2 Burst results for "Rob Hutchison"

"rob hutchison" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

09:18 min | 1 year ago

"rob hutchison" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Welcome to episode Twenty Six popper PhD being the last episode of Twenty Nine Thousand Nine hundred instead of an interview and this week. I'm bringing your collection of inspiring full of wisdom the guests of shared so far. I hope you enjoyed them. Having sneak a happy sharing welcome to papa. PhD With David Mendez. The podcast where we explore careers in life after Grad school with guests who have walked the road less traveled and have unique stories to tell about how they made their place in the world of constantly evolving rules get ready to go off the beaten path and hop on for an exciting new episode of Papa PhD. I'd really love you the audience to play an active role in the show. So if there's a theme you'd like to see covered on the show or if there's a guest did you like me to interview head over to anchor dot. FM FOR SLASH CAPUCCI and drop us a voice message to be featured on a future episode on the PG see website you can also subscribe to our newsletter and get our resource sheet at the bottom of every page and you can also leave us a written message contacts page. Welcome to the show on episode one. The new Murchison shared about the importance of allowing self to think big when thinking of career opportunities. I think the the first biggest thing would be To to think big about what the possibilities are you know Well I think you know things like like this project. You're working on you know things it's like this podcast really help people to to realize there are a lot of opportunities to raise the go in addition to just you know continuing on academia right. So you know. Don't be scared to kind of be a little bit audacious about what what kind of direction you might be able to go into And to really think about what. What's what's GonNa work for you when it's going to resonate for you And then you know to you know work figuring out how you're gonNA spend yourself how you're going to and how you're GonNa get all personal brand how you're GonNa you know how you're GonNa spin it so that you're the right person to do that. Ah On episode. Two Joel. mccower talked about the importance of staying curious. I you still learning stuff. Yeah I thought I've got a PhD. I'm an intelligent person But when I was doing my MBA. I realized that If you're not not studying something quite rigorously you know. You don't feel union in especially of course I was in my late forties doing my mba as well but You don't Your mind does begin to stagnate so keep leading cause after a year of my MBA. I felt I was twenty years younger mentally again. My agility amd back and that was great you know is a great feeling To I would say just keep letting no matter what it it is do Of course you know Learn about extraterrestrial life. You know If physicals search for extraterrestrial life or learn about anything I think that's really important again. Every opportunity increases you'll network on episode three Mark Roberts shares. Why should never feel like you're stuck professionally? The key mindset is just to keep reminding yourself that if what you're doing say that new job outside Academian started if it doesn't live up to your expectations that doesn't mean that you made the wrong and that somehow failed so you really should have just stayed in academia. Now that's not that you can always leave. That new job can find another the job either in the same field perhaps discovered that field just isn't for you so if something brand new again you're really never stuck in this. You convince yourself you're stuck and so What what I would really recommend is that everybody is their own pep squad? So when things aren't aren't working out just keep telling yourself that things will turn around you one way or another on episode four Rob Hutchison talks about why it's important to identify your strong suits. I I would say to identify what you are good at and what you enjoy doing so they may not not necessarily be the same thing but hopefully future job would contain elements of both and next. I would say start working on your brand early so so this would mean developing your CV and your Lincoln page but also putting together your elevator pitch to summarize your profile. This is something that you should have prepared to recite someone on its opportunities arises and then third I would say. Don't be afraid to take a leap to try new things and do things that scare you like. I mentioned before some people might like the idea of just doing the same old repetitive tasks and over and over again. But if you want to progress in your career keep things interesting and do more meaningful work and makes a real difference whether it be for your clients or for anyone else that I think they need to take risks and put yourself out there. On episode six Fiona Robinson Talks about the importance of finding your passion. If you're doing research I think that the two top things you're at are transferable from that are your critical critical thinking skills and your ability to take a big project rated into pieces analyze those. Get those done tied back together and bring her back to the whole. I think you can do that pretty much. Anyone doing research is being back. Then you can do anything you can. You can take on any kind of challenge. So then it's finding where do you want to put your allergies. What are you passionate about? I know they say you know do what you love and you'll never work a day in your life. Whatever you still have to work? It's not always fun and not everybody gets to work doing what they. But there's gotta be something but you're doing or that you wish you in that that draws on episode seven Philippa Kereta Bauza talks about. Why you deserve to be where your today? Life is really really stressful nowadays in every field so you really stressful but if you are doing winging it is because it deserves and love your child as it's been hard in win nowadays the working. Where'd you live science will? Is Everything Itar and so rest. This will take all these days on episode eight. Emily Blue Roberts tells us what's important to have a side hustle during your PhD. Start doing actual work outside of your role role as a graduate student OR POST DOC By work I don't necessarily mean paid work. Although that is preferable it could be volunteer work but anything just just to gain any kind of experiences outside of your primary one as a researcher As a student as a trainee because working saying if it's a side hustle or a volunteer position or an internship or whatever it is gives you again those additional perspectives That you might be seeking at this this time and you know usually something you can put on your CV. Because a lot of the the fear I think at this stage is around I don't have any work experience. I don't have any reason working experience. All employers are looking for the PhD plus two years. He's Mary's as an entry level position. Well of course we know. That's negotiable right But something you can do while at the same time you're finishing her PhD. You can start that work experience clock even on a part time basis just by reaching out and having some of these other Arab experiences in episode nine killer look shows advice on finding a fulfilling career. Yeah so that is A. It's obviously a huge task to that transition and to even begin to understand what you want to do and I think one of the main things is needs to do. Your research find vocation that is profitable fulfilling but also can provide value to your audience and make you feel like you're making a valuable contribution And that's not always the easiest thing to do but if you do that research in you you have a decent idea that something's actually going to earn your money and filling. That's ninety.

