35 Burst results for "Rob Schmitz"

"rob schmitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:29 min | 2 months ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And I'm a Martinez in Culver City, California. The European Union has agreed to a plan that aims to cut gas consumption across Europe by 15%. This move comes the same week that Russian energy company Gazprom abruptly cut gas deliveries to Europe through one of its most important pipelines. NPR's rob schmitz joins us now from Berlin to talk about all this rob, the EU came to this agreement to quickly, but it did so after many of its members were able to get exemptions from having to make these cuts. So what did EU members agree to exactly? Yeah, you members agreed to cut their gas consumption by 15% in spirit, but it's important to note here that these cuts are voluntary. They stop being voluntary, though, should Russia create an energy emergency by making sudden cuts in gas supplies to Europe. And Russia did that, right? Yeah, that's right. Not only did they do it this week, but this goes back several weeks when Russian energy company Gazprom abruptly cut the flow of gas on its Nord stream one pipeline by half. And then earlier this month, the company simply cut off all the gas in the pipeline for a ten day period, and it resumed last week, but then it cut gas again this week. So as it stands, the pipeline which connects Germany to Russian gas is now flowing at 20% capacity. So given this as a backdrop, member states will now need to start looking for energy savings so that they can meet this 15% gas savings benchmark because many see future cuts from Moscow as likely. And if the Kremlin should do that in the winter when Europe needs more of its gas for heating, then we're looking at a more dire situation. Now we mentioned on the cuts that not all EU member states will need to make them. Tell us about the exemptions. Right. Yeah, there are several EU countries that are not burning Russian gas for electricity or heat, so they've been granted exemptions as have other countries that have already launched ambitious energy savings plans. I spoke to the German Marshall funds at Jacob Kierkegaard about this and here's what he said. So, you know, once you factor in all these exemption, it's pretty clear that the number of countries that have huge reliant on gas and none of these exemptions, what they're going to be bearing most of the pain or most of the burden here, and that is Germany, Austria, and others, precisely, frankly, the way it should be. In a Kierkegaard is not alone in this opinion, many in Europe believe Germany, which up to the war in Ukraine, relied on Russia for half its natural gas, should shoulder most of the burden here due to its risky decision to rely so heavily on Moscow for its energy in the first place. In fact, the original proposal was for all EU states to cut 15% of their gas consumption, but the southern European states that long ago decided not to rely on Russia for energy were angry saying they shouldn't have to pay for what they saw as Germany's energy mistakes. So then what is Germany doing to reduce that Russian gas reliance? Quite a bit. Germany's parliament has passed a law that will fast track construction of liquefied natural gas terminals with the first one scheduled to be completed by the end of the year. That gas will be imported from the Middle East and the United States. The government is also conducting an energy survey right now to explore whether it should extend the life of three nuclear power plants that are scheduled to close by the end of the year, and we will know more on that option in a few weeks. NPR's rob schmitz is in Berlin, rob, thanks. Thank you. American

EU Europe rob schmitz Gazprom Russia Germany Culver City Martinez Jacob Kierkegaard NPR Berlin Moscow rob California Marshall Austria Middle East United States
"rob schmitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:29 min | 2 months ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And I'm a Martinez in Culver City, California. The European Union has agreed to a plan that aims to cut gas consumption across Europe by 15%. This move comes the same week that Russian energy company Gazprom abruptly cut gas deliveries to Europe through one of its most important pipelines. NPR's rob schmitz joins us now from Berlin to talk about all this rob, the EU came to this agreement to quickly, but it did so after many of its members were able to get exemptions from having to make these cuts. So what did EU members agree to exactly? Yeah, you members agreed to cut their gas consumption by 15% in spirit, but it's important to note here that these cuts are voluntary. They stop being voluntary, though, should Russia create an energy emergency by making sudden cuts in gas supplies to Europe. And Russia did that, right? Yeah, that's right. Not only did they do it this week, but this goes back several weeks when Russian energy company Gazprom abruptly cut the flow of gas on its Nord stream one pipeline by half. And then earlier this month, the company simply cut off all the gas in the pipeline for a ten day period, and it resumed last week, but then it cut gas again this week. So as it stands, the pipeline which connects Germany to Russian gas is now flowing at 20% capacity. So given this as a backdrop, member states will now need to start looking for energy savings so that they can meet this 15% gas savings benchmark because many see future cuts from Moscow as likely. And if the Kremlin should do that in the winter when Europe needs more of its gas for heating, then we're looking at a more dire situation. Now we mentioned on the cuts that not all EU member states will need to make them. Tell us about the exemption. Right. Yeah, there are several EU countries that are not burning Russian gas for electricity or heat, so they've been granted exemptions as have other countries that have already launched ambitious energy savings plans. I spoke to the German Marshall funds Jacob Kierkegaard about this and here's what he said. So, you know, once you factor in all these exemption, it's pretty clear that the number of countries that have huge reliance on gas and none of these exemptions, what they're going to be bearing most of the pain or most of the burden here, and that is Germany, Austria, and others, precisely, frankly, the way it should be. In a Kierkegaard is not alone in this opinion, many in Europe believe Germany, which up to the war in Ukraine, relied on Russia for half its natural gas. Should shoulder most of the burden here due to its risky decision to rely so heavily on Moscow for its energy in the first place. In fact, the original proposal was for all EU states to cut 15% of their gas consumption, but the southern European states that long ago decided not to rely on Russia for energy were angry saying they shouldn't have to pay for what they saw as Germany's energy mistakes. So then what is Germany doing to reduce that Russian gas reliance? Quite a bit. Germany's parliament has passed a law that will fast track construction of liquefied natural gas terminals with the first one scheduled to be completed by the end of the year. That gas will be imported from the Middle East and the United States. The government is also conducting an energy survey right now to explore whether it should extend the life of three nuclear power plants that are scheduled to close by the end of the year, and we will know more on that option in a few weeks. NPR's rob schmitz is in Berlin, rob, thanks. Thank you. American

EU Europe rob schmitz Gazprom Russia Germany Culver City Martinez Jacob Kierkegaard NPR Berlin Moscow rob California Marshall Austria Middle East United States
"rob schmitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:19 min | 2 months ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"European Union has agreed to a plan that aims to cut gas consumption across Europe by 15%. This move comes the same week that Russian energy company Gazprom abruptly cut gas deliveries to Europe through one of its most important pipelines. NPR's rob schmitz joins us now from Berlin to talk about all this. Rob, the EU came to this agreement quickly, but it did so after many of its members were able to get exemptions from having to make these cuts. So what did EU members agree to exactly? Yeah, you members agreed to cut their gas consumption by 15% in spirit, but it's important to note here that these cuts are voluntary. They stop being voluntary, though, should Russia create an energy emergency by making sudden cuts and gas supplies to Europe. And Russia did that, right? Yeah, that's right. Not only did they do it this week, but this goes back several weeks when Russian energy company Gazprom abruptly cut the flow of gas on its Nord stream one pipeline by half. And then earlier this month, the company simply cut off all the gas in the pipeline for a ten day period, and it resumed last week, but then it cut gas again this week. So as it stands, the pipeline which connects Germany to Russian gas is now flowing at 20% capacity. So given this as a backdrop, member states will now need to start looking for energy savings so that they can meet this 15% gas savings benchmark because many see future cuts from Moscow as likely. And if the Kremlin should do that in the winter when Europe needs more of its gas for heating, then we're looking at a more dire situation. Now we mentioned on the cuts that not all EU member states will need to make them. Tell us about the exemptions. Right. Yeah, there are several EU countries that are not burning Russian gas for electricity or heat, so they've been granted exemptions as have other countries that have already launched ambitious energy savings plans. I spoke to the German Marshall funds at Jacob Kierkegaard about this and here's what he said. So, you know, once you factor in all these exemptions, it's pretty clear that the number of countries that have huge reliant on gas and none of these exemptions, what they're going to be bearing most of the pain, or most of the burden here, and that is Germany, Austria, and others, precisely, frankly, the way it should be. And a Kierkegaard is not alone in this opinion, many in Europe believe Germany, which up to the war in Ukraine, relied on Russia for half its natural gas. Should shoulder most of the burden here due to its risky decision to rely so heavily on Moscow for its energy in the first place. In fact, the original proposal was for all EU states to cut 15% of their gas consumption, but the southern European states that long ago decided not to rely on Russia for energy were angry saying they shouldn't have to pay for what they saw as Germany's energy mistakes. So then what is Germany doing to reduce that Russian gas reliance? Quite a bit. Germany's parliament has passed a law that will fast track construction of liquefied natural gas terminals with the first one scheduled to be completed by the end of the year. That gas will be imported from the Middle East and the United States. The government is also conducting an energy survey right now to explore whether it should extend the life of three nuclear power plants that are scheduled to close by the end of the year, and we will know more on that option in a few weeks. NPR's rob schmitz is in Berlin, rob, thanks. Thank you

