19 Burst results for "Rob Jackson"

"rob jackson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 3 months ago

"rob jackson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The heat away from a place where you don't want it to a place you don't care like cycling that captured heat out through the supermarket roof. But there's a problem with these gases. They're leaking. Leaking 25% a year, says Danielle right, she heads the North American Sustainable Refrigeration Council, an environmental nonprofit. The reason we got to these leaky system isn't because we can't build a week proof system. It's because it's not cost effective to do so. Refilling refrigerants is just cheaper. The leaking doesn't harm a customer walking around the store, but it's really bad for the climate. Because of HFCs, HFCs or hydrofluorocarbons are the worst greenhouse gas that nobody's heard of. And they're everywhere. In a C units, spending machines, trucks driving food from place to place they're the fastest growing source of greenhouse gases globally. Rob Jackson is a professor of Earth System science at Stanford. One large glass of HFC 1 34 has the same warming as £1000 of carbon dioxide pollution from our cars. That's Why it matters If it's leaking out why it matters so much, Jackson says. While it's crucial to curtail carbon emissions cutting HFCS is more straightforward. Plus, there's a lot of bang for your buck. If we can phase out HFCs quickly. Will reduce global warming by one F at century's end. In recent months, the U. S has been moving in the right direction. Bipartisan Federal law passed last December will cut HFCs by 85%, which will mean a different kind of supermarket like this really supermarket in Sacramento with our refrigeration expert head. This is just one of maybe 13 walking boxes where the refrigerated product is stored. It's HFC free. Instead, it used His natural refrigerants.

Danielle Sacramento Jackson North American Sustainable Ref Rob Jackson £1000 85% last December HFC 1 34 13 walking boxes Stanford one one F 25% a year One large glass System U. S Federal HFC
"rob jackson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:43 min | 3 months ago

"rob jackson" Discussed on KCRW

"Moving the heat away from Place where you don't want it to a place. You don't care like cycling that captured heat out through the supermarket roof. But there's a problem with these gases. They're leaking leaking 25% a year, says Danielle, right. She heads the North American Sustainable Refrigeration Council, an environmental nonprofit. The reason we got to these leaky systems isn't because we can't build a leakproof system. It's because it's not cost effective to do so. Refilling refrigerants is just cheaper. The leaking doesn't harm a customer walking around the store, but it's really bad for the climate. Because of HFCs, HFCs or hydrofluorocarbons are the worst greenhouse gas that nobody's heard of. And they're everywhere. In a C units, vending machines, trucks driving food from place to place, They're the fastest growing source of greenhouse gases globally. Rob Jackson is a professor of Earth System science at Stanford. One large glass of HFC 1 34 has the same warming as £1000 of carbon dioxide pollution from our cars. That's why it matters if it's leaking out, White matter so much, Jackson says. While it's crucial to curtail carbon emissions cutting HFCS is more straightforward. Plus, there's a lot of bang for your buck. If we can phase out HFCs quickly. Will reduce global warming by one F at century's end. In recent months, the U. S has been moving in the right direction. Bipartisan federal law passed last December will cut HFCs by 85%, which will mean a different kind of supermarket. Like this really supermarket in Sacramento with our refrigeration expert head. Well, this is just one.

Danielle Rob Jackson Sacramento Jackson North American Sustainable Ref 85% £1000 last December HFC 1 34 Stanford 25% a year one one F One large glass U. S System
"rob jackson" Discussed on The CultCast - Cult of Mac

The CultCast - Cult of Mac

03:18 min | 4 months ago

"rob jackson" Discussed on The CultCast - Cult of Mac

"Got booed. You got bamboozled so if we are going to see apple tv or excuse me apple arcade stuff announced. It's going to be soon. I think potentially maybe even at w. deb. Now we may not ever hear anything about this but clearly. It's something that apple's various convince you don't know You know that that first brumer. Wow i read the translation and what we talk about sketchy i mean. Gee whiz did you read it on. The original korean leader screen is somewhat. And this guy. How what kind of This guy he popped fudge he popped up two years ago and said they were gonna put an a fourteen chip in the apple tv. Which i guess at that time was i mean. That's pretty amazing prognostication. When they're you know they've been putting those a series chips into the previous hardware so Part i think is predictable. But the second part. I dunno okay. I'm going to let's see here. I'm going to apple track. And let's see if he's on here. I think he is macrumors. I don't see him on here. But i think he is on here somewhere. Yeah run. there is darius he's seventy nine point three percent according to you apple track for twenty nine rumors so that's not nothing. Okay not that. So he's not at the bottom but he certainly. He doesn't have a lot of rumors under his belt. I think that's the big problem. But he's got some and he's got almost eighty percent for his track record so far and you got you got to keep in mind. I mean he. He said that we were going to get an apple. Tv with an eight twelve. I think this two years ago and then it happened. Two years later it happened now. That's a pretty. That's a pretty profound prediction. Two years ahead of time to know what ship is going to be going into. What because apple could use any chip apple. Tv is not like an iphone. They're not going to always put the most cutting edge technology into it so for you to it's going to have an eight twelve. It seems like you have a specific piece of knowledge there and and that you can provide otherwise you might guess it would be. Some kind of newark was the next stop at the time. Why think the previous apple tv. I think had the eight and have to look into that. I think it was the ten. So i was just twenty nineteen and he and he said h twelve and when did it come out well last month. That was my thought. Is that you know he was just saying it's like saying. Oh look you know. The next apple iphone is gonna fifteen chip in it right. Which is doesn't seem to be much of a league. So did you cut member for two years ago. What was what was what. Yeah me either but we have a. I can't believe this is happening. Live on the show. We have a hot tip from someone in the chat. Rob jackson says. I think we'll get 'em three in the mac in two thousand twenty. Five guys we gotta get this uncultivated.

Rob jackson iphone seventy Five guys three two thousand last month second part twenty nine rumors two years ago Two years later mac ten darius first fourteen Two years apple tv twenty three percent
"rob jackson" Discussed on The Digital Analytics Power Hour

The Digital Analytics Power Hour

01:38 min | 9 months ago

"rob jackson" Discussed on The Digital Analytics Power Hour

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"rob jackson" Discussed on The Digital Analytics Power Hour

