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17 Burst results for "Rob Reid"

"rob reid" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

02:43 min | 11 months ago

"rob reid" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"Out. I'm not going to get the the right the the numbers right but the amount of energy they could get out of a chord of wood wouldn't power a city but it would power a auto one all stuff. That's being done with biology right now. Super materials super energy efficiency and we're just in the earliest stages of cracking this stuff. I found it as this is from twenty ten by the way researchers from the university of wyoming have developed a way to incorporate spider's silk spinning genes into goats <unk> out allowing the researchers to harvest silk protein from the goat's milk for a variety of applications for the milk not the hair from the milk. That's cool right because i guess the problem is spiders are territorial from what it looks like you're in so when you try to set up spider farms. They just kill each each yeah social additionally. I think gets probably you. You wait for a spider to spin a web. You're just like oh my god but you can milk a goat. I think several times a day yeah and if the stuff the required <unk> stuff is in there and it's still out of it right you have a ton of this stuff yeah and it says other than their ability to produce the spider silk protein. The goats do not seem to have any other differences in health appearance or behavior compared to goats without the gene and this is a brilliant idea that dates back nine years. This scythia was pre crisper. This idea was when all of the tools of synthetic biology were unbelievably primitive compared to what they are right. Now i mean the amount of stuff that's gonna come out of this field. That's positive is reason enough to make sure we don't get annihilated because the future has the potential to be so amazing thing. I'm i'm interested in what kind of super senses are super abilities. Humans might get in a future too. That's probably a different show but we'll life extension and then also i mean there's there's <hes> <hes> you know. What kind of photoreceptors can we get share. You know what there are. There are creatures out there that perceive elements perceive reaches of the electromagnetic spectrum. <hes> perceive steve reaches of the sound frequencies that we can't access. There's creatures that are out there that have something called electric perception which allows <hes> sharks to hunt and other kinds of fish to hunt without seeing their their birds have something called magneto perception magneto perception allows them to navigate so they have a sense of where the earth's magnetic magnetics fear is aligned. There are senses that humans lack actual senses the beings on this planet have and there are extents <hes> to our senses the term that's often uses called velde. It's a very interesting idea to germanic wordings environment in german will what it means the way that it was used by the philosopher for who who who started using the word in the narrow sense u._m._w..

university of wyoming steve milk nine years
"rob reid" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

03:00 min | 11 months ago

"rob reid" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"I think real networks. They all started around ninety five. Oh my god the real player. I got so angry whenever that thing would open up in order to play something and i was like i don't want to it was one of those early hey abbott. We can force everyone to get this so a lot of people have p._t._s._d. From the player there's no question so the earliest days of the commercial internet were ninety four ninety five win ninety five yeah that would have been coincident incident with the real early adopters when he's x. p. I think was the one that just stuck around forever. 'cause it was pretty stable and a lot of people really really liked it but this is a different problem mainly. It's bad enough. When you get a virus on your computer. You have to reboot your computer and maybe reformat your hard drive. Get a virus that you're one of us. You die right yeah. I'm like how do i d- frag my lungs. It's pretty rancorous now so when i decided i i actually was asked to give this ted talk with eleven days notice search which was <hes> intimidating humble brag is no well i was and it was because i did this podcast within the vol ravi kat an episode ah my podcast then they herded tat and they said we'd like to have this done but the conference is right around the corner so my challenge was rather other than just raise the specter of this i really we need to end on an optimistic note. We need to end with some action items because i am convinced we can navigate this and so i started talking to some of my former guests from podcast and there are a couple of very interesting steps that i believe could be massively cured if we take them right now. Mound talked about both of them at the end of the talk. We got a little bit more time here. There's really two sides of this. The first one would be a massively distributed pathogen off the jin detector network said think of basically a smoke alarm but instead of detecting smoke. It's constantly inhaling all the fragments arguments of d._n._a. D._n._a. that are cycling out in the air and it sequencing. It's reading the secrets and eric fancy word for reading it and trying to find you know what's weird. What's dangerous. What is bizarre in the air now if we tried to do this twenty years ago the response would be like hey you knucklehead. It's going to cost us three billion dollars in thirteen years just to read a single unit human genome well that cost as we talked about is plummeting and it's plummeting so rapidly there already pretty are some pretty primitive and pretty bulky and imperfect pathogen descent dispensers. I'm sorry detectors that are used in laboratory and other environments this. This is something that if we made an r._n._d. Priority of it we could get to very very sensitive very smart. <hes> pathogen detectors that would probably be as ubiquitous bigwigs is smoke detectors within well within a decade and in the long term goal would be to have them be as ubiquitous smartphone sure just how pathogen detection everywhere inhabit network right because in here my phone. I'm holding my phone. I've got a barometer got. A barometer got.

ted Mound eric three billion dollars thirteen years twenty years eleven days
"rob reid" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

