. If they faced enormous pain. The United States is attempting to impose this pain through ten percent tariffs and threatened more pain with twenty five percent tariffs. Should it? Go go through with that. So that then raises a question is it possible to tell rob? If the tariffs are having that much of an effect a negative effect on China right now. While there has been a lot of chatter among Chinese economists about this in recent months, and the consensus is that. Yes. China's economic growth is slowing more than anticipated since the tariffs were were imposed and this is backed up by lower than expected consumption numbers in China and also from announcements like apple CEO, Tim Cook's, not too long ago that his company's numbers would be worse than expected due to China's downward economic trends. So yes, there is some data here in evidence that China's economy is hurting because of this, and that's an interesting point US tariffs in away hurt American consumers because they raise prices of goods here, I suppose, Chinese retaliation raises prices of goods in China. Right. And so that might affect Chinese consumers in a way. Absolutely. If if those tariffs remain imports into China from the US are, you know, of course, tariff in of course, you know, China's consumer grooved ended the the consumers of China a really rely on a lot. Of increasingly imported goods and a lot of those imported goods are from the United States. Okay. Rob thanks.

China US Beijing Rob Schmitz Steve Inskeep Chinese government Noel king President Trump Shanghai NPR Xi Jinping Argentina Tim Cook apple CEO twenty five percent ninety day two hundred billion dollars ten percent
"rob schmitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Noel king. And I'm Steve Inskeep. A group of mid level US. Trade officials has begun talks today in Beijing. They're working toward a trade agreement the United States wants concessions in Chinese business practices and in exchange. The US would eliminate tariffs recently imposed on Chinese goods NPR's. Rob Schmitz joins us from Shanghai. Rob good morning. I guess we should bear in mind. They're talking about getting rid of these tariffs. But tariffs could also go up, right? That's right. President Trump in Chinese leader Xi Jinping agreed a month ago at a meeting at the g twenty in Argentina that they'd hash out their differences over a ninety day period in the hopes that they reach a deal in that time that ninety day period ends on March second, and if the two sides don't come to an trade agreement by then the Trump administration plans to increase tariffs on two hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese imports from ten to twenty five percent. Both countries have had tariffs on hundreds of billions of dollars worth of each other's could sense last summer. Would you just remind us for people who are coming back to the news after the holidays, what are the sticking points here. Well, the Trump administration has a list of demands it wants to end its practice of forcing American companies to hand over key technology in return for doing business in China. It also wants China to buy more products in the US in order to reduce the trade deficit. And it wants a fairer playing field for US companies inside of China now Beijing's prepared to buy more American products. That's. Easy enough to meet the demands of hundreds of millions of consumers here, but what's going to be difficult for the Chinese side is to level the playing field for US companies inside of China into do that properly would require significant changes in how China manages its economy changes that would put the Chinese government, and it stayed on enterprises in a vulnerable position. So that is the big sticking point from Beijing's perspective. Well, let's think that through you have to assume that China would only do that if they faced enormous pressure if they faced enormous pain. The United States is attempting to impose this pain through ten percent tariffs and threaten more pain with twenty five percent tariffs. Should it? Go go through with that. So that then raises a question is it possible to tell rob? If the tariffs are having that much of an effect a negative effect on China right now. While there has been a lot of chatter among Chinese economists about this in recent months, and the consensus is that. Yes. China's economic growth is slowing more than -ticipant. It's sense. The tariffs were were imposed and this is backed up by lower than expected consumption numbers in China and also from announcements like apple CEO, Tim Cook's, not too long ago that his company's numbers would be worse than expected due to China's downward economic trends. So yes, there is some data here in evidence that China's economy is hurting because of this, and that's an interesting point US tariffs in away hurt American consumers because they raise prices of goods here, I suppose, Chinese retaliation raises prices of goods in China. Right. And so that might affect Chinese consumers in a way. Absolutely. If if those tariffs remain imports into China from the US are, you know, of course, tariff in of course, China's consumer group the consumers of China really rely on a lot. Of increasingly imported goods and a lot of those imported goods are from the United States. Okay. Rob thanks for the update. Really? Appreciate.

