36 Burst results for "Rivers"

Fresh update on "rivers" discussed on Mark Reardon

Mark Reardon

00:40 sec | 42 min ago

Fresh update on "rivers" discussed on Mark Reardon

"Denmark. Things are in pretty good shape right now, With the exception If you're headed down into the Jefferson County on 55 this traffic reports of service of Reinhold flooring because we have an injury accident there, South Bound 55 just south of Richardson Road. Only the White Lane is getting by and it's a solid jam back to about 1 41 on South I'm 55. We also oven incident south on 55. Right around on Holly Hills just passed a Bates is causing a bit of a back up in the city. So troubles on 55 South out westbound Highway 70. You have the usual roadwork delays from 2 70 after the Blanchard Bridge westbound 60 for a bit of a back up, it looks like it may be an incident on 70 or at the 70 overpass on westbound to keep works is a solid backup through prospect. Once you get past that 700.61 of the core of a river is a little busy but 70 itself out that way. Is not bad. We had a pursuit to begin in North County and ended up in Metro East at Missouri Avenue right near Ah, 13 right in the Centerville area, So there's some restrictions, in fact, a lot of heavy traffic right now on 1 57 at 15 not too far away from there as well. Looking for first.

Jefferson County Blanchard Bridge Holly Hills North County Centerville Bates Denmark.
4-Year-Old Girl Found Dead After Wandering Away From Danvers Home, Northeast Of Boston

WBZ Morning News

00:25 sec | 10 hrs ago

4-Year-Old Girl Found Dead After Wandering Away From Danvers Home, Northeast Of Boston

"Shore this weekend after a four year old girl wanders off from home, it is found floating unresponsive. In a Danvers River. Police say it appears to be a tragic accident after locating the girl in a section of Crane River just after noon time yesterday, not far from her home in a Danvers apartment complex. Rescuers performed CPR, but the little girl was pronounced dead. A short time later at Beverly Hospital. It is now

Danvers River Danvers Crane River Beverly Hospital CPR
Boston - 4-Year-Old Girl Found Dead After Wandering Away From Danvers Home

WBZ Morning News

00:28 sec | 11 hrs ago

Boston - 4-Year-Old Girl Found Dead After Wandering Away From Danvers Home

"This weekend after a four year old girl wanders off from home. It is found floating in a Danvers River. Police say this appears to be nothing more than a tragic accident after locating the girl in a section of Crane River happened just after noon time yesterday and not far from her home in a Danvers apartment complex. Rescuers say the child was unresponsive and was given CPR but was pronounced dead a short time later on arrival at Beverly Hospital. Well, it's backed off

Danvers River Danvers Crane River Beverly Hospital
Washington DC - 3 Missing After Falling Off Boat in Potomac River

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 13 hrs ago

Washington DC - 3 Missing After Falling Off Boat in Potomac River

"People are missing after falling off a boat in the Potomac River near southwest DC Rescue crews in D C. Are trying to find three men who did not resurface after falling off the boat. According to our news partners at NBC for multiple agencies in the D. C. Police Harbor Patrol responded to the area about 5 40 PM as off 8 p.m. D C. Fire, and E. M s say that they're now treating the incident as a recovery operation.

D. C. Police Harbor Patrol Potomac River NBC E. M
The Importance of Looking Upstream with Dan Heath

The EntreLeadership Podcast

05:39 min | 16 hrs ago

The Importance of Looking Upstream with Dan Heath

"Have, you ever gotten those spots where you start treating your business, your leadership, your team, maybe even your family and quite frankly your entire life like a game of mole, like you hit this one thing and you think you're good, and then another thing pops up and then another thing boss up. Then you have to hit two things at once and then you need five hands because you have to five things at once they keep coming up and you're going frantic and you're going crazy and you just can't get to all of it. Have you ever been there? Whenever you engage in that version of life. That's a lot like whack a mole. You start to realize that you're focusing only on symptoms and you never actually get to the source from the Ramsey network. This is the entree leadership podcast where we business leaders grow themselves, their teams and their profits. I'm your host. Alex Jed. Today, we get to talk with Dan Heath WHO's an author and researcher who has spent over a decade working on this exact. Exact topic, not just how you as a leader solve problems, but how do you prevent them from ever occurring? How do you not just attack the symptom, but get down to the source to the root cause. Now, he calls this upstream thinking and it's the title of his new book upstream and this whole idea that can transform your priorities, your leadership, and your team would all originated with a parable about you having a picnic by the river? So you and a friend are having a picnic beside a river. You've laid out your picnic blanket. You're just preparing to sit down and eat when you hear a shout behind you from the direction of the river and you look back and there's a child and the river. Kinda thrashing around apparently drowning and. Instinctively jump in both of you and you fish the child out you bring them to shore and Just. When you're adrenaline starting to recede a little bit, you hear a second. Shout, you look back and it's another child also apparently drowning. So you go. You rescue them, bring them to shore, and no sooner. Have you done now that you hear to shouts now it's two kids in the river, and so you're in, you're out, you're rescuing kids and you're starting to get exhausted. And about that time your friend swims to shore and starts walking away as though to leave you alone and you say, Hey, where you going I can't do this by myself. All these kids they need rescuing, and your friend says I'm going upstream to tackle the guy who's thrown all these kids in the river, and that in a nutshell is what this book is about. It's about this phenomenon. What's so often life whether it's our personal life or a businesses we get trapped in the cycle of reaction, we're putting out fires responding to emergencies. We're always. Always downstream dealing with problems after they happen, but we rarely make the space. We rarely devote the time and attention that we would need to go upstream and forestalled head off these problems before they ever happen, and that's what I'm chasing with this. I'd love to know what was the genesis of this thought being a book for you. Where did that come from? As something that you said man I want to spend a ton of time studying researching and writing about that. The first time I started a file called upstream was in two thousand nine. And two things that happened was I heard that parable for the first time. Then it was the first time. This notion of upstream thinking was planted in my head, and the other is around the time. I heard that parable I had this conversation with the assistant deputy chief of police in Canadian city, and he told me this story of this thought experiment really stuck with me ever since and he said, imagine you've got to police officers and one of them goes down in the morning during the morning rush. And she positions herself in this intersection. That's kind of notorious. It's chaotic. Accidents there, and just by being a visible presence in that intersection, she calms people down. She gets them to be more cautious and she prevents accidents from happening. So that's officer one. and. Then officer to go to a different part of downtown where there is prohibited right turn signal, and she hides around the corner and when people cheat and and make that prohibited right turn. She jumps out and slaps them with the ticket. And this deputy chief said, which of these two officers do you think did more for the public good and for public safety and he said? Indisputably was the first right. She probably prevented some accidents maybe even prevented someone from being killed. But if you ask who is going to be praised who's going to be rewarded, who's going to be promoted, it's officer to because she comes back with a stack of tickets that show what she's accomplished, and meanwhile, if you think about officer one, how does she prove? She did anything. You know how do you prove that something did not happen. And we might say, well, you can look at data and that's certainly true I mean. We could keep a log of how many accidents happen at this intersection before and after the officer was stationed there, and if there's a downtick claimed credit for that. But notice even in that scenario where we have the data backing up our work, we still don't know. Know who exactly was helped? There was some guy headed downtown to go to his job that morning and he noticed the presence of the officer. He slowed down a little bit. He was fine in an alternate reality where she wasn't there. He would have been in a crash in died that morning. He'll never know that that's right. Officer will never know who? Who she helped. So there's this kind of maddening ambiguity about upstream work that even though it's essential, even though it can stop problems before they happen. It also brings a lot of ambiguity and complexity, and in that idea coupled with that parable Kinda. Got Me hooked and I've been fascinated by ever since

Officer Deputy Chief Ramsey Network Alex Jed Dan Heath Researcher
New York sheriffs arrest boat owner, captain for violating social distancing rules

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:21 sec | 1 d ago

New York sheriffs arrest boat owner, captain for violating social distancing rules

"You you can't can't social social distance distance on on a a party party boat. boat. New New York York Sheriff's Sheriff's intercepted intercepted the the Liberty Liberty Bell Bell last last night night appeared appeared 36 36 arresting arresting the the captain captain in in the the owner for an illegal party in violation of the mayor and governor's emergency orders on social distancing and Mohr. Liquor violations to the Liberty Bell was the largest river party vote in the Empire Cruise Fleet tendon wins asked them for comment, and they hung up on a several times.

Liberty Liberty Bell Bell New York York Empire Cruise Fleet Mohr
Pilgrimage to Sacred Activism

Hay House Meditations

05:40 min | 1 d ago

Pilgrimage to Sacred Activism

"Hi Andrew and welcome on to the hey house meditations podcast how wonderful to be with you and how wonderful to have the opportunity to speak to whoever's listening from my heart. Out wonderful wonderful. I'd like to talk to you today about the Fifteenth Century Poet Mystic Kabeer. Who you've been doing so much work on and and perhaps have you read a few of his lines. That articulate a meditative experience that is at once transcendent but also completely grounded I really appreciate that in computer But before we get there, there's a pilgrimage that I like to ask you to take us on a pilgrimage to the ark of of your own spiritual journey. An ARC that is has taken pauses with a variety of traditions, teachers, and Gurus and especially that are of the internal pilgrimage of the heart. So I wonder if you'd take us on that pilgrimage and then we'll sort of maybe conclude with Kabira. Does that sound all right with you? That sounds wonderful. Today and your little remission it it's. Never ends. I remember when I was with father bid when he was dying and. The thing that struck me most and move me most about him here. He was the greatest living Christian mystic but even on his deathbed when he was eighty seven, he was still striving for deeper and deeper realize. So he gave me a permanent image of what this really is journey of endless expansion. Shems of Tabriz said to Rumi. The world of God is wealth of endless expansion. We don't ever arrive. We just go Diba and DEEPA and Deepa went blasted where wild enough were brave enough into a mystery that always keeps opening onto wilder and holy vistas. This is my experience. Yes, and you're well I must say your your life has demonstrated that but I'm not exactly certain if you knew that when you were born. In mother India right you are. You're born in south India early in your life. You earlier in life you're surrounded by multiple religious by religious face including your your parents Protestant faith. And among the Hindus and Muslims. So how did that early on your life? How did that shape your outlook on the nature of humans on the nature of people and the nature of the divine? India is too big bomb in a well the distill known that live as cred experience. And that mock me forever I feel that I have an Indian. So a European mind and an American mission. So my deepest deepest ground is always in there especially in south India. When I was born. Nineteen fifty two was the twilight of the Rosh. So this. Was the atmosphere of an. Empire would still. Diffused itself through everything but India itself although it had been dominated by the British in never lost its passionate spirituality and that's what I met in the earliest and most impressionable years of my life. I loved going to temples with my Hindu coke. I loved learning the hail. Mary from my Catholic nanny and I loved it when the driver that we had to as a Muslim stopped the car in the middle of traffic and put his. Prem Don and chunk to Allah. In very early on. I met a saint and this is an extraordinary story because I had white Russian. Godmother. who used to smoke cigarettes out of black along black cigarette holder in Lyon dressed in gold she fall she looked like a Russian Melena dietrich and I was crazy about her she's. and. Every day off to school I would go running up the stairs of her flag. And jumped into bed between her and have great friend who is huge Rowley poterie Indian woman Shanti. Of course as a child I didn't know. Shanti Shanti, later revealed to me it was India's greatest living Quila and she is the child had been. A welcome to previous incarnation and a gunman, a group of journalists to the village that she'd been born in. As, a nine year old recognized absolutely everybody and Meta previous husband and said the money looking for is under a break in the back. So he went and found the money that he'd been looking for. Any. gave. Me a lot of profound simple instruction. She told me two things that have not my whole life. She said God is one. God is the sea and all religions alike rivers that run into the sea. So. Don't get hung up on anyone religion realized that they're all different expressions of the same unity, the different expressions of the same reality

India Shanti Shanti Andrew Tabriz Deepa Kabira Prem Don Melena Dietrich Mary Lyon Quila
Gov. Newsom asks Warren Buffett to back removal of Northern California dam

KCBS Radio Midday News

00:28 sec | 3 d ago

Gov. Newsom asks Warren Buffett to back removal of Northern California dam

"Governor Newsome has appealed directly to investor Warren Buffett to support demolishing for hydro electric dams on a river along the Oregon California border. The goal is to save salmon populations that have dwindled to almost nothing. The governor on Wednesday wrote Buffet urging him to back the Klamath River project, which would be the largest dam removal in U. S history. Dams are owned by a Pacific Corps, an Oregon based utility owned by Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway company.