03:06 min | 11 months ago

"rob reid" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"Did they make a bug will yes. They made a bug but also automated data file because the genome for flu whether it's eight try then one or another derivative is about ten thousand letters long and that's an a four letter alphabet. There's there's about ten thousand base pairs in that genome the changes that they made in order to make that thing virulent now ten thousand thousand pay ten thousand letters. That's going to fit on a few pages because that's not a huge gina yeah. That's a good point. How many letters fit on a page <hes> well. Let's see if you figure i think in you know it's probably they say two hundred and fifty words per page but it's it's actually probably more than that with the fonts that we use today and they say five letters award right and that's probably under counting so i'd say good twelve thirteen hundred pages characters per page so which is about seven pages yeah i in fact it says just to keep in mind. The average one spaced pages contains three thousand characters one space yeah. I was thinking doublespace. Oh so this is this is a ten thousand character thing and by the way it's not a twenty six letter. Alphabet alphabet is a four letter alphabet because it's d._n._a. <hes> so that is a sliver of data at now. What modifications would they make to that genome in order to make it while they contagious tasteless. I don't know but i could pretty much guarantee you that tiny number modifications within on a frigging posted now share a cashier so the the ghost story that i worry about what is this. I mean that that that modification has happened it. Sitting in labs and wisconsin and amsterdam and let's god forbid that these labs ever get hacked and those changes get out but let's say several years go by and actually i should. I should give you another point of context. Which is how fast. This technology is improving proving. This is a really really important. Let me put a pin in that short getting hacked if you work at a lab like that and somebody wants to hack you as an inevitable occurrence yeah because because i i don't know anything about this. I don't know if you do if i work at a lab with you and i'm doing that kind of stuff. How tight is security sure getting being in there and getting out is probably tight but if i email you hey turns out the modification to this is just a quick dinner is that email are we talking can super encrypted n._s._a. Level security or scientists email. I'm using g mail. I'm using my university email. My lab email to email. You go turns out. We can modify this this this in this. Why don't you give that a try. I mean how much is this research even encrypted on my laptop when there's only two of you in the world who have done this and you have an enormous amount of respect for it. Ah maybe you're careful about it when we're at a point where tens of thousands of graduate students can be shuffling information back and forth like this. They're going to take the same amount of care that they take with cell fees and sensitive photographs and anything else. That gets hacked thousands of times per day yeah right it. Was it equifax what was one of the yeah. Equifax got hacked. They were in the business of data security equifax one of the three entities in the world that did sa- credit ratings eatings for americans and had hundreds of millions of social security numbers..

Equifax wisconsin amsterdam
"rob reid" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

03:17 min | 11 months ago

"rob reid" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"Player of choice so you don't miss a single thing now back to our show with rob reid d- how can we don't have nukes that are built in garages since those have been around for eighty years because you'd be that's that's a very interesting interesting and important question if you could have nukes and garages obviously something would have gone off by now sure if you had seventy five thousand hobbyists all with a nuke in their garage at some point somebody would have lost their mind gotten pissed off at their neighbor just screwed up. Even countries are having trouble building. Yes exactly because first first of all getting the raw material getting the plutonium that can go to you know see critical mass and actually ignite takes a huge amount of work and you also need to use materials orioles that are very very closely tracked by the international infrastructure the i. e. a. the u._n. Other people as well so you know and then you have to put in centrifuges and spin them a all lot of centrifuges for a lot of tens of thousands of hours which is what iran was doing over a period of years to get to the point where they enriched material enough to get nukes. It just takes an enormous effort that you just can't do on a garage. Thank god for that yeah now. Synthetic biology is a very different matter and i'm i am very conflicted talking about synthetic biology which i'll define in a moment because i think that it has unbelievable potential to do so much good good for humanity to help our health span in our lifespan and so forth but kinda quick pocket depth and definition of synthetic biology that is when we basically basically start modifying the d._n._a. Of an actual living critter or even designing from scratch the d._n._a. Of a perfectly artificial critter redder to create something that will do things that we want it to do so it might be something as simple as we wanted to make a biological agent that will cure some terrible disease. There's lots and lots of science labs that are working on that. It might be something a little more complicated. This is kind of exciting <hes>. There's an effort underway right now to make it possible to use pig organs as transplants into human beings stub. We already had bad like people who had pig hearts. They was a big effort in the nineties to do that. Okay maybe that's why we spent the i think the national institutes of health or or some organ in the united states spent over billion dollars in the ninety s because the sizing was perfect and there's a lot about the metabolism that was going to work well for a lot of organs kidneys hearts other things and you know you know. Vegans might not like that but <hes> we're already killing pigs bacon anyway if you're going to be killed on a lot awakens if you can save fanta tens of thousands of human lives or you're at it that's great the trouble was they ran up against this this unbreakable barrier which that there are sixty seven kevin retroviruses that are needed to the pig genome that don't harm pigs but every single one of them turns out to be lethal human beings jeez and they couldn't ultimately we figure out how to edit the genome there was they weren't the tools in the ninety s get rid of this retroviruses will now using very recently invented technique called crisper <hes> a guy named george church a couple of.

rob reid united states iran george church billion dollars eighty years
"rob reid" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

01:36 min | 11 months ago

"rob reid" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"Free. There's no credit card bs. There's no drama. I just think the more people that have this information the better that's at jordan harbinger dot com slash course and it takes just a few minutes per day in the meantime. Here's here's rob reid. Let's start off on a positive note. A certain percentage of the population are suicidal nihilistic killers yeah. That's that's as good it is. It's gonna get in this conversation. Yeah yes so tell us about kind of where this because. I watched your tedtalk and i went okay. This is beyond interesting and scary in your asai. Hi fi writer so i thought how true is all this and then you start doing research and it's like oh. He's not just making this up yet. Footnoted the bejesus out of that yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah so what's up with people. I don't know if we have to prove that. There's a percentage of the population that are suicidal now well this week in particular. I don't know when this is gonna go up. We're obviously really sitting here. In the immediate wake of of two horrible mass murders here in the united states and so the opening premise. I guess i started the ted talk with a little bit of a ghost story to get people's attention and the reality is a certain number of people very large number of people about. I think it's something like eight. Hundred thousand people per year do kill themselves. A tiny tiny percentage of those people are in such a tormented place that they come to the decision that they wanna go out killing as many strangers as possible. That's a tiny tiny subset of people but we've seen how many mass murders as there are in the united states obviously suicide bombing is a phenomenon you know is it. A thousand people.

united states rob reid writer
"rob reid" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