The Digital Analytics Power Hour

08:05 min | 9 months ago

"rob jackson" Discussed on The Digital Analytics Power Hour

"On the community that you're trying to target it's funny you say that because like even the beginning when we meet the young people will. I thought one's gonna straighten decline services. This one's going to be you know really good with an emergency you Hedge bets on both types of professional. We think they're gonna they often agent. You can see that people really communicate is a really good problems all of his and then just giving them that that that's will boost confidence. Tell me you're capturing those predictions in that big google spreadsheet that you can actually come on you gotta background and cro. You gotta pick. Which tests you think's going to be the winning run. It's actually a separate google sheet where they have a little pool like you know place alongside just kidding all right. We do need to start to wrap up. This has been such a great discussion. Rob thank you so much. It's a perfect for the season. And i think we can all take something out of sort of what you started here in kind of like. Try to pull it into our own lives. And i really appreciate you coming on the show and sharing that with us. Thank you guys for having us really really enjoyed it all right so back to the action of digital analytics power hour which is the last call which we could still keep a holiday theme. I guess i don't know whatever. Okay we do do last calls the show just means we go around. The horn share something we think might be of interest to our audience. So rob your guest. You have less call. You'd like to share. Yes so it was a podcast by a chap. Cold david mcwilliams. I actually got into him. Just when i saw it Wake digital he's a Quite famous economist from ireland. He's worked for obama. He's worked for bernie goes to davos every game and it's He did an episode on wealth inequality. I said the format really good like the foam is. He's like this top off. Economists and then chats with an irish mate who knows nothing about economics and layperson view really really brings through really well. They're always chatting about how much whiskey they had at the weekend. And things like that. But if you check out episode twenty seven of that podcast at it's about wealth inequality in what we can do to to solve that. I won't ruin it for for people are gonna listen to it. But what are the key messages. That really resonated with me as i begun the journey with wake is that there was an experiment. Don in the seventy s were they gave a hundred families from low. Income backgrounds is in the united states families The kids a college fund that they can only access when they turn eighteen for a amid jay college and the couldn't get any of the way until the kid was ready to go to college aging. The new hundred kids are the hundred families. They track their progress. Would didn't give them any money. I'm what they did. Is they measured the progress of the kids. Throughout the academic impose the wives by the age of four the kids whose families knew that they had a chance a guaranteed slot college began to massively outperform their peers from the other test group. And that's because the parents were helping our homework giving them encouragement knowing that they had a chance on. This is the key point for me. If you know that you have a chance. I think people will will absolutely roussel's opportunity and in everything that wake sons for more. It's all about so great podcast. Great series i really How the recommended measles. Wow that's awesome. That was fantastic. Okay mo- what about you. Follow that. I can fully that one in mind such little like interesting thing that i learned that i yet now schilling's shoes. That's okay now. If you're memo even just sharing that somebody listening might get some value out of it so it is kind of like a teeny teeny way okay. Well let's anyway i am. I was chatting with the senior stakeholder at work and always explaining the predicament about like when people ask for something but it's not really what they want and they don't give enough context and you know the typical shit that analysts deal with and i was really baiting my head against the wall and he was like all the x. y. problem and i'm like because i'd never heard someone refer to the situation by name but apparently it's called the x. Y. problems are basically like someone asks about an in solution rather than giving you the problem and the thing is they. Don't even ask for the solution that need so it's basically like us wants to do x. They don't know how to do x. Sorry they figure out if they can do why then they'll be successful but they don't know how to do why either so then they asked for help on why and so it's like all these layers of like extrapolating out and then somehow it normally like lands on an analysts desk with some stupid question like can you just figure this thing out because that will suddenly give me all. The answer is but it's actually also like the root problem. So i just found it interesting that i never heard a name for this phenomenon. So thank you adam for enlightening me on the x. y. problem. I like it i like the framing. That does describe really well. How like the question isn't the question you get is not really the question they're trying to answer and framing. It is the x. y. Is going to be like well. You should ask them why it was going to be going to be the going to become the five wise. Why need any one. Y two y three wire x. wise jesus read. What about you tim. So mine is actually a follow up to last episode. When i did a last call of recommending a that i had not read yet read but it was really excited to read. Now i have read the book so it is the subprime attention crisis by tim. Long ninety eight percent sure that i mispronounced his name with my hillbilly anglican background. When i said it last time this time. I i make that mistake but it is only one hundred and forty pages so it is a quick read but it is basically just eating programmatic advertising in. He does a lot of he is comparing the state of programmatic advertising to the financial markets leading two thousand eight bubble. Which sounds like cutesy. And then it is. It's one hundred and forty page book that has like thirty pages of footnotes like it is researched and he talks about the opacity of the market. That nobody between the ssp's and the dsp's there's like the story of what's going on. You're matching things up. But you can't actually see it which i was like. Yeah i've actually lived through that of trying to say where was this ad actually served in. Nobody can tell you so the opacity the increasing spend in digital. So you've got high demand You've got high dollars that are being told to go into it. And then you've got the agencies in the middle who have next two zero zero incentives to actually you know actually call out what's really going on and so he's frames it as it is a bubble going to burst and it really goes back to when the entire internet is built on advertising. It's not like oh it's going to collapse and a well so much for martic and agencies are gonna take a hit. He's like no it. The internet could implode so it is it is dense. I read it with my highlighter. In it was one of those where i'm like can use up a whole highlighter on a very small book but i highly recommended i actually think he did not go as deep into some of the problems is i feel like i've seen so that's the that's my negative. Nellie attitude and he does go. After facebook and google as like their walled garden ecosystems. So you gotta dance with the ones that brung ya but at the same time. That's like the aunt. That's the antidote to peter. O'neill showing the salary growth I can say yes. Stick with the data science and the analytics because that will still be there but man.

david mcwilliams jay college google roussel bernie Rob rob schilling ireland Don obama tim united states adam martic Nellie facebook neill peter
"rob jackson" Discussed on The Digital Analytics Power Hour

The Digital Analytics Power Hour

07:00 min | 9 months ago

"rob jackson" Discussed on The Digital Analytics Power Hour

"We will not naming names on these things cost money. You know you look at their awesome awesome really accessible to me and whatnot. But these ones where you have in-person trainers from five fifteen grand quite easily on young people. You're comfortable income backgrounds. Don't have access to that. We have to put the on outcomes first so that so whatever method that we do scale it has to be doing with a balanced that it is still really healthy people because when people come from places where they've got low confidence or they come from low income backgrounds and they come from minority groups that that convey about at the end of the training program can be harmful. It can be and it won't be getting too many closets who job so something that we're actually looking at the Getting ready to launch is creating a mini services. Delivered company at the end of the program on that company will be staffed by graduates for Draw intentionally so as an extended intervention program. So like i said some of these kids are in interviews right now. Some of them are getting high. It right now. They just needed that little lift to get going. Some of them are going to need to develop the skills on the confidence in safeguarded environment. Whether feel comfortable to do suck and it's very hard. I think i would with when you're looking for work as a young person to maybe find that so we're gonna offer this extended vehicle for them to to grow as a person to develop skills become full bar and you hope they quit. That's like we. Actually you've hired them in you actually like. I want you to quit. As soon as again i ever turn turn becomes opposed to kgi. That's right solving that problem. Once and for all it is interesting that you know analytics. Data specifically is is not built on whether you have specific degrees or those things. It's very much. can you do the job. And you know that sort of sort of like what you're building there is kind of demonstrating that and it's just interesting that it exists that way because it does open up sort of like these alternative has and ways of looking at it and yeah i just. I'm struck by that. Because this is like there's things that i've like like mo said like in my head like these things i want to be able to do or ways to give back and i feel like that's probably like late in a lot of analytics people because sort of like. Yeah i wanna like show other people how to get into this so i just love paradigm in the model. You've you've created there absolutely. I think you hit the nail on the head the it's vocational hanson job. I mean me personally at worked digital mock fatih as before. I actually learned in my first properly job. I worked in an in an envelope agency. I really love the analysis and problem solving paul like building hypotheses creighton. Ab testing my campaigns on that naturally that allow me to step quite comfortably into analytics Without if someone doesn't give you the opportunity to achieve the hands on experience. How do you get thawed very tricky. And i wanna say i love that. You're thinking about the other end of the program as well. Because i mean i remember and i had hates in hape support when i moved into analytics me. My sister worked in the industry. I met tim very quickly. Like i had yet like amazing network of people to help me and despite those people you still managed to build a successful career. But i still remember feeling like i was drowning and failing every single day at my job and i can imagine for these kids that that real challenge to get up and give it another crack the next day. Like the thought you've put into how you have that supportive environment. Once they actually start in the workplace. He's completely amazing we. I had to manage the expectations of the young people as well was so passionate about wanting to achieve in this. Kobe rob. We can't get the ecommerce tracking google analytics match up with facebook impression. Day going to to ten weeks guys worry and they were asking me like the things that you we take for granted like scenario scenarios that things often the basket or on the website out. You remember all of its experience. It's years and years of experience in no here to create you a go to market ready analysts. What we want to do is create that first and then find individuals businesses individuals business. You actually care about issues. Well and connect those young people with those individuals and businesses continue journeys. All this is very much. The beginning with i two given that view of the fundamentals that to give them a chance to learning some of the the coal skills that required to get started without the community and without businesses give shit it will be few tiles. That's the next staff is really building a community of organizations and individuals who want to support that mission as well so this does seem like. You've you've kinda come out of the out of the gate. Even with a even with the completely ike having the gates slammed right as you're about the you know the the opening buzzer was going to go off in a very in a. This is a huge lead your credit and largely due to your experience with starting and running companies it is it seems like it is very mature in thoroughly thought out. Or maybe you're just a really good bullshitter or and it's like all duct tape of baling wire and there. It's all crumbling. But that's all lengthy wind up to a question of when i've worked with nonprofits in the past and we start saying okay. What is the data. You're collecting so. Is that in the plan or you doing that. To collect both the demographics and needs as well as the outcomes. Twelve twenty four thirty six months out really good at this podcast of tim bulls rake questions. Pick the one by first of all. The timing is the worst time ever Employability charite eight when the job market is down lance to. That is the most important time. I think if we has to happen now a similar to you'll you'll side project mike you've been doing trying to connect analysts the roles who's well you put that in the context. Slow the commerce industry. I know the starts in the united kingdom. It's fully percent this year. The no the commerce industry right now in the united states is worth four hundred billion job growth and jobs outlet. The task is the responsibility. We have is to make sure that young people wouldn't normally have access to those roles. Get johnson get out of them but next point and this is.