Warren Buffett Governor Newsome Oregon California Border Klamath River Berkshire Hathaway Company Oregon Pacific Corps Buffet U. S
Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

The Vergecast

48:04 min | 3 d ago

Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

"So, this hearing just going to say it, it was six hours of chaos. So. So many things like individual moments of pure chaos happened this hearing. But because every member of Congress was only given five minutes to ask the questions in and they moved on, no one could process the moments of cash. So here are some things that happened during this hearing. Jeff. bezos just started eating nuts on his call. That was just a thing that you started snacking for the first ninety minutes. It appears that basis had tech issues was operating in some kind of delay. So we didn't hear from him. They just answer any questions and they'd take a ten minute break Jeff. bezos could fix his computer. Amazing. Jim Jordan, who McKenna pointed out. On the show last week is always sort of chaos element. Try to talk over several members of Congress got yelled to put his mass back on floated. Just elaborate conspiracy theories. was when I say was chaos I. Don't know if there's any other way to describe it. I. Think that led a lot of people to think the hearing itself didn't accomplish its goals, but I think in many ways it did. But Kennedy you WanNa Kinda go through what the committee was trying to accomplish the themes they were pointed at in. How hearing played out, right. So okay. First off. Harkening back to last week I mentioned Jim. Jordan's mountain dew obsession. Definitely drink a handful those throughout the hearing I took notes in screen shots. So, I, called it. But regardless of their pores soda choices, there were a lot of lawmakers who definitely did their homework and I think that was really apparent throughout the entire hearing and when I look at. The picture that they tried to paint I think that became really clear in chairman Sicily's opening statements. So this is the guy who liked. And spearheaded the entire investigation from the beginning, and in those opening statements, he pointed out that yeah Apple Amazon Google facebook. There are different in a lot of ways and they exhibit anticompetitive behaviors potentially allegedly and a lot of different ways. But what they tried to pull together and was a story, and it's really hard to tell a story and five minute fragments. But what happened yesterday was Sicily. Ni, and a lot of the Democrats on the Committee wanted to point out that these companies they become bottlenecks for distribution whether that's information or just like APP stores marketplace's they control what gets distributed in how what was really key to the investigation was how? How they survey competitors. If you have so much control dominance over a market or a specific part of the tech industry, you have a lot of insight into your competitors and you can do a lot of dangerous things with that, and then lastly, after that dominance has gained, it's how they abuse it. Right? How they abuse it to make harder for small businesses in competitors and I think that's exactly what Cellini pointed out in the beginning and I think they did a poor job that storytelling throughout the process. But I think that's also our job. Right is to pull that evidence together and tell that story for them in a way that isn't like. Yes, no yelling at CEOS and like stopping them and I think by getting that in the evidentiary record doing all this questioning, I think they really did achieve their goal in the end. Yeah. I mean, I think the thing that happened sort of next to the hearing was that they released a bunch of documents from these one point, three, million documents of clutch. Over the past year, they released pretty targeted selection documents for every company showing some of this stuff, Casey, I wrote a story about. facebook. INSTAGRAM. My I'm going to frame this email or mark Zuckerberg. Literally one sentence, no period. The Andrew says I need to figure out. I'M GONNA buy instagram like I would love to just be in a place were sending that email like super casually like I got this thing to figure out and it's not like am I gonNa buy the model of the car. It's like instagram. I've been thinking of the text messages where so and so says that Mark Zuckerberg's didn't go destroy mode on instagram ever since they got that up. Case she this to Kevin and right that text was. Yes. Well, it was Kevin. System was talking to an investor and Kevin said to the investor. If we don't sell well, mark, go into destroy mode on us and the investor side probably. Of course, stray casual. So there's just a lot of documents and I think one of the functions of hearing was to get those documents into the official congressional record to make the CEO's account for them. That did not seem very successful to me. Is like a takeaway people should have from this hearing, right? No. I think a lot of people that go into these hearings are expecting like these big Gotcha moments and expecting like a lot of news and all this stuff. But it really, it wasn't oversight hearing. You know it wasn't. They didn't come. They came at this like in a report last earlier this week that they came out at as investigators. They didn't come at it to make a big show horse and pony show out of it, and yet I think the CEO's didn't. The record well enough to the extent that they could have. But there was definitely, I was expecting them to do a lot less evasion and I expected a lot less room probation with the documents, but it's just the process of a Congressional hearing. It's. It's hard to do that in a congressional hearing. But if you put those documents out there, you get the CEO's on the record a little bit who does excite this excites the FTC. J, and that's who can take this next and then it's also congress. You know they can't break up a tech company, but they can regulate going forward and it's those three key themes that I pointed out earlier that they could regulate. You know what I mean. They could legislate to forbid companies from surveying competitors and things like that, and that's where this goes. So the format of the hearing, every member and five minute chunks, it seemed very clear that the Democrats had some sort of coordinated evidentiary strategy, they would start and. And they would say, I, want to read this email to you. What did you mean by this email and then Jeff bezos would say something like I have. No idea is on works. I. Was real pattern that developed was basis really not doing or claiming he definitely knows claiming not really no way Wayne is under the thing they did or they would ask sooner Pichai about the very granular add deal google made by an ad product, and soon I, would say I'll get back to you, which is basically all responses. So the Democrats seemed like they were coordinated to move through their documents. The Republicans seem to be doing something else that also seem coordinated intentional, but what was their focus because that seemed clear split my takeaway from Jim Jordan who? We got into earlier, he he was interviewing. As if they were all Jack Dorsey. And as we talked about like, yeah, he invited Jack Dorsey to testify, but he doesn't sit on the antidote subcommittees. Anything. He says, it just doesn't matter. So it sounded to me as if he prepared questions Jack Dorsey and then it was like, oh, he's not coming I'll ask Tim Cook the same questions. Another completely crazy moment that happened just seen by and five minute chunks is that. Represented Sensenbrenner from Wisconsin Dear Sweet Wisconsin. Definitely. Asked Mark Zuckerberg why the Donald Junior was banned from twitter and mark. Zuckerberg was happening on twitter facebook and there was just like a moment of confused silence, and then he tried to move on and that just sort of floated by in the river of chaos to tell you how much chaos there was kneeling. When you started to tell that story, I thought you were going to tell the story about when Jim Jordan asked him cook if the famous one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, Apple Super Bowl, AD was actually about twenty twenty cancel culture, which is another thing that really happened. I think that's out of context. He didn't ask him. He said clearly, this is. That's definitely what Steve Jobs was thinking IBM is canceled culture and Apple's going to break it with hammer and Jeff. Bezos said that social media is a nuance destruction machine and all this crazy stuff from that. It was a wild will that that particular question when Jim Jordan asked, do you support the cancel culture mov, you could see the CEOS like. 'cause they went in order. He asks them all in order. So First Tim Cook just like basically muttered nothing. Here's like I don't. I support speech whatever. The iphone a keyboard like that was his answer. Sooner per child also, just like muttered, right? He's like Google has always supported free expression Zuckerberg like saw the opportunity and took it and the forces of liberalism I rising I, and then basis was like I cannot. I cannot do in like went for it, and that was just totally insane moment. But it also seems like the Republicans were intentional to try to create their own moments where they were yelling at CEOS about bias on platforms is obviously something cover a. At. You were paying a lot of attention that case you're paying a lot of attention to it. Do you think that was effective in creating because you know there's like a parallel conservative Universe Jim? Jordan was on Tucker. Carlson. Last night like was that effective or d think that the CEO's were able to sort of tamp down on interesting the Tucker Carlson pointed out that Google and other companies are all big donors to Jim Jordan another folks. So that is a weird side, but I think it was actually besides the moment where they mixed up twitter with facebook I. Think this was much more effective off. Off Topic yelling about technology than we usually see like are genuinely issues that like they are upset about that, they could point to largely around like cove nineteen misinformation and they could at least like pick those topics and stick to them rather than kind of asking vague questions about like, why is my phone listening to me? Well, they're definitely asked questions about why are my campaign emails getting filtered by G mail? Yes. I should. I should mention that they have really and they have all of these cases where they ask about extremely specific one off incidents that anyone who has used social media knows happens constantly. And, then turn them into a sinister pattern. But I think they managed to come off as sounding more like they understood what they were talking about the unusual. I think that was a real theme of the hearing, Casey. What did you think of this sort of bias side show that occurred? Well, I mean the the idea that conservative voices are being suppressed is foundational to the conservative movement and is behind the rise of conservative talk radio. It was behind the rise of Fox News. Now that social media exists, we have seen it in this new form, but it is sort of being presented as extra, sinister and worthy of. Some sort of legislative intervention what frustrates me about it is that much more than newspapers or or cable news like Mark Zuckerberg Dorsey. These people benefit hugely from having all possible voices on their platform. None of them is incentivized to drive conservatives off their platform. What they are incentivized to do is have rules that make the place safe and welcoming. So that people want to hang out there and so to the extent that there are issues on the platform, they've largely come because these platforms have rules. And you know you would think that a bunch of free marketeers would realize that the alternative to the system that they're so mad about would be creating a new system, but they don't seem at all interested in doing that. So I just sort of dismissed all of them as charlatans I actually thought it was interesting that the opposite track came up, which was the Stop Hey for profit campaign I kind of wasn't expecting that. The representative Raskin I believe asked facebook. Basically, why aren't you kicking more hate speech off. I forget who else asked like look is the point that you're so big. You don't care about advertiser boycotts I. Mean, you know it will here. Here is a fact that the number one complaint that facebook gets from its users, the thing that users. About. FACEBOOK is that it removes too much content and so if you're running the place, you do have to take these complaints seriously in a way. Right? It might not be you know that you shadow band conservative whatever that even means on social network in twenty twenty. But the fact that you're removing content is really upsetting people. So you can't dismiss that idea entirely, but I still don't feel like we're having that intellectually honest conversation about it. So this was definitely I feel like you can connect the you control distribution. We're GONNA show the abuses of power narrative. We got other. Democrats. With the you control distribution. You're banning conservatives right like I. Think what's Sensenbrenner Again, cups and conservatives are consumers to is that people don't realize that like fifty percent of the population in many ways. But facebook has like famous conservatives working its highest levels Kevin. We last week, we're talking about Kevin Roose keeps sharing the list. List of the most engaged content from crowd tangle. It's all conservative content, and that's so problematic for facebook that they're. They're pushing back with other metrics and graphs of their own, making the facts just aren't there, but it doesn't seem to be convincing. Brett Kevin is being asked to recuse himself from facebook case because he's like best friends with facebook I, AP I wrote a column almost two years ago. Now, arguing that conservatives were trying to redefine. Any conservative identified person having any unwanted outcome on a social network, right? So bias is your name was higher than mine in search results. Bias is used suggested that I follow a Democrat and not a Republican right, and if you take action on your policies that apply to everyone against me a conservative that is biased against conservatives, right. So and by the way I have to say this has been hugely successful because we've talked about it. How many minutes now and the longer that these discussions. Discussions. Go on. They just sort of refi people's minds. The idea that there really is a vast conspiracy to silence conservative speech because he's networks are so big millions of conservatives are having experiences like this every day, and now there is an ideology that is basically a religion for them to attach to, which is although Silicon Valley liberals are out to get. Reason I wanted to talk about the conservative side show, which in many ways was a circus is it feels like the notion that we should be punitive to the companies or mad at the company's. Bipartisan, right we were. We were not looking at a hearing where the Democrats were on the attack. Republicans are saying we love. Apple. We're looking at hearing where they were. Everyone was mad. There are a couple of exceptions to that. There were a couple of I think sensenbrenner and a few other folks were like look we want to be clear. Big is not bad. We just WANNA make sure we're not punishing you for your success, but you were like almost entirely, right? Yeah. I. Mean I. think that's it's important to. To capture that mood like Jeff Bezos Mark Zuckerberg, Tim, Cook soon. Darpa, try they usually get to finish whatever sentence they start saying. Right. They're not used to being interrupted. Their thoughts are usually like you know they get to live in complete sentences and people take them seriously here in five in intervals, they were interrupted almost every time they started speaking to be told that they were wrong that they were filibuster at one point Sicily said stop thinking is for the questions. We can just assume they're all good questions. They. Were getting yelled at and they're going yell that about a variety of things that were pretty specific. So you kind of in your kind of structure here. The first one was controlling distribution. What did you hear as a hearing went on the indicated to that? The committee had a case here? I think the apple's APP store is one thing you know charging thirty percent cuts on certain things is just controlling an APP store. It's the same thing with Amazon's