12:36 min | 1 year ago

"rob reid" Discussed on Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

"Shift. It's unwarranted because we have perfectly realist versions of quantum mechanics that fit the data and what's an agent you know why is it agents seem to agree on the world of it doesn't pre exist them and things like that so it's really difficult for me to take it seriously on the other hand they find it. Difficult difficult. Take many world series right is a tree there. There is a cemetery there so if we took let's say a thousand academic physicists chosen entirely early at random and ask them. Which of these theories do you adhere to how many would say. I don't know and i don't care as it just doesn't interest me so i think that'd be the winner. That'd be the way if you ask that question at cosmology conference or a quantum information conference or condensed matter conference. You're gonna get very different answers. There is <music> sympathy for many worlds among people with cosmology or quantum gravity interests in the quantum information theory community where you're doing the things like building quantum computers and stuff tog raphy yeah cryptography stuff like that. There's surprising sympathy for cubism and you can kind of understand that that's so they're doing. They're measuring outcomes agents getting experiences calculating probabilities for them. That's what they do and in the philosophy of his community dynamical collapse in hidden variables theories are the most popular ones and you can understand that as well because they're perfectly well formulated theories that don't have any metaphysical conundrums associated with them. The thing that just intuitively is most difficult to accept about many worlds is that these vast expanses populated by a perhaps october conscious systems are just propagating constantly just intuitively. I think most people who were hearing about the theory for the first time would basically leave it at that and maybe put it in more formalistic terms. You'd say conservation of matter and energy. This seems to be creating an awful lot of something out of nothing or awful lot of something out of alone universe yeah and i think there's a perfectly valid first intuition to have but then you gotta go through the math and if you buy into many any world's this current state of the university around you is just one branch of the wave function and that branch comes with what we call a wait. The wave function says is is this branch big or small. Is it thick or thin. That's the likely or unlikely is it a probability statement. No it's there with one hundred percent so when you have the electron and spin up plus spin down and the universe evolves into a combination of both spin up and spin down basically it's not like you're taking the universe and doubling it. It's like you're taking the universe and slicing it in half and now there's two universes but they're each half the size of the original universe every time you branch the wave function the the total thickness of the wave function doesn't chain this thickness. This is not something that's easily measurable. I assume well you can prepare something like the electron wave function action in any superposition you want like we talked about right and one percent up ninety nine percent down etc so you know what it is. Then once you measure it you know what the thickness thickness of the two branches that had been created but once they've been created you can't measure it yeah and it just seems that whatever arbitrary thickness we assigned to the universe. Let's say and new year's day midnight nineteen fifty. It has an arbitrary thickness state at that instant the number of times. It's been split since then. It's it's not infinite but god it's a lot of times i mean if every single time there's radioactive decay in my body and that's five thousand times a second yeah and there's all these bodies and there's all these planets and we can only see fourteen billion light years in either direction. It probably goes further than that with all of those splitting happening whatever thickness the world had in one thousand nine hundred fifty it is it's such a miniscule sliver of it at some point you kind of run into xenos paradox well. Maybe maybe not and the one thing that we don't know when this is sort of an embarrassing admission mission for an ever ready and we don't know whether an infinite or finite number of branches of the wave function of the universe. We don't even know that simple basic fact and to be fair in n._o. Version of quantum mechanics do we know whether there aren't infinite or finite number of different distinguishable wave functions. This is a deep question about quantum gravity and the wave function of the universe so there's physics we don't understand that we would need to know before we said there's only a finite number of branches for an infinite number of branches but having settle that there's plenty of room for lots of branches you can ask yourself if the universe just keeps branching at this fantastic rate. Will we run out of room for branches. No we're nowhere close. It's it's a really really big number. If there are an infinite number of dimensions in what we call hilbert space the space of all possible aid functions then the question of how many branches there are many worlds makes no sense. It's always infinite number and what you should be asking. Instead is what is the relative fraction of worlds where the electron was spin up. Versus electron has been down and a quick aside the term for someone who adheres to the school of thought. Do you prefer many worlds or or or ever ready and ever ready his fine ever ready in yeah. It has a nice ring to it sounds a little like the battery every by the way fascinating guy yeah. Let's talk about him briefly because he for somebody somebody had such a big academic idea. He did not say academia for long. He didn't even try. He didn't apply for jobs while he was still a graduate student. He <hes> wrangled angled a job in a sort of defense consulting firm and got us based left and it's unclear to me whether or not that was because he he was put off by the bad reception that his theory gun because it certainly did get a bad reception. It got a bad reception as he was writing his dissertation. Yes that's right. This was in the the fifties. I'm all right. He's okay with his p._h._d. Advisor was john wheeler who is the most successful p._h._d. Advisor in history physics for should fine men was his student kip thorne was his student and whoever it was a student and plenty others as well and wheelers mentor was guess who kneels bore <laughter> <laughter> they'd worked together when wheeler was a post doc and so forth and to the extent that physicists worship each other wheeler worship bore and so really was stuck doc in the position where his mentor was the boss of the copenhagen interpretation his student had just invented its primary competitor so wheeler tried really hard to pretend that these two theories were not in conflict with each other in the problem was that was obviously false. They are very much in conflict and ever understood that perfectly you read what he wrote and it's perfectly clear he was a genius knew exactly what he was talking about. He were alive today he would walk right into conversations about foundations of quantum mechanics and fit right in and so he we saw that his theory was a competitor to bore. He saw all the problems with the copenhagen interpretation. He laid them out ever left the field in nineteen fifty seven when he got his p._h._d. H._t. thesis published and then as late as the late seventies wheeler was still trying to get back into academic physics. He died young right. He died young as early fifties fifties. He was a smoker and a drinker an eater his son mark has become a famous musician. He is the band called ills right. I do that yeah and <hes> <hes> wrote a book. You know a little bit of autobiography. Memoirs and mark everett explained that he was very angry with his father when he died because he clearly didn't take care of himself um but then he said you know since then. I realized a lot of people die for bad reasons. My father lived the way he wanted to and had a good time and there's a lot worse ways to go than that but that contribution bution you still call yourselves ever redden's yeah. It's clear who did the work. How many of you are there. I honestly don't know the theory was completely. Ignored for are a number of years. After everett proposed it it was eventually bryce dewitt who is a physicist at the university of texas who in the early nineteen seventies he began to publicize it. He's the one who gave it the many worlds interpretation label but it never became very very popular and then partly because of improvements in technology now that we have the ability to isolate individual quantum systems and ask what they do to each other not simply measure them but manipulate them without measuring them without having them deco hearing they need understand the foundations of quantum mechanics better so in the physics community as a whole. There's been a softening of their stance that studying the foundations of quantum mechanics is a bad idea and so all of the interpretations quantum mechanics are getting more attention now than they ever did including everett and roughly how many are taken seriously. Are there four four or five rivals. Are there fifteen or sixteen you know i was on a panel at the world science festival a few years ago. Brian greene was the moderator and there were four other people and i was one of them and we each held up the flag for an approach to interpreting quantum mechanics. You each had two different interprete. I was many worlds. Shelly goldstein was was hidden variables. David albert was dynamical collapse. Ruediger shaq was cubism. Now is that by prearrangement that was the theme of the panel god's right yeah and i think that that that's fair. I think those four approaches are the most popular okay. I'd like to talk about the self in many worlds because that's one of the most intriguing rigging things that pops out of it the notion that there are octogenarians of me quote unquote out there it is the right thing to think about because it is where for many worlds radically deviates from our previous experience with physics right if you believe whatever it says then when i measured it's been electron goes from being one copy meeting two copies to me and it's natural myself to question before i do that measurement which one will i end up being the one who measured the spin up or the one who measured the spin down down there will be two of you except with a little footnote they won't be of you in exactly the same sense. They are two versions of your future self but they're they're separate. People in everett introduced this analogy. It's like an amoeba. The that's a really good analogy right yeah there's enemy and it splits into then there's two amigas abbas and for the original meal say which one of my going to be. You're going to be both of them. There are separate beings that came from the same original being and they also have memories and memories memories of being the original me about us and then thousands of generations of amoeba could all have equal claim to saying on the original. What does it mean to have a relationship between you now and you five minutes ago or five years ago because in some sense you now is not the same you as five years ago we were slightly different person but in in every day life we have no trouble relating ourselves but if you sit down and carefully ask a what is that relationship between you now and you five years ago you might say okay well like you said continuity of memories continuity of some physical aspects. There's a pattern that is maintained over time so it's not that there's any problem the issue of personal identity many worlds. It's just different than what it would be in a single world theory so let's say that i'm in the lab and now i have a choice to make. I'm going to observe the spin been upper spin down and know that is a direct consequence of that. There are going to be twice as many me's a huge number but there's gonna be twice as many me's going forward and let's say okay do that and then there's the up me and the downy that is such a trivial experience and that's such a trivial factor in the way the universe is going to unfold whether every that electron spin up or down it would seem logical that those two rob's would go on to live almost identical lives yeah yeah unless they thought ahead of time spent his up. I'm going to ask her to marry me and it's been down. I'm going to go and be single and then went ahead and did that. That's right which brings us the app can. Can we say the universe right now we can. Let's split the universe and i explain what the app is yeah. This is some folks who actually worked for walt disney in their spare time they made a little app which which splits the function of the universe so as we know splitting the wave function the inverse happens all the time because the radio activity or whatever but you can do it intentionally one good way of doing it intentionally sending a photon on into what's called a beam splitter. A beam splitter is basically piece of glass which is sort of halfway mirror half reflective. Yes so there's a fifty percent chance the photon. John bounces to left fifty percent chance it just goes right on through since this is a quantum observation by operating the app as we're about to do you cause a photon on that would not otherwise have been been split to beam split exactly right they found online a lab that it hooked up a beam splitter to the internet.