European Union Europe rob schmitz Gazprom Russia Germany Jacob Kierkegaard NPR Berlin Moscow Rob Marshall Austria Middle East United States rob
"rob schmitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:16 min | 2 months ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Build its own infrastructure, but as NPR's rob schmitz reports, time is not on its side. Industrial sized vehicles, Kris kross, the port of bloom's bootle as an oil taker begins to offload its precious cargo. This port lies at the mouth of Germany's elbe river along the North Sea. It's the entry to the keel canal the world's busiest artificial waterway. And it's also where Germany wants to build one of its first liquefied natural gas terminals. It will be an important step towards just becoming partly independent of Russian gas. It will be difficult to become completely independent, but we have to start at some point from schnabel is managing director of prunes brittle harbor. He's been trying to get Germany to build a liquefied natural gas or LNG terminal here for years. And now the government has finally listening. That's because a third of the country's natural gas arriving by pipeline from Russia is now in jeopardy. Russia has cut the supply of gas on one of its main pipelines to Germany by nearly half prompting Germany's government to urge citizens to take shorter showers and turn off their lights to save energy. And to save money. In a strong industrialized country like Germany, it would be very tricky to maintain industries here on these price levels. And CEO of RWE supply and trading says skyrocketing energy prices means the country needs to find a quick solution. That means more LNG to bridge the period until more renewables come in and we can electrify the country further. LNG is a gas that's cooled to a liquid state that makes it easy to transport it by shit before it's turned back into gas. Company is in charge of installing a temporary LNG terminal, essentially a massive ship here in the port of Glenn's bootle. It's one of four such terminals that Germany has chartered in hopes to have up and running before the end of the year. But not everyone's happy about this. I don't think Germany should be building any LNG terminals. There are studies that show we can do without them. Norbert Prado, a retired ship engineer opens a cattle fence before climbing a grassy embankment overlooking the Brunswick port. He

Germany rob schmitz Kris kross prunes brittle harbor elbe river bootle NPR North Sea schnabel Russia RWE government Glenn Norbert Prado Brunswick
"rob schmitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:47 min | 3 months ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Management, banking, and capital market solutions. Learn more at Raymond James dot com, and C three AI, C three AI software enables organizations to use artificial intelligence and enterprise scale, solving previously unsolvable problems. C three AI is enterprise AI. This is morning edition from NPR news, I'm Rachel Martin in Washington, D.C.. There are many Martinez and Culver City California. Leaders of the 7 wealthiest democracies began three days of talks yesterday in Germany's Bavarian Alps, Russia's invasion of Ukraine is set to dominate the agenda. But the other dominant theme is China. One of the first announcements out of the G 7 was a $600 billion infrastructure initiative to help developing countries, counter China's belt and road initiative. NPR's rob schmitz joins us now from Berlin, rob G 7 leaders are seeking a deal to impose a price cap on Russian oil and pipeline gas to curb Moscow's ability to finance its war in Ukraine. Tell us more about what's on the table here. Yeah, the idea here would be for the U.S. and Europe to set a fixed price for Russian oil that is below the market rate so that Russia would lose revenue for its war in Ukraine and so that inflationary pressures here in the west recede a little. The argument among G 7 leaders is that at least in the short term, Russia doesn't have many alternative markets to sell its oil. So would have to agree to a price cap. But it's clear there is demand for Russian oil in Asia, India and China, for example, so it's unclear whether this would work. And is there a possibility that this price cap idea could maybe backfire? Oh yeah. The country most skeptical of this plan is probably Germany. It relies on Russia for around a third of its natural gas and will continue to import Russian oil alongside much of the rest of the EU through the rest of the year before an EU wide oil ban kicks in. Germany needs this energy to keep its economy running. And last week, Russia cut gas flows into Germany by 60%. So there's concern here that a new price cap on oil could backfire and prompt Russia to simply cut off oil and possibly gas unilaterally, which would be a big blow to the European economy. And I know President Biden used this G 7 summit to announce the partnership for global infrastructure and investment. What's the end of this and why now? Yeah, so this is a $600 billion infrastructure plan to help developing countries deal with climate change, help them build healthcare, infrastructure, and help promote gender equality. President Biden announced a solar farm project in Angola, hospital construction in Ivory Coast and regional energy trading platforms in Southeast Asia. Here's what he said about the plan. I want to be clear. This isn't aid or charity. It's an investment that will deliver returns for everyone, including the American people and the people of all our nations. It'll boost all of our economies. It's a chance for us to share our positive vision for the future. And a Biden said it's also a chance to pull the developing world closer to the democratic west instead of towards the orbit of China, whose belt and road initiative is the competing infrastructure development plan for the developing world. And rob, one of the thing, because shortly before the summit began, the United Kingdom announced that it, the U.S., Japan, and Canada would ban imports of Russian gold as part of the latest measures taken against Russia. What will that mean? Well, the Biden administration said this will be formally announced tomorrow at the summit, British prime minister Boris Johnson says banning Russian gold imports will directly hit Russian oligarchs and strike at the heart of Putin's war machine. Russia and gold imports to the UK reach 15 and a half $1 billion last year. And this figure has only gone up since sanctions were imposed. It's been a way that Russia's government has tried to get around the sanctions. But then again, it's unclear whether the EU will join their allies on this initiative. That's NPR's rob schmitz, joining us from Berlin, rob, thank you very

Russia Ukraine NPR news Rachel Martin Washington, D.C. Culver City California President Biden Germany rob schmitz rob G China Bavarian Alps Raymond James EU Martinez NPR Berlin Moscow
"rob schmitz" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:53 min | 5 months ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"A fighting in Ukraine will be a major focus when he meets with Germany's Chancellor next week in Berlin Here's NPR's rob schmitz The two leaders plan to meet on Monday I'll discuss the war in Ukraine and European efforts to assist Ukraine in its defense against Russia as well as energy policy in the wake of EU embargoes on Russian coal and oil The leader is also will talk about the situation in the Sahel region of Africa Macron announced earlier this year that France would withdraw its troops from Mali where it has been battling Islamic militants for nearly a decade Macron and Schultz will also discuss the western Balkans and relations between the EU and China which have been tense in recent years as Beijing imposed sanctions on EU lawmakers in retaliation for criticism of Beijing's treatment of Muslim minorities in the region of Xinjiang Rob schmitz and Pyrenees Berlin The Dow is now down 1218 points Is that we are The fall in the U.S. markets is coming a day After the Federal Reserve raise interest rates by the most in more than 20 years and said it would continue to raise interest rates in an urgent fight to bring down inflation Investors are fearful those rate hikes will be too aggressive Tipping the U.S. economy possibly into a deep recession technology shares were among the biggest decliners given that the tech sector tends to suffer during higher interest rate environments The tech heavy NASDAQ has fallen more than 5% We see the S&P is down more than 4% and the Dow is down three and a half percent or more than 1200 points The number of Chinese companies that face being booted from U.S. stock markets is getting longer and PR's David girl reports the Securities and Exchange Commission has put more than 80 companies on notice The SEC has flagged JD.com the massive Chinese retailer along with Petro China and China Mobile they're part of more than 100 companies identified by the SEC as facing potential delisting It's part of an ongoing battle between U.S. and Chinese regulators The SEC wants Chinese companies listed in the U.S. to share detailed information and audits with American regulators China has resisted doing that citing national security reasons Ladies editions to the SEC list dims hopes the two countries are closer to reaching a deal David gura NPR news New York The Dow Jones Industrial Average is down 1226 points more than three and a half percent At 32,838 the S&P has fallen more than 4% the NASDAQ has fallen 5 and a half percent Its NPR Support for NPR comes from NPR stations other contributors include Fisher investments Fisher investments is a fiduciary which means they always put clients interests first Fisher investments clearly different money management Investing in securities involves the risk of loss.

Macron Ukraine rob schmitz EU Rob schmitz Pyrenees Berlin NPR SEC U.S. Beijing Sahel China Mali David girl Balkans Schultz Berlin
"rob schmitz" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:15 min | 5 months ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"NPR news I'm rob schmitz and I'm Mary Louise Kelly Nearly 1 million Americans have died from COVID-19 And according to a new estimate from the Kaiser family foundation more than 230,000 of those deaths could have been prevented by vaccination Today we have a story of one person whose life could have been saved by the COVID vaccine Her name was Stephanie She died in December and her family is still struggling to figure out why it had to happen It's something I can't understand Still I mean there was no perfect puzzle piece for this I literally go through this all the time That is Stephanie's daughter Laurie We're keeping it to first names to give her and the rest of the family privacy as they grieve Stephanie refused to get vaccinated because she believed in conspiracy theories There's no way to know exactly how many other people have made similar choices but Laurie thinks there are many families like hers I know we're not alone I know this is happening all over the place And pierce Jeff bromfield looked into Stephanie's story and how bad information contributes to the COVID death toll Before we talk about the conspiracy theories the family fights the illness and ultimately Stephanie's death Her kids want you to know that she was a really great mom Here's her other daughter Vicky You know she just believed we could do anything And I think that's really powerful as a parent you know She was married to a Vietnam War veteran named Arnold He worked for the gas company designing the lines She was more of a people person When it came to human interaction human emotions she was like wise she just had a wisdom about her She loved astrology She did tarot readings to advise people of that houses kids jobs It was quirky outside the mainstream to be sure but Arnold says that Stephanie brought a lot of positivity to her sessions When people came She just was looking to help them to give them whatever they needed At the same time Stephanie was pretty practical about healthcare She went to the doctor regularly and she was a big believer in vaccines She had made sure I took the flu shots We took the shingle shot We took the pneumonia shine I mean.