kgi Kobe rob creighton hanson mo tim facebook tim bulls google gates lance mike united kingdom united states johnson
"rob jackson" Discussed on The Digital Analytics Power Hour

The Digital Analytics Power Hour

07:35 min | 9 months ago

"rob jackson" Discussed on The Digital Analytics Power Hour

"Of people would have had that good intention but fails. It's really really a question. So i mean it's well saying actually the the original program that was due to launch in march the spokes assault the week. The pandemic the lockdown start in the uk. We had funding pulled. We had we had officers rented in central london. We had our training team employed. We will like ready to go. And unfortunately the princess i had to polls all programs. Because everyone's going into lockdown. And so myself like i guess the rest of us shot there in. What should bit too much netflix. For a little while and eight. Which bad food for a couple of weeks and then one of the train is artificially high it. We call Let's do something about. This is a bunch of kids recite home. These prospects are becoming bleaker and bleaker and bleaker. What what can we do about so the first long essentially while is a voluntary program that myself an arian. Donahue huge shouts arianna. She's an absolute legend. She's one of the people who really made this whole thing. Possible Effectively we had a principals gave a seven hundred and fifty pounds to run it to run a nine week online but what. We didn't have anything today because it was locked town and rei on won't mind me saying that we we made as we as we were going along and those those for group of kids absolutely fantastic have gone on to get jobs but we realize going then going out to the market and saying look who owns the highest from people in this factor when companies own ready to hire remote still at that point we we knew we needed to adjust to the industry. And so what we did. We went to the community and we said look we. We know that you might not be ready to hire right now. But we as a collective industry who don't point well who you know you've got this opportunity. We saw leave behind the most vulnerable people in society when when the chips are down this collective responsibility goal of city. And so what we did is we created a framework. We took to the industry to the tonight. Six to say. Look if you call it high. Now he's a bunch of other ways you can suppose so. We're looking for of course volunteers and so we had volunteers. So for the people who were happy to spend an hour or two week over the ten weeks of the program you can be. Mental mental is so so important. The real lincoln's industry that can help identify jobs. They can help support with applications. Just having someone That's new so they play huge. But let's say actually you haven't go that amount of time free you can come in and give a guess tour you can come in and talk about your career you can come in and talk about your specific profession your company or whatever if i'm speaking to a small business. Hey right you might not be ready to hire. I bet you've got some fast shot at home twiddling the films or the hands that you know maybe not as productive as you as you were a outside of the lockdown donate some your teams time to come in and do some training as well. What we found was that given given everything that's happening given the people that time to reflect on whether i in life. I think that's one of the things that we we roll points throughout throughout the pandemic this. There's banished huge surge in people. I think you actually want to do something. They wanted to take some time to give something back to people. You want People were stalling out in the career. A been hugely overwhelmed by the levels of support. We will always rely on a on. A voluntary component of the industry. Took to keep it going. But that said i'll trainers the guys who are paying to deliver the syllabus. The guys who are paying to really own the skill development and the growth of these young people were paying them a fellow. Wage were paying them industry. Right day rate. it's a. It's very important for me that we create something that is sustainable scalable and replicable so you know in nine months time maybe some of that goodwill from following you know when the vaccine now we're all moving on and we've all got targets we will coley grows to hit maybe not goodwill won't be there is much what what we've really endeavoured to do is to create a syllabus and delivery format allows us to pay expert train is that the market rates deliver a quality product. We think that's really important but it does seem like they're they're parts of digital that are kind of reminiscent a little bit of like analysis exchange. When it was part of this is trying to get hands on experience now. That was done kind of entirely volunteer. Definitely with really no rigor on the kind of training. It was really just a. Let's get you something that not only is giving you skills but you're also have real experience on your which is part of the program. Right is that they do get tied up with with real so it seems like if you just go to where you're picking you're getting there. They're still going to be inexp- relative relative to market and inexpensive resource. They've gone through a rigorous and balanced set of training. They have some hands on experience. Like it's not that hard to envision that the model becomes a. Oh this can actually be self sustained because we're moving in. I mean you're not officially doing placement work or are you doing some of the actual placement. So well i mean technically. This was all a pilot. Like i said the first one was voluntary operation really. This was all offers pilot and we explored a number of income methods so we have obviously some funding for the prince's. Trust what we also did is that we got some agencies. Some culprits bounces to to actually sponsor seats on the program again. Another show a magic complexly because they wanted a couple of seats in the program in the analytics trackside. What we wanted to do is allow businesses to pay forward as well to benefit either pipeline of talent. What's the benefit the water community as. Well we haven't gone as far as like the recruitment muddle. Some some skills you can skills programs have have done that but we we haven't gone down that route as well but you on a very important point. Tim way after the first program which was mostly theory but some practical exercises as part of this program. We've matched the young people to real businesses. And say i'm the i i felt the burma boating then theory. Then they get matched the clients. They decline kickoff meeting whether asking questions trying to understand. What the challenges of these these business up and that these are all young people. You'll entrepreneurs you come through the princess as well and they've got these mason e commerce businesses or professionals really really cool and the young people watching them get into teams and treat it not like. Oh we just have to set up some reports like what the problems are trying to solve. Hey how can we help this friend overcome that. Challenge and then rosen campaigns measure. It delivered some insights seeing the presentations. This week. That the guys have delivered for these. It's it's it's mind blowing. Because i remember i. I wasn't presenting to a client that they will let me anywhere. Knit dot practical is really want. The future business model will be because like. I said my goal is to to make the scalable replicable and to do that. It's got to be as meaningful as possible for the young people. Come on the program. I think there are also programs out whether people through the ticking boxes and you you know you do the training you get get off the end of the conveyor belt. You got very often her name. Something stopping bootcamp. Just.

arianna Donahue netflix london coley uk lincoln Tim mason rosen
"rob jackson" Discussed on The Digital Analytics Power Hour