john wheeler mark everett Advisor walt disney copenhagen Brian greene graduate student David albert n._o rob kip thorne everett redden Ruediger shaq bryce dewitt Shelly goldstein university of texas physicist five years
"rob reid" Discussed on The Kevin Rose Show

The Kevin Rose Show

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"rob reid" Discussed on The Kevin Rose Show

"Kids, we'll one day include eighth graders. And once a genius has made a data file any idiot can distribute it worldwide in copy it, and eventually when the printers, are there can print it. So that is scary. So I mean, how do we I guess you could add in certain checks into the printers where they have to go out almost like they have to be look have an antivirus software installed. Look for malicious files before they print them, there could be a known database right there could absolutely be a new database yet. How would you protect against something like that? Well, that was really. So the, the last third of, of the Ted talk, and the other thing that I worry about, just sort of complete who are the bad actors like who would unleash something like that? And the reality is about a thousand people a year worldwide, I word, I use is detonate. There are suicidal. Mass murderer is out there. And you know there's the Columbine killers there's the Orlando shooter is the Vegas shooter. There were three hundred twenty three mass shootings in the United States last year. So one of many possible bad actors would be somebody who's like, you know, what really nihilist state of mind and they just want to kill his MIT. They want to die in the act of killing as many people as possible, and unfortunately society, just, that's a, that's a malfunction that occurs several hundred times a year throughout the world across the society's religious lines class lines, etc. And when that happens the force multiplier is technology, so kind of grim fact, they're actually a lot of mass school attacks in China. We don't hear much about them because it's a far far away. The I don't know much press, they get, but also the most lethal items you can buy at retail, in China are hammers and knives. Well, this just happened a few days ago in Japan. Did you hear did? Yeah. Mass stabbing. Exactly. And stabbed a lot of kids. But I believe. Only two fatality, only to Fidelity's, a lot of kids were like seventeen or something like that. Horrible, horrible thing to have happened. But nowhere near the death toll that you see with a gun off compare compared to new town, and so two deaths horrible, fifteen kids traumatized horrible. But when the deadliest thing, sold it retailer hammers and knives. That's what's going to get used. And so this is really macabre coincidence. There is a spate of mass school attacks in China. A spate of about ten of them over the span of a couple of years and by weird coincidence, macabre coincidence, the last one occurred just a few hours before the new town attack in Connecticut. But that one grotesque American act chilled roughly the same number of people in. In fact, I think it was one more person than the ten Chinese attacks combine so knife, terrible gun much worse. But what about an airplane? So couple times in the past few years. There was the air Malaysia incident where a pilot decided to end it all and take his passengers and crew with them. And then there was another incident a year. After that Germanwings pilot named Andre Slough butts, who was, you know, morbidly depressed and German pilot guild rules, basically said that is right to privacy about his more depression was far far far far far more important than the lives of one hundred and fifty people. He ultimately killed when he drove his plane into the side of the French Alps. They might have changed as real since then so knife gun airplane. The worst the technology gets when you have one of these people who detonate the more casualties, there will be. So now, let's think about the proliferation of sin biotechnology at this point. There are probably a handful of borderline geniuses who could probably make a doomsday buck. That's a tenth of one percent or maybe one percent effective. They tend to be, you know, brilliant stable people without criminal histories, but still that's kind of scary to contemplate as technology improves at some point, it's going to be thousands of life..