China US Rob Schmitz Beijing NPR Steve Inskeep Noel king Chinese government President Trump Shanghai Xi Jinping Argentina Tim Cook apple CEO twenty five percent ninety day two hundred billion dollars ten percent
"rob schmitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Police to rob Schmitz NPR news, Shanghai. This is NPR news. The Trump administration has so drastically cut the number of refugees allowed into the US some advocates fear. The system is collapsing would not be surprised if we do not have this program at the end of this administration. If there isn't some type of intervention by congress to change the shape of this program. I'm Ari Shapiro. Here about the fallout from this afternoon on all things considered from NPR news. All things considered coming up at four thirty this afternoon on K Q E public radio. Well, a second child has died this month while in US custody after being apprehended by US customs and border protection. Details ahead from a reporter who has been following the plight of migrants, I'll be coming up right after we have a news headline coming up here on public radio. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Windsor Johnston. The US government is now in its fifth day of a shutdown President Trump and congressional Democrats remain at an impasse over funding for a border wall with Mexico. The Senate and house will be back in session tomorrow. He was customs and border protection will begin medical evaluations of migrant children being held in detention facilities along the southern border. Monica. Ortiz a rebate reports the move comes after two children from Guatemala died in US custody this month as a result of these to death, the border patrol is now doing medical assessments on all seven hundred children in their custody within the El Paso section sector, which also includes New Mexico. Monica. Ortiz a rebate reporting Israeli airstrikes have hidden arms depot near Damascus wounding three soldiers. That's according to Syrian state media reports and Daniel estrin has more from Jerusalem. According to reports is rarely warplanes struck sites where Hezbollah militants and Iranian forces stored weapons, Israel wouldn't confirm but Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu recently said Israel might expand its efforts to act against Iranian military. Entrenchment in Syria. NPR's Daniel estrin reporting trading resumes.

US NPR President Trump Daniel estrin Israel Ortiz Monica rob Schmitz Ari Shapiro Shanghai Hezbollah Prime Minister Benjamin Netany congress Senate reporter Mexico New Mexico Jerusalem
"rob schmitz" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on KCRW

"Oh, man. And then Vincent Vinny is here with a suitcase full of toys and superman underwear. Kisses his dad daddy. This place. This is the airport. Iraq, iraq. Shimmer he's home country. But he doesn't think he can survive here. The US is the only home he's known. Jana? Ralph NPR news, Baghdad on voice for the US and China clashed this week at a World Trade Organization meeting in Geneva, blaming each other for disregarding WTO rules as NPR's rob Schmitz reports rhetoric from both sides is diminishing hope for a breakthrough when President Trump meets Chinese leader, Xi Jinping later this month deputy US trade Representative in WTO ambassador. Dennis shea said China was using the WTO to promote non market policies policies that have distorted world markets and let a massive excess capacity in the global supply of commodities like steel and aluminum a Chinese official shot back saying the US was blaming China. Disguise its own violations of WTO rules the current exchange on Wednesdays. The latest example of a souring mood between the world's two largest economies the clocks winding down to an important meeting between President Trump and Chinese leader Xi Jinping, the group of twenty summit in Argentina at the end of the Mont a meeting that many hope could lead to a deal that could prevent a trade war. Between the two from getting even worse. I think people in the US government just like sit up with all of the WTO commitments to China made. And then essentially evaded where they promised to do this that and the other thing, and then basically did nothing further. Kroger is author of China's economy what everyone needs to know, he says, he's not holding out hope for a deal between the US and China anytime soon, there's a very strong feeling throughout many aspects of the US government to Chinese naughty, trustworthy, interlocutor the commitments that are not being phones. We don't follow through on. And that is not worth having more conversations protocols, the notion that Trump, and she will reach a breakthrough at the g twenty a big nothing burger, and he expects US tariffs on Chinese imports to increase from ten percent to twenty five percent on the first day of twenty nine thousand nine as scheduled time is running out for negotiations between the two sides. China's lead trade negotiator. Leo has just announced. Visit Germany in the days leading up to the g twenty making it increasingly likely, the US and China. Will not be negotiating a deal anytime soon. Rob Schmitz, NPR news Shanghai. is morning edition on KCRW ahead.