marketplace. They can inherently in control what gets placed and what gets sold and you know if they want to play with search results on Amazon, they can do that, and then on facebook and Google, it's not just like products and software that's information. And it could be information when it's like Google. Google. Stealing yelps, texture views right in putting those in its little info boxes in search queries in facebook if facebook is just like an. Mation, distribution platform and. It can decide Algorithm Mickley. Knowingly. What people get to see this bution was very keen to the committee's hearing yesterday and they pointed out different aspects in which you know each company exhibited that kind of behavior. So the one that will you bring up apple? We wrote about this, say there's much emails. Apples document production is just one hundred and thirty pages of unrelated emails and whatever order see it's like scan through it. So there's a lot of little stories in there. There's one about right to repair and apple realizing it needed to repair. By watching PR people operate by reading their emails journalists. Very entertaining. They're like we had a break like here's our strategy. Here's we're GONNA. That's all in there. You can look at it, but there's a lot about the APP store itself and how they're going to use the mechanics of the APP store to control their platform, and it started at the beginning like the first emails in this production from twenty, ten there. From Phil, Schiller Steve Jobs saying, are we GONNA? Let Amazon Sell Books in the kindle store. Store, it felt like I saw an Amazon ad was hard to watch this hard to watch this ad where a person's reading a book on an iphone in the kindle APP in the pick up an android phone keep reading. He's like literally like it was hard to watch like Schiller's at home like pain what a customer is having an experience that good it really just. Heart and so he's like it was hard to watch. You fours Steve Jobs. They're like we gotta shut it down jobs is the bookstore will be the only bookstore on the APP. Store. That's the way it's going to be everyone's gotta used to it. We know that restricting payments will hurt other things, but that's what we're doing and they started there in two thousand ten and they pulled it out, and then that ladders up into everything that we've seen with, hey, ladders up into the analysis group showing up to. Apple, can pay them to say that there's independent study has revealed. Everybody has a thirty percent cut. It has landed up into Tim Cook, forwarding. He gets a letters from developers that are in this direction. It's like apples breaking my heart and he just like Ford's it. Tim, Cook forwards that email to filter credit eighty, just as thoughts like amazing like they are constantly thinking about the APP store as a mechanism of control for the platform in the leverage and other deals. So the other one was apple is this Amazon one which I have very mixed feelings on saying that this is bad or legal I'm curious for all of your thoughts famously. Did, not have the prime video APP on the Apple TV and all these other places apple, Amazon came to a deal. There's an entire presentation in this production like the slide deck of how the deal is going to work. Apple got to be the preferred seller of its own product. So third parties cancel. Apple. Products, Amazon pages, they got. They have a custom by flow. They've custom product pages, all the stuff in return. Amazon got a lower commission on the APP store and gets to Selatan products which no. No like you can rent a movie from the Amazon APP on the Apple TV, no one else gets to it in one world. This is just pure platform collision, right? Apple cut VIP deal for big companies because it wanted something and you could say this is legal in another world. It's like this is how deals work apple something valuable. Amazon s something valuable and they came to a conclusion wherever made more money and quite frankly the consumer experience platform has got better. How do you read that? Casey? That is good and fair analysis of it. I. Think I did read slightly more scandalous. Tones into it in part because apple would never acknowledge that some developers are more important to it than others even though if you assume that that's true, I think maybe one of the things that's frustrating about it is there is no transparency accountability around which developers get sweetheart deals is that once you hit a certain threshold of revenue will cut your price. Why couldn't they extend that deal to everyone right? Or is it just if we withhold something that seems particularly valuable, we can eventually drag you to the table. Table, which is sort of what seems like happened here. I think in all cases, what I'm always looking for is the accountability, right like and some sense of of equitable treatment of developers and I understand the guys are always going to get the best treatment, but it can that be publicly visible. Can it be acknowledged and there'd be routes for others to achieve that same level of success and treatment, and that I'll just seems missing here. Did you buy Tim Co? He said it twice. It was obviously A. Glimmer, of sympathy for all four CEOS. There is a lot of reporting that they had spent months preparing for this hearing like being grilled there, they'd hire outside law firms. They. Practiced they all clearly had soundbites memorized in none of them. Got To say him because it kept getting interrupted. Tim Cook had this one where he is like if we're the gatekeepers, the gates are open wider than ever. We've gone from five hundred. APPS to one point seven, he said like. A whole speech. and. The thing is there's fierce competition for developers. They don't like our store can do for android the windows. For xbox and PS. Four. Which I was like the idea that adobe is going to be like we don't want to be on the IPAD. Here's PS. Four Photoshop is insanity to me. I'm going to build a spreadsheet. APP. For the five. That's how frustrated with Tim Cook. To that ring. True to you I. Mean, there's no, it does not ring true. There is a, there is a duopoly. In the United States when it comes to smartphones, iphones have majority share in the United States and you can't say, well, you know there's there's a rogue fork of android in Malaysia that you could go develop for if you really wanted to and have that come across as a credible argument to Americans. Right it is. Natural for any monopolist to spend most of its time, arguing that it is much smaller and much less consequential as as you think it is and they're essentially always asking you to ignore what is in front of your face, which is that they are the giant. They are in control. What they say goes, and it doesn't matter which small businesses get hurt along the. The. Way I would point out that the contact and we're gonNA talk about earnings eventually. But the context for that is apple had its biggest third quarter ever this month, their revenues went up eleven percent year over year, they're making obviously making billions of dollars in their services revenue, which is a lot of the narrative around the APP stores increasing that services line. Also went up. I think it was thirteen billion. So you're right. They're very big in their earnings the day after the hearing did nothing. To reduce that impression. I want to switch to Amazon a little bit McKenna. You really focused Amazon was basis first time up there. They came at him a lot about marketplace. How did you think that went I think it went pretty good. I. Think. John Paul specifically was just like killer her questions with breakout star. Yeah. She was just like killer and she's the representative for. SEATTLE. So this is where Amazon is right. So she just like killed it and. And I think there were a couple of instances in the documents and in questioning yesterday that really pulled important things out there was like testimony from one bookseller who was like, yeah. We just can't sell a category of books and we don't know why Amazon doesn't let us do that just like testimony like that or even when it comes to like acquisitions, the ring acquisition especially, I wrote about that today through the documents and how. They said, this is for market position. This is a for technology, your talent or anything. We just bought this and that's something that base said again, yesterday he was just very clear. It's like, yeah, we do buy things market position, which is like so insane just here like the richest person in the world. But like, yeah, we're buying market position. It's just what happens. That's another one I have mixed feelings right, and by the way, people should read McKenna story because those documents have just a very funny breakdown like the pros and cons of buying. Buying ring in many of the cons like what if this turns into nest, which if you're just the verge cast listeners like it's just like the Keyword Bingo, but it's fine to say, we're buying market position like this isn't the best product out there, but it's the category of video. doorbells is not huge, right? So to by the the market leader in video doorbells is maybe the most rational use of the money. What is the problem that you think the committee was trying to show an address sense of we're just going to market position. Pointing out, they can just do whatever they want and how casual it is, and there really isn't. It's really funny to read an email like that, and we could buy it or we could just copy it or are. We could just watch. You know that was one of the emails that base from someone. Those are just three options you know and it's like just pick and choose you know. Pointed out like a lot. Just that email itself really pointed out just how easy it is for them. They used a lot of that time history to talk about copycat behaviors and to talk about just like you know buying up competitors and it just seeing that all in one little e mail having to do with the ring was like really i. think it was really kind of I opening and especially like useful for the committee. So Amazon got hit a lot for the data collection side of it of copying competitors. bezos did not seem to have great answers there. Right. So that's the. The thing they got in trouble with this. There is that Wall Street. Journal article from like April where employees were literally like, yeah. We dip into data and we use that to guide our own private label products and everybody was like Whoa and Amazon basins. Yesterday said, well, we do have a policy that bans that but giant pointed out yesterday. It's like, okay. So what's your enforcement look like you can have the policy, but like if you don't enforce it, then it's like meaningless. And then yesterday I. Think Paul was like, can you give me a yes or no answer? Do you dip into data and he's like I can't I can't give you. Yes or no, and we're just like we're looking into it. The story had anonymous sources. So that isn't very helpful to us. You know what I mean. So that was one of the main things and that Wall Street Journal article and I think it's the same kind of examples in the committee's documents. They point out specific examples like car trunk, organizers of all things. It's like weird little products like Amazon's like this is a little hot. Maybe we should do that. So I, I think. I, think they made a good case yesterday. Yesterday on that. Yeah. I mean bezos brought up that Wall Street Journal, Article himself twice, and he was like, well, your policy against it. But I can't guarantee never happened. Then there is a strange just didn't come across clear I. Think I know what the committee was trying to get at their like US aggregate seller data when there's only three sellers and then only to sellers? Yes, I. Think what they're getting at is when you're down to the aggregate data of two companies, you heard effectively looking at individual data. What is the problem? They're like the I get what you're doing. You're just reducing the denominator to get to one, but like it, why is that particular problem? Right? Well, none of these. Dipping into individual seller data and looking at aggregate data. That's not a legal. There is no law. This is all voluntary of Amazon. So they have a voluntary policy where like we can't do individual seller data, but they say nothing against aggregate and aggregate what you're getting at eight. Here you is. Does the same thing if it's just like some goofy little product they. They bring up pop stock. It's all the time before pop tops in a moment. Right? There's only like one pop. So company like you know pop soggy, it was kind of an innovative product. It's like well, if there's only two of them and use the aggregate data, you you you have everything you need to know you know about that product line looking aggregate. If that's what you decide to qualify as do you as you're looking through the other Amazon documents and other stuff. So anything jump out at you is something the committee was trying to prove or get at. The questioning seemed very focused on. Like are you using the state at a copy products? Are you buying things? You shouldn't buy. There's one question which I did not understand why came up about DMC. Take downs on twitch and Jeff as just had this look of panic in his eyes. He's like I don't know man I bought Wedge because my kids want to. Do something like that was like the side show stuff, but the real focus here, it just seemed like it was definitely in the marketplace, right? Amazon, everyone came at Amazon for the marketplace. That's what everybody knows him as like they have all these little sides. They got rain. They got Alexa Alexa was one thing too. That was kind of interesting. It's like. Are you buying things like ring to put Alexa into and dislike expand your like Titan Ism as like an Internet Internet connected home. Thing and make that more closed off and walled gardening. That was one thing. But no, it was just focusing on how much power they have to kind of change. What happens in the marketplace to kind of decide what companies in what products are able to come up on the first page of results. You know that's also something that they dug into Google and in something that one of those like themes that kind of ties everything together. We should say they all spend a lot of time talking about counterfeit goods, and why is it Amazon removed? Fake stuff from the platform and how much is it profiting off of you know selling pick rolexes? Is it surprising? The whole foods didn't show up at all they're. Like that is a really massive thing. Amazon owns that. Is it moving into a huge new product category? I think whole foods is not an online marketplace, which was the title of the hearing, not that that restricted anybody from doing anything except that, one of the things Amazon says is we have lots of competition from offline marketplaces, right? Brought up kroger a lot I mean, this is the case he's point. They all made. It seem like they were beset at any moment. They could be crushed by the likes of stop and Shop Right? Like I think the point though was really on the. Digital. Experience Consumers have and like I, don't know Ho-. Foods fits. Into that narrative, especially, because it is itself not dominant like they bought it because you needed to grow in their. Good at that at my question for you on the Amazon stuff was when you think about, we talk about two thirty a lot right like you and I in particular spent a lot time to thirty, which regulates with the platform can do with content. There's not really an equivalent of two thirty for goods on store. Right like there's some case is out there saying like you're liable for what what happens on your online store page, but Amazon doesn't have that like second order of like Messi nece around it that twitter and facebook to with two thirty, I. Mean, it gets invoked a lot for marketplace's, but it's way messier. Well, I just wanted to like this question at counterfeits question about ranking the store like they are even more free than any twitter is to to sort tweets algorithm. Algorithm clear to modern like it just their store. Do you think that they're like that Algorithm transparency? Your wire things ranked. Did you catch a sense that that's where the regulation is GonNa go. So much of the conversation around Amazon really felt like it was individuals sellers being wronged for reasons of Amazon being unresponsive or stealing. It's data. So I don't know it didn't. It didn't seem like a really big focus of the hearing, but it is a huge deal. Yeah. The, digital marketplace frame of this, which is where we have talked to. Cellini. That's where he's going right like facebook and Google very digital. They have like they don't do physical goods. Really. Apple is the APP store. It's all digital goods. Amazon is the one where it's. Front to a lot of physical things, and that is the only place where I can see this regulation needing to make some sort of like major meaningful distinction in I. Didn't see it in the hearing, but I was curious of you caught a glimmer of it. I'm not positive that they have to make a huge distinction there like depending on what they come up with because. So much of this is about their companies and whatever product they produced. The issue is more or less whether or not they're being surveilled and unfairly by targeted and crushed by that data surveillance. All right. We have gone for forty minutes. We should take a quick break. I said I wasn't going to go by company and it happens. So we should come back and talk with facebook Ango. We'll be right back. This is advertiser content. When I say utopia what comes to mind. Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the perfect social body. Every Body Matt Place. Everybody happy now while the peacock original series, brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. A concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago. But we keep looking for that community identity stability of aldous Huxley's Utopia and not finding it Americans are the unhappiest they've been in decades, and we're increasingly lonely whereas in a utopia. Everyone belongs to everyone else. In nineteen forty-three, the psychologist Abraham. maslow's developed a theory of Utopia. One that allows total self determination in basic terms. maslow's theory says that in Utopia, we decide for ourselves, what we need and how we're GONNA get it in Huxley's Utopia citizens always get what they want and don't want what they can't get. Sounds. Pretty good. Right. Then why can't we make it happen? For a Utopian Society the work we might need to disband some of the things we hold dearest marriage government privacy individualism even family. See for yourself. If a Utopian world is as perfect as it seems watch brave new world now streaming only on peacock. These are really difficult crazy stressful times, and if you're trying to sort of cope, it could be helpful to find something that gets beyond like doom scrolling and like obsessive worried. But digs into what is really going on underneath the surface, and that's what the weeds is all about I. Matthew Yglesias. Weeds podcast here on the box meeting podcast network. This is podcast for people who really want to understand the policy debates and policy issues that shaping our world. We've seen now more than ever like how relevant policy is to our actual lives, but so much in the news isn't focused on really understanding and explaining detail way if that sounds good to you, join us for the weeds, every Tuesday and Friday to find out what's going on why matters and what we can do about it. You could download the weeds on apple spotify or wherever else you get your podcasts. Tracy. When it comes to facebook I turn to you. FACEBOOK is patience consumer of startups as what we've learned. Yeah. But you said something to me yesterday was interesting, which is everyone else's problems are forward looking and it feels like facebook's problems are actually in the past break for people explain what you mean. Yeah. So when Congress is looking at any trust with respect to these four companies for three of them, it's It's sort of about the marketplaces that their operating right now with facebook, the question is much more about should we have allowed it to buy serum? Should we have allowed it to buy WHATSAPP and most of the antitrust conversation that was around facebook yesterday was all about that. What did Mark Zuckerberg know about Instagram, and when did he know it? We wrote a story based on some documents that the house released yesterday. In which facebook has clearly identified instagram as a competitor. In at least some ways and wants to go after it and knock it off the table, and so that's kind of where the focuses their facebook and Burke did get a lot of other questions yesterday, but it tended to be much more about content moderation and things that don't have a lot to do with antitrust. So there was weird section where they asked the face. Face Research APP in the novel, Vpn? Any kind of got lost well, explain what happened and I'm curious reactions. Yeah. So facebook has a bunch of nifty tech tools to figure out what's trending which APPs or the kids using, and so that can essentially have an early warning system if it needs to consider acquiring something or more likely in these days, go out clone it. and. So Zuckerberg was asked about the way that the company uses these systems and if they are anti competitive I, think you know traditional antitrust law probably would not say copying an APP feature is anti competitive, but could lobby written in the future about it shirt I. Think the one that caught me was I mean, this is what I'm. McKenna's points from earlier is like one of the themes here is, are you so dominant that you can collect data that's unfair and then use that to crush or killer competitors, and definitely bought the Inaba VPN to do it. That's true. Now, when I've asked executives at facebook about this, what they'll say is they don't get surprised anymore. When you have three point, one billion people using your apps around the world. You know what links they're sharing, you know what they're talking about. And so you're not going to need some kind of specialized tool to know that WHATSAPP is really taking off. Right. So they would argue that, yes, these tools were useful to them, but you know at their scale, they know what's popular now, which doesn't really seem like addresses, the problem is reached. The fact that we're so big that we're all knowing is maybe not the defense that they sometimes presented as so here's what I didn't get. I thought, Zuckerberg I want to the instagram. What's about who's issues, but on the facebook research front, the data front, they him about this APP facebook research, which you were giving to teens. They were deploying with an enterprise certificate that story broke apple revoke the certificate, and all of facebook's internal APPs went dark, and this is a scandal story after story about it, they went on for two days. So I can I, don't recall that APP? Just how he you know, he remembers the day that all facebook's internal APPS went down and people couldn't go to the cafeteria. I would agree I found that answer. Extremely, ed? Persuasive. that. Do you think that was like actually strategic for him to be like, I, don't know and then come back later and correct the record I do remember when that happened I. Mean. I really don't know I mean also you know during a six hour hearing, it's also possible that you just you get flustered or you miss here something or or something because. Yeah. As as you say, I'm sure he remembers the day that apple turned off their internal APPS I mean. Honestly. Seems like an opportunity to talk about apple's market power, and the fact that you know a day of work canceled at facebook because apple got mad. But I think most of the CEO's didn't go into yesterday a wanted to pick fights with each other. It was kind of sad that they didn't. I was Kinda hoping that Tim Cook take a shot at soccer burger. Point that the other two APP platforms I was expecting it. It was there. It was. There was all there. So cellini ended and he ended the whole meeting with closing statement. He said, some of these companies didn't get broken out. They all need to get regulated in the off too much power that some of them I. don't these breaking up apple. What sort of break. Right like. The division get sent into the corner thing about what it's done. Right. Does should spin out the finder team I've always wanted to. A clean is always that they want to. They want the APP store to be separate from the IPHONE. Basically, that's the thing I always hear. Can't break I. Think you can write some strong regulations but not playing you're on store, right. But like Elizabeth Warren's point was it's cleaner if it's two companies, but it's still a gigantic remedy that I don't think there's a lot of like like consumer or public opinion is going to walk into an Apple Cup I think you'll radio at marketplace. It seems very clear that we says some of them she broken up he is talking about facebook. I have a twenty percent conference level. He might be talking with Google and Youtube as well. But if he's going to say some of the need to get broken up like it's facebook, did you hear anything yesterday that supported that conclusion or Saudi stocks I? MEAN HE I don't remember which Republican it was, but he was like the Obama FTC looked at this and they said it was minding love. Obama. Right. Like. Why would we go back in time to relook at I? Mean, there is a belief and I mean. Somebody who thinks there could be a lot of benefit in instagram and WHATSAPP being different companies from facebook. And the reason you ask. So many questions about that acquisition as you're making the case that it never should have been approved in the first place, and so now you need to remedy it. So that was actually like the entire thrust of the argument against facebook yesterday. I think, you could probably make just as good a case that Amazon after spin out aws, but lawmakers chose not to make that case. Yeah. I think that also gets into. Politics of the acquisition of the time. To his credit is like nobody knew instagram would actually be a success like we made it a success. It didn't happen by itself. I, don't know if the lawmakers. By award, these guys said, but I don't know that he actually made that case very persuasively. and. Who knows I mean? That's like anything could have happened. Right? Cram could've stayed independent and rapidly grown and overtaken facebook like that's something that could have happened. It could have kind settled into a middle zone like snapchat or twitter seems more likely to me although I think probably would have been bigger than those two but. You're never going to know I mean it is true that facebook gave Mike and Kevin it instagram enormous resources. A lot of the reasons why Mike and Kevin sold was because running tiny startup that's blowing up is absolutely exhausting Mike. Krieger. was dragging his laptop all around San. Francisco. Because the servers were melting at all times of the day whenever Justin Bieber. Posted like the site stopped working and they really we need help. Finding a person who can quickly fix this? So we don't have to like that is the reason that they were entertaining these offers and wanted to sell it. So that is also thing that happened. Do you think that that same kind of argument or approach can apply to what's up? What's up basically did not come up yesterday and all the focus on Instagram, but that's the other one, right? Yeah, and we know weirdly a lot less about that acquisition I. Think it's because people in America just have so much less love for what's APP generally. That, it's never seemed as important. What happened to WHATSAPP as what happens to instagram even though WHATSAPP, is used, you know way more, it probably has way more engagement even than instagram does so I don't know why that didn't come up as often. We know there was a competitive bidding war for that as well. Goule. Wanted it as well. You know Mark Zuckerberg made them an offer, they can't refuse. Do you think everyday Google's we should've spent more money on what's whatsapp like this could have been solved. Should have, but Google has been placed under an ancient curse that prevents them from ever making the right decision about any social product. So it was doomed never to happen. It's fun looking through the documents and watching them casually say they should buy facebook dot com. Yeah, that. Point. That is how they talk like the window into these executives just casually being like we should just this thing or maybe not, or we should just copied ourselves and kill it before it gets any traction like it's repeated over and over again last facebook question. This one is like harder to parse because I. There's a chance, it's October is just joking around but. But. He's in many of these emails. He's like the thing about startups, as you can always buy them, which I think the committee thinks is a smoking gun, right? Like facebook's entire plan is to buy the competition to get the data from wherever they get it to say, oh, man, this apps popping, we just buy it and kill it before it competes with us. I. Think he actually said at one point. That's a joke. Yes, he did and I believe that you know it was two thousand, twelve, right? He was probably still in his mid twenties. At that point, the company was a lot smaller like people were joking around like there's more loose talk when companies are younger and I do think. It was it was part of that. I think the more interesting question becomes. Let's say facebook is telling the truth about everything. Let's say they thought it was going to be a successful acquisition, but they never knew it was gonna big as it became today and they invested in it and it got super big. Okay. Well, now, it's as big as it is. Should they be allowed to keep? Keep it or should they be forced to spend it out and if you're GONNA force them to spin it out. What's the argument that you'RE GONNA. Make about why one question that I have a lot is clearly the referral they're gonNa make, and it seems like if you don't have some other reason, we've heard hints that there's some other reason, the FTC scrutinize this that will eventually be revealed. But what you're saying is the antitrust standard at the time, the Consumer Hartman stand, which is still our standard. Says, you have to prove prices will go up both products for free. You're screwed. Right? There's nothing to review because you're not gonNA prove prove that free products are gonNA get more expensive. I think it's pretty unfair if you change the standard and you go back in time and say you missed that standard. So I think there has to be something else there. Well, what was the standard by which at and T. was broken up? Right? Like presumably at and T. didn't used to be that big, and then it just got really big and then they broke it up at least. That's the thumbnail understanding I have of that break-up. Well, yeah. But then reformed itself. Right. But because of lax antitrust regulation, right? Like it wasn't a naturally occurring phenomenon that all those APPS got back to the other or was that just sort of like inattention to capitalism It's like in the seventies and eighties. This is Tim moves book the cursive bigness in the seventies and eighties Robert Bork I can't talk about Robert on this podcast. Are we doing this right now. Robert was very influential judge Appellate Judge Federal Appellate? Judge. And basically moved the antitrust law to the consumer harm standard as part of a movement called and economics. A whole thing Robert. Bork. Mostly famous because he was not appointed. He was nominated Supreme Court by Reagan but they leaked video tape rental history, and then he didn't get nominated and that is where the expression getting bork's comes from. This is all true Netflix's still has to abide by videotape data privacy act is a whole. This is all true when facebook and Netflix had some partners, Nansen? Partnership. To. Automatically share your net flicks, watch history to facebook. They're like pending the change of this law which we are working on Robert Bork. He haunts us all. I'm sorry, I can't believe this much. Yeah I. think that's just like the law changed in the in the seventies and eighties, the standard change. The conversation right now is a very much about changing it back months and months ago, pre pandemic, we had an economist from I. Think it was Nyu Thomas Philippon came on the show, and he was like look you have this natural ab test going on in the world where the European Union when it formed was like, how do we get an economy like America's? So, we'll just take their competition policies pretty good, and at the same time we changed consumer harm standard. So everything you're seeing the EU is basically our old competition antitrust standard in. You can see how active they are in everything. Here's a new consumer welfare standard. Whether you believe, this is actually a functional Ab test given. The state of both governments is up for debate, but that was his point I thought. It was spare can say.