The Digital Analytics Power Hour

07:32 min | 9 months ago

"rob jackson" Discussed on The Digital Analytics Power Hour

"Tis the season for holiday. Cheer and drinking eggnog. And eating you'll logs. Whatever that is maybe a trickle or putting i dunno a roasting chestnuts on opened. Fire that sort of thing. Hey tim Do you have a favorite holiday song of your mean. One mr grinch. I figured that might be right up there for you. what about you. Mo- got a favorite favorite cd. That i play every year at christmas. Oh good lord my. It's called white christmas. It's very meller. Is it the soundtrack to white christmas like the movie. I don't know. I just as a kingdom was the cd. I would go get from the city cabinet and put on every christmas and i still do. That is one of the songs a song that says. I'm dreaming of a white christmas. Yeah okay that's from the musical. Glad that mystery so. This is why we do the podcast to figure out. Of course who can forget the number one holiday single of all time. Of course my favorite mariah. Carey's i want for christmas is you. Oh wow how pat how predictable. I'm a man of the people. I'm a man of the people. Come on it's a beautiful throw in really really. Merry christmas from the family. By roy keane so if rudy shoppers listening he will be the only possible listener. Who realizes what an awesome song that is. But i think you'll find tim. People will pop up in the comments with some love of these various artists. Nothing about all right but we are analytics. People and one thing that is almost always true of analytics. People is they loved share. What they know and they care about others. If you've been in the analytics industry for a long time you know. None of us. Sort of planned our careers out perfectly. We just sort of got chances to get into this field. We were excited to grow our skills and learned and now as the industry is growing there are opportunities to kind of find ways to give back to share our skills and help bring others into our data analytics industry so we wanna to talk about giving back and maybe as a product of that also helping us solve some of the ever present challenge of talent in our industry so we needed someone we could discuss this with. Rob jackson is the founder of wick digital a company. Helping young people get their start in digital marketing careers. He's a non-executive board member at uk flooring direct and prior to that he founded db into analytics and optimization consultancy and today he is our guest. Welcome to the show. Rob thank you michael. It's great to be him. It's a pleasure to have you. I mean we go way back. You know rob with his company and mild company search discovery. We shared a stage at google conference where we both won an award at same time. So shameless plug. Shapeless google plug. I mean i shared. I shared an audience with rob years before that wego so like no i just i feel like you need to like get out there winston awards or something you know. Just kidding okay. I'll get straight straight working on that. I think you're winning already. All right rob. let's get started with. Maybe just how people understand wick digital with a company and and what you started and then we'll use that as a springboard talk a little more about this topic. Yeah yeah sure so you said. I've worked in vigil for a long time. When i logged i in in london back in two thousand eight two thousand nine. The team we put together. I felt was real reflection of london place. The team had a very sort of international failed to it. We had young people with on british african caribbean backgrounds. British indian background got spanish. People polish people mexican people. And i felt like that was a great reflection of the diversity of london and then when we got quiet. And we we've been to one of the big media network groups. Well we suazo no is that is that the title post who works as pre similar is a lot of people i guess like me white white dudes. You've got a good university education. It just got me really thinking like this career. That we have is is so awesome. Fold so many advantages in life. You know whether it be financial or the freedom to travel working remote and it just got me thinking like my best mate. Actually he works in youth employability and he he actually raises with me. News like could we. Could we not do something about this to create a vehicle. That can widen the access for people from all different types of backgrounds regardless of the you know their their income background regardless of whether originally from their ethnic background to widen access to this amazing career on allow people to get on board and not. That was very very simple inception of really super. What are some of the challenges you faced setting this up in like are there particular. I suppose areas of focus that you need to teach people more. Or what's your experience been like. Where do you. Where do you start with question. It's one of the reasons. Actually the first program was just digital marketing. So ppc on facebook we we wanted to do is create a really low barrier to entry and then hopefully through the first program. Obviously i was talking about my career in analytics and the young people in the first of like we wanna do more analytics. it's more challenging salaries about You know this we also of appetite from the young people. I'm to bring analytics into the program. And so what we had to do is think of a way because what we want is the program to be available to will. There's no prerequisite for having no math education or a degree background college education. We wanted to make it available to mix ability learning. And so what i did. I hired an old blue mine. Adam gutteridge michael knows from what back in my days and one of the foremost google analytics trainers in the uk. At gokul mickey right. I'm we sat down to ninety eight. How we could how we could do this. We call it by thinking you know while the practical skills that businesses looking full once hiring people and i did. Is we try to have a think about when graduates come out with college. And they're applying for jobs. Where are they at a level in terms of the practical skills that they have with going into it. We remember the beginning of october Kitchen making cooks say waiting to be told today and so our idea was to give the young people very practical skill components that would be applicable straight away if they were working with. Let's shelve the other goal. Was to gas a ignite the passion interested the will say well we would selection process. Actually we didn't really do much competency testing. We weren't doing any mass testing or anything like that. We will looking full for the for the attitude. We looking full that. So of desire impressions taken opportunity lightness with both hands and room with it so that was definitely one of the key challenges was thinking about. What's achievable from scratch. Because it can be high-skill threshold with analytics. And then you know there's a little little pandemic been going on in. The background is somewhat affected..

mr grinch Rob jackson wick digital rob tim wego winston awards roy keane suazo london mariah google rudy Carey cabinet pat Rob uk Adam gutteridge michael michael
"rob jackson" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