China Orlando French Alps United States Ted Malaysia Japan Connecticut Andre Slough Germanwings one percent one day
"rob reid" Discussed on The Kevin Rose Show

The Kevin Rose Show

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"rob reid" Discussed on The Kevin Rose Show

"I have a handful of really amazing guests coming up this summer one is going to be pretty crazy. If I can lock it down there is this allegation. Hint. There was this near times, or click came out here, a while there was actually one last year. One this year, it was talking to some navy pilots who have seen. These UFO's while out on missions in their F16.'s now what makes this different is that rather than just some random story by some random pilot for the first time ever. The government has released footage of these UFO's now they're not saying that these are aliens are saying, here's some footage. We have of crafts and the cruiser travelling at speeds and staying in the air for, you know, twelve plus hours, which no Kraft, obviously know, aircraft can do due to either if it's a drone there, obviously, battery restrictions in terms of, you know, just how much power you can put out in drone and how long it can stay in the air. And then also obviously, when you're talking about fuel burning vehicles, that can only be out there for a few hours, so these things they've recorded have done all different types of crazy maneuvers. And what's really cool is that the government actually released this footage? So it's coming directly from the government, and this is not somebody's handy Cam to shooting foot. In their backyard. So very cool stuff. I think I've walked down one of the pilots to come on the show. It just goes to show you some of the random stuff I wanna have on this podcast, speaking random stuff. I gotta have Tim Ferriss back on June the random show, we've been talking about getting together this summer. He's a busy dude, working on some cool projects that he'd be pissed if I talked about, but he's got some close off coming as well. So a couple of housekeeping things one, go ahead and head on over to Instagram. Do search for Kevin rose and follow me up there at appreciate it. That's real seal. The latest and greatest little things that I'm playing around with been doing a lot of like a stuff around the house lately. Meaning like I've been growing medicinal mushrooms, some lion's mane, taking some old oak logs, and then inoculating them with mushroom spores and then sealing them up with wax and placing them in the backyard. And hopefully this fall will have some great lines main mushrooms, if you're not familiar with lion's mane. They are a really powerful mushroom that are. It's great. For brain health, so people that take lines main have just quick response times, and they seem to think clear. And so it's one of those culinary mushrooms, but it's also medicinal medicinal mushroom at the same time. So they're quite expensive. They're like twenty bucks a pound or something. So when you grow them yourself, obviously, don't have to pay anything near that I bought a thousand plugs, which is a thousand little wooden dowels for, like, I want to say it was like fifty bucks or something like that. So not all of them will actually create the little fruit, bodies and actually turn into mushrooms, but I'm hoping quite a few. So we'll see what happens. Anyway, you could fall that stuff on Instagram Kevin rose. Today's guest is rob read. This is Robin. I have been friends for quite some time. So this podcast is long overdue. Rob is a fascinating guy. He spent his early career. Well, first of all, he went to Harvard got his MBA there. He studied Middle Eastern history, and I think airbag. Stanford as well. So he's been all over the place worked at Bain Solomon brothers, venture capital firm. He's been entrepreneurs. Well, which he created listen dot com..

Rob Tim Ferriss Stanford UFO Kraft Kevin rose Harvard Bain Solomon
"rob reid" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"rob reid" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Enhancing, tools of synthetic biology, are very very very widespread today, a very small number of highly trained people could if they wished making credibly deadly pathogens, and it's been done back in two thousand and eleven which is a long time ago in the arc of synthetic biology technology, researchers at the university of Wisconsin and elsewhere made a strain of influenza that was as deadly as the deadliest this. We'd ever seen was called h five and one that particular strain kills sixty percent three out of five people who get infected with swine. Flu kills one out of five hundred people, and we fear swine flu with very very good reason, we should all be scared of swine. Flu kills one out of five hundred this. Monster kills three out of five three hundred out of five hundred. Right. So a lot scarier. Now what happened? They basically took this university of Wisconsin, and experiment. They they didn't use this term. But I'm going to say weaponized that that strain, and they created a strain or a substrate that is vehemently contagious now that was only a tiny group of people the world were capable of doing that in twenty eleven they were people who were not bent on killing people. They were scientists. They probably had the best possible motivations that. We're probably doing it. And sure they in fact, they said publicly, so they could understand what might go wrong in nature. But the point is the things that only a tiny brilliant. Handful of people can do in twenty eleven or twenty eighteen will be doable by ten thousand people in a fairly short number of years. Let's say all bio grad students because the tools are getting better and the technologies and techniques are getting better. So rapidly crisper didn't exist in two thousand and eleven crisper which radically enhanced the ability of. People to edit gene codes now, they can now crisper does exist and a lot of grad students and life sciences, and probably rather soon-, essentially, all of them are going to be masters of crisper and another data point, which is really interesting the human genome project cost three billion dollars and took thirteen years to sequence a single hap- Lloyd genome, which is almost like half Agena, right? That ended in two thousand and three and all that long ago. Right. Two thousand and three that ends today. A single lab tech can do quite a bit more work than that in a day. So we're talking about and probably for about a thousand dollars rather than three billion dollars. So we're talking about three million axe price, compression, and I don't even know how many billion exceleron in the amount of work one person could get done because of the acceleration in the tools. These tools are continuing to accelerate their accelerating faster even. Than Moore's law. So we really need to think about what can five people do today. All of whom are good guys, all who are brilliant. None of whom have single odious is thought that fifty people will be able to do tomorrow that fifty thousand and eventually five hundred thousand people will be able to do. I mean, there will be things that are happening. There will be things happening in highschool bio labs as part of standard experiments thirty years from now, let's pick an arbitrary number certainly thirty years from now that nobody in the world is capable of doing right now. And I think we need to start worrying about this today rather than twenty two point nine years from now, I mean, even if you just look at the history of computing, you will see only governments could create computers, and they were unreliable and buggy in the forecast by the sixties companies could create computers, but very large ones. We're still buggy. Sometimes it took a lot of maintenance an expertise to keep them running by the eighties. Everybody could have a computer. But you still kinda had to be a. Hobbyist, and you still had to wanna make it work and figure out how to make it work and then fast forward to today where most of the world carries a computer in their pocket, which is our full than the most powerful computer on the face of earth during the eighties up. Yeah. So I mean, that's a positive right to grant. Now, imagine apply apply that same trajectory to everything..