Facebook Apple Amazon Mark Zuckerberg Google Tim Cook Instagram Jeff. Bezos Tim Co Twitter CEO Casey Brett Kevin Cellini Jeff Bezos Jim Jordan Sicily Mckenna
'On our way to Mars': NASA rover will look for signs of life

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:47 sec | 4 d ago

'On our way to Mars': NASA rover will look for signs of life

"Has launched its most sophisticated Mars rover to the Red Planet yet status check. So Atlas Go center Go! Morris, 2020. The rover is a car sized vehicle with cameras, microphones, drills and lasers. CBS News Space analyst Bill Harwood details the mission. The person various rover is the most sophisticated lander NASA has ever built, designed to look for signs of past microbial life across an ancient river Delta. For scientists say water once flowed into a 28 mile wide crater is going to collect rock and soil samples is going to leave them behind its specific locations, and they'll be recovered later. NASA hopes and returned to Earth. If that wasn't enough was included. A small helicopter will attempt the first flight on another planet.

Nasa Bill Harwood CBS Analyst Morris
Someone was convinced Kate Beckinsale needed a bunny rabbit

Woody & Wilcox

00:47 sec | 4 d ago

Someone was convinced Kate Beckinsale needed a bunny rabbit

"Anonymous fan left a quote unsolicited rabbit and a box of flowers at kate back and Sales Front door unsolicited Reynolds solicited rabbit which by the way great band name their first album was so sounds like a weird move from urban dictionary. is she happy about it -cerned unsettled is the way she described as worn as bagged on social media for folks to quote never send an unsolicited pet to someone's house. Or just as a gift I agree. So, not limited to rabbits if you were thinking about sending an unsolicited war frat or river rat to someone's house that's not welcoming either kate back and sale or otherwise for that matter

Kate Sales Front Reynolds
Orca who carried her dead calf for 1,000 miles is pregnant

Seattle Now

08:31 min | 4 d ago

Orca who carried her dead calf for 1,000 miles is pregnant

"Pregnancies are good news for the southern resident killer whales and right now, it looks like there are three whales including j thirty five who could give birth. But there's a long way to go today. We're GONNA talk about the lives of these orcas and our complicated relationship with them here to do that with us is Linda makes she's the environment reporter at the Seattle Times Linda. Thanks for joining us. Thank you, Trish. So give us a quick recap on J. Thirty five for people who weren't here maybe when her calf died. So J thirty five or Takuma really is the ORCA whale who changed the conversation about this very small population of whales and very sadly trish as I talked to today that population is even smaller than it was two years ago when she gave birth to a female calf and it live for only one half hour, and then she did something that scientists know these animals do as well as other, very, highly intelligent. Socially, bonded animals they grieve and she just refused to let that baby go. Now, this calf is probably six feet. Long weighs about three hundred pounds, and for seventeen days, she just refused to let it go and she had to decide to retire. She went down for breath to pick it up once again and carry it some more, and it really did touch the hearts. People around the world and even though these southern resident orcas have been listed as dangerous since two thousand and five. Suddenly people really did understand for the first time, just how fragile they are, and the fact that these aren't just random black and white wildlife. These are families with very, very close bonds. And why do you think that we feel so attached to these orca because I grew up in the Eighties and Wales were such a big deal. You know every girl had little whale necklace and why do we feel so attached I'm gonNA, make a sound for you inherit comes. That is sound of a whale breathing. They are mammals like us, and that's sound when you hear it, it's like a sound from the beginning of the world. It's It's a magnificent presence to be with these whales and you and you understand as you observe their family bond says, you see the way they take care of one another. You know they're so superior to people they. They have brilliant diplomacy. They share space in the ocean without ever warring or committing any acts of aggression against one another. They've families together for life. It's really quite remarkable and they've been around don't forget this for six million years as a species. So these are in every way our elders and mentors for how to run a successful society and don't forget this. They were doing just fine until we showed up. How do we raise up the cause of the ORCA of the environment here without doing the thing that we tend to do a lot of as humans, which is just the help that hurts, how do we walk that line? Actually, this is easier than ever I mean, let's remember how we got to know these southern resident whales. Well, it was the capture era which by the way was not that long ago. Free, willy. Oh. Yeah. Anybody could go out and catch themselves a killer whale for an aquarium or for that matter, sell it for profit anouar in the world until as recently as are you ready Nineteen, seventy six. So wow, that's really recent. Recent and the only while who've had survived that time is still alive and she's still at the Miami Seaquarium and the fiftieth anniversary of her capture and Penn cove is on August seventh. Wow. This is recent time and ironically it was through seeing these so-called killer whales up close in captivity and realizing their incredible intelligence and they're gentle personalities that people went through a whole change in their understanding about these animals and today they're not only revered but protected and I said it's easier than ever to love these animals without loving them to death God look at what you can watch the documentary footage that's out there to enjoy these animals is so much. Better than anything that has ever been available. The amount of knowledge we have about them is superb growing by the day and you know you can watch them from shore. The idea that you need to spend the money by the way and get on a boat. Go after them. You know that's not the only way to enjoy these whales and I think that it's important to. Show some restraint and also some respect for their space. So. J thirty five is pregnant. Again, this is a good sign but two thirds of pregnancies in this population are lost. I learned this lesson with birds in my backyard last year in a nest so. This is not the time for a baby shower. We have a long way to go here. That's so well said. I would think about it. This way this time to hold space for these oils to hold them in your mind and think about what you can do to help whether it's something that might feel small but adds up such as be involved in local land use decisions in your community. That's where all this getting decided about how much of the puget sound lowlands we retain and how much we pay of over. You know these tedious things that we don't think matter like Oh, the king, county flood control district. Well, you know what they're up to. They're thinking about the future of the Green. River. which is upstream from the Duwamish, the green flows into the duwamish Seattle's only river. It's very important Salmon River for the whales and so things like paying attention to what's the local flood district doing what is going on in my local community? By Way of development? All of these things make a difference especially if all of us do. and. Read learn about these animals become informed. Educate Yourself. You know there are lots of ways to get involved and stay involved and play heart in whether. Tele. Calf actually. Does get born and does survive. To me, that's our work song as a region. May Her next calf with? So J thirty five. How will scientists track her pregnancy? Will very remotely fortunately. The scientists who do this work are John, Durbin? And Holly Fehrenbach, and they're they're a team of scientists who came up with a new method. using drones to photograph these Wales from at least one hundred, few of them and remote Louis activated. So they're far from the whales. So nowhere near them, the whales don't seem to show any notice of these drums when they're flying. And they take suspect hack your pictures, and there's something about the angle from above That's very different from a boat. You can see not only the shape of the whales. You can watch their behavior, their families. I. Make It takes your breath away and it is an entirely new view of the lives of these Wales and when it comes to keep track of j thirty five and the other pregnant whales. They're going to do is take another peek in September. DID THEY FATTEN UP? Did they pump up or are they going into winter in good shape? Are they look stressed or are they looking skinny? Most importantly with regard to her? Is She nice fat around? They'd like to see her a lot rounder in September than she is now for early in her pregnancy, these whales carry their babies, believe it or not for eighteen eighteen months Linda I read that and I thought. Oh. My Gosh Holy. Mackerel A. And actually then the real work starts because they've got to feed not only themselves, but they've got a lactate and that's a very, very high fat milk. So she's got her work cut out for her so they'll immature September and we will all cross our fingers that she's even bigger. And then you know she's either. Going to be carrying another kappa which time. I, don't know what I'll do. Or, we'll see her romping with a baby. You know We'll see what happens next I. do think that we ought to kind of hold our breath. A little bit chances are are high that things won't go well, but it doesn't mean that she couldn't surprise us and we might have some more good news. Let's remember there have been two berths to southern residents and let's remember Linda are bar for hope, is pretty low. Sleep. Vote through. Isn't it for the? Thought, I'd get a good peach these days and I'm just thrilled. Good Peach. Tomato. I'm good.

Linda Orca Wales Trish Seattle Times Takuma Puget Sound Reporter Miami Duwamish Salmon River Seattle Penn Cove Holly Fehrenbach John Louis Durbin
Collaborative Notes

Topgold Audio Clips

05:28 min | 5 d ago

Collaborative Notes

"Hi It's Bernie Bach with a topcoat audio clip episode five, three, three. Talking to you on the. Speaker APP soup you're listening and you WANNA see imagery that goes along with these thoughts about. Collaborative. Ticking than that speaker, apple shares some screengrabs. If you listen inside the APP alternatively, there's website inside you that I e were employed posting this ended up, you know play what you're hearing. I WanNa, do collaborative, not taking i WanNa talk to you about that because. I'm about to start another year with students in a creative media did join a nation and game design program three different degrees on the clonmel digital campus of the limerick. Institute of Technology on. It's important that I get from those students how they do not taking effectively and how I might share some of my highest value notes with them. So here's the process it all starts by reading. I have subscriptions I pay for and a river of News I. Get the subs come from things that are on the cover art for this episode, different premium places like the Washington. Post the Atlantic New York, times, the Irish Times tipperary live and several others. As I read through these flows of information. alantic things sometimes, the annotations are very simple. I just saved instant paper to an instant paper allows me to annotate or make notes or to grab pieces of content and make it into distilled nuggets of information. So I read online and I had this one tap sharing-mechanism work wherever I read sometimes I read on the kindle and the kindle is interesting because not only do the books I get. Appear on kindle. But I can email to my kindle were documents from emails from student essays from variety of sources. Were documents become readable in the kindle, which means they can be annotated and shared on the kindle. These processes of reading. And annotating for sharing and up in a place called read. Wise. Wise is clever. Application hasn't API and it allows me to that API and through another service called hypothesis to share stuff that I see through the chrome web browser into the service called read wise and then read wise allows me to push out A. Piece of information, premium information to students or to other readers an instant paper does the same thing allows me if I like a piece of content for that content show up as one of the ten pieces of content shared through the instant paper out. These things are collaborative, for example. If I'm using. If I'm using the same annotation technology is another person. Hypothesis is one of those sharable piece of technology. I can see people annotating and making notes some things they find online. The hypothesis chrome extension allows you to. Grab a piece of text graph, put a note or two next to it, and then to share that in a public space, which could see collaborate and share. In fact, there's a whole plug in mechanism with case studies for blackboard and for muddle. And for other online virtual learning networks where students can collaborate and go down through a reading list of content where they're asked to annotate and share information about this pieces of content. I'm thinking about doing that with my. Next semester of students but it might just be easier to have them read recommended documents that I share inside of Microsoft teams as well as inside one drive system or asked to respond to different prompts. And then to through their response, I get a collaborative input to the thing they looked at. That have to the item that they're collaborating with. Hopefully by the time, my students get to the fourth year their education with me. They'll have a more sophisticated way using chrome extensions or annotations on the fly through a very smart web. Browser. At this moment in time I'm happy to say that what I'm doing is taking and leveraging paid content that I see through my news feeds or through ino reader, a feed reader I use. That I can see that stuff. Save those pieces of information that I went to rise, and then I can share what I want to annotate and what I want to mark up. I like the processes behind the scenes I like how I'm doing it with read wise. I like how it works with instant paper I like how the annotations work of hypotheses I like how the simplicity of kindle or the annotations with a standard book and a yellow highlighter work when extracted through office lens. All these things are possible and