09:18 min | 1 year ago

"rob jackson" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"I'm Bob McDonald on this week. Show covert and climate. The pandemic has led to a huge drop in our greenhouse gas emissions. Were seeing a you know a drop. We project four to seven percent. This year may not sound like much but that will be the biggest decline since world war two and perhaps ever also a robot stand is exploring the secret to great comedy timing. That's another thing that we've programmed into the robot and listening to how the previous joke win and trying to decide what to say next based on not plus the ancestor of all had everything. You need to be a successful animal. The Korea had a mouth. Where food could go in. It had a gut to process that food and it had an opening at the back for waste to go out and climate change in agriculture on Canada's prairie for farmers. It's always something every year. Something's happening right and some years. It's the smoke from wildfires that are affecting our crops. It's a pretty broad range of things that we might be having to deal with all this today on Cork's courts. Two months after much of the world came to a standstill. We're starting to get a clearer. Picture of how? The pandemic related lockdowns have affected our carbon emissions in a study released this week. An international team of researchers from the global carbon project looked at data from sixty nine countries and found that by early April daily global carbon emissions. Were down seventeen percent. They estimate that depending on how reopening goes carbon emissions for the year will be down between four to seven percent now. Those are promising numbers. But we know they won't last not only is global pandemic a less than ideal way to curb carbon emissions but the changes. We've made to get those declines aren't necessarily changes we. WanNa make long term but it is possible. We can learn lessons from this data and take an opportunity to build a better more sustainable future. Dr Rob Jackson is an environmental scientist at Stanford University and the chair of the Global Carbon Project. Dr Jackson Welcome to our program. Thanks for having me. How did you come up with this? Number of seventeen percent reduction in carbon emissions. We the two things. We looked at confinement in different states. Provinces and countries around the world to estimate how how constricted or restricted activity was and then we looked at how different sectors of the economy changed transportation driving flying manufacturing like steel production electricity production. And then we mapped those decreases onto different confinement levels and came up with this estimate of of an emissions declined by day. Now the you mentioned several different sectors there were some more responsible for those emissions than others. They were of course. Transportation was at least half of decline in emissions cars and trucks. Mostly airline travel was down more than any other on a relative basis. It's a smaller part of the economy. But even beyond transportation manufacturing emissions started to decline once industrial activity slowed so it really was a a number of of sectors of the economy that contributed to this decline. Do you think that these emission declines that we saw during the pandemic like the clear skies over Beijing kind of thing even if they just lasted for one year could have an effect on climate change? Well they will have an effect. We're seeing you know a drop we project of four to seven percent this year. Not Sound like much through to listeners. But that will be the biggest decline since world war two and perhaps ever so they will make a difference previous crises. Those suggests that they won't have a lasting effect unless we use them to transform parts of the economy The crisis in two thousand and eight reduced emissions about a percent and a half year but they roared back five percent in two thousand ten what that crisis did do those really jump started the the wind and solar industries in Canada here in the US elsewhere. And I hope that this crisis helps us. Jumpstart and rethink reimagined transportation. Well how can we take? We learn from the COVID nineteen related emission reductions and move forward in the sustainable way. I think the most obvious thing people are seeing are the beautiful blue skies you referred to. The air is so much cleaner from from pollution. Because we're driving less and we can have that that clean air save thousands of lives every year rather than staying home by coupling electric cars with with renewable electricity. Cities are rethinking streets there there closing streets cars permanently now and opening them to pedestrians and bicyclists. We're all telecommuting and I think that will be the normal to and who misses a an hour or two hour commute in a car every day? So it's a lot that we can learn from this experience and only learning. We translate this tragic event into long lasting good. Okay so that's Let's rethink our transportation. How we get around. But what about other sources of carbon emissions such as power generation? Electricity decreased a little bit during the crisis so far not from. Home USA COURSE. Most of us are home and and still using as much or even a little more electricity but commercial buildings or down the manufacturing's down a little bit. We don't want our mission to drop because people are unemployed and the economy's bad right so good things are happening in the electricity sector. Canada has more than half well more than half of your electricity with with clean fuels in worst setting records now in the US. The first part of this year renewables past coal for the first time in Electrical Generation. So those changes are happening because of price first and foremost cheap natural gas cheap wind and solar electricity sectors changing quickly. Well if things are changing quickly already how do we take advantage of this situation to accelerate that change or come back to transportation because that's the change that has been the most obvious to people If we can produce the price of electric cars they're there. Faster than gas powered cars accelerate more quickly and they're better for the environment. I mean car and coal pollution still kills tens of thousands of people every year so there are a lot of reasons to want to move away from from gas powered. Engine a move towards cleaner electric motors. Well you mentioned that. After the two thousand eight crisis there was actually a spike in emissions. That went up afterwards. Is it possible that the other side of this pandemic go the wrong way like people abandoning crowded public transit to stay away from folks and preferring to drive their cars? It's a really interesting question and it is possible. Another thing I worry about is companies or governments stepping away from climate commitments and environmental commitments. I mean here in the. Us were even talking about rolling back vehicle fuel efficiency standards which you which helps no one. I do have some concerns that the virus could backfire. Even well. We know the well. Personal changes are one thing. What we really need to do is make sort of systematic changes in big industries. What are the opportunities that exist there? That's absolutely right. I mean personal choice matters in our own decisions matter but we have to transform whole economy. One of the biggest changes is this switch from coal to natural gas in particular and there are benefits real benefits for that in terms of of of two carbon dioxide pollution less particular. It's less mercury but we also have to remember that as a a bridge fuel. Natural Gas Helps. But it's still a mess. Carbon Dioxide greenhouse gas pollution to the air so eventually that bridge can't be too long so we also need to really speed up the adoption of renewables even coupling solar facilities to natural gas methane production hydrogen production so we really have transform every sector of the economy. Well considering the huge economic difficulties at most people and industries are facing. Is it realistic to expect? Huge changes like these to come as a result of the pandemic the first priority of course will be getting people back to work but I think it is reasonable to think about priorities. We can put people back to work. In different ways. Wind and solar jobs are creating tens even hundreds of thousands of jobs a year around the world and far more jobs than we're losing here in the US at least in the coal industry. I'm so I think by promoting energy efficiency industry which employs millions of people in Canada and the US and these other industries that can provide jobs and help the environment and fight climate That's the way to go in. My view now dejection thank you very much for your time. Thank you so much. Dr Rob Jackson is a professor of Earth System Science at Stanford University and the chair of the Global Carbon Project..

US Canada Dr Rob Jackson Stanford University Korea Bob McDonald Cork Dr Jackson Beijing Electrical Generation
"rob jackson" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

06:27 min | 1 year ago

"rob jackson" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"A trap and he gets the ball in the Jackson and mark up in the corner it comes to weight one way of looking into the Kentucky defense sent to the bench to is very active head coach young Tom green shouting instructions way ahead of a key driving on Hayes challenging Hayes puts it up in the lane did not get the role but he did draw the foul and that's cool okay now tell you what that is they're coming out of the timeout because mark canton isolated between wait at the top of the key as they said Qatar through one so there was nobody to help on the way to way to drive Wade makes the first free throw and he now has fourteen points for the game and Erik Daniels replaces Mazen the Wildcats take to take out the man who really sparked their win over Wisconsin as much as anybody else well remember Brad Kirk Penney is more of a perimeter jump shooter then a guy like queen wait isn't even in that game we talked about the meeting when he's on the drive and that is wait wait specialty he took advantage to get hazy about the weightlessness second free throw at the rave about the Kentucky quit within the the line Daniels the camara camara dragged his feet all over local Daniels left for no good one rebound slapped by barking out the Balkans Marquette Tennessee three zone market late fifty two thirty eight left wing slogans of three short an airball opinions and hear the merits no whistle there either and the reason mark Kennedy Jackson getting the rebound you're going to get close to a season high in rebounds here in about one quarter to dinner in fact is there is equal to season high thirteen rebounds for rob Jackson a market now the left corner way over the right hand and I can't stop the glands well he was way parallel to the floor and still bounce it off the glass put it right on the top one is square fifty four thirty eight marketplace tech drop tops around dinner past Bradley right hand good and fifty through the fall the file is on Wade and that's a long way away and it is the second tomorrow third Marquette team file of the second half America has to come to the and now they're going to bring a Kentucky is going to bring a lot of the book you back in a moment he comes in and bogans clearly limited brand on the ankle he's got to come out and he also draws the ire Tubby Smith Tubby really park cannabis Balkans came by the big thing here is that Gerald has got a heat up a little bit it has been more aggressive read so far he's got eleven in the game he made the free throw a three point play market latest thirteen their ball thirteen thirty eight separating Marquette first final four since nineteen seventy seven container outside no back he's a great shooter eighteen minutes three point three thirteen correct not from the floor that's unbelievable fifty seven forty one here comes the right Jackson the last with the Kentucky that's the second best all of a all the markets should have come up with and now Kentucky browse full quarter million pounds his call for a okay who got a little excited about trying to guard out of the way and then his team file number five for Kentucky way over to the bench to get instructions from three read one thing about this aggressive Kentucky press now as they get more capital bonus Marquette seventy seven percent from the foul line pressure is on Marquette in the backcourt heater breaks it major carting about half four off a high screen from Novak deter no good off the back iron steel extra extra now what for me that is no good at all good and the wheels are beginning to come off the wildcat express because Marquette has refused to wilt under the pressure that Kentucky is thrown out of twelve twenty remaining in the game mark which led by nineteen at half is up by sixteen fifty nine forty three with the ball on the front porch dinner hounded by Hawkins I know back screen check the ball to know little head fake driving left baseline to Jackson to collapse elbow up topic Hey Ron Bradley resetting the golden eagles and data runs and takes the handoff from him in the center circle and now comes off but no black screen at the three point line five to shoot leader lost the dribble gets at the Jackson missed a layup rebound barber for Kentucky and here come the Wildcats Barbara ended up paying a whistle while inside on Todd Townsend of Marquette and that is his third and there's a break in the action eleven thirty eight remaining in the game Marquette fifty nine Kentucky forty three you're listening to the NCAA radio network on Westwood One can.