Stephanie COVID NPR news rob schmitz Mary Louise Kelly Laurie Kaiser family foundation pierce Jeff bromfield Arnold Vicky Vietnam flu pneumonia
"rob schmitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Bill that could total as much as three and a half $1 trillion Kelsey Snell and PR news Washington Germany's Social Democratic Party has narrowly won the country's national election defeating Chancellor Angela Merkel's center right party and Pierre's rob schmitz says the results will likely lead long political negotiations The narrow outcome means the left center's social Democrats with just 25.7% of the vote will likely need to team up with two other parties to form a government The Green Party and the libertarian free Democrats If it fails to get these parties on board the party that plays second could wind up leading the country it could take weeks if not months of negotiating to form a coalition NPR's rob schmitz reporting Today's the day the New York State's vaccine mandate goes into effect for some healthcare workers workers at hospitals and nursing homes must have at least one dose of a COVID-19 inoculation by today New York governor cat the hoe will has released a list of options to cover staffing shortages that includes deploying some members of the National Guard Arizona governor Doug ducey is offering parents who do not want their children to follow school mask mandates a $7000 voucher This is to send their children to other schools from member station KJ zz and Phoenix Ben Giles prepared this report Governor ducey used federal COVID relief funds to expand Arizona's state funded school voucher program But critics say doocy is misusing the federal dollars meant to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 by incentivizing parents to avoid CDC recommended health guidelines Chris cotterman is the head of government relations for the Arizona school boards association Here we have what I perceive to be the governor advancing a political agenda and using public health mitigation measures to do it And I find it to be highly objectionable To put it mildly Applications for roughly 2800 students in Arizona have been started or completed For NPR news I'm Ben Giles in Phoenix You're listening to NPR news from Washington You are listening to WNYC in New York at 7 O four a good Monday morning of Michael hill clear in 62 with the sun rising out there sunny and near 80 today Delays up to 35 minutes on the George Washington bridge inbound after crash from across expressway this morning A COVID vaccine requirement for all healthcare workers in the state of New York starts today that includes those who work in hospitals nursing homes and New York City's vast public hospital system Healthcare workers who don't get at least a first COVID shot by today could lose their jobs but is up to individual employers to make that decision Governor Kathy hulk has said she declare a state of emergency if hospitals of nursing homes become short staffed She is considering bringing out of state healthcare professionals to New York and enlisting recent graduates and retired workers to practice medicine She is also planning to deploy.

rob schmitz Kelsey Snell Chancellor Angela Merkel Ben Giles National Guard Arizona Doug ducey Social Democratic Party Governor ducey COVID New York doocy Chris cotterman Arizona school boards associat Green Party Pierre Washington NPR
Ramstein Air Base in Germany Becomes a Refuge for Afghans

Here & Now

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Ramstein Air Base in Germany Becomes a Refuge for Afghans

"There is still a significant number of people in afghanistan who are still trying to leave the country after the us pull out and for afghans who have already left some are in limbo at the us. Air base in ramstein germany. Waiting to fly here to the united states. Npr's rob schmitz reports this hanger. Which can snugly fit. Some of the largest planes in the world was not meant to house people that it is. Today it's nine story. Tall ceiling looms above a series of rectangular enclosures constructed of ten foot tall wire fencing separating groups of afghans dressed in colorful robes tunics. Were allowed to leave these massive cages when it is time for their flight to america a woman in a black hejab cradles her newborn wrapped tightly in a linen cloth on hangers cold floor. The infants name is mustafa. His short life has been hectic two weeks ago. He was born in a village outside. Kabul the next day is family whisked him to the frenzy gates of the kabul airport where they slept outside for four days packed among throngs of others desperate to flee the taliban when he was five days old little mustafa was rushed through the gates and carried onto an aircraft ending. Up here at ramstein air bags now. He's waiting for a flight that in a few hours. We'll take him to his new home. America i plan to build a life for my son and his siblings. In america says mustafa's mother walk. Meena will only gives her first name for fear of reprisals by the taliban on family back home my husband worked with the afghan army and we were in too much dangerous day in afghanistan. There are nearly fifteen thousand others here left for the same

Ramstein Rob Schmitz United States Mustafa Kabul Airport Afghanistan NPR Germany Ramstein Air Kabul Taliban Meena Afghan Army
After Fatal Floods, Germans Look at How Climate Change Contributed

Environment: NPR

02:05 min | 1 year ago

After Fatal Floods, Germans Look at How Climate Change Contributed

"To germany now where crews are cleaning up after the worst floods the region has seen nearly six decades more than one hundred sixty people have died. The damage amounts to billions of dollars. Now germans are asking what role climate change may be playing and how to keep this from happening again. Npr's rob schmitz has been out surveying the destruction. He joins us from the flood. Region near bonn. Hey rob emyr lewis. So i know you have been out. In one of the worst hit towns. You spent yesterday talking to people there. What are they saying about how this happened. Yes spoke to several yesterday. In the town of knowing of isla people who had suffered incredible damage to their homes. Dozens of people in this town died in this disaster and the one thing everyone was talking about was how unnatural all of the seem. The rain was nothing like anyone had ever seen. Before the way the tiny creek that runs through this town the are filled up from below a foot deep to twenty five feet deep in a matter of a few hours as water rushed down into this valley as spoke to resident martin larsen about this and he thought climate change was definitely a part of this but he also listed other culprits behind the severity of the flooding. Here's what he said. This type of flooding is not normal. This type of rain is not normal. The consequences of not for the main thing is probably infrastructure. Now you've probably been building everywhere where we hear you asphalted. Everything's paved the river straight. Yeah it's not bending back and forth. It's been manipulated by man throughout the years. It's nice and and shallow and it's just cozy but when it comes high water it's a germany is europe's most populous country. It's about the size of new mexico but it has more than eighty million people in that area so its population is fairly dense and there are so many towns like the one i visited yesterday that are built along waterways that are highly engineered and urban management to prevent these extreme weather events from causing so much damage is something that german officials will likely start analyzing more closely in the aftermath of this tragedy.

Rob Schmitz Rob Emyr Lewis Martin Larsen Bonn Germany NPR Isla New Mexico Europe
Stop New Oil Investments to Hit Net-Zero Emissions, IEA Says

1A

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Stop New Oil Investments to Hit Net-Zero Emissions, IEA Says

"A report by the International Energy Agency says immediate action is needed if the world aims to me climate goals. By the year 2050 more on this from NPR's Rob Schmitz. The reports suggest ending investments in new coal mines, oil and gas wells as part of an overall reshaping of the global energy sector in order to meet ambitious carbon emissions reduction goals. Paris based agency has determined there is a narrow but viable pathway for building a global energy sector with net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. Several countries, including the U. S and the European Union, have pledged to achieve net zero emissions by mid century. The IAEA report laid out 400 steps needed to transform L energies produced, transported and used, including seizing investments in new fossil fuel supply projects and ended the sale of internal combustion engine cars by 2035. A four fold increase in the deployment of solar and wind power. Rob Schmitz. NPR NEWS Berlin

Rob Schmitz International Energy Agency NPR Paris U. European Union Iaea Berlin
"America is back," Biden tells Munich Security Conference

All Things Considered

03:19 min | 1 year ago

"America is back," Biden tells Munich Security Conference

"By video link at the Munich Security Conference. German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron also spoke NPR's Rob Schmitz was watching from Berlin. Welcome, Rob. Hey, Howdy President Biden emphasized today that he is reaffirming America's commitment to the transatlantic relationship. What else did he have to say? He had a lot to say. First off. He really hit home that Europe is a cornerstone of America's approach to the rest of the world, and that the transatlantic alliance is more important than ever, he pointed out. The West faces a new set of challenges. He mentioned the strategic threat of China as well as Russia and, of course, the Corona virus pandemic. But he said one of the biggest challenges the West faces now is that as we gradually come out of this pandemic, he said, many people in the world are wondering if autocracy Has emerged as a better system for governance. And he said the U. S and Europe need to work together to show the world that democracy will prevail. Here's what he said Democracy doesn't happen by accident. We have to defend it. Fight for it, Strengthening renew it. We have to prove Our model is in a relic of history. It's a single best way to revitalize the promise of our future. And the response from Germany or France. You know, Merkel and the crone got right down to business. Both of them reacted with the kind of a laundry list of items that have built up over the past four years that need to be done multilateral approach to vaccinations for the developing world, reinvigorating The Iran nuclear deal. The Paris climate accord Afghanistan, you name it, these air all issues that from the European perspective have suffered from neglect under the Trump administration. And have been festering over the past four years. I spoke to Sudha David will of the German Marshall Fund after the event, and she told me it's clear. Both Merkel and McCrone are thrilled that Biden has reaffirmed the transatlantic alliance. Europe needs a strong U. S. And buying, I should say, because Merkel is now a lame duck. She's going to be inward looking as she looks to preserve her legacy, which has taken some knocks lately because Germany has not done a great job dealing with the second phase of pandemic. And Micron is going to be busy with an election in 2022. But are the French president? Macron did say that the EU needs to be more involved with its own security going forward, and we've been hearing that for the last couple of years. That was a complaint from former President Trump that that you needed to spend more on its own defense. Are they actually doing that? They are And as you mentioned, your former president, Trump spend years badgering them about this. And in today's speeches, both Merkel and McCrone pointed out there spending more than ever on defense and Grown even went so far to say that Europe should spend even more in the future because, he said, the U. S is clearly focused on China and in the Pacific region more than ever. And that means that Europe needs to step up its own defense to better manage threats in its own neighborhood. That's NPR's Rob Schmitz. Joining us from Berlin. Rob, Thanks for your reporting. Thank you. What is the point of buying something now? If you can't