US China WTO President Trump Xi Jinping rob Schmitz NPR Vincent Vinny Ralph NPR Dennis shea Iraq Jana Baghdad Geneva Leo Kroger Germany KCRW Representative
"rob schmitz" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on Here & Now

"We learned today that China's economic growth is at its lowest level since the global financial crisis. The economy there grew six point, five percent in the quarter that ended last month down from six point, seven percent a year ago, China's stock market is down thirty percents in January, and the currency. The you on is falling against the dollar. The country's finance officials today launched a media blitz to try to shore up confidence in the economy. Joining us now is NPR Shanghai correspondent rob Schmitz. I rob, hey, Jeremy. So six point, five percent of we'd love that kind of growth rate in the United States in China. I, it's bad news. It is bad news. Yeah, six point, five percent. We haven't seen that since two thousand nine. And that was when the global financial crisis hit and had a pretty tremendous impact on China and the jobs in China, there were many, many jobs lost after that. And so going back to that is not what I think China's regulators and China's bankers and China's. Economic planners were hoping for. And so what is causing it? Is it mostly the tariffs from the United States? Well, China's economy has been lagging for the last few years. You know, the government is dealing with a lot of problems. You've got public debt spiraling out of control. You've got a fairly significant property bubble in urban China, and the biggest pressure on the Konami comes from this historic transition that China's making the shift the way that it's Konami runs moving from an economy based on building things to one based on buying things. When you're the second largest economy in the world and you're managing one point, four billion people that type of economic transition is pretty painful and pretty complicated, and that's part of what we're seeing here. And are they expecting that it's going to last for a long time this downturn or or the they'll be able to work their way out of it somehow? Well, I think that's where the tariffs come into play because we've got in the midst of a downturn. We've got these tariffs from the United States, and that is happening at a pretty vulnerable time for China's. So when you. Oh, look at both. The fact that China's economy is already lagging, its markets are tumbling, and it's it's, it's currency is also starting to decline pretty quickly here. And then you've got these new tariffs coming. Fourth, I think that's creating a lot of psychological bears for the Chinese, and it's it's basically making people try to make shore up what they've got. And I think the entire system is preparing for a big shock right now..

China United States Konami rob Schmitz NPR Shanghai Jeremy five percent seven percent
"rob schmitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"New building. I flew over on his lot of damage. Local officials expect rivers to crest by this weekend. Breaking previous water level records for NPR news. I'm been scope Lugo in Columbia. Hawaii democratic Senator maisy Hirono is sharply. Criticizing the judiciary committee's handling of sexual assault allegations against supreme court nominee. Brad Kavanagh Hirono says she believes Kavanagh's accuser Christine Ford. She says the panel's response to force accusation is reminiscent of how Anita hill was treated after accusing Clarence Thomas of harassment. I am appalled by the treatment of Dr Ford by the Republicans, and this offered rush to get this man on the supreme court ASAP Hirono says it's not true that the committee has done everything possible to contact Ford as its chairman Charles Grassley claims Ford wants an FBI investigation before she testifies before the judiciary committee but Grassley says. Hearing with just two witnesses will be held on Monday as planned South Korean president moon. Jae in is spoke to around one hundred and fifty thousand North Koreans inside a stadium for the mass games in Pyongyang as NPR's. Rob Schmitz reports moon pledge that the Korean peninsula will be a land up to eternal peace. These spectacle of the South Korean president speaking to wildly cheering crowds of North Korean fans was one of the most memorable moments of the Pyongyang summit. Third meeting between the Korean leaders moon said that he and North Korean leader Kim Jong Hoon had agreed to measures. That would completely eliminate the fear of war and the risk of armed conflicts on the Korean peninsula. He said that the people of north and South Korea had lived together for five thousand years and have only been separated for seventy he pledged that the decades-long hostility between the north and the south would be radically aided in the two Koreas could become one again each phrase of moons was punctuated with thunderous cheering inside the massive stadium. Rob Schmitz and. Pierre news. So on stock markets in Asia shares now mostly higher following mixed trading. On Wall Street, the Dow Jones industrials gained one hundred and fifty eight points. You're listening to NPR news. From ABC news. I'm Tara Siler seven Cisco city officials say they may move forward with a supervised injection site for intravenous drug users with or without governor Jerry Brown's blessing. John sepulveda's reports medical professionals would work at the safe injection site to help curb deaths from drug overdoses, San Francisco officials want to create the first safe site in the country in the legislature has passed a Bill that would allow it. But it's unclear whether the governor will sign it. And if he does not than the city might do it. Anyway, according to former San Francisco supervisor and now state Senator Scott Weiner, we would strongly prefer not to have a state law prohibition in place. But you know, the city has always been ahead of the federal government and often the state government a lot of these issues city officials confirmed acuity they are considering moving forward with the safe injection site. Even if it is against state law. US department of Justice told kqeDorg would quote take action. Against any safe injection site. I'm John Sepulvado. Te-kuiti news, the largest wildfire in California history. The Mendocino complex is now fully contained that means officials are confident it won't spread, but it is still burning and Mendocino national forest spokeswoman Phyllis Swanson, says crews are still there working like cutting down burned trees, we have equipment and crews that go out and repair all the the fire lines. Does our lives that were put in during the attack of the fire the blaze, scorched, nearly four hundred and sixty thousand acres.