Kindle Bernie Bach Apple Clonmel Digital Campus Washington Limerick Institute Of Technology New York The Irish Times Microsoft
Rain and humidity through Dallas area this afternoon

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:59 sec | 5 d ago

Rain and humidity through Dallas area this afternoon

"State planning rain on the radar. Dan Yeah, another little area of showers. Nothing like what? We saw this time yesterday morning. But again, at least, there's a little more rain that's going to be falling across the northern half of North Texas, mainly along in north of Interstate 30. That's the weather story this morning, and it's very still out too. So it's very human. Got little shower between Bedford and up towards death, and in between the 2 35 Wnt Highland. Oh, it's getting a little rain and speaking of Highland Village in Lake Lewisville Lake Dallas area Over 2.5 inches of rain fell over Lake. Well, that doesn't do any good except downstream causes a little bit of flooding down around the Carrollton area. That area about 1 21 in the Bush Also some very heavy rain up in Cook County. And that's some pretty heavy rain in the eastern parts of Dallas and also into Colin Rockwall County. Now again, the showers in the morning hours temps in the seventies will reach around we'll say, 88 to 93. From the Red River down south of 20 today, right now, checking in at 78 with

Lake Lewisville Lake Dallas Wnt Highland Colin Rockwall County Dan Yeah Highland Village North Texas Red River Cook County Lake Carrollton Bush
Deliberate flooding could recharge an Idaho river

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 6 d ago

Deliberate flooding could recharge an Idaho river

"The Henry's Fork River in southeastern Idaho provides water to nearby farms and at the major fly fishing destination. But as the climate warms, water, levels in the river are becoming less predictable. Sometimes, water is plentiful. But earlier snow melt and more erratic rainfall can lead to shortages later in the summer when the water's needed most. Christina Morris is with the nonprofit Henry Ford. Foundation, she says one way to help. Balance out these highs and lows is to capture water when it's abundant and use it to recharge natural groundwater reserves, we flood, agricultural land, or like a pond or a lake, and allow that surface water to infiltrate and percolate down into the aquifer to raise the water table. Models of the Henry's fork show that if the returned location is close enough to the stream, much of that water will seep back into the river later in the season, where it will be available to farms and fish, we found not when you recharge within a mile of the river than we get ninety percent of that water back into the river, so she says it's one promising way to store water and maintain stream flows when water is needed most

Fork River Christina Morris Henry Ford Idaho
My Secret Hack To Increase Your Webinar Conversion Rates

Marketing Secrets

04:33 min | Last week

My Secret Hack To Increase Your Webinar Conversion Rates

"Right. The webinar fuel Webinar the Anthony. More so than I did really recently. In fact, we tonight for the time you're listening, but recording this day could be week or so. By the time you listen to this this episode, but basically happened. We came in here and we did the web and so. It was a little ready firing. Things was like we planned this to be in a month now a whole month launched and we said No. Let's get it done quick. We gave ourselves like three days. So that meant is like number one which was Monday creator registration page and promoted it right ID number two, then I created the slides because I could which were perfect, but they were Kinda. Good. Day three finish slides, and then we went live, and it was just chaos because we had over ten thousand people registered. We have I think. Thirty five, hundred live cutting, it was chaos so a lot of fun, though and we did the Webinar and overall, the Webinar was awesome. Crushed it sells converted really well like everything was was awesome with it, but the right three or four spots that I could tell them work right right that we miss something. Looking back at the questions that people smit afterwards like they're missing this gap, and the urgency of the scarcity wasn't right in the bud. Things were busy. In fact, it's kind of fun todd. You know I co Co founder and partner Todd. He watched it, and then he messaged me he's like Russell you've messed up. You've heard about this and this and this and I was like house taught. Teach me webinars now, but it was actually really good. It was some of the most of the key things that we didn't click funnels to increase conversions and our webinars and I forgot about it. I was rushing to build these slides out, and so basically was was. was there there was no. There's no urgency in scarcity couple things. If you've ever gone through any my my deep webinar training. Talk about how in the offer stack you want to introduce constraints so later in the stack you can. You can amok was restraints right so what I saw what the thought was instead of saying hey. webinars unlimited everything was coming and saying. Hey, you get a you know. There's going to be limited at twenty twenty webinars. You could build hundred thousand things like that, and so those constraints people nobody constraints with okay, because still pretty good, and then at the end of it like the bonus. These people now say hey, those who get started today while we're live. We're going to release these constraints. Instead of having twenty dollars. You get one hundred or unlimited so this you're going. Get this you can. kind of break things out and so it was cool out of that is. He told them I was like. Oh, my Gosh, she's right and right now were Brandon Fisher on our team. Is that rendering the Webinar and getting it ready? All sorts of stuff like that and say wait before you render the final version I needed record. Some clips ran back to the office. You know it's nighttime now we're. It was the morning or during the day when you. Turn Lights look as close to possible deal before and came back and I redid three sections of the slides to introduce constraints, and then and then only. Restraints by making unlimited offer in. Record those three things quarter part one part two part three brands going through editing it in and then anthea for weight increase with three bonus record right now and then. Brandon said that in taking this presentation, they did really really well, and it's like what are the Holsworthy gap? So could you better and recordings weaving in, and it's really it's really powerful if You badgen light. River. This is probably a horrible example, but it's taught by. Hand is probably tired now, so but on on Seinfeld where it's the time where George's with his buddies and they're. They're They're making fun of him. They keep ripping on him and and he has come back way to stores, comebacks and just work, and so finally he up with the perfect comeback. He's so excited in the comeback with something like. The jerk store called, they're out of you and everyone's like trying to give me a horrible comeback. You'd better come back in. And then he put himself the situations where he can use his comeback. He's been waiting for. It's like this is the perfect comeback. It's GonNa. Crush everybody, destroy him, and and he kept setting finally came back and someone said you know the thing is like the jerk store. They're out of you. You and kind of bombed, but it was funny because he knew all this was lying. If I had this line that would work perfectly and think for for us like the reminder. It's been a while since I've done something like this, but it's like wepener. Overall was given a couple of parts like if I just was said this just had this piece. It would have been perfect I forgot about it and so. This gives me the billy and Tony, this news well have the recording. That's like it's done. It's good, but now I know where to go back and recording him and trying to record it with the same energy level trying to record it same situation close like an so our video editors can weave it into the presentation, and hopefully people notice they do notice. It's such a small thing that's not going to stop them, but it adds in these things that change

Brandon Fisher Russell Todd Co Founder Billy Hand George Partner Tony
Kelly Reichardt  First Cow

Filmspotting

05:54 min | Last week

Kelly Reichardt First Cow

"Welcome to film spotting back in early March one of the most anticipated films of the year for US Josh Kelley, records first cow finally came to theaters, and then less than two weeks after its release the COVID nineteen pandemic force, the nation's movie theaters to close along with just about everything else meeting that most people never got a chance to see it. It it wasn't quite the last movie I saw pre pandemic. The penultimate I think I fit in birds of prey, just after I scout, that sounds right and man, my so grateful we were able to get first cow, because to have to sit for a few more months without seeing it as many people had, that would have been tortuous. Yeah, the pandemic. Records plans to come to Chicago when we were scheduled to sit down with her for an interview fast forward now to July first cow is now finally available to rent on demand, and we got a chance to talk to Kelly Reicher by phone later in the show will revisit our first cow review from back in March and hopefully more of you have had a chance to catch up with it now that it is available to rent I though it is our conversation with Kelly Reichardt in addition to first cow. Films include 2016 certain women that starred Kristen Stewart Laura, dern and her frequent collaborator Michelle Williams before that she offered us night moves that was about a trio of radical environmentalists, one of those played by Jesse Eisenberg and she gave us of course meek's cutoff. Which I think is still her masterpiece in Oregon trail set. Film that yeah, a lot of people consider among the very best of the last decade Wendy and Lucy was the film before that one. This was a doomed road trip movie again with Williams, and then the first film that I saw of Hers Atom I think you as well two thousand six's old joy, that one like I call centers on male friendship records debut film river of grass that came out back in nineteen, ninety four for first cow reichert return to the Pioneer Era Pacific northwest setting of Meek's cutoff. Cutoff for a tale of unlikely friendship capitalism, and yes, oil leaks in the movie, a cook from the east to play by John McEnroe joins a group of for trappers Oregon there. He meets Orion lease King Liu a Chinese immigrant, the to become friends and set out on a risky business venture together. Also, there is a cow. It's the first cow in the area. Josh indeed floating down the river in one of the movies more memorable images I'd say absolutely. Let's get to that conversation with Kelly Reicher now. Call me cookie. Mother died when I was born, and then my father died. I never stopped moving. It's a good thing stopped at the puzzle. No way for women to stop. have account cow in the. same place for cows. That's no place for white men. He's A. Since virginity here. Kelly thanks so much for coming back on spotting. It's great to have you nice to be here in virtually exactly so josh and I have both spoken very very favorably of the film, actually our favorite film of the year so far between us, and we both talked about it as almost a parable, a movie that in a story that seemingly very simple, the kind that maybe could even be passed down orally, and without any heavy-handedness or easy moralizing impart. Truths are we on the right path? Do you see I cal that way? I'm. A visual person so. Making it is a audible story I. How came from Jonathan Raymond's novel? The half life. I I'd have to think about it. I haven't thought about it in those terms of course moist thinking about it in images. Yes, so When you say. It's your favorite film. I don't know why you have to qualify it and say so far to stop watching other things. But seems fair. That seems fair. I'm sure you're like A. I think all those qualities topping out exist? I just yeah. I haven't thought about it. In terms that of course I I think maybe a better way to phrase that would have been if if you think about it and I know that this sounds almost like it's simplifying, but whether or not you think about this project, or any other is in terms of imparting kind of lesson, or is there. Is there some? Is there something you were trying to teach to the audience? No No. No I don't think so. I mean I. Know I would not want to think in those terms I mean I hope it has. Layers to it that there's things to think about and Questions to ask as far as. I mean ultimately I think like to focus on the friendship and kept blake quote in the beginning. That's in John's. Novel to remind myself that ultimately are making a film about friendship, and there are these teams of capitalism and You know running through out the new the but It has to be considered like just figuring out how to do seem sort of. Where the power lies in a scene, so it's not like I'm not thinking about those things, but I'm Only, in terms of how they relate to cooking, King Lou not in terms of. Some world message or cheek I World should not be being taught from me. That's for sure.