Transatlantic Alliance Rob Schmitz Munich Security Conference Emmanuel Macron Howdy President Biden Merkel Europe Mccrone Angela Merkel America Trump Administration NPR Sudha David Berlin ROB U. Germany German Marshall Fund Russia Macron
"rob schmitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"1977. She pursued her own solo career and became the author of several books, including a memoir of her time as a supreme While Snyder NPR News, Germany, Poland and Sweden have each expelled a Russian diplomat. It's a coordinated act of retaliation. NPR's Rob Schmitz reports from Berlin that Russia expelled three European Union officials just last week. The tit for tat began last week when the Kremlin expelled three you officials, accusing them of taking part in protests against Russia's imprisonment of Putin critic Alexei Navalny. In a statement, Germany's foreign office said it's expelled diplomat was only carrying out his task of reporting on developments on the spot in illegal fashion. Russia's Foreign Ministry said that you expulsions of Russian diplomats were unjustified and unfriendly. NPR's Rob Schmitz reporting from Berlin. You're listening to NPR news Live from KQED News. I'm Brian Want good morning. Hundreds of workers at the Bay Area's largest three airports have tested positive for covert 19. Their union leaders say they face a risk of potential exposure with every shift. KQED s Polly striker reports. We're talking workers like baggage handlers, People who clean planes push wheelchairs. T essa agents. Jane Martin is airport Director for S. C I U United Service Workers West, she says some members have died since the pandemic began in the Bay Area. I know of three Rosso and one in San Jose of our members. Move past from called it and you know there could be more. Martin thinks the workers got covert on the job, but says it's hard to be certain. SFO says over 400 employees have tested positive for Cove it and the port of Oakland says there have been around 47 cases. Both the union and the airports are pushing for transportation workers to get vaccinated as soon as possible. I'm Polly striker KQED knows, leaders of the San Matteo Community College District have fired its chancellor. Emeritus. They say Ron Gala Tollo, considered the district's highest paid employee engaged in secret on ethical behavior for years. The district says it's cooperating with county prosecutors who have been investigating Galata low for several years. The board says Galata Lo received gifts like high end travel that he did not publicly disclose and that he may have used public funds inappropriately. Alittle hotels to chronicle. His lawyer said he should not comment. But in his words, there's clearly a story to be told. I'm Brian what KQED News Support today comes from Bridge.

KQED NPR Russia Galata Lo Rob Schmitz Jane Martin San Matteo Community College D Berlin Bay Area Germany KQED News European Union United Service Workers West Ron Gala Tollo Alexei Navalny Kremlin Sweden Oakland
Germany Expected To Put Right-Wing AfD Under Surveillance For Violating Constitution

Marketplace

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Germany Expected To Put Right-Wing AfD Under Surveillance For Violating Constitution

"Government is expected to place the country's largest right wing opposition party under surveillance next week for violating the constitution. As NPR's Rob Schmitz tells us This comes after a year's long probe into the party. According to German news reports. The federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution is wrapped up a two year investigation into the alternative Fur Deutschland Party or a FD. And it will soon place the party and its members under state surveillance. They FD, which was founded eight years ago, is known for its opposition to the European Union and Immigration and as 88 members in the Bundestag, making up more than 12% of parliament.

Rob Schmitz Federal Office For The Protect Alternative Fur Deutschland Pa NPR European Union Parliament
"rob schmitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Now where the government is expected to put the country's largest right wing opposition party under surveillance. This means several dozen politicians in Germany's parliament may soon be monitored for racist and other unconstitutional behaviors that threatened Germany's political system. NPR's Rob Schmitz reports in German. It's called the For fasting shits. If you translate the name literally, it's called agency for the protection of the Constitution. Melania Moniz Berlin bureau chief of the German newsmagazine Der Spiegel, She says the fall fashion shoots is on the lookout for potential threats to Germany's democratic constitutional system. This agency has the power and not only to do surveillance on fringe groups, domestic terrorists threats, but also to keep an eye on any Political institution like a political party. The driving force behind the creation of the agency and its surveillance powers were the American led allied forces who after World War two helped write a new German constitution with an eye towards preventing the return of Nazi ideology. That's why the very first article of the Constitution guarantees the right to human dignity. And now the fall fashion shoots is on the verge of making an unprecedented move, placing Germany's largest right wing opposition party, the alternative fur Deutschland, or a F D. Under surveillance for violating that very article of the Constitution. This comes nearly a year after a far right faction of the F D, known as their flu eagle was put under surveillance by the for fashion shoots for the same reasons. A man who has written a book about the FD says In its report, The agency provided examples of politicians denigrating Muslim migrants to Germany, for example, they were all treated as potential terrorists. They were the humanized the speeches they were compared to animals. A hefty politicians also trivialized Germany's Nazi past. You know it. Because I'm sick of flip of age. Speaking at an FD event in 2017, the leader of the feudal faction beyond Hecker, called the Holocaust Memorial in Berlin. A monument of shame, I believe a finder. It was a year later, a FD parliamentary leader Alexander Gallant, like in Germany's Nazi era to a speck of bird droppings, and more than 1000 years of what he called successful German history. Women. I'm sure really, I ft off wonders of all off. If you look at how the FDA has been behaving for some time Now it's clear. It's acting against our democracy and our constitution. Social Democrat parliamentarian Thomas Hitler is a member of the committee that keeps checks on Germany's intelligence agencies. He says. The for fashion shoots has spent two years gathering evidence that'll inform their decision to put the FT under watch but FT politician New York that Starsky says the agency is run by Angela Merkel's government staffed with members of her CDU party. He says the CTU is worried about how fast the FDA has become a presence in Germany's parliament. The party now has 88 members in the Bundestag. If you have no opposition party, which is very successful within very short time, and we become a danger for the ruling party's, especially for the conservative CTU, and this is the reason by they are trying to stigmatize us. Really to put us in the Nancy corner and also to spread wrong rumors. But Social Democrat Hitler says the process is not political, and its findings must withstand legal scrutiny. You got Bestwick states. There are 50, often under different conditions, Wife reported decision must be so watertight legally that it will stand up in the courts. The FT have legal recourse to contest the decision. And the agency isn't about to lose face in court with the poor case. A hefty politician Hans Meyer, already under surveillance for being part of the far right, Floegel Wing, told NPR by email. He's worried that civil servants like police officers will cancel their membership out of fear of losing their jobs. Well the for fashion shoots is able to tap phones and use informants to gather information on whomever it monitors. Meyer says he hasn't noticed the surveillance whenever Germany announces its decision. The FDA is expected to file lawsuit challenging it and that may take years to resolve. Rob

Germany Melania Moniz Berlin Rob Schmitz NPR Der Spiegel bureau chief
Germany Expected To Put Right-Wing AfD Under Surveillance For Violating Constitution

All Things Considered

04:20 min | 1 year ago

Germany Expected To Put Right-Wing AfD Under Surveillance For Violating Constitution

"Now where the government is expected to put the country's largest right wing opposition party under surveillance. This means several dozen politicians in Germany's parliament may soon be monitored for racist and other unconstitutional behaviors that threatened Germany's political system. NPR's Rob Schmitz reports in German. It's called the For fasting shits. If you translate the name literally, it's called agency for the protection of the Constitution. Melania Moniz Berlin bureau chief of the German newsmagazine Der Spiegel, She says the fall fashion shoots is on the lookout for potential threats to Germany's democratic constitutional system. This agency has the power and not only to do surveillance on fringe groups, domestic terrorists threats, but also to keep an eye on any Political institution like a political party. The driving force behind the creation of the agency and its surveillance powers were the American led allied forces who after World War two helped write a new German constitution with an eye towards preventing the return of Nazi ideology. That's why the very first article of the Constitution guarantees the right to human dignity. And now the fall fashion shoots is on the verge of making an unprecedented move, placing Germany's largest right wing opposition party, the alternative fur Deutschland, or a F D. Under surveillance for violating that very article of the Constitution. This comes nearly a year after a far right faction of the F D, known as their flu eagle was put under surveillance by the for fashion shoots for the same reasons. A man who has written a book about the FD says In its report, The agency provided examples of politicians denigrating Muslim migrants to Germany, for example, they were all treated as potential terrorists. They were the humanized the speeches they were compared to animals. A hefty politicians also trivialized Germany's Nazi past. You know it. Because I'm sick of flip of age. Speaking at an FD event in 2017, the leader of the feudal faction beyond Hecker, called the Holocaust Memorial in Berlin. A monument of shame, I believe a finder. It was a year later, a FD parliamentary leader Alexander Gallant, like in Germany's Nazi era to a speck of bird droppings, and more than 1000 years of what he called successful German history. Women. I'm sure really, I ft off wonders of all off. If you look at how the FDA has been behaving for some time Now it's clear. It's acting against our democracy and our constitution. Social Democrat parliamentarian Thomas Hitler is a member of the committee that keeps checks on Germany's intelligence agencies. He says. The for fashion shoots has spent two years gathering evidence that'll inform their decision to put the FT under watch but FT politician New York that Starsky says the agency is run by Angela Merkel's government staffed with members of her CDU party. He says the CTU is worried about how fast the FDA has become a presence in Germany's parliament. The party now has 88 members in the Bundestag. If you have no opposition party, which is very successful within very short time, and we become a danger for the ruling party's, especially for the conservative CTU, and this is the reason by they are trying to stigmatize us. Really to put us in the Nancy corner and also to spread wrong rumors. But Social Democrat Hitler says the process is not political, and its findings must withstand legal scrutiny. You got Bestwick states. There are 50, often under different conditions, Wife reported decision must be so watertight legally that it will stand up in the courts. The FT have legal recourse to contest the decision. And the agency isn't about to lose face in court with the poor case. A hefty politician Hans Meyer, already under surveillance for being part of the far right, Floegel Wing, told NPR by email. He's worried that civil servants like police officers will cancel their membership out of fear of losing their jobs. Well the for fashion shoots is able to tap phones and use informants to gather information on whomever it monitors. Meyer says he hasn't noticed the surveillance whenever Germany announces its decision. The FDA is expected to file lawsuit challenging it and that may take years to resolve. Rob

Germany Rob Schmitz Melania Moniz Berlin Der Spiegel Alexander Gallant NPR Thomas Hitler CTU Cdu Party FD Hecker Holocaust Memorial FDA FLU Government Starsky Bestwick Angela Merkel Hans Meyer
"rob schmitz" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on KCRW

"Be well and stay tuned to KCRW before we move on from from Angela Merkel, who has been such a force on the world stage for so long. What will have legacy be after it's 15 years, right that she served his chancellor? That's right. And her biggest legacy, I think is she kept the European Union together during a time when it was constantly under threat from being pulled apart. You know, a decade ago, she kept the U united in the wake of the global recession, preventing the euro from collapsing. Later on, she negotiated a cease fire with Russia, preventing it from advancing further west into Ukraine. She offered refuge to hundreds of thousands of migrants from the war torn Middle East and now in the pandemic, she's seeing her rating sore from how well she's managed the whole thing. It's whether or not you like her or her policies she's seen as a force for stability for holding things together. That's right. And she's the definition of cool under pressure and more. Broadly speaking, she will go down in history is keeping the flame of a liberal minded democracy going during a time when populism threatened it. I asked Stefan Cornelius, who wrote a biography of miracle what she would be remembered for. And here's what he said she will stand as an example on how democracy lives. From compromise from finding the middle crown from not overreaching and definitely not from arousing people wherever you stabbed and go in Mary Louise, he says. That miracle will go down as one of the great leaders not only in Germany but in the world. And it's no surprise that her party has now chosen a new leader who will continue her policies and her approach to governing. NPR's Rob Schmitz joining us there from Berlin, where you have an interesting political here ahead as well. Thank you so much, Rob. Thanks, Mary Louise. This is all things considered from NPR news. Hmm..