Christine Ford Senator maisy Hirono judiciary committee NPR Rob Schmitz Kim Jong Hoon Pyongyang president San Francisco Charles Grassley Mendocino South Korea Lugo Clarence Thomas Anita hill federal government
"rob schmitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Past to win the two sides have held highlevel talks they often have it resolved much and they usually ended in a stalemate a stalemate so that means we shouldn't really expect anything to come of this opening well you know i think that's the definitely this dance the trump administration is taking you know the us ambassador to the united nations nikki haley played down talks between the two koreas she said the us was not looking for a bandaid nor an opportunity to smile and take pictures together uh she said the us wouldn't take any talk seriously unless they are able to give kim jongun to give up his nuclear weapons and for president trump's fired after sending his infamous my nuclear button is bigger than yours tweet he responded to news of these talks with a foulup tweet calling kim jongun rocket man again the but saying also this perhaps as good news perhaps not we will see all of this aside when you look at the political situation the region here you have a new president in south korea moon jaein he's made it clear he wants to take a softer approach to the north and previous presidents in south korea and since he's become president his administration hasn't had an opportunity to we talked and then are so for him in his administration this is progress it's impossible to know how this of course will influence kim jong un and what he does with the weapons his country has developed it is a regular dialogue which is something that simply hasn't been there for the past two years between the two sides take the successes week get them i suppose npr's rob schmitz thanks a lot tribe decks that's the sound of protesters last night in the streets of isfahan one of the largest cities in iran they're using the name of ayatollah ali khamenei the country's supreme leader and saying shame on you give up your rule it was the sixth day of protests across iran which have led to at least twenty two deaths according to the state media these are the biggest demonstration since two thousand nine and there's a big difference between now and then nine years ago only about a million iranians had a smartphone today forty eight million do that's more than half of the population social media and messaging apps played a major role and sparking these protests and as part of its crackdown against them the.

united nations nikki haley us nuclear weapons trump president south korea kim jong un npr rob schmitz state media social media kim jongun isfahan iran ayatollah ali khamenei nine years two years
"rob schmitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The past that's what's happening in hong kong which has enjoyed a degree of political autonomy since great britain returned control of that city to china twenty years ago if here's rob schmitz reports on the push to teach the communist party's version of history in schools the last time china pressured hong kong to scrap its curriculum in favor of one developed by china's communist party led government this happened in the summer of 2012 tens of thousands marched through the city chanting down with national education after protesters besieged government headquarters for ten days officials back down but now the government is back with a plan to revamp how history has taught in hong kong secondary schools history teacher trump's who chung says he's worried about the changes the new curriculum is missing key parts of modern chinese history like hong kong's 19th sixty seven riots between communists and british rulers and the tiananmen square massacre of 1989 when chinese troops killed hundreds of unarmed prodemocracy demonstrators in beijing allow mom with these on we have a hood ogawa hung these are crucial parts of history being taken out on teachers are asking what the rationale as behind this and our own deputy secretary of education set these parts of history are trivial so we don't need to teach them she literally said that the new propose history curriculum would go into effect in two years would require schools to spend more time teaching students about china's modern history from the communist revolution in 1949 through its transformation to an authoritarian capitalist powerhouse today the curriculum carefully removes or skims over events deemed sensitive by china's communist party like miles failed political campaigns that left tens of millions dead as well as uprisings like tiananmen leaving it to teachers to decide whether they'll have the time to teach these events on legislator alvin young is afraid teachers won't i don't mind students being pod the developments and constructions and the achievements mon china has achieved is fine economic late day half done a great job but on the other hand i expect the students to be taught on what happened in the cultural revolution and also to tadamon square in 1918 ah fellow hong kong legislator tanya chances the struggle over education in hong kong is the latest battle with china over how the city is governed these.