Papa PhD David Mendez Grad school Rob Hutchison Fiona Robinson dot Philippa Kereta Bauza Murchison Mark Roberts Academian Joel. mccower Emily Blue Roberts Mary Lincoln graduate student researcher trainee
"rob hutchison" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

13:44 min | 2 years ago

"rob hutchison" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Yeah why not I said well. How about we don't know. Oh Oh no. That's just not the attitude that an employer wants of course companies now are teams and often be teams in people need to the you know you have to be personable and and humble in the just there needs to be a sense that you're willing to pay some induce at maybe taking a step backwards to get your foot in the door to type of industry excellent. That's the various thank you for that because it's also people might urge by going to the other extreme end and of course that that that that's not ideal so we talked about what we just touched upon the the idea of a ticking taking advantage of maybe career services that existed university but I wonder whether you in your in your path that brought you where you are today. Whether you had the the privilege of having mentors you know that were crucial at different points in in helping you move forward forward in in your B. It's in your in your in your graduate studies or even after in your career okay definitely so in my graduate career my thesis adviser all across on my committee at Princeton or just amazing at who that fine balance of giving advice without hand holding tank so they they also gave me swam to fail you know to go go down dead ends and figure my way out on my own without panicking so there was that sense that yeah we we'll let you be independent. and we'll you know give pointers here and there but if if you fail it's not the end of the world and that's something which I really appreciate it and it was a big advantage of doing by degree in that department it said it was a special place place or from entering they also do things quite differently there to most other departments arguments where you know in most departments you will come in to work in somebody's lab they might even get your research question right and then when they publish when you when he published your research your adviser is automatically going to be an also add on everything but it was different instant yet to come up with your own question. You really couldn't work on the exact same thing as a supervisor and it's just you as an also on articles so that that was handy after my studies I can honestly say I had any mentors but then again I didn't really feel I needed one. I was thirty four years old and I graduated because it's been so long in university and by the time I was in my a second medical rights or jaw that managing editor position by then. I was thinking I saw yeah. That's interesting because what I was going to say. Nix Search like maybe putting you a little bit on the spot with not really I've interviewed Rob Hutchison who you know very well and he he mentioned you as one of his mentors so I'd like to maybe again. Turn turn my questions around given the you know that I have you on the Mike and and may be think of of because now now you're you're working you know you have you have stratton him. He working in in a in a team there but in a previous positions you've had the chance again to help people that were coming from academia did grow into their their new medical writing or medical editing in career and so have this kind of mentorship position towards different people in an rob mentioned mentioned specifically how you really helped him learning the the middle of of of medical editor and and so what I was going to ask you and I don't know if you've ever thought of it this way would be the question would be as a mentor. How did you help people mature into into an domain or you know an area of activity that they were not proficient before I think it would boil down to devising a plan so if there was a if there's somebody who has scope to improve proven given area right making a plan means clearly defining what it is that is optimal right now and then describing what it would look like if it were optimal and then what what would you have to do to get from where you are now to that preferred position and it could involve a specific meetings things in areas that the person is not strong in it could mean introducing different process for doing an aspect the job it could be really simple as turning off. They spoke picturing the day though if anything it'll be different for different people and I think if people can do this for themselves rather than waiting to to be mentored by someone else then they're really a step ahead. you know a lot of what I would say. A mentor does is teach or lead by example apple's so you know you're not necessarily directing somebody and telling them do this do that but just in your own way that you're in the world in in your job you're setting a good example. I think you know what I always tried to impart. because it's something I I believed him for myself is being unafraid eight to try