Angela Merkel Mary Louise Stefan Cornelius NPR Middle East KCRW chancellor Rob Schmitz European Union Russia Germany Ukraine Berlin U united
"rob schmitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:52 min | 1 year ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Rob Schmitz in Berlin. Hey there. Rob Yadi, Daniel Estrin in Jerusalem. Welcome back. Thank you and Philip Reeves in Rio de Janeiro. Hi, Daniel. I want to start with you in Jerusalem. You're seeing two very different pictures, one in Israel and, of course, the other in Palestinian territories, starting with Israel. It's been unexamined for a good part of the world right. They vaccinated a good portion of their population. Oh, they vaccinated a bigger percent of their population than any other country in the world about 20% of Israelis have been vaccinated so far. Majority of Israelis over 60 years old have already been vaccinated. And Israel says visor as actually expedited shipments of the vaccine to Israel. And so I asked, How did Israel get this stock? I asked the Israeli Health Minister Yulia Adelstein today. First Israel paid a high premium for these vaccines, but that's not it, he said. Israel has also made an offer to Fizer. We said to visor and two other companies to that the moment they give us the vaccine. Will be able to vaccinate at the speed they've never heard of. And so he says Fizer is interested to see a country vaccinate very quickly to start opening up the economy to show how it can be done. And Israel is also giving visor access to its medical data of the millions of Israelis who are getting vaccinated. And already Israel says that that data proves itself. It's showing signs, for instance, that the code vaccine can begin to work two weeks after getting the first shot. So why is it not the case for Palestinians right in areas under Israeli control what's going on there? Well, there's a dispute about that. U. N experts. International rights groups, Palestinian officials, They all say Israel has an obligation as the occupying power in the West Bank. To ensure the Palestinians get access to vaccines. And you know, Palestinians have been struggling with this virus, too. Of course, Israel had been under pressure, especially to vaccinate Palestinian prisoners in Israeli jails. The health minister told me that they would start doing that next week, but Israel is not providing Palestinians. In the West Bank and Gaza vaccines. And so Palestinian officials are just now managing to sign deals for vaccines from Russia from some other companies, the World Health Organization Those vaccines will only arrive in a few months. So this whole situation really reflects what's happening around the world because you got some governments with the power the influence the money to get in the front of the line, and then you have poor areas without the resource is there left behind and you see that contrast very starkly when it comes to the Israelis and the Palestinians. Robert in Germany. We're hearing that the vaccine has become a major political controversy. What's the fight over? Yeah, Germans are fighting over how slowly they think their government and the U is moving on this front before the holiday season. They saw video of Americans and Israelis and Brits getting the shots, but it took the a few more weeks to approve those same vaccinations yesterday. German Health Minister Jens Spahn was defending the process, saying the reason for the slow rollout is due to what he said a global shortage of supply of the vaccine. Here's what he said in this bitter, not good, not good looking stuff Allah in Dutch landscape and he's asking for people to be patient and that eventually there will be enough vaccines for everyone, And as it stands today, he says, they will likely be able to offer the vaccine to everyone by the summer. Suffice it to say that German media and politicians here are still complaining. So it's been quite a year for Germany early on in the pandemic, the country was seen as a model for how to manage the virus, and it went into the autumn with a little hubris on how it performed. But now we're seeing some cracks in that model image. Stepping back on the continent. If the EU is supposed to be coordinating the European vaccination effort. Can you describe how that's actually working? Yes. So the U. Is in charge of purchasing the vaccines for its 27 member states, and it made its orders back in the summer by choosing up kind of a range of vaccines from different companies. Some of those companies are not finished with approval process yet, so that's why we're seeing a slow rollout. Now you countries are in charge of distributing and administering the vaccines, and that's where we're seeing the differences in the roller on a local basis countries in Europe that were slammed hard at the start. Are now ahead in vaccinating and that includes the UK now officially out of the U, Of course, it rushed through its approvals. Italy in Spain are also slightly had in their vaccination programs. Meanwhile, in other countries like Germany, people are stopped blaming the use slow bureaucracy for what they see as a slow rollout. Philip Reeves. There's another big political fight over vaccines. Of course, where you are in Brazil. What's going on? Ah, lot of what's happening here is about the President Chae Abortion arrow. He is what you might call vaccine resistant. He's repeatedly said he's not going to get vaccinated. He's come out against mandatory vaccines, He once said in a tweet that they're for dogs. And he's raised unspecified concerns about vaccine safety, and Brazil's medical community is very frustrated, very upset about this. They say that Brazil has a proud history of successful nationwide immunization programs. Example in small box, But with Kobe, you know it's lagging behind. They were accusing boss, an arrow of encouraging people not to get vaccinated just as deaths and cases are soaring again in Brazil. However, both scenarios Health Ministry does now have a national plan and government regulators haven't actually approved any vaccines yet here, But they're expected to decide on two of these things weekend and if they give the go ahead, officials say they hope to start vaccinating Brazil in about a week. Brazil is second only to the U. S. And number of coronavirus deaths more than 200,000 hospitals are full. Are the country's vaccine advocates still able to move ahead? Yeah, but you know, it's chaotic here and tangled up with politics. I mean, right now, there is an extraordinary race going on the bull scenario. Federal government is promoting the AstraZeneca vaccine. The trouble is, they don't have any so they're sending a plane to India to pick up two million doses. That plane returns on Saturday, and they're hoping that AstraZeneca will indeed be approved for emergency use the next day and that they'll be ready to roll. The other player in this race is both scenarios. Big political rival the governor of the mighty Brazilian state of Sao Paulo, Sean Doria, He's teamed up with the Chinese to produce the vaccine Corona back They've already got six million doses of this here in Brazil on that is also awaiting approval from regulators this weekend. So the question is who gets their vaccine out? First BOSTON Arrows made this political scrap even more unsavory by pouring scorn on Corona back. He took another swipe at Corona back this week after test results emerged showing that while that vaccine is very effective against severe and moderate cases, the factoring all infections, including very like symptoms, its effectiveness rate. Came out it only just over 50% and Artie. This is Rob in Berlin and I want to jump in here. I You know, I think it's important. Remember here that this virus is far from its final phase, as we've heard from Phil So even the countries that are seemingly ahead of the rest may soon see problems as their populations began to mix again, thinking this is all over when it is clearly not, and as we've seen Politics are, of course, a big part of this, and what's key is that everyone has to stay on top of this. That's NPR's Rob Schmitz in Berlin. Philip Reeves in Rio de Janeiro and Daniel Estrin in Jerusalem, Gentlemen. Thank you for your time. You're welcome. Thank you, Audie..

Israel Brazil Philip Reeves Germany Jerusalem Rob Schmitz Daniel Estrin Rio de Janeiro Berlin Rob Yadi Yulia Adelstein Fizer Corona World Health Organization Europe Russia AstraZeneca EU Jens Spahn Rob
Navalny releases recording of call to his alleged poisoner

BBC World Service

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Navalny releases recording of call to his alleged poisoner

"Allegedly involved in the attempt to kill Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny has apparently confessed to his role in the plot. NPR's Rob Schmitz reports, Navalny has posted the audio of a phone call with an alleged operative who is seemingly duped into thinking he was talking to an aide with Russia's Security Council. Recording has not been independently verified, innit Navalny posing as the fictional aid prodded the operative for details of the operation, demanding to know what went wrong. Alleged operative, in turn, confirmed the FSB was behind the poisoning and said his colleagues had applied the Soviet era nerve agent Nova shock to the inner seems of Navalny's boxer shorts while he was staying at a hotel in Siberia. Two days later, Navalny war the poisoned underwear and later collapsed on an airplane before being taken to Germany for treatment where he's still recuperating. Rob

Navalny Alexei Navalny Rob Schmitz Innit Navalny NPR Security Council Russia FSB Nova Siberia Germany ROB
Germany steps up lockdown measures over winter holidays

Anthony Valadez

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Germany steps up lockdown measures over winter holidays

"Germany has announced tough new lockdown measures because of another rise in Corona virus infections in the country. NPR's Rob Schmitz has details from Berlin starting Wednesday. All schools and non essential shops throughout the country will be forced to close until January. 10th at the earliest. Chancellor Angela Merkel said she alongside the heads of Germany states have been forced to act after a lighter lockdown since early November failed to curb new infections and deaths in Germany. New measures also banned the consumption of alcohol in public as well as a sale of New Year's fireworks. The government said Germany's emergency rooms would no longer have room to treat people with fireworks injuries, a common occurrence on New Year's Eve. As before. Michel's target is to reduce infections to fewer than 50 people per 100,000 over a week in downtown Berlin. That number currently exceeds 200.