hong kong britain china communist party trump deputy secretary miles tiananmen rob schmitz chung beijing alvin young tadamon square tanya twenty years two years ten days
"rob schmitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"By the winners so when power is shared there is often a tug of war over the past that's what's happening in hong kong which has enjoyed a degree of political autonomy since great britain returned control that city to china twenty years ago and here's rob schmitz reports on the push to teach the communist party's version of history in schools the last time china pressured hong kong to scrap its curriculum in favor of one developed by china's communist party led government this happened in the summer of 2012 tens of thousands marched through the city chanting down with national education after protesters besieged government headquarters for ten days officials back down but now the government is back with a plan to revamp how history has taught in hong kong secondary schools history teacher trump's who chung says he's worried about the changes the new curriculum is missing key parts of modern chinese history like hong kong's 19th sixty seven riots between communists and british rulers and the chairman square massacre of 1989 when chinese troops killed hundreds of unarmed prodemocracy demonstrators in beijing allow mom with these on we have a hood ogawa hung these are crucial parts of history being taken out teachers are asking what the rationale as behind this in our own deputy secretary of education set these parts of history are trivial so we don't need to teach them she literally said that the new propose history curriculum would go defected to years who would require schools to spend more time teaching students about china's modern history from the communist revolution in 1949 through its transformation to an authoritarian capitalist powerhouse today the curriculum carefully removes or skims over events deemed sensitive by china's communist party like miles failed political campaigns that left tens of millions dead as well as uprisings like tiananmen leaving it to teachers to decide whether they'll have the time to teach these events hung legislator alvin young is afraid teachers won't i don't mind students being pod developments and constructions and the achievements mon china has achieved is fi economically they half done a great job but on the other hand i expect the students to be taught on what happened in the cultural revolution an audit tadamon square in 1918 our fellow hong kong legislator tanya chances as the struggle over education in hong kong is the latest battle with china over how the city is governed these kind.

hong kong britain china communist party trump deputy secretary miles tiananmen rob schmitz chung chairman beijing alvin young twenty years ten days
"rob schmitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The past that's what's happening in hong kong which has enjoyed a degree of political autonomy since great britain returned control of that city to china twenty years ago if here's rob schmitz reports on the push to teach the communist party's version of history in schools the last time china pressured hong kong to scrap its curriculum in favor of one developed by china's communist party led government this happened in the summer of 2012 tens of thousands marched through the city chanting down with national education after protesters besieged government headquarters for ten days officials back down but now the government is back with a plan to revamp how history is taught in hong kong secondary schools history teacher chunks who chung says he's worried about the changes the new curriculum is missing key parts of modern chinese history like hong kong's 1960 seven riots between communists and british rulers and the chairman square massacre of 1989 when chinese troops killed hundreds of unarmed prodemocracy demonstrators in beijing amman with these on we up in that the hood ogawa hung these are crucial parts of history being taken out online teachers are asking what the rationale as behind this and our own deputy secretary of education said these parts of history are trivial so we don't need to teach them she literally said that the new propose history curriculum would go defected two years who would require schools to spend more time teaching students about china's modern history from the communist revolution in 1949 through its transformation to an authoritarian capitalist powerhouse today the curriculum carefully removes or skims over events deemed sensitive by china's communist party like miles failed political campaigns that left tens of millions dead as well as uprisings like 10.