Kelly Reicher Josh Kelley John Mcenroe Kelly Reichardt Meek Michelle Williams Oregon Jesse Eisenberg King Lou Chicago Kelly Kristen Stewart Laura Jonathan Raymond Wendy Pioneer Era Pacific Blake Dern King Liu
20 Minutes About A Smart Rowing Machine

20 Minute Fitness

05:48 min | Last week

20 Minutes About A Smart Rowing Machine

"The day we have an interesting guests. Bruce Smith from hydro reuss. Why don't you just introduce yourself little eight? Great to be with you on the show and name is Bruce Smith I'm a Canadian living in America, and and the CEO and founder of a company called Hydro. What's grow? Yeah, hydro is a indoor rowing machine, and it uses some pretty revolutionary resistance mechanism technology to make it quiet, but the coolest thing. Thing about the machine. The part that we love the most about it is that we broadcast not fitness classes, but we actually take the experience of being out on the water rowing, and we have instructors out there. Who talked to you directly live on a beautiful twenty two inch, high definition screen with great speakers, so you actually experienced being out on the water and being part of a rowing crew you know from. From your living room or your bedroom or wherever you machine, so it's like having a penitent Kloss, except it's on a rowing machine that is extremely quiets why it whereas like putting us more broad, you know like almost feeding like you're dancing. Really off focusing on you know creating an immersive experience of being out there rowing exactly so we have trademark this idea of votaw reality and I love Peleton we have A. A time in the office they're they're totally great. It's really fun and it is. You said it's exactly right. It's like being at the club with your friends. You know you're not drinking or smoking, but you're you know you're listening to music or super photogenic people. You know it's fun experience and we love that that's great for us the coolest thing that we could think of doing to take this concept of live. Elo are and create an immersive experience so rather than going to the club every day for your workout, which is great, we can have great music and really really charismatic instructors, but you're actually out on the river, or on the bay, Miami beach or rowing by London, bridge, so, who do you think is it for? Is it like somebody that Audio Patent Than They WanNa? WanNa to mix up the workout as really somebody that is looking for different experience because they don't like going to a club, but they wanna have liberal quietness of actually being outdoors and row. It's for people who are looking for the very best experienced the best workout experience and the best way to connect with their friends, so Peleton has a leaderboard which is great. Great, but you're really competing. You're competing by yourself and you know not that many people have actually wrote out of the water in a boat with other people, but the experience of it is unbelievable. You're right on the water, but most importantly you're moving in complete rhythm with seven other people, Ya, howdy, howdy create that because if I'm Roy like, let's say like on. On, a big rowing team or like even dragon boating like a need to be in sync with everyone right because as soon somebody's out of things not working. That's exactly right. In human beings hardware. They love to do things in synchronicity with other people. It makes you feel better. It's like it's a genuine way of connecting and when you're biking, you know you're. You're like ninety five or one hundred beats per minute, and and really not moving in the same rhythm as as the instructor like you're having a shared experience, but it's not exactly the same rhythm when you're on the rowing machine, you're encouraged. It's actually really easy. You move every part of your body in exactly the same rhythm as the instructor, and so there's some brain. Brain science behind this you know the brain is an aerobic organ like a muscle, you not energy systems like like the rest of your body, and so every time you make a decision in your brain. You're using some energy, and so when you're exercising, you have to keep deciding to exercise and they're really really cool thing about rowing especially when you're rowing crew like. Like, not just on a machine by yourself in a room, but when you're rowing as part of a team, you turn off that decision making process in your brain, because the person that you're following the person in front of you is is making those decisions. You don't have to make them, so you achieve the state of flow much much faster and we know from. From our experience and I know from my experience as a national team coach that has it actually has a profound impact on people. It is the best exercise you can do. It's also US eighty six percent of your body's muscles when you're biking like forty forty five percent of your muscles with you have to use your arms and legs. It's like a full body. And your core and it improves your bone density also, so it really is like. If there was one pill that you could take, that would like. Make you friends and make you healthier. You take that pill. Of course. We feel like we've got that pill. We all would like that, but say so just saw. Listeners can really imagine how the product experience looks like so I'm imagining now you're sitting on a rowing machine and you have like a huge monitor of some sort right, and and you see an instructor like. How do you create that experience off? Somebody actually sitting in front of me. Somebody's sitting behind me and I'm not competing against. Against them, but we actually working together like how you create that certainly question, so this isn't like we didn't just go. Go to the river with some of our friends and get some go prost. We don't talk about our our workouts as we talk about them as episodes and we hired this really really amazing film team, and so we take all the experience that Hollywood and television. Television have created in the United States and we apply that skill in that art to capturing the whole experience of being out on the water, so we have four cameras. We have a team that is mixing and editing that you know. The most important part of this are two things number one is the rhythm, and so you never lose that rhythm and the instructor. Who's WHO's out. Out there with you is encouraging you to be in rhythm with everybody, and it's very very easy to follow like you do it instantly, even people who've never done it before within like two or three strokes there in the right rhythm, and then the other part is that emotional connection and two things contribute a lot to that one is music, so we have an amazing library of. Of Music and the other is making sure that when you're filming, you captured not just the rhythm, and the experience of being outside, and and the you know the environment of being out on the water, but also the eyes of the instructor is are the window to the soul, and it's it sounds trite, but it's. It's unbelievably true like you have to see. People's facing to be able. Able to read what's in there is and it, it's that experience being able to move your whole body in the same rhythm, AC- instructor and also connect with them. Because you feel what they're feeling, you know they're out on the water and they're excited about what they're doing. They're you know they're training for the US national team and they're sharing their passion for sport that they love. Love more than anything else, and it's really it is genuinely inspiring, and we thought just a crazy response from consumers, which is really encouraging, and

Rowing Instructor United States Hydro Peleton Bruce Smith America Kloss ELO CEO Hollywood Founder
African-Americans, Nature and Environmental Justice

Science Talk

04:16 min | Last week

African-Americans, Nature and Environmental Justice

"Road wanting. This is so exciting. Fred Tuchman is the river keeper for the Pawtuxet River in Maryland and a winner of the Audubon. Naturalist Society Twenty Twenty Environmental Champions Award River keepers are part of the national nonprofit group dedicated to protecting waterways. Swami this conversation with myself began sixteen years ago started production, river, keeper, and the Guy delivered packages to the office. It might have been ups or something like. Like that, so what in the world you guys do? I told him you know. We protect a river, and we sue polluters, and we run advocacy movements. And he said wow thought about that I could see the wheels turning in his head. He was a person of color, and he said I didn't think that black people could do this successfully wore. The white communities would accept doing this. So I realized that there was perspective out there a set of expectations about what any of us are likely to be able to do, and that we had to challenge those expectations all of us as the only African American river keeper in the US Tuchman acts as a bridge between a white, dominated conservation, establishment and communities of color alongside the river. He protects you find challenges being a person of color in working in this field. Sure I feel challenges and their intricate ones because I don't want to. To be identified as the river keeper for the Black Folks. That's kind of futile right I. I feel like I'm representing a movement that wants to protect a watershed that requires as much participation across many boundaries and I do find time to the messing us in black and brown communities necessarily needs to be different, because the problems are different, because the perspective is different, environmental consultant to Chemo Price adds that perspective may be at odds with the perspectives of mainstream environmental groups had to talk to people who. Bring bring trees to neighborhoods. It hadn't even considered the history of African. Americans in trees. People may not be jumping up and down. Going here on trees, you know older people, maybe like you know what reasonable represent safety for me who knows, but it's just being open and honest about an invalidating the fact that not everybody is a tree hugger in it's okay, and while many people consider untrammelled park lands peaceful escapes from the stresses of the city. People of color may view them differently. There's a lot of people that you know of justifiably are afraid of certain parks because that's where people go maybe to. To Do to dump bodies where people go to do things that they don't want other people to see them doing, and she says that people may simply feel unwelcome especially in federal parks. This like that room in your house that has the plastic on the couch gymnastics to go into, but looks really nice, but you can't go use it so sometimes I think people perceive that is just any unaccessible space to them that distance people may feel regarding these spaces comes partly from their not having been included in the process of creating them, maisy us is a landscape architect and arborist and says that city. City planners pay much more attention to the needs and desires of upscale neighborhoods than those of low income communities. I've gone to so many different community admitting and can tell you from firsthand experience. How much more deference communities that are rich white? Get in the in the planning process how they get to Co. create their communities as part of that because they have power that they can leverage in that process. She's found that many people don't fully understand the process one in which city planners create land, use maps and decide the fate of each community everywhere there is. There are people who decide what type. Type of land use goes where rate so if you have like a power plant in your neighborhood, somebody decided that your neighborhood is a good location for that power plant. If you have other types of pollutants in your neighborhood, a lot of times it has to do with industrial land uses or commercial land uses those are decisions that an urban planner would make, and so if you noticed stat, communities of color tend to have these adjacent cities with pollution. That's because somebody approved that land use, but people don't know that land use maps drive like these kinds of decisions and a lot of times people. Are not part of the process when they're creating the land use maps in a lot of times, people are part of the process. Get Nord in the process of creating this,

Pawtuxet River Naturalist Society Twenty Twen Fred Tuchman African American River Black Folks Audubon Maryland Swami United States Chemo Price Consultant
"rivers" Discussed on Secular Buddhism

Secular Buddhism

04:38 min | 2 weeks ago

"rivers" Discussed on Secular Buddhism

"So the mountains and rivers, Sutra this is a teaching that was written by Duggan Dougan was he lived in Japan and the twelve hundred. He's the founder of the Soto Zen School of Buddhism is the largest of the three major forms of Zen Buddhism, and he founded a monastery in the mountains. And for Togan, the practice of sitting meditation and the experience of Enlightenment were essentially one in the same so knowing. Path that leads to enlightenment is enlightenment is a very simple in a very profound teaching for me, and in the mountains and rivers, Sutra teaching after a long teaching about mountains and about water, <hes> Duggan teaches that in the end, mountains are just mountains and water water are just waters, but I think in that in that statement, it's very simple and very profound, and I wanted to share some of my thoughts about this, so there's a book. <hes> called pointing at the Moon and the author j Garfield and Graham Priest. And in chapter, six of the book at opens up with the statement that goes like this says before I studied Zen mountains were mountains and water was water after studying zen for some time, mountains were no longer mountains and water was no longer water, but now after studying zen longer mountains are mountains and water has just water. And this is an expression that has stuck with me. Since I heard it <hes> several years ago and fact, I'm pretty sure I've mentioned this in the podcast before, but the expression or the concept of the idea that mountains mountains water is water, and then mountains aren't just mountains and waters, not just water, and then after even more time mountains, argest mountains and water water is an expression that that really resonates in the and I WANNA share a couple of reasons why? <hes> doggone taught that. When we know something intimately is ceases to exist, and so do we. And he alludes to a concept in this <hes> in the Sutra that really. Speaks to me, he says in the in the teaching. He says waters freedom depends only on water. Now the first time I heard that I thought well. What does that mean waters? Freedom depends only on water <hes> well. If we think about this, the are what we perceive. Always depends on us as the as the one doing the perceiving. <hes> and this is this is something that echoes in a lot of Buddhist teachings is that? What I perceive has more to do with how I perceive than what the thing is that I'm perceiving now water again as the example when we perceive water, it gets attached to a story that has meaning for example, a farmer praying for rain. <hes> proceeds water once it starts to rain and might think <hes> okay. I'm being blessed I needed this rain and meanwhile another farmer. WHO's trying to dry out there? Hey might be praying for the rain to stop or for their Tanabe rain, and when he perceives, the water sees the rain may be thinking Oh <hes> I'm you know I'm I'm being cursed or <hes>? I am trying to think of the word. That's the equivalent of curse, but not quite that strong. Maybe I'm being. I did something wrong and that's why it's raining on me. Or again a storm or <hes> I guess in any anything that we perceive can be or will be interpreted through the lens of us as the one doing the perceiving so in this expression that waters freedom depends only on water to me is to say that water is free to just be what it is when when it allows itself to just be what it is, it depends only on itself, so this expression is quite profound to me when I think of it in the in the context of myself, my freedom depends only on myself now that's a concept and a teaching that's certainly echoed and a lot of Buddhist teachings, or to say your freedom depends only on you. So for me, this is this is a very powerful thing. I think perhaps the mountains and rivers. Sutra is not about mountains and rivers at all, but perhaps the mountains and rivers themselves are a teaching.