influenza university of Wisconsin Moore Lloyd three billion dollars thirty years thousand dollars thirteen years sixty percent nine years
"rob reid" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"rob reid" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Knives and clubs the technologies simply didn't enable that you had you had had been like a real Goliath to do that. Now, this matters because a grim fact isn't a terrible fact and something will hopefully one day fix. But a grim fact is that a very tiny percentage of humans in any given year will take their own lives. It's something on the order of one in six or seven thousand tragically at least in the United States over the past twenty five years that we've had the most celebrated class category of anti-depressants, which is SR is during that span of time. The suicide rate has actually increased in the United States by ten percent. So if you say rate, I think it's important in you're talking per capita cabinet talk McCallum, just a gross number because we have more people, right? No per capita per capita rate's gonna by about ten percent. While we've had what are considered by medical science to be the best tools? We've ever had to fight depression that that just means this is very very hard problem. And if you read Stephen pickers recent book enlighten. Now, you'll know that on almost every quantifiable metric of human flourishing, you know, from infant mortality literacy to the number of people who were living, you know, in relatively non oppressive societies etcetera etcetera etcetera, we're getting better and better at it incredibly uplifting rates, but suicide is a stubborn one. So we have that tiny percentage of people across the he's socioeconomic groups classes, you know, gender, etc. Right now, even worse tiny miniscule fraction of those people. Who get to the point where they decide to end their lives a tiny tiny percentage malfunction in a terrible way, which causes them to want to kill as many people as possible on their way out. Right. And there's almost one mass shooting in the United States per day. It's a little less than that. It's over three hundred per year. So it's getting close to one a day in this country. Now, not all mass shooters are suicidal, but very very high percentage of them are and of course, the most. I, unfortunately, renowned cases notorious cases were all cases of suicidal mass murders. And so again, Las Vegas. I think that was the biggest suicide last murder mass shooting in the United States. Fifty something people killed the guy took his own life. Omar Mateen killed the forty nine people in Orlando took his own life. The guy who killed all the children in my home state of Newtown, Connecticut, you know, sometimes people use the term suicide by cop. They intend to die. Right. And they either get killed by the cops. They take their own lives. It's a tiny tiny tiny percentage of humans, but when they're seven billion humans on the face of this earth, and they were probably six hundred in two thousand fifteen is a year that I'm interested in for a reason I'll get to in a second. There was something like six hundred suicide bombings worldwide that year. So there's a lot of suicidal attacks when you have seven billion people. Many of them are eighty illogical. No, suicide bombings are some of them are completely non-ideological the note most mass shootings are not logically driven. Right. But some of them have. In in the United States, but most not so when somebody reaches that point, and they do they do hundreds of times per year throughout the world. It's just something that happens the force multiplier is technology. And so let's go back to stabbing. There was this is a pretty gal statistic. And I talk about this. I think gosh, I think it's in the second of the four essays that are on medium. There was a spate of mass school slayings in China actually over a period of a couple of years. There were ten or maybe it was twelve mass killings in schools, but the deadliest retail items in China, generally are knives and hammers and things like that. So basically medieval grade weaponry on a certain level. And so these attacks in China were mass stabbings, and the total the last of these mass stabbings by very macabre..

United States China Stephen Las Vegas depression Newtown Omar Mateen Connecticut McCallum murder Orlando ten percent twenty five years one day
"rob reid" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"rob reid" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Us, it might be easy to miss the warning signs. If there's two things I'm a relentless optimist up perhaps almost pathologically optimistic, particularly when it comes to science and technology, and I have always. Have been. I'll Pat myself on the back of often been right? You know, like begging nineteen Ninety-four was very excited about the worldwide web. And you know, there were a lot of there was a lot of doom and gloom about how stupid and overrated and ridiculous. And and futile everything on the internet was in the wake of the dot com. Boom, I was very convinced that if anything the internet was still under hyped, and I believe if you look at what the internet has done since the year two thousand or whenever the deepest darkest moment was it was under hyped at that point. It was even under hyped at the peak of the bubble. So there is that. And I think that if you are inclined to be wildly optimistic about what technology and science can do you can miss actual dangers. But the even more amplifying factor is if you are an optimist, by the way, I'm gonna call myself a realist, and you as well, Tom rather that after a realist, that's her you, you know, how extraordinary of a future we are likely to have we humanity writ large and our. Children and our grandchildren are likely to have as a result of all the things that can and should go right with things like synthetic biology and with things like artificial intelligence, and so since the future is so much brighter than the present much as the president is so much brighter than the past and anybody who would refute that go to the dark ages for a couple of weeks and come back and tell us if the past is really that awesome. Right. Willis novel. You'll understand exactly the future that we potentially have in front of us is so much more precious than I think non optimists or pessimists depreciate that it's all the more important to safeguard that by thinking very very cautiously about what could go wrong because what could go wrong in the future is a lot. And I think that's a very important point. Because I tend to want to think, and I think a lot of others do well when knives were first invented we could have all stabbed each other. But we didn't. And you know when when God. Un's were invented we could have all shot each other. But we haven't and when nuclear bombs were invented we could have destroyed the entire surface of the earth. But so far we haven't we seem to be pretty good at figuring out how to subvert the danger as we get better. And better creating it. But that's the past and the past as any financial adviser will tell you is not a guaranteed for deter of the few. So the other the other issue is the symmetry between the person who is inclined to be destructive and the potential victims. And so you actually try to interesting path they're back in the days of clubs and knives. Which was really all weaponry until rather recently if you hundred years ago weapons were very interpersonal devices and somebody who wanted to kill somebody else. Either needed to surprise them which happened. I'm sure we great, you know, frequency kill them in their sleep. Whatever it is mugged them something like that or overpower them. And therefore, you wouldn't have something like what we just had in Las Vegas this mass shooting in which several dozen people were killed and almost five hundred people were injured one person couldn't inflict that back in the days of..