hong kong britain china communist party deputy secretary miles rob schmitz chung chairman beijing amman twenty years two years ten days
"rob schmitz" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:49 min | 2 years ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on NPR's Business Story of the Day

"rob schmitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Rob schmitz has been following that ever hi rob a safe what is china's say it's been doing well china has agreed to ban imports of coal from north korea and it's also banned imports of a lot of other stuff north korean seafood ironore range of rare earth minerals and you know it because nearly all of north korea's trade is with china as you mentioned these are all significant revenue generaers for kim drillings government chinese also agreed to significantly limit exports of oil to north korea which is a big hit the pyongyang since the north relies on china for nearly all of its oil another thing that china's done is at its ordered all north korean companies operating inside of cia china a closed by the end of the year okay that sounds pretty severe but are the chinese actually doing these things well according to chinese customs data fuel imports and exports between china in the north have dropped significantly figures from september show that chinese imports of north korean coal were down more than seventy percent from a year before that same month china exe sported only ninety tons of oil to north korea that was down one hundred percent from last year china also exports electricity to the north and customs data shows that in the second quarter of this year the amount of electricity sent from china north korea is also down nearly one hundred percent from last year do all of those changes make a difference in north korea well i spoke with cinching jay off professor at geeling university who studies site on north korean relations about this and he told me it's already having an impact inside north korea here's what he said to good kandush sure sure new onus on the sean hannity show in told me that last mud north korea should reshuffled some of its senior leadership and at the official in charge of the north's economy has now been elevated to a higher position swent follows e shifts really closely any says this political reshuffling telsim the north is scrambling.

Rob schmitz china north korea pyongyang professor north korean geeling university sean hannity official one hundred percent seventy percent ninety tons
"rob schmitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"China's economic policies and for more on this let's bring an impure shanghai correspondent rob schmitz either rob good morning so what steve bannon doing in hong kong you have the title of his speech is broken into three parts american economic nationalism the popular revolt in asia each one of those items is a pretty big topics so it's unclear what exactly bannon is going to talk about and it was announced this morning that the speech will be closed to the press so that'll make it even harder to find out after it's over but what we do know is who bet it will reach talking to you in it's going to be an auditorium full of bankers who have made their fortunes on the rise of china which makes this whole thing kind of odd right i mean doesn't bannon are lame china for hurting americans for putting middleclass americans out of work for doing a lot of other things yes air here's the thing this past weekend battering gave interviews to the new york times and sixty minutes as perhaps a sort of preview of this event in hong kong in the times he compared china's rise to that of nazi germany he told the reporter that is one hundred years will all look back to see what we did to confront china unathorized to world domination and then on sixty minutes here's what he told charlie rose were not economic war with china china's an economic war with us okay you want a trade war with china i want china to stop appropriating our technology china is through forced technology transfer in through stealing our technology but really forced technology transfer is cutting out the beating heart of american innovation okiro schmitz i'm still trying to figure this out so so bannon is basically trashing china and saying that china's up to no good why would have branch of a big state owned brokerage firm want to hear a speech from him why bring him yet karen tudor well you know first off this event sponsored by firm called clsa is an annual one in previous years they brought in other controversial speakers like edward snowden and sarah palin it all so important to point out here that clsa makes its own decisions and is largely left alone by its parent company so there's that but perhaps most importantly no other us.

rob schmitz hong kong asia new york times reporter china china clsa sarah palin shanghai steve bannon germany charlie rose china karen tudor edward snowden sixty minutes one hundred years
"rob schmitz" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on NPR News Now