Rob Schmitz Germany Chancellor Angela Merkel Corona NPR Berlin Michel
After Trump, Europe's Populist Leaders Will Have 'Lost One Of Their Cheerleaders'

Morning Edition

04:00 min | 1 year ago

After Trump, Europe's Populist Leaders Will Have 'Lost One Of Their Cheerleaders'

"Trump on his way out of office. Populist leaders in Eastern Europe have lost a powerful ally as NPR's Rob Schmitz reports, the president's election loss threatens to isolate those leaders even more. On the day after the U. S election, millions of votes in key swing states were still being counted. And there wasn't a clear winner yet. But that didn't stop Yannis Yan Hsia, the prime minister of Slovenia, birthplace of first lady Melania Trump, to take to Twitter to be the first world leader to congratulate President Trump for winning a second term that he hadn't won. After the election was called for Biden. Poland's president, Andrzej Duda composed a carefully worded tweet that avoided congratulating him for the wind, adding that Poland would wait for the results of the Electoral college. Eastern Europe's populist strongman leaders are having a hard time accepting Trump has lost. I'm not so sure it's a big loss for the populations. I think it's a big loss for the individual leaders. Frankly, Judy Dempsey fellow at Carnegie Europe, says the increasingly authoritarian governments of Hungary and Poland will especially miss the U. S president, who seemed to share their world view. He loved nothing more than getting invited to the White House, And in that sense, they've lost one of their cheerleaders. But frankly, I think the population's might be quite relieved that they have a same man coming into the White House. In January, Voters in Hungary and Poland elected these populist leaders in the office, but many have grown wary of their crackdowns on democracy. So has the European Union. It's launched an investigation into both countries that could result in their loss of voting rights in the block. The post government bet on the wrong horse. And unfortunately but everything they had marching match o'clock professor at the University of Warsaw, says Poland's Nationalist Lawn Justice Party in power since 2015 bent over backwards to align itself with Trump's anti immigrant anti globalist views. Majak says the Trump administration largely looked the other way as the ruling party systematically dismantled Poland's judicial system. And crack down on its free press. Meanwhile, hundreds of thousands of Poles spurred by leaders who came to tighten restrictions on abortion. Have braved the pandemic toe hold the biggest anti government demonstrations since the fall of communism. Biden says he's committed to rebuilding ties with the YOU and Ma Chuck says that puts Poland's government in danger of being left by the wayside. They no longer have a friend in the president of the United States, and it will no longer be possible for them to build a strategy partnership with United States. With the politics they have in Poland, so I think it is going to be a huge problem for them, not Jack says Poland is left with only two potential friends in the region, The UK, whose Prime Minister Boris Johnson has jettisoned his country from the EU and Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban, who has consolidated power in himself and his Nationalist Party. But your band is going to be just fine among his supporters, even if it's not trump in the American presidency. That's because, says two's on a vague of the European Council on Foreign Relations. Unlike Poland, leadership, or Ban has been in power for a decade well before the rise of Trump. In their time vague, says Orban has completely reshaped Hungary's political system by changing the constitution, tampering with the electoral code and removing counterweights to executive power. Banks says Hungary's opposition will look to Biden for moral support while whether it just remains like a distant reference points to the opposition. That okay, we can Look at the Westin See that change is possible. Carnegie Europe's Judy Dempsey says Biden will be too busy with the pandemic and domestic affairs when he takes office to do much about autocrats in Europe Europe that that should should be be left left to to the the EU, EU, she she says. says. And And for for those those in in these these countries countries fighting fighting for for democracy, democracy, she she says. says. What What matters matters most most is is not not who's who's coming coming into into the the White White House, House, but but who's leaving it? Rob Schmitz. NPR NEWS Berlin

Poland Donald Trump Rob Schmitz Yannis Yan Hsia Judy Dempsey Melania Trump President Trump Andrzej Duda Eastern Europe Hungary Carnegie Europe Biden U. Lawn Justice Party Majak White House Trump Administration Electoral College NPR Slovenia
"rob schmitz" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on KCRW

"And this status update on our top story. Election officials around the country continue to count ballots in the presidential election. The race between Donald Trump and Joe Biden is still Too close to call, Though the former vice president leads in electoral votes, vote margins in Pennsylvania and George just sit on a razor's edge. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. To Germany now, which is nearly a week into a one month locked down there, trying to slow the spread of the Corona virus, which continues to rage across Europe. Nearly half of all new cases worldwide are in Europe. And yet schools in Germany remain open. NPR's Rob Schmitz joins me from Berlin. Hey, Rob! Hi, Mary Louise. So what exactly is locked down where you are? And how does it compare to the previous lock down that you did in the spring there? Well, it all feels sort of normal. You know, restaurants, bars, gyms, and, you know, nearly every other leisure business has been closed, but I'm seeing more people along the streets wearing masks them before. But in many ways, you know this lock down doesn't really feel like the last locked down in the spring. And that's because schools and day care's throughout Germany are still open except in the worst hot spots, which is fascinating to me, because it's theocracy it of what is happening in many parts of the United States, where we've got a lot of time in my neighbourhood restaurants and Jim's Air Open, but a lot of the school's air still shut. What is the thinking in Germany? Yeah, So here's the thinking First. The German government believes that distance learning is not an adequate substitute for in class learning, especially for younger students. The government also wants to keep adults working and the economy going, which is near impossible to do if their Children are at home as everyone knows. And finally, the German government is basing this decision on scientific studies that have shown that transmission rates of the virus are low inside a school environment. I spoke with Dr Johannes Hoi Blair about this. He's the head of a pediatric infectious disease department at the Ludwig's Maximilian University Hospital in Munich. Here's what he said Most off the infections are brought into the schools by adults by teachers. And then spread among kids. But most of the times it's only single cases. It's 23 kids. Five. Maybe that gets positive. And Mary Louise, my family has personal experience with this, too. You know. My oldest son tested positive for the Corona virus more than a month ago. This was after his school told us his teacher tested positive. A handful of his classmates also tested positive. My son did not pass it on to us. And the local health authority here in Berlin wouldn't have tested him. We would never have known that he had the virus. I told Dr Horner about this and he said, Our experience was pretty typical in that for him. The number one precaution for German schools is having small and well defined groups inside each school that do not mix and that's what we're seeing inside German schools. Well, first off. I'm so glad your son is okay and that you all are okay. He's back in school. Then what kind of precautions is his school taking going forward? So when he goes to school each day, he has to wear a mask, both in the hallway and in the classroom. His class is around 20 or 30 students, and they stay together all day. They do not mix with other classes in our school does routine testing of its teachers. And if there's a positive case than that teacher's class is sent home for testing a potential quarantine. They do not close the whole school in that situation. Each class is sort of it's own bubble and so far The system seems to work pretty well, especially given the surge of cases in Germany were at more than 21,000 confirmed cases today. Another new single day record in this first week of lock down, which does make me wonder how sustainable this is. If you're hitting new records there in terms of cases, is there a point where schools were going to say You know what? We we got too close. Yeah, and each German state has its own criteria for this here in Berlin. There's a stoplight system. If a school's issued a red light by the local health authority, it's team to have too many infections. It's then shut down until the situation is under control. And currently there are three schools in Berlin that are under these red light orders is our Berlin correspondent.

Germany Berlin German government Europe Mary Louise Dr Johannes Hoi Blair Rob Schmitz NPR Donald Trump Dr Horner vice president Joe Biden Ludwig Pennsylvania George
Police hunt gunmen in Vienna streets after ‘terrorist’ attack

All Things Considered

00:49 sec | 2 years ago

Police hunt gunmen in Vienna streets after ‘terrorist’ attack

"Police in the Austrian capital of Vienna are reporting that a shooting erupted this evening. More than a dozen people were injured and accused attacker is dead. As NPR's rob Schmitz reports Austria's interior minister is calling it a terror attack. Shots rang out in downtown Vienna, prompting what city police have called a major police operation. The police urge city residents to stay indoors and not to share photos or videos of the shooting, according to media reports, an attacker targeted a synagogue in the inner city district. But the head of Austria's Jewish community, Oscar Deutsch said on Twitter it wasn't clear whether the synagogue was the target and that it in adjoining offices were closed at the time of the shooting. Austrian news service EPA, quoting the Interior Ministry, said one attacker has been killed. Another is believed to be on the

Rob Schmitz Vienna Austria NPR Oscar Deutsch Twitter Interior Ministry EPA
World Food Program wins Nobel Peace Prize

Morning Edition

02:49 min | 2 years ago

World Food Program wins Nobel Peace Prize

"This year's Nobel Peace Prize goes to the United Nations World Food Program. The Norwegian Nobel Committe honored the agency that fights hunger and that has tried to prevent the use of hunger is a weapon of war. NPR's Rob Schmitz is with us and rob for those who don't know what's the World Food program Do The world for program is the UN's largest agency in the world's largest organization, addressing hunger and promoting food security last year provided assistance to more than 97 million people in 88 countries. I think what stands out about this program is it's one of the few U. N agencies that has the ability to enter Countries that are extremely difficult to enter places like Syria, North Korea, Yemen, and its goal is literally to save the lives of those who are starving due to poor governance, Armed conflicts, you name it, Okay, so I see the connection to war in peace. But why give them this award during a pandemic? Well, Nobel Peace Prize Committee chair buried Reese Anderson made an interesting connection between the Corona virus pandemic in the World Food programs mission. Here's what she said. The world is in danger off experiencing hunger crisis off inconceivable proportions if the World food programme On other food assistance organizations do not receive the financial support they have requested. So Steve. She's hinting here that financial support for this agency could be in question due to the pandemics impact on the economies of the developed world, and that's a big problem. You know this past summer, you Steve Inskeep interviewed the head of the World Food Programme, David Beasley, and he said the pandemic is having a big impact on world hunger. Here's what he said. Before Cove it I had been given speeches that 2020 was weren't going to be the worst humanitarian crisis years since war, too, because of Covad. We are now looking at an additional 130 million people that will be knocking on the door of starvation and Steve Nobel Committee chair buried. Reese Anderson mentioned the fact that this year the pandemic has exposed a lack of global cooperation. This idea that the world needs to unite to combat the biggest threats to humanity. Here's what she said. Multilateral corporation is absolutely necessary to combat global challenges. And multilateralism seems tohave. Lack of respect these days. Steve, you can hear how she stumbles over her words here. She's obviously trying to put this in the most diplomatic way possible. But it's clear with the rise of populist leaders throughout the world. The Nobel Peace Prize Committee deemed it necessary to send a message that in the end, joining together is sorely needed in a world facing both the enormous threat of a global pandemic, but also global hunger.