Pat Las Vegas Willis Un Tom president hundred years
"rob reid" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"rob reid" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Or download the app. Welcome to another interview on DT NS. Labs. I'm Tom Merritt. And I'm very happy to be joined today by rob Reid. Of course, you might know him as the founder of rhapsody or the author of years zero and after on or even the podcast after on. And if you've if you've read the books or or listen to the podcast, you know, that there are some serious ideas floated in a fun science fiction way in after on and then explored in serious here. The people who know about these I in your interviews robbery. Thank you for joining us. Thank you so much for having me, Tom. It's great to be here. Now, you're your interviews in particular. But also, the concept she used in the novel are terrifying. And yes, they are. Because you you take them to their logical extremes in a lot of this. And in fact, you've got four medium post and believe they're all up by now for people that explore a is synthetic. Biology terrorism. A lot of these concepts that are themes from your work. In a way that well what explain why are you exploring these themes in where you taking them. Well, so when I wrote the novel after on which came out about a year ago a little bit more than a year ago. It is in many ways of playful romp. It's about this diabolical social media company that teens consciousness, so it's like a conscious social network, and it basically becomes a, hyper empowered super intelligent fourteen year old mean girl, and there's a certain amount of playfulness that happens within the book. But there's also a lot of darkness because there are themes that worry me a great deal and trends that worry me a great deal in technology. Not this year not next year. Maybe not even this decade. But down the line most of which I explored in the novel and the two that I focus on the most in the medium posts are the long-term risks that synthetic biology could pose to us, and by the way, I should note that there are amazing things that's inside synthetic biology has. Up at sleeve as well. And I am a wide fan boy of much what is happening in sin bio, but there's some terrifying things that could emerge from this technology as well. And I also concerned about some of the super AI risks that we might face decades. Hence now, both of those fears played out in the story line pretty vividly. I'd say within after on and in researching the book, even though it was a work of fiction. I do a lot of rigorous research for most of my works of fiction because I want them to map closely to the actual science and technology that we live with in researching that book, I came across a lot of really brilliant experts in countless fields quantum computing consciousness neuroscience and also synthetic biology and also super AI risk. And so those got baked into the story line in a way that I believe are nicely grounded in actual risk in actual fact, and what these medium posts that basically came out throughout the month of October. So the fourth one just went up. What they do is they claim to distill all the fun and humor away from after on and really put a spotlight on these intermediate term risks that I'm concerned about and I want to put a spotlight on them. Because the sooner we start worrying about things, the sooner we come up with hopefully, creative solutions and the dangers that we foresee are much less likely to bite us. You know, I think one reason that we got through the Cold War not unscathed. But without a new going off is that we gave ourselves nightmares for many decades. We told ourselves terrifying stories about the apocalypse, and what could go wrong, and we were all good and worried about that. And thank goodness. The Cold War ended without a nuke being fired. Although lots of awful things happened during it nobody really had a nightmare about September eleventh until September twelfth. And I think that's one reason why September eleventh. Happened. It was a crisis of imagination on some levels on the part of our defenders. And so this is trying to draw a little bit of concern, hopefully decades in advance. Yeah..

Tom Merritt rob Reid robbery founder fourteen year
"rob reid" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"rob reid" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"Have everybody jordan here i'm back i know you missed me i'm here with rob reid whose voice you just heard on the mary lou jepsen episode and whose voice you just heard again that's right now this episode was phenomenal that's why it's in the feed i listened to this on the plane home from denver where i was working on some advanced him dynamic stuff which is why i took that the opportunity to throw this show in the feed in the first place and this is i never do this but i didn't want the episode to be over which i mean like i said never happens usually i can't wait for the last twenty minutes of anything i'm over it already checked out right even breaking bad gave me that feeling come on really think i think probably there are a few exceptions there there was this this mary lou jepsen episode was one of them rick and morty rick you and everybody else telling me major exception to that rule yeah but i want to know what gets you look you've done a lot of amazing things in your life i'm not going to go in embarrass you too much but you essentially is it safe to say you invented music streaming or is that kind of i would say the team that i was able to draw to the company that i started did i get myself credit for it but my company's call listen dot com the product we created was called rhapsody and it was absolutely by any way of thinking of it the first spotify we did create as a team the unlimited on demand streaming model that everybody uses now and we were actually also the first coming to get full catalog licenses from all the major record labels so that was back in my my troubled youth as a tech entrepreneur right the reason i'm putting this out there is not only to flatter you here and show everybody else smart you are which i think they already have the idea from the from the episode but to show the amount of work obviously the amount of work that goes into an episode like this is thirty hours or so and we just discussed this pre show but i prepare probably eight to ten hours people who listen to jordan harbinger shore like oh my god.