something and just knowing it's not gonna be the end of the world if you fail. It's just a just like a an opportunity really to to dust this yourself off. Try again in a different way and I think that that attitude of owning your own mistakes is very powerful awful. I couldn't have taken the plunge into Phelan's consulting where you know. I have no no salary that is every week I know I I get my paycheck right or two weeks. It's it's all entirely dependent on me going out getting projects and doing them in the book always stops at your desk but knowing just having that knowledge that okay things might make a mistake but own it and correct. I still think that especially in this in this context of transitioning to an industry that that you may know little about of the about the nitty gritty someone that's already inside that can show you the ropes still concealed play a very important role in in you know launching you into your new career. Yes not a hand holding you know forever and ever ever but that initial push yeah and that initial you know example like that person has probably gone through that same path right so if they can share what it was like them their first you know I nee first week first month. That's really helpful one we did when I I was managing editor as he had a unborn guide for new hires to have written down for them those those key things that they really need to be grabbing during that first day Chris and I yeah but a mentor would be you know very handy in that in that situation as well and it is it is it it just be another employees. Just there bit longer than you. somebody to shadow yeah for example. Yep but I don't want people to think that it's without an a mentor. They are going to fail so that's that's not been my experience for myself no again especially especially you know people who who have these skills of problem solving and of self studying and that you know that that we're talking about which often will so you know they'll be able to learn a new skill in a couple of days because they need to and they just again and then they come out of that intense study knowing knowing most of what they need so oh exactly yeah well. We've we've reached my last question which is kind of a a role play at question a little bit the way I set it up. you know to kind of close the interview with some advice to the listeners and the idea is the to imagine that the you know you're in front of an audience of young finalists or young graduates just like you were when when you when you finish it's an or when you were finishing and you know they're struggling. They may have fears worries doubts about finding their place in the job market's about stressing tracing the journey towards fulfilling and productive life and these people that are in front of you. I'd like you to to tell what two or three he basic strategies or principles they could follow starting today to put in place a realistic and attainable transition plan you know due to this plan that she talked about you know when the person comes with the plan how what were the first steps in the basic principles that they can start applying today to start in writing their plan. I would say that the principles are are kind of all mindsets. the first one I would say is something I've mentioned before this idea about paying your jeans a bit like when I started in medical writing that's how it felt for me and I really like it but you just have to realize is you can't walk straight out of Grad School or from one industry in my case since I was already out teaching while became walk walk straight out into a CEO position at a company in a different industry you need time in the field to build your new network and that's what you're going to be doing from the moment that you take a new job even if it's a very humble you're building a new network so oh I would. I'd encourage anyone considering that means a industry to take advantage of job openings that even if the position seems a bit humble you can see that it has a potential for career advancement down the road so either directly in that same company see you're applying or else if you see that it could be a stepping stone to something bigger and brighter elsewhere and I just had the mindset that there is absolutely absolutely no such thing as useless experience. you know one job. I took when I was an Undergrad was telephone fundraising Vancouver symphony and I did a two week training there and telephone marketing at you know I still use things I learned then at that little job to this day so road. I really believe there's absolutely no such thing as useless experience so go ahead paired. US tried something but if side of that it's the we could call principle apple number two is that honestly this is the only life you're gonna get seems to be true. So if you don't end up living the life you dream of that's that's kind of a tragedy so don't let yourself stagnates in a new role that it's clearly not working for you..

Rob Hutchison managing editor apple US Vancouver supervisor Princeton Mike Phelan editor Grad School Chris CEO thirty four years two weeks two week