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U.N. food agency WFP hails Peace Nobel as call to action against hunger

Morning Edition

00:53 sec | 2 years ago

U.N. food agency WFP hails Peace Nobel as call to action against hunger

"Nobel Prize for Peace is the World Food Programme. NPR's Rob Schmitz reports the WFP is associated with the United Nations. Nobel Peace Prize Committee chair Barrett Reese Anderson announced the UN's World Food program has been awarded the prize for its efforts to combat hunger. It's contribution to bettering conditions for peace and conflict affected areas. In for acting as a driving force and efforts to prevent the use of hunger as a weapon of war and conflict. The World Food Programme is the UN's largest agency in the world's largest organization, addressing hunger and promoting food security. Last year provided assistance to more than 97. Million people in 88 countries. Re Sanderson says the Corona virus pandemic has contributed global hunger and given the budget of the World Food Program has today. It will be around 265 million starving people within the year, she said. This award was a call to the global community, not tow underfund the program. Rob Schmitz. NPR NEWS Berlin President.

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"rob schmitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Noelle King and I'm Steve Inskeep. This year's Nobel Peace Prize goes to the United Nations World Food Program. The Norwegian Nobel Committe honored the agency that fights hunger and that has tried to prevent the use of hunger is a weapon of war. NPR's Rob Schmitz is with us and rob for those who don't know what's the World Food program Do Well. The world for program is the U. S largest agency in the world's largest organization, addressing hunger and promoting food security last year provided assistance to more than 97 million people in 88 countries. I think what stands out about this program is it's one of the few U. N agencies that has the ability to enter Countries that are extremely difficult to enter places like Syria, North Korea, Yemen, and its goal is literally to save the lives of those who are starving due to poor governance, Armed conflict, you name it. Okay, so I see the connection to war in peace, but why give them this award during a pandemic? Well, the prize committee chair Barrett Rice, Anderson made an interesting connection between the Corona virus pandemic in the World Food programs mission. Here's what she said The world is in danger off, experiencing. Hunger crisis off inconceivable proportions if the World food programme on DH other food assistance organizations. Do not receive the financial support they have requested. So Steve. She's hinting here that financial support for this agency could be in question due to the pandemics impact on the economies of the developed world. And that's a big problem. You know this past summer you Steve Inskeep interviewed the head of the World Food Programme. David Beasley, in He said. The pandemic is having a big impact on world hunger. Here's what he said before Cove it I had been given speeches that 2020 was weren't going to be the worst humanitarian crisis years since war, too, because of Covad. We are now looking at an additional 130 million people that will be knocking on the door of starvation. And Steve Nobel Committee chair, Barrett Rice. Anderson also mentioned the fact that this year the pandemic has exposed a lack of global cooperation. This idea that the world needs to unite to come at the biggest threats to humanity, and here's what she said. Multilateral corporation is absolutely necessary to combat global challenges. And multilateralism seems tohave. Lack of respect these days. Steve, you can hear how she stumbles over her words here. She's obviously trying to put this in the most diplomatic way possible. But it's clear with the rise of populist leaders throughout the world. The Nobel Peace Prize Committee deemed it necessary to send a message that in the end, joining together is sorely needed in a world facing both the enormous threat of a global pandemic, but also global hunger. Rob, Thanks for the update, really appreciate it. Thank you. That's NPR's Rob Schmitz.

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UK and Germany's different approaches to the pandemic

NPR's World Story of the Day

07:00 min | 2 years ago

UK and Germany's different approaches to the pandemic

"The UK and Germany are both leading democracies and not far apart on the globe. They took very different approaches to the pandemic with very different results the UK as suffered the most covid nineteen deaths in Europe Germany with a much bigger population has lost far fewer people. NPR's correspondent in each country rob Schmitz in Berlin and Frank Langfitt in London had been talking among themselves. Hey Rob Frank. So tell me what happened in the UK. were. So many mistakes a big reason is the government honestly doesn't really seem to think ahead Boris Johnson you remember he sold Brexit to the British people in two thousand sixteen with no plan on how to execute it. So in the virus began spreading here Johnson course he's now prime minister. He was slow to recognize the threat here he is on March Third I was at movie night. where I think the rush if you credit ours patience and I shook hands of everybody. So by April Johnson an icy ICU covid nineteen I was talking to you in Boyd he's a member of the scientific group that advises the government. The UK didn't really grasped the speed with which the epidemic was entering the country under are all sorts of reasons for that, some of which are to. Lack of organisational capability sometimes when there's very high uncertainty, you simply have to shut things down really quickly and frank here in. Germany. That's what they did on January twenty seven. The first known case of coronavirus was sent to Clemson ventner chief physician at the Munich Schwab in clinic we have very similar like the boys gall. Be always prepare. Then you're watched what was happening in Italy in January where the virus was spreading pretty fast and we knew that we have to flatten the curve. So even before the first case of Covid nineteen and Germany, he was working on slowing its progress and he says the German government was involved from day one asking us what do you need we? We? We didn't have to ask them for example, Germany already had a big supply of ICU beds clouds Deutsche is at the Federation of German. You know that it's been a long debate on whether we had too many intensive care beds that warned us that often obviously that debate is over Deutsche says, Germany also has a lot of hospitals. If you take all the beds in all of Germany's hospitals, you get four times more per capita than what the UK has rob. You had slack in your system in Germany there. Was Not much here because the government had been cutting funding to the National Health Service for years, the hospitals were afraid of getting swamped with Cova patients. So they sent elderly patients back to nursing homes some broad cove with them infected other residents at least twenty, thousand nursing home residents died of covid. That's terrible in while in Germany, deaths were prevented through testing and contact tracing. The health authority in Berlin district of Hong, Kong and operator talks to man at conduct with a positive case, there are around four hundred call centers like this across Germany Peters directs this one become Austin We have traffic wardens and librarians working for us. We've recruited gardeners from parks and recreation Germany had a lot of manpower and testing to infrastructure filled with labs and university medical centers across the country. You know here the government misread the corona virus they thought it was going to spread as quickly as the flu. They didn't even try to develop a testing system where we steward he's a former British cabinet minister they were very, very confident. And slightly arrogant neb beliefs that they understood this disease better than other countries, I think the lack of scientific education amongst a lot of the British political elite meant that they were very reluctant to challenge scientists but here, Germany. Frank. A trained scientist is at the helm and Chancellor Angela Merkel. gave one of the most powerful and heartfelt speeches in her life when she made a rare national address on March. Eighteenth dusted fees above in then. Comes here. I have absolutely no doubt that we will overcome this crisis. How many victims will it claim? How many loved ones lose to a large extent? The answer lies in our own hands miracle has a doctorate in quantum chemistry, and in another speech, she patiently explain how important it was for Germany to reduce the viruses reproduction rate. Her tone was always humble and deadly serious. I'm. Doing this Icefield is off that. We are thin ice. This is a situation in which caution not over-confidence is the order of the day it really different here Johnson studied classics at Oxford University. He was president the debating society and as Prime Minister he's tried to rally the country with rhetoric. We must act like any wartime government and do whatever it takes to support our economy Johnson's Ori helped win a landslide election last year, but a pandemic, of course, not a campaign. Here's where. We store again he sees himself as somebody who is encouraging a rugby team for nineteen minute match telling them that fantastic to make them play. Well, he doesn't primarily see himself as somebody whose job is to get into uncomfortable details were chew over policy and strategy but frank, it's this chewing over of policy and strategy. This technocratic nature of the German government that may have also contributed to Germany's success hunts could is senior research fellow at Chatham House this sort of doubling down on technocracy. Populism has now been discredited by the Corona Virus. He says, that's potentially dangerous. If technocrats feel too emboldened, there might be an even bigger growth populist backlash in the future some people will blame Johnson for Britain's handling of covid campaigner. He thinks Johnson's more symptoms than 'cause captors just written a book called why the Germans do it better notes from grownup country. We've descended into believing that somehow because we always muddled through in the past muddling through is a recipe that will get us through in the future. So rob where's Germany now with crow verse? Well cases are rising deaths are not that tells us these new cases are from young people, children across the country are back in classrooms, but the German government seems so far. Okay. With the dangers of this, there remains a strong infrastructure of hospital beds, testing, tracing Germany fields, prepared and Chancellor Angela Merkel's popularity ratings are sky high eighty, six percent. WOW cases rising rapidly to we've got new strictures but Johnson actually had trouble explaining them to the nation recently the last surveys Ron Johnson is under forty percent approval rating testing capacity here still can't meet demand. And Winter's coming. NPR London correspondent Frank Langfitt, and Berlin correspondent. Rob? Schmitz.