rob reid denver lou jepsen morty rick spotify twenty minutes thirty hours ten hours
"rob reid" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"rob reid" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"When i was done speaking to people came up to me and one of them had a name tag i could read which was bob metcalfe as like wow bob metcalfe is five men he created metcalfe's law he's one of the biggest thinkers in networking he started the company three com and he's a very witty or bain writer i'd read a lot of his articles and ease a very insightful writer but they're always be these funny little jabs in quips on i just alighted in his writings i'm like i am meeting bob metcalfe nailing that bob metcalfe is coming up to talk to me after my talk and there's this other guy whose name tag i can't read so the other guy obviously knew bob and he started asking me some really really smart and probing questions about rhapsody and then other guy whose name i don't know yet says one of the three of us get lunch the buffy was open right so we sit down and i realized at some point this is paul allen cofounder of microsoft he described to me the music infrastructure that he had built in his own home or compound or whatever it is and in it involved thousands of cds having lots of people in code those cd's very carefully acquiring extravagantly expensive hard drives because this was some years ago to store all these gigabytes of data hiring people to type in the names of the songs and all this other stuff i think he might even have done something crazy like but a cellular tower in the middle of his home to broadcast it wirelessly and he basically said in a playful ways i put x million dollars forget what ex was into the system and you're about to make that available to anybody in the world for ten bucks that's why i love this industry and that's what technology does is it moves down the curve of moore's law and as that trillion dollar infrastructure that you and i have discussed in asia that creates things cheaper and cheaper and better and better that's what happens billionaires music experience had become available for ten bucks a month it's the hospital yeah he made a hospital in how do we digitally stream the help at.

bob metcalfe writer bob moore asia paul allen microsoft million dollars trillion dollar
"rob reid" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"rob reid" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"Percent of the cost and so i had an idea of how to do it did it but really the issue was more than cost was power because half of the children in the world live without steady ready access to electrically so we figured out how to make a one watt laptop and chipped it so a lot of that was the screen architecture that i invented that was sunlight readable and retina display before apple going the term long before the lowest cost laptop ever made and see for low power now the organization did not ultimately itself hand a laptop to each child in the world but there are a lot of things that came out of it that were radically important you also did ship a lot you how do you encapsulate the legacy of one laptop per child rate so that's true we delivered to ministries of education and only did a billion dollars of revenue we catalyzed the thirty billion dollars of revenue and catalyze the fastest growing consumer electronic category ever rico boarded the net buck which was a low cost small laptop but the legacy is really changing the equation of what a minister of education can do for the children of their country in the developing world specifically this episode is sponsored in part by the great courses plus you know i'm always trying to tap into the wisdom from the experts we have on the show that's the whole point i want to improve my knowledge on a topic i want to discover something new and that's why the great courses plus is what i'm about i'm a big fan this is unlimited access to learn from the ward winning professors and experts dive deep into any topic that interests you got history science business skills travel the arts watch or listen to over ten thousand lectures always something new to explore in there i recommend checking out this is a new course why you are who you are investigations into human personality this stuff is as you can obviously it's right up my alley fascinating insight psychology neuroscience genetics that not only helps us better understand our own thought process he's behaviors and beliefs but those of those around us as well i want you to start enjoying the courses plus as well so they're giving our listeners a fantastic limited time offer get your first month for free plus received the second month for only ninety nine.

apple rico thirty billion dollars billion dollars one watt
"rob reid" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"rob reid" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"And the question is just because you can do it so do you do it now also i was getting sick at the time but really i think it was the death threats and you had to do it at a sliver moon which had religious significance right in his lungs in his lomb yeah that people might have been afraid you were going to put the coke logo up there or something like that which by the way coke would have been delighted with them both coke and pepsi and they're both vying for who's going to sponsor this there you go hey then you did get sick was almost a year right and it was mysterious wasn't it i've been on and off sick since about age twelve with long bouts in the hospital to three months at a time or unknown diseases and i had been getting progressively worse for few years it's insidious though it's so slow you don't even notice he just you know late twenties thought it was getting old so yeah so then i was sleeping twenty hours a day living in a wheelchair body covered with all kinds of different colors soars and couldn't move half my face i drooled the worst part was could no longer subtract in my head and so i didn't think i deserved a phd in device physics so dropped out of my phd program to go on to die because nobody could figure out what i had i mean i was at an ivy league school that had a med school i got access to a lot of the professors that tried to debunk what i had but they could not figure it out and then what ended up happening one of those professors actually sprung for the cost of an mri and then it turned out i had a brain tumor which everyone else was depressed about but i was thrilled because i had a diagnosis great there's a solution for that cut it out and so that worked i had brain surgery and it took about thirty days to get the appointment have the surgery recover from the surgery and then i got back into grad school no i want to echo something you just said you were in an ivy league school your.

ivy league school pepsi three months twenty hours thirty days
"rob reid" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"rob reid" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"Welcome to the show i'm jordan harbinger as always i'm here with my producer jason to filipo on this episode well i'm not really talking to anybody i actually decided to air an episode of another show and don't worry i don't think i'm gonna make a huge habit out of this but i listened to this episode on after on podcast hosted by rob read and he interviewed mary lou jepsen who's talking about well imaging technology fm are i that's portable wearable a lot of brain imaging just stuff that's going to blow your mind from dream reading and being able to upload thoughts and dreams and everything that's going on in your brain to the cloud it is a crazy set of thoughts and she is the authority in this field and really working on this stuff now this is not just like one day we'll be able to do this it's like no i'm working on this right now i figured y'all would love this so much that i remember listening going is should interview this person but i would probably just do the same interview so robin i reached out to each other and we're like hey why don't we just do kind of a cool swap because he really liked the james fallon episode and send it out to his audience so i'm hoping that many of you will discover a new favorite today in after on podcast it's quite a different show than what i'm running here and i interview rob at the end of this episode so you can figure out what's fit what's not what's going on with rob show and why i think it's good for you in a little bit more about him so enjoy this episode with mary lou jepsen and prepare to be pretty freaked out and amazed by what's coming in the future and don't forget to stick around at the end of the interview because i do have that little mini interview with rob reid at the end of mary lou jetsons interview enjoy.

jason mary lou jepsen rob reid producer robin james fallon mary lou one day