Jackson
"rob jackson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"rob jackson" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Thanks so much for dropping by thank you thank you John professor rob Jackson by the the website is global carbon project or Twitter handle is Stanford he is the chair of the global Kerr card Carmen project and professor of earth system science at Stanford University School for energy and environmental sciences we'll be right back this is the Thom Hartmann program back with your calls and more the news of the day right after this and welcome back Nora and Montgomery Alabama Hey normal what's on your mind today impeachment of course does your does your yeah thank you for picking me up a lot of people don't know that last summer at which a lot of twenty eighteen eleven of our senators went to Russia to discuss these problems we were having with the rumors of the election I was I was July fourth of July for ironic and at one of them was my senator Shelby from Alabama and then there was Steve Daines from Montana and John Hogan from north north to cal North Dakota and Ron Johnson from Wisconsin John Kennedy from Louisiana was one of them and ran from Kansas and soon from South Dakota I can't remember them all but these people one over there the senators won over there to discuss you know making relationships with Russia much better and I find myself wondering are these people going to interfere with the impeachment because they have their own connections to Russia and once trounce tax returns are released and we have access to them are we going to find that he actually owns Russia money a great deal of it and he has to did for five years ten years or even twenty and as trump fails to register as an agent for Russia you know if you were in for a foreign country you're supposed to register and has he committed treason or any thing else with this money and has it been over eighteen Russia as president and how how long will it take before we get any answers for this particular if we have our own senators who probably are just as guilty covering this stuff up all very very good questions and and this is the kind of stuff that typically you would expect Congress to investigate and the justice department and they're not doing it no they're not and and and and I'm surprised that there haven't been may know frankly look like lawsuits you know from independent groups about you know the foreign registration act I I don't know we'll see no I might I have no easy answers to any of that but you you raise the you know some very very important questions thank you very much robin in Belle haven North Carolina a robin what's up hi Tom how are you I was trying to get this question in with Mister Khanna but I missed it but it's it's still a topic I think the establishment Democrats I like to call them the liberals many talk about this once before you know to find it like I do and a lot of the all news we call the neo liberal Caesar the Democrats is sold out to donors their arguments in their and their journalists that that support these neo liberal says Democrats I was watching the PBS newshour on you tube a replay of it or not from the December twenty ninth episode and the duo Brooks and sealed the two anchors that talk on so it came out Medicare for all and shields said that the Democrats have been trying to push this since you know F. B. R. maybe even before and.

John professor rob Jackson five years ten years
"rob jackson" Discussed on Capitalisn't

Capitalisn't

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"rob jackson" Discussed on Capitalisn't

"The answer would be no. You could not now question you might have about. This is look rob if the proposal only gained four percent support. Maybe it's a good idea to get off the ballot because it's obviously not one that investors like but this makes assumption. It's a little bit like a workshop. Paper that has a weakness. It makes an assumption that we should spell out the assumption. Is that the short run. Voting results reflect reflect the value of the shareholder proposal and. I don't know if you noticed but when Luigi spoke earlier he pointed out that even proposals that don't get majority support Silken oh can draw very substantial amounts of shareholder support and still be ones that are value enhancing rather than just look at the vote. Total I think we should look at the long run value implications Haitians Proposals and the answer. Is that the amount of vote resulted. Getting the first or second vote is not necessarily indicative of whether they're good proposals and that's why I descended from those rules. But let's me play for a second the devil's advocate here. Because of course there is a risk of blocking some re proposer these also it cost of having ving allot of gadfly proposers. We p. e. after year without much of a following a without much of an effect and my fear is that too. Many of those has got fly proposes. Actually make it difficult to create a space for sears discussion. On the other ones and my understanding of the new rule is not a reporter Oh he bates Presentation just delays by few years. And so if this is a long term benefit the longer benefit manufacturing long-term so even any proposal next year in two or three years. I can we propose it. So it's a bit like with a referendum for Scotland independence. You propose it but you don't want Every year if that I does not win you want at least we propose it for the next X.. Number of years so Louise's I guess my question to you is how long should investors have to wait to increase value. Because for me to agree. We think it's value enhancing proposal. We don't want to knock it off the ballot and by the way these new rules knock it off the ballot for three years that's a substantial extinction amount of time to ask investors to wait by for and by the way Luigi let me. Just be clear. My colleagues proposal in my statement I said this is like swatting gadfly fly with a sledgehammer. This would not just exclude the Gadfly proposals. You're worried about no. Also we showed in. We presented new data or statement that forty percent of a proxy access proposals that allow investors to put their own candidate on the corporate ballot. Those would be thrown off by this new rule. Fifty percent shareholder proposals that would require. CEO's goes to keep skin in the game. Those would be bounced off the ballot. So I agree with you Luigi that we have to manage in balance the costs and benefits here but I would propose a rule that would address. Just doesn't galleys. Gadfly problem rather than take valuable corporate governance innovations corporate ballot. So what would be your whole if if you are the chairman of the SEC. I would I develop a rules specifically targeted at this problem. So for example Luigi there have been many proposals proposals in this area. That would say that. A particular kind of shareholder should be limited in the amount of time they can access the ballot particularly. Or if you prefer I actually actually like a private ordering solution. You could give to issuers to companies a basis to exclude a proposal on a gadfly exclusion. And say look. We believe that this proposal is not not the serious type that Jesus is described on the podcast instead it is a gadfly proposal therefore we wished to exclude it from our ballot and the SEC. Staff could weigh in on the appropriateness lightness of that like we do for every other kind of exclusion for shareholder proposals. So I think there are lots of very tailored ways to deal with this problem. Unfortunately my colleagues went so much much further as to get very basic corporate governance innovations like proxy access off the ballot many companies. One thing I don't understand is why there wasn't more more of a decision to use the size of the support for the proposer as as a criterion currently. I understand you have to have two thousand dollars worth of stock and Alad just for years so it's very low as a threshold. The first is going up either. You have two thousand John for three years old. You have twenty five thousand four something like that. If I require a larger crash old as long as I can allow people to coordinate and sign on this and I keep actually the old imperial shorter because the old imperial is a way to make it more difficult choice institutional investors to get involved. Why isn't this a way to penalize the God flies but let that have a significant amount of following to be on the ballot? Oh I think it will Luigi this good ideas. One thing to be clear out from the proposal that was made last week is that it prohibits aggregation of individuals stakes so as to cross the particular thresholds so it rolls out the poem it. Now let me stop it. It prohibits the allegation that they are gonNA Gatien different stakes. Absolutely uh-huh why. If I had the answer to that question my friend I'd be in the majority not that look for me. These are this is what I mean back by a swatting at Gadfly with a sledgehammer. These are not tailored solutions to the particular economic problems that we we're facing a balancing of costs and benefits. This is just just full. Stop making it harder for shareholders. Bring Proposals and making it. Easier for CEOS to navigate the annual meeting by the way. Here's what's so frustrating to me Luigi. Yeah I know you know. There's lots of very good scholarship. Making pro management arguments for why we should make it harder for investors to intervene. I'd love to have that debate with my colleagues. We can have that debate on the podcast right now but we should come forward and say what we are doing. What we're saying is we preferred trust corporate managers and grapple with the agency costs hosts didn't allow investors to have a say? If that's the choice we wanna make a society we can make. We should call it what it is but this looks like the old restriction against gathering offering that the next thing you used to have in order to prevent democracy to spread well without commenting too much on on Matt. Here's what I'll say I think it's very frustrating for shareholders who have been participating in this process for a long time because it doesn't feel like a problem a solution for a particular problem it just feels like tipping the scales toward management. These are areas with very strong intuitions. People have very strong views and they tried to do is say look. The fact is will be taking forty percent of proxy access off the ballot. We'll be taking fifty percent of retention proposals off the ballot. Whatever you think maybe you think that's a good thing we can have that debate of course but let's just agree that that is what we are doing? We are not solving the gadfly problem. We're going much further than that you're listening to capitol. Isn't there's a good chance. You're interested in pioneering research and groundbreaking discoveries big brains. Another podcast from the University of Chicago brings the work and ideas of the world's smartest thinkers straight ear buds with guest. David Axelrod if you know people if you understand Dan something about them. It's harder to dehumanize him. It's harder to hate them even if you disagree with him. Richard Thaler those two words systematic bias and that was the big Aha if there's systematic biases. Then you can make better header prediction and ewing. We now in the past couple of decades have started thinking about schools. Not as things that we have rights to but rather something that we are to consume and choose you hear the stories behind the research reshaping our world. Listen and subscribe to big brains wherever you get your podcast Josh. Let's talk.