"But states that have no limits would have to abide by the two hundred fifty thousand dollar cap the bill does not limit awards for economic damages the law also restricts the statute of limitations for filing a medical malpractice suit to three years or one year from the date that the injury is discovered whichever comes first the bill would apply to suits brought against doctors hospitals nursing homes and fda approved pharmaceuticals and medical devices i knew jaffe npr news some residents of hong kong took to the streets for a prodemocracy rally twenty years after britain handed the city over to china from hong kong npr's rob schmitz reports the demonstration also comes on the heels of an official visit by chinese president xi jinping early this morning in his speech i was closed to the public chinese president xi jinping ward hongkong residents that challenging china's sovereignty over the city is quote absolutely impracticable he was speaking at the swearing in of hong kong's new chief executive hours later after she had boarded a plane back to china thousands of people gathered to march through the city as part of an annual march for democracy under xi jinping's rule china has tightened its political grip over hong kong china's refusal to make good on a promise to allow citizens to vote for the local leader prompted citywide protests in a violent police crackdown in 2014 many protesters in today's march called on china to allow nobel peace prize winner leo shauble to leave china to seek treatment for cancer china's released from prison so that he could seek medical treatment.

hong kong hong kong npr rob schmitz hong kong china leo shauble jaffe npr britain china official president chief executive jinping nobel two hundred fifty thousand dol twenty years three years one year
"rob schmitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The sustaining members of this npr station it's morning edition from npr news i'm rachel martin and i'm steve inskeep china's president visits hong kong today xi jinping is marking twenty years of chinese rule the city you may recall was once controlled by great britain that colonial possession britain returned to the night ninety seven and peers rob schmitz is in hong kong what did like there to rob while steve it's it's pretty busy i'm yachting i'm in wanchai right now which is the neighborhood where xi jinping is at at this moment and a lot of the streets here are shut down you've got the entire waterfront barricaded against any sort of a anyone who's really not allowed in that area you've god also two of the major hotels downtown hair the hyatt and the renaissance the thirteen hundred hotel rooms have been blocked noone can stay there except the entourage around xi jinping is is the entourage that large classic already measure it's a security measure i mean this is a this is a very big visit this is xi jinping's first visit hong kong since becoming a chat as president this seems like a good moment to put this question on the table rob schmitz twenty years ago china did takeover hong kong from great britain which had imposed a certain rule of law and the chinese promised to keep version of democracy the rule of law law onecountrytwosystems they said twenty years ago how's it worked up it hasn't when it came time to make good on this promise beijing implemented this system that ensures the chief executive of the city is elected by a mostly probeijing group of elites not by individual citizens hong kong in when it became clear that this was going to be the case ace in 2014 people became very angry and they flooded the streets the shut down the financial district of the city for nearly three months thousands of protesters in that ended in a violent police crackdown so there are a lot of sore feelings about this anniversary in about the incoming chief executive carrie lam we'll be sworn in us on saturday does that help to explain the massive security the barricades the police in the.

rachel martin china britain rob schmitz hong kong president beijing chief executive npr steve inskeep steve it wanchai shut down carrie lam twenty years three months
"rob schmitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Rob schmitz will explain its friday june twenty four singer jason morass is forty years old the news is next live from npr news in washington i'm chorba coleman president trump is poised to sign a bill making it easier for the veterans affairs secretary to fire and discipline employees and pierced hammer keith says the bill has bipartisan support the bill the president is signing would shorten the appeals process for firing or discipline winning employees at the va after the va scandal that broke out in 2014 where facilities were covering up long wait times for care at there was an issue where it just took a very long time at to fire employees there's a in a peels process that they can go on for years peers tamarine keith saudi arabia and other persian gulf arab states that have cut ties with qatar have issued a list of demands to resolve a diplomatic crisis anne pierce peter kenyon reports they include cutting ties with iran and closing aljazeera of other cut are funded media outlets saudi arabia the united arab emirates egypt in bahrain initially said there moved to cut ties with cutter was over dole has funding of islamist groups they consider terrorist organizations but this list of thirteen demands goes far beyond that the gulf states want cutter to close its diplomatic missions in neighboring iran which shares a giant gas field with cutter the aljazeera news channel should also be closed in addition of turkish military base in cutters should close and turkish troops be withdrawn turkey's defence minister says he sees no reason to revisit the base agreement gutters been given ten days to comply with these sweeping demands but it's not clear what happens if it doesn't peter kenyon npr news istanbul the us federal reserve.

turkey aljazeera egypt saudi arabia iran peter kenyon qatar va chorba coleman npr us Rob schmitz dole bahrain united arab emirates media outlets saudi arabia president secretary trump washington forty years ten days