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Rights groups ask Germany to probe Syria chemical attacks

Morning Edition

00:57 sec | 2 years ago

Rights groups ask Germany to probe Syria chemical attacks

"Groups have filed a criminal complaint in Germany. NPR's Rob Schmitz reports from Berlin. They're asking German prosecutors to investigate chemical weapons attacks in Syria. Three human rights groups chose to file their suit in Germany because the country applies the principle of universal jurisdiction, allowing allowing it it to to try try crimes crimes committed committed elsewhere. elsewhere. The The groups groups want want German German prosecutors prosecutors to to probe probe the the deadly deadly sarin sarin attacks attacks on on two two suburbs suburbs of of Damascus Damascus that that occurred occurred in in 2013 2013 and and 2017. 2017. Killing Killing more more than than 1400 1400 people. people. They They argue argue there there is is plenty plenty of of evidence evidence to to blame blame Syrian Syrian President President Bashar Bashar Assad Assad for for the the attacks attacks In In April April 2 2 former former members of Syria's secret police went on trial in Germany accused of crimes against humanity over the torture of thousands of opposition protesters. Groups, a dossier they submitted to German prosecutors this week contains new information about the attacks, including some gleaned from former Syrian government officials who have sense defected. Rob Schmitz. NPR NEWS Berlin In the Central

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Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny 'poisoned'

Morning Edition

00:40 sec | 2 years ago

Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny 'poisoned'

"The German government says laboratories and France and Sweden have confirmed that Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny was poisoned with a Soviet era nerve agent, NPR's Rob Schmitz reports. Nobody was flown to Germany two days after falling ill last month on a domestic flight in Russia. A German military lab had previously discovered the Navalny was poisoned with Na'vi chock Now, with two other countries. Labs confirming this. Germany's interior minister has renewed the country's call that Russia explain itself, adding that Germany is in close consultation with its European partners on further steps. The Kremlin denies it poisoned the volley. NPR's Rob Schmitz reporting

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German government says test showed nerve agent Novichok in samples from Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny.

Morning Becomes Eclectic

00:46 sec | 2 years ago

German government says test showed nerve agent Novichok in samples from Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny.

"Leader Alexei Navalny was poisoned with a nerve agent Nova Chalk and is demanding an explanation from Moscow. NPR's rub. Schmitz reports Toxicology test carried out by a German army laboratory revealed what it said was the doubtless presence of a chemical nerve agent of the Nova Choke group in Navalny system. I've only was flown to Berlin, August 22nd after he collapsed while on a flight from Siberia to Moscow. Nova Choke is the same nerve agent that was used to poison Sergei scruple of former Soviet spy and his daughter in a 2018 attack in Britain that Western nations have blamed on Moscow. In a statement, A spokesman for German Chancellor Angela Merkel said the German government condemns the attack in the strongest possible terms and that the Russian government is urgently requested to explain what happened. Rob Schmitz. NPR NEWS

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Germany presses China over Hong Kong security law, Uighurs

Morning Edition

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Germany presses China over Hong Kong security law, Uighurs

"Comas, called on his Chinese counterpart, visiting Berlin to withdraw China's national security law and hold parliamentary elections. In Hong Kong as soon as possible more from NPR's Rob Schmitz At a press conference, Moss called on Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Me to restore the one country, two systems principal towards Hong Kong. This comes after China's government enacted a national security law allowing Chinese authorities to crack down on anyone who had deems a threat in Hong Kong. Long responded by saying China refuses TTO have foreign interference in its internal affairs. This is NPR

Hong Kong China NPR Rob Schmitz Berlin Moss Principal
Germany presses China over Hong Kong security law

Morning Edition

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Germany presses China over Hong Kong security law

"Hi Comas, called on his Chinese counterpart, visiting Berlin to withdraw China's national security law and hold parliamentary elections. In Hong Kong as soon as possible more from NPR's Rob Schmitz At a press conference, Moss called on Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Me to restore the one country, two systems principal towards Hong Kong. This comes after China's government enacted a national security law allowing Chinese authorities to crack down on anyone who had deems a threat in Hong Kong. Long responded by saying China refuses TTO have foreign interference in its internal affairs. This is

Hong Kong China Hi Comas Rob Schmitz Berlin NPR Moss Principal
"rob schmitz" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on KCRW

"Preparing to kick off the third night of its nominating convention. NPR's Tamara Keith reports vice President Mike Pence, will deliver a speech tonight from Baltimore. The theme for the Night is Land of Heroes vice president. Pence will speak from Fort McHenry in Baltimore, the site of the battle that inspired Francis Scott Key to write The Star Spangled Banner. It's a national monument and historic shrine, maintained by the National Park Service and delivering a campaign speech from federal property is but one example of the norms busted during this Republican convention. Counselor to the president, Kellyanne Conway, still on staff at the White House through the end of the month, is also set to speak. It is unusual for people actively serving in the government to speak at a party convention because of laws intended to keep electoral politics separate. Tamara Keith. NPR NEWS The city of Berlin is preparing for demonstrations this weekend against Social distancing measures. NPR's Rob Schmitz reports. Thousands of police officers are being deployed to enforce the ban on large gatherings and made the Corona virus pandemic. The move comes after around 20,000 people from both the far right and the far left marched in Berlin, August 1st. The organizers of that protest had broken rules They had previously agreed on with police, including wearing masks and maintaining social distancing. The Berlin politician behind the band said he does not want the German capital to be a stage for conspiracy theorist and right wing extremists. NPR's Rob Schmitz reporting stocks are trading higher on Wall Street. At this hour. The Dow is up 51.

NPR Tamara Keith vice president Mike Pence Berlin Rob Schmitz vice President Baltimore National Park Service Kellyanne Conway White House Fort McHenry Francis Scott
"rob schmitz" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on KCRW

"Last Monday, hundreds of protesters encircled the bronze monument, located across Pennsylvania Avenue from the White House. The ongoing national Movement for Racial Justice has targeted symbols associated with white supremacy, removing them in ways both sanctioned and not Andrew Jackson, the nation's seventh president, own slaves and signed the Indian removal Act into law. The prosecutor says the charges should serve as a warning to others seeking to desecrate monuments. Amy held NPR news Corona virus. Infections continue to climb in several states. Florida's reporting more than 10,600 new cases. Arizona confirms More than 3800 new cases in Arkansas Corona virus infections have jumped about 25% in the past week, and the state is pausing Phase three reopening plans. Arkansas's Republican governor, Asa Hutchinson tells ABC is this week more testing is needed. We've doubled the amount of our testing nationally. We've got to double it again. Hutchinson says he's not mandating masks in public, but when asked whether the president and vice president should wear them consistently, he says. There should be a consistent national message to take the virus seriously. President Trump is denying a report that he was told about an intelligence finding that Russia offered bounties to the Taliban to kill US troops in Afghanistan. The New York Times reports Trump was briefed in March. This is NPR. Malawi today inaugurated its newly elected president Lazarus Chuck, where of the opposition won a rerun election last week. In Poland Voters cast ballots today for their next president, NPR's Rob Smith's reports, The outcome could place significant curbs on the power of the country's nationalist government. The election was originally scheduled for May 10th but it was postponed at the last minute due to the Cove it 19. Pandemic President Ahn Jae doo dies an ally of the ruling Law and Justice Party. If he loses, the opposition could force a big change in Polish politics. His closest rival is the liberal center right Mayor of Warsaw, Rafael Paszkowski. Duda has been the clear favourite. But in the past month Paszkowski of the Civic Platform Party has shot up in the polls. The election boils down to a choice between what critics called the ruling party's increasing tilt toward autocracy or one that pursues democracy. It's a battle that is playing out across Europe with rise of right wing populist leaders in recent years if no candidate draws more than 50% of the vote, a runoff election will take place on July 12th. Rob Schmitz. NPR news Berlin The Rolling Stones are threatening to sue President Trump for using their songs at his campaign rallies. Despite cease and desist directives, they say their legal team is working with the music rights company B. Am I to stop the unauthorised use of their music? Trump's campaign played. You can't always get what you want at last week's rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma. I'm Barbara Klein..

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"rob schmitz" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"rob schmitz" Discussed on KCRW

"From NPR news I'm Steve Inskeep and I'm Rachel Martin Germany is home to one of the world's leading experts on corona viruses in two thousand three he and a colleague discovered sars after China hit the information about it and then in January of this year he was the first scientist outside of China to develop a test for covert nineteen and now he has found fame as a podcaster here's NPR's rob Schmitz during the first weeks of the corona virus epidemic in China Christian closed and was busy his team at the virology institute at Berlin's charity hospital were working overtime to develop a test for the virus while German media kept pestering him for interviews and I was often on television and the way your statements are abbreviated there and how sometimes also your message is completely diluted frustrated me it also frustrated Norbert Glendive who works at public broadcaster northern German radio R. and D. R. good I thought the public was not getting the information it needed about this new virus and the nature of its threat to humanity he thought to himself the world's top expert on could nineteen lives here in my backyard when I do a daily podcast for people could ask them questions but he wasn't sure if professor Torsten who was juggling corona virus research and advising European leaders would have time to respond the green dye email them anyway and only a few hours later I got an answer in which he said well I'm on the road right now I think it's a good idea we can start on Monday the time it took from idea to execution three days in full the school no vehicles updates Zacks cool folks might have to adjust.

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