Luigi SEC Richard Thaler David Axelrod University of Chicago Scotland ving Louise Alad ewing Josh John Dan Matt
"rob jackson" Discussed on Capitalisn't

Capitalisn't

14:12 min | 1 year ago

"rob jackson" Discussed on Capitalisn't

"Of the community one way to address the issue is transferring power away from shoulders to manager and doesn't doesn't necessarily empower the other groups could end up giving seals full reign over copper landscape without any checks and balances one of the things. I'm always afraid of. Is that the rules. Changing the background Rosen might have a serious impact on how markets work. But they don't get much attention from the public. We may be leaving through one of those moments now. Now while these attention being paid in the media to voter suppression in Presidential and congressional elections.

Rosen
"rob jackson" Discussed on She Podcasts

She Podcasts

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"rob jackson" Discussed on She Podcasts

"The android system works in you know not the most highest quality handheld devices but you can afford it and there's that but john was better be honest with you right now could care less. If i ever had another iphone again. I i really could care less. The only thing i miss is i message because a lot of my friends have i try iphones and they always try to semi an i message and it only comes to my computer now right yeah. That sucks sorry john. I think that's one of the biggest things that i would use but they should use. You guys should use what's app because that's universe aw yeah what's up. It's huge so i've been i've been trying to figure out i might be working on another platform to build community as well because i'd also don't wanna use facebook and i'm thinking more worldwide what other people are using what other places people are downloading information and and whatnot and i'm going to be doing some marketing based on that but i mean you can't take it away from you know from apple that just being featured like that all of a sudden. I got all of these extra downloads and i'm like oh all right. The the interesting thing is going to be how many stick around right because it's like meat and they'll download your girl. Oh my god come on fascinating donating though my god i made so many jokes in that show. I was laughing all by myself. I was like i am being so silly in this show. I scripted it. All of course what's wrong with that well. That's what i'm saying. It's illegal yourself so it's kind of yeah and there's times where i wish and then john i was thinking about you. I'm like i can't even ask you. I can't even ask you to edit this because you know comedy so then like when you're listening to somebody's rhythm with a comedy show. You'll know like this is where the sound comes in this is where she landed the joke or this is where she whatever you can put that. You can't hear me say even if i say to you here's the joke gentlemen pedal of her moneymatters starting. She started wanting her to narrow but it was all in spanish. She wanted me to edit it and i i can't yeah you. How could you i wasn't able to so she got somebody else but then she came back and changed it back to english with some spanish flavor and i can do that so that happened. It's like it's impossible to know what to cut. Yep exactly clearly goes. <hes> spanish is the same as in english well yeah and and so is <hes> in mouth. Noises are the same but elsie young boy knows pasta can plug casserole solvay fought broadcasting. Call my god nobody protests go find e._s. Crowbars links and the show notes but rose listen listen and we have another like pod lord in our in our here yeah i had. I heard a rumor that that you're on a show recorded last week with jim harold when he asked me almost fell off my chair because all the big names are there air and she was on words. I've never been on hooah jackson rob jackson. Lee procup up was interviewed so excited and it was nice to sit down with jim and talk podcasting so it'll be up next week. I'm surprised podcasting show about podcast. He just started fourteen fourteen years after the fact knows that he's in podcasting you know well. He has a popular campfire his campfire show. I used to his shows shoes for awhile good job. You'll have lincoln the show notes you guys for that show and all of the other shows and i think that that's about it. If you have not heard i heard the special bonus episodes of jessica and myself <hes> answering some questions for the she podcast super squad. Please do so so you'll get a little bit behind the scenes of what we do every week back in the super squad which is an incredible little <hes> community. It's really growing and we're getting a lot done in there so please sign up for a patriot for five dollars a month. Y'all aw five starbucks like one day a week. Just like think put away another five dollars like you're.

jim harold john i Lee procup facebook starbucks rob jackson jessica lincoln apple five dollars fourteen fourteen years one day
"rob jackson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"rob jackson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But you should do everything within your power to create a plan on what your maintenance schedules, going to look like so that you can do the best that you can't mitigate possible causes of those fires. In addition to the plan. The wall also requires any work performed on utility infrastructure to be conducted by qualified linemen for the California report, I'm Paul Volcker. In Carson city, Nevada. One of the culprits blamed for recent wildfires its. Climate change. Scientists are proposing a new solution to combat it and includes converting one greenhouse gas into another cake science editor Craig Miller explains. The idea adding carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Sounds like a novel approach to arresting global warming. It is researchers at Stanford University want to convert the more potent greenhouse gas methane into carbon dioxide. Yes. That would be the same CO two. That is the main driver of global warming. We need to cut emissions but emissions are still rising for both carbon dioxide and methane. That's rob Jackson and earth scientists at Stanford. Ideally, he says we would catch those gases before they go out. But we need to explore other ways to remove some of those greenhouse gases after during the atmosphere, that's not preferable but it may be necessary. But Jackson contends the conversion will be a net positive. He's proposing to use minerals. Catch methane and render it to see. Oh, two pound for pound. Methane is more than eighty times as potent as c o two as a greenhouse gas for the first twenty years after, it's released the research has major implications last year. Methane emissions passed a grim milestone, they are now two and a half times greater than pre industrial levels of the California report..

rob Jackson Stanford University California Nevada Paul Volcker Carson city Craig Miller editor twenty years two pound
"rob jackson" Discussed on Buzz Burbank News and Comment

Buzz Burbank News and Comment

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"rob jackson" Discussed on Buzz Burbank News and Comment

"Lifetimes. But nearly a third of us are on the fence about climate change and one in five just isn't buying it Gallup found the skeptics are mostly Republicans. In the meantime, America's coal fired power plants belched out more c o two than ever last year and the fourth biggest amount in recorded history. It is that carbon dioxide that eats away at the ozone layer of our atmosphere that filters the rays of the sun around the world last year the demand for energy grew by nearly two and a half percent. The most rapid increase in years to meet the demand power providers around the world turned to gas and coal. We burned over thirty three billion tons of the stuff last year pushing carbon emissions up by nearly two percent at a time. Scientists say we should be making drastic cuts. Also hanging in the air. The question of whether the nations that signed the Paris climate accord will be able to live up to that agreement Stanford earth science professor rob Jackson says we are in deep trouble. The climate consequences are catastrophic adding I don't use. Word like that very often. We are headed for disaster. He says, and nobody seems to be able to slow things down. And that brings us to the green new deal. It's a Bill but not a policy. The green new deal is a statement of principles the setting a goal to fix the environment. And the economy at the same time a new deal to create jobs in alternative energy it sets the ambitious goal of converting one hundred percent of the power demand in the US to be clean and renewable with no emissions within ten years. It would upgrade existing buildings and expand high speed rail to the point of eliminating the need for most air travel. It shoots for a million new jobs with guaranteed healthcare and guaranteed minimum wage along with family and.

rob Jackson Gallup America US Paris professor thirty three billion tons one hundred percent two percent ten years
Greenhouse gas emissions are rising, again

Climate Cast

04:42 min | 3 years ago

Greenhouse gas emissions are rising, again

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America as one of the largest global financial institutions Bank of America is in a unique position to help society. Transition to a low-carbon economy Bank of America NA member FDIC. Greenhouse gas emissions are on the rise. Again. I'm NPR chief meteorologist, Paul hunter. This is quite a cast. Troubling news for climate watchers this month, a new study in the journal environmental research letters projects. A two point seven percent increase in global greenhouse gas emissions this year emissions edged slightly higher last year after three years of nearly flat. Emissions, but how and why emissions are rising is a bigger story. Rob Jackson is an earth sciences professor at Stanford University. I asked him what the numbers mean last couple years several things that happened. The developing world is still using more energy countries. Like, India are building coal and nuclear and renewables at breakneck pace because they have hundreds of millions of people without access to electric city. Still today this year, we have seen China's emissions go quite a bit may have green lighted. Some coal-based projects that they had put on hold out of concern for air quality. But it's not all about those other countries here in the US are only uses going up steadily. And we have some unusual weather this year. Let's higher heating and cooling loads. So armee missions are up a couple of percent for the first time in a decade or more. I see the European Union emissions actually decreased slightly. What is Europe doing right Europe has the longest track record of emissions declines, we're seeing much more aggressive development of wind and solar power in electric sector. We have some countries some of the Scandinavian countries that are selling the vehicles as electric cars. They're moving aggressively not just in the electrical sector as we are in the US, but they're decarbonising their vehicle fleets at a much faster rate than we are. So the big atmospheric question then for climate impacts is what has to happen for global emissions to peak and start a downward trend. Several things have to happen. We have to provide all incentives we can to help countries. Like India choose to build as many wind and solar facilities and low carbon technologies as possible every time. We or anyone else the new coal plant on the ground, even a new natural gas plant. We're talking about emissions for thirty or forty years. We have to have steeper cuts in the developed world richer world like Europe and the United States to offset a billion or so people around the world who still live in energy poverty. The best thing that's happening is just a radical growth. We're seeing in wind and solar power, and it's driven not first and foremost by climate policy. It's driven by economics, industrialized solar facilities are now as cheap as coal and natural gas and consumers want clean power. So I'm optimistic that eventually we will we will get there. Just a much your how long it's going to take rob Jackson earth sciences, professor at Stanford University. Thanks for sharing your work and your insight today. Thank you so much. My name is Maryanne, Michael. I'm twenty five years old. I live in Minneapolis. I'm one of the regional leads in Minnesota for sunrise movement. I am working to stop climate change by helping to get leaders elected who will fight for future for all of us after the election. We heard from Nancy Pelosi that she had plans to revive a select committee that had the purpose of convening hearings and investigating on climate change and reporting to the public, but we need action and we need action now. So I went in November with a group of two hundred young people from sunrise movement to ask Nancy Pelosi to create not a select committee on climate change. But a select committee on a green new deal. The green new deal will rapidly transition our economy, and our society away from fossil fuels and towards renewable energy in order to stop climate change. It also comes with a guarantee that anyone who wants a good job with a fair wage to. Assist in that transition. We'll be able to get one. I went back again just this past week. And I was with a group of one thousand young people to ask speaker Flosi again to create this committee, it felt incredibly powerful to have been there a month ago, and even more amazing and hopeful about our future and about our future in stopping climate change to be there with so many other young people who are as dedicated as I am. That's climate test. I'm MPR chief meteorologist, Paul Hutton.

Rob Jackson United States Bank Of America Europe Chief Meteorologist Stanford University Nancy Pelosi India Professor Fdic NPR Environmental Research Letters Paul Hunter
Carbon Dioxide Emissions Are Up Again. What Now, Climate?

NPR's World Story of the Day

02:55 min | 3 years ago

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Are Up Again. What Now, Climate?

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from internet essentials from Comcast. Connecting more than six million low income people to low cost high speed internet at home. So students are ready for homework class graduation and more. Now, they're ready for anything in Poland climate negotiators from around the world are meeting to figure out how to keep greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere. The task looks harder than ever as NPR's. Christopher. Joyce reports. New research shows emissions are getting worse for three years. The news about global emissions of the biggest greenhouse gas carbon dioxide was pretty good. They were leveling off. But then they started to rise again in twenty seventeen and they're still going up. Rob Jackson is a climate researcher at Stanford University last year, we thought was a blip or could be a blip. But it isn't this year were up again the second year in a row and emissions arising the slowdown. And then the uptick are largely the result of. What's been happening in China? Their economy has been slowing a bit, which is one reason the mission stalled. But now the government is trying to boost growth than are green lighting, some coal projects that had been on hold. India is also using a lot more coal as the government tries to bring electricity to millions. Who don't have it writing in the journal environmental research letters Jackson notes that Americans are using way less coal now. But like most everyone else in the world, they're using a lot more of another kind of fossil fuel. It's cheap gasoline were buying bigger cars, and we're driving more miles per vehicle. Another hurdle reported in the journal nature this week China is cleaning up its air pollution. That sounds great for pollution, weary Chinese citizens. But some of that air pollution, actually, cools the atmosphere. It blocks out solar radiation, less pollution. Ironically, could mean more warming some climate experts meeting in Poland are eager to point to successes rather than a Lou. Coming carbon apocalypse like Corine mccarey from the university of East Anglia in Great Britain. She says take a look at clean energy growth. Ninety owner and wind power. Yeah. Hasn't been investment by government, and by businesses and wind and solar energy. And these investments have driven down to cost down to where renewable energy can compete with coal for new power plants, but renewable energy is far from replacing fossil fuels and the gauche eaters in Poland. Just got a rude. Reminder of how hard that will be in France a proposed tax on gasoline meant to cut consumption caused widespread rioting the French government quickly put that idea on ice. Christopher Joyce NPR news.

Christopher Joyce Npr Poland Rob Jackson China Comcast University Of East Anglia NPR French Government Stanford University France Environmental Research Researcher
"rob jackson" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"rob jackson" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"The international energy agency just released its annual world energy outlook this morning according to the report the us is on its way to becoming the world's quote undisputed global oil and gas leader and quote that's right in line with the aims of the trump administration at the un climate talks in germany the white house officials are focused on fossil fuels and nuclear power marketplace's andy euler has more america's delegation of the climate talks is all about efficient coal natural gas and nuclear as a response to climate change john hofmeister is ceo of citizens for affordable energy which promotes natural gas to put him quickly irresponsible who think that we could replace energy density of nuclear and fossil energy with wind and solar he says renewables alone won't get as close to emissions targets rob jackson the global carbon project at stanford forecast that worldwide fossil fuel emissions will reach a record in 2017 he says reversing that trend isn't cheap with you try clean coal when anything else who pays for that utilities and their customers don't want to foot the bill nuclear cuts emissions but building a new plant is really expensive so until there some sort of national policy incentivizing does industries i don't be either nuclear or clean coal taking a bite out of our energy needs he says to diversify the energy mix in whatever direction the us has to start investing now i mean euler for marketplace.

andy euler america john hofmeister ceo natural gas energy density clean coal us germany white house nuclear power climate change rob jackson stanford