Buddha Morella Cohen sophie Mike
"rivers" Discussed on The Adam Schefter Podcast

The Adam Schefter Podcast

07:11 min | 2 months ago

"rivers" Discussed on The Adam Schefter Podcast

"Every. White Guy in a Beers Jersey. In Knicks Jersey and he looked at me and he says Doc rivers said Yeah Aren't you from Chicago? Man I see. Yeah, he started Craig. Through the story I. Give The guy a big hug. Just walking down the street and I was like that's the quite that sounds right now. My task. WHO's GonNa win the bears quarterback competition. Some. Who Do you think well? You know who it is, but they didn't go get full for him to sit. And that's the way I look at it. Listen I think the best man is going to win, obviously, and then one thing, but nagy did you such an offensive genius I would be shocked to see them both at times, but I don't love. That's just in my life when you decide who it is, and that's who it is, but we have a superbowl winning quarterback now and we also have a very young quarterback right, and so you would think the super bowl winning quarterback. We'll probably get the not. And the other young kids will get the teach. And so in some ways you may win both ways. The way of looking at it and I think they hope it works out that when you did mention. That Philip rivers brought you into. Speak with the culture helped. Arrange that for the Ray Allen money story but I don't know the money store, so I got ask you to share the Ray Allen money in the ceiling store less stock, will it? It's a true story. We lost to the Lakers on Christmas Day in the regular season game, and when you play West East, you only played a west coast teams one time of year in their arena, and we laws and walking on the floor I felt like it was the first time. That our team was down. You just fill it like They knew they thought they were better than the Lakers. They lose to him and they were down so walked in the locker room. Why this came to me? I can't tell you, but it did I walk into the Locker Room I every player every trainer, every coach, every equipment manager to get out of hundred bucks and give it to him, and you know guys like looking around what they need under bucks. I didn't even talked about the game. Game I walked. I need a hundred bucks. Everybody on Kindergarten Eddie, you know. Kevin Garnett the greatest team leader in sports, but he has a very colorful way of expressing himself. You know the F.. Word is now verb an adjective Kevin Garnett, so he's bombing outlet. We're doing this and he's going back and for and I said I'm not. This is not an asset. This is you have to give me a hundred dollars, and so they all gave him his money. And I and there was a ton of. Money in my hand and I had my one security. Guy feel Mitch feel I want you to take everybody in the shower. Is the question you take them in a shower I grab one the system I said Hey. I want to hide this money, and he's like what I said I wanNA hide this body. We gotta figure out a place where they no one could ever find it, and so we finally looked at the ceiling panel. We felt like there's no plumbing and we put the money up in the ceiling. We closed the backup and the players all come here comes in and said. Where's the money? I, said the money got. What do you mean the money? I said the only way you can ever get this money back is we have to come back here and play and the only way we can come back here and play is we have to make to the finals? I believe you're gonNA. Make the final, and we're going to meet them here and when we come back here. We're going to get our money back and so we made it to. The finals went when we got off the bus. It was awesome you saw these. Clare Spreading to the locker. They were waiting. They I walked in that. Locker Room Strasse like. I was laughing because me and Kevin Eastman was one of my only knew where it was. We let him look for another five minutes and I got an. Kevin grabbed a broom lift up the ceiling panel fallout. I swear to God I. Didn't think would be there. I thought someone may have so little founded, and it came falling out, and it was awesome. Player the diving underground. You would think that I I'd love to get you make twenty million dollars in your. A hundred dollar bill. That's. Extra cash. How long was the money hiding in ceiling for their duck? Say Four months wow. Yeah Yeah. We played them in December, maybe longer. Yeah, we played them in December. Six months because our seven because the finals were June. But I wonder if there's any like ceiling tiles in Orlando that you have to scout out now to stick hundred dollar bills. They're inside your team here in the upcoming MVP season year. We'll we're all the funniest call I got? That story got out after it and I got a call from Gregg Popovich and duck and ask you a question with this. Sure you said you. Go into San Antonio. Locker Room said look around. I can find some money. Pop out to tell you. We only thought. The Lakers are GonNa win so no. That's outstanding. Well. Duck like I said I want to get you on. To talk about your experience of the NFL teams, and then obviously with all the events going on in the world, I thought well. This is just unbelievable to build to get him I wanNA. Thank you for all the time that you granted me today. visit time for you It was worth the wait trying to get you on the phone I. Really do appreciate it very much. I look forward. To somehow meeting on the road hopefully Gimme a clippers game at ESPN point I love doing the sideline reporting to these games, and it'll be a great honor to get one your games here while I would love that that would be phenomenal. But somewhere we gotta mid up. Maybe it was doing the rams game. We've run in each other, but I love your word. Keep doing it and all this stuff that we are involved in right now i. think doing the thing, the more we talk about it The more we speak out the better will become as society so I'm hoping we can just keep this going a lot longer than a protests. What we're trying to educate, right, we're trying to educate you and I think that you've done a great job of doing that today, and that's why I appreciate it. I'm going to find you at some point I i. don't know whether it's going to be a work assignment or whether you're going to be coming to new. York to play a game I'm going to confine you at some point in time at look forward to shaking your hand in person and thanking you for your time today. Where I'm looking forward to that, and so are here's the head coach, Los Angeles Clippers who now have to begin to get ready for training camp will be July nine to eleven with the NBA. season. Up July thirty first in Orlando and he's got so much going on and as I mentioned to him, we reached out to him before. All, these protests erupted. We reached out when. I heard he had been talking the bears in the colts, and the rams, and that was what I wanted to bring him on, and I think we're the great things.

Lakers Locker Room Kevin Garnett Orlando Ray Allen Los Angeles Clippers Locker Room Strasse Knicks Doc rivers Beers Jersey Kevin Eastman rams Philip rivers bears Craig Gregg Popovich nagy Chicago
"rivers" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

Everyday Zen Podcast

04:04 min | 2 months ago

"rivers" Discussed on Everyday Zen Podcast

"Section in the 'cause translation of since we kill Great Master Kwong Zone of human said and this is the same inman by the way we were studying last month. We studied several of his sayings. You might remember. Every day is a good day of that body exposed in the Golden Wind. That's the same union. He also said Eastern Mountains travel on water now up to now. We've been talking about mountains. Now we're switching and we're talking about waters so in a way of mountains and rivers are in Chinese. Lor Mounted rivers is a way of saying nature the whole of nature but mountains and rivers suggest two sides of nature's the soft side flowing side and the side. That's adamant hard and strong like iron. Maybe I don't think this is really right but it's partly what's going on here. Mountains are like form waters. Our rivers are like emptiness as you'll see mounted just like in the heart sutra form. An emptiness are the same. Form is emptiness emphasis form. You'll see mountains and waters merge as he as he goes on here so you said Eastern Mountains travel on water in his commentary Showing Aku uses the word hostile. Hush Son Sorry. Ho Ho show sweet so he is water. Hotel suite is Dharma water or such this water. So that's the water. We're talking about here not not regular water as a metaphor but it's actually truth water and that's the name of the water that we use in. Germany. It it's supposed to relive on top of the head of a person who has received Shijo and you take it from your head and you put it in the water and then you sprinkle in all over everybody so that they can take the precepts. That's the water. He's talking about here regularly water but special water which is everywhere. The reason these words were brought forth is that all mountains are eastern mountains and all eastern mountains travel on water so all eastern mountains doggedness telling us doesn't just refer to mountains in the East eastern mountains are all mountains. There are no directions. It's true right. I mean Are we east or west of Japan right now? What we're both east and west of Japan except for Joe Allen. Who's in Japan? The rest of us are both east and west of Japan. Everything is East and west of everything else. All Mountains Eastern Mountains and eastern mountains travel on water because of this nine mountains months. Subaru and other mountains appear to have practice realization so because each phenomenon is everywhere and everything that's the nature of the mountain is in the east. But if you really are there it's everywhere that's why all the famous mountains these are all pilgrimage mountains sacred mountains nine mountains Matsumoto and other mountains. They all have practice realization. This phrase practice. Realization is the essence of does against teaching. And so.

Mountains Eastern Mountains Eastern Mountains mountains Matsumoto Lor Mounted rivers Japan Golden Wind Subaru Shijo Joe Allen Germany
"rivers" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

02:10 min | 4 months ago

"rivers" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"And Ethin- to be surface. And so. Yeah it's hot enough then. Things that on earth seem like solid or impenetrable could be part of a cycle and this probably happens on Jupiter Saturn where carbon is evaporating from certain layers in than it is solidifying and falling back down as as diamonds. We can't go get those diamonds. Because they're in the deep deep inside of a gravity well inside of a very bad place but there there I love the idea of geology on other worlds obviously biology's you know in geology terms of in terms of complexity. Anyway but I love it. Yeah there is really active geology on other places in our solar system and of course even more so in the rest of the galaxy It's Kinda just boring here because we already seen all of it. Go other places see crazy? Yeah well yeah. It's good to remember how really cool Earth Yeah like really exceptional and unique and and like what what and also like three cheers for water. Yeah substance I don't WANNA drink diamond. That wouldn't do me any good. Yeah for substances that. We could have a cycle of water a job. Drinking diamonds is only good for smuggling. Ooh That's true that'd be like it would number on your intestines so you got a package them in something squishy stuff. I've got an idea you're smuggling Tim. Steph EH. GotTa have another increment? I'm not going anywhere. Yeah like what is. What is the illicit substance right now? Besides ourselves toilet paper you can't I mean it doesn't help us. Luckily toilet paper inside of your body is counterproductive. All right if you wanna ask the science couch your questions. You can follow us on twitter at sideshow tangents where we tweet out topics for upcoming episodes every week. Thank you to at Acrobat. I at Kenji Hawaii five and everybody else. Who tweeted us? Your questions this episode Sam Buck Final. Scores Syrian. I tied for first Salmon Stephan tied for second or as they say.

Ethin Kenji Hawaii Sam Buck twitter Steph
"rivers" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

01:40 min | 4 months ago

"rivers" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"Actually like landed probe on Titan's so we got like very briefly and up-close view of it and it's kind of squishy there you know there's rivers there's lakes there's rain but it's all but it's all methane and like that. Certainly not the only one like anything that has you know fairly close together points for liquid and gas that those conditions whether it's pressure or temperature can be duplicated on other and other places and you can have you know you can have diamond rain. You can have led rain. You can have all kinds of like it just depends on the and the conditions of the Individual Planet. We're talking about so yes. You can have hydrological ish cycles of non water chemical so and people say diamond rain. It's actually is it liquid diamonds than Israeli. Yeah no well. No it would be saw. It would be like I guess that would be like snow. Rapport carbon would be still formed in a similar way to how? Yeah where it's like. The planet is so hot that the carbon evaporates and then it falls down as like solid. Stones of diamond would be the idea. We've never like observed this up close but seems like it's what's happening like. Hank has been Zane at Austin with the temperature of the planet so like on Titan for example the surface temperatures are really cold so minus one hundred eighty degrees Celsius which is minus two hundred ninety two degrees Fahrenheit and that allows for liquid methane and Ethin- to be surface. And so. Yeah it's hot enough then. Things that on earth seem like solid or impenetrable could be part of a cycle.

Titan Hank Austin Zane
"rivers" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

09:42 min | 4 months ago

"rivers" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"Welcome back everybody. Sam Buck total series in the lead with two points with her devastating stone quarry Deception I have one point Sam has one point and Stephan has nothing and now it's time for Stephan to try and claw his way back with me in the back off. We've got to panelists who are going to present facts to the attempt to blow their minds and the present easy Sambuc to award at the fact that they liked the most who's GonNa go I will. It is the person who can tell me how long the third longest river in the world is the Yangtze River. How long Since this is devastating because being very wrong. We'll just like Abu like well. I didn't know how big earth was. I guess I'm GonNa say eight Hundred Miles Ken. I was GONNA say more than that. I'll say twelve hundred. Okay Anka's closer you both bigger this. Oh three thousand nine hundred seventy way. Nihil it's four thousand one hundred thirty two miles long online. Gosh all right so Stephan. I guess I'll go first so rivers great and sometimes they kind of get in our way or we're gonNA capture him in some way like for example. Maybe they're created ice jams and we got blow 'em up or we just want to harness the energy of that river and build dams and stuff. This is great if you want to store up a bunch of water and maybe get some electric city. It's bad if you want fish to survive so we do want fish to survive and in doing that. Would you believe me if I told you that? We created a delicious death trap for Salmon to be consumed in a kind of sushi. Conveyor belt for sealines so fish ladders are thing and the idea of official ladder is like you have the dam and like that's like the water comes up to dam and like obviously a fish can't get up but then you can build sort of a thing that a fish can kind of swim up a little external thing so the fish can continue on its path to it spawning ground in the things can get down and you sort of connect the two ecosystems that you've built a big wall between but at the Bonneville Dam and Oregon sea-lions started showing up in the nineteen nineties. It started out with just like one or two and then a handful but then the apparently started telling other buddies about this amazing sushi conveyor belt and by the early two thousands there were like hundreds of sea lions showing up to just like grab the little fish out of the or just like wait at the top when they came out of the fish ladder and be like go. Thank you very much so The number of salmon actually decreased significantly as a result of this and no other National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration estimates that the sea lions eat around ten thousand adults. Spring Chinook Salmon a at Willamette falls where the sealines found another fish ladder to hunt dot. There are an additional twenty five thousand steelheads migrating through that in the nineteen seventies and in two thousand eighteen. The numbered in the hundreds so in response to this wildlife. Managers have tried to scare the sea. Lions off so sometimes they run at them and they're like that doesn't seem to work very well they also have tried to blow them up. Not Actually they did however set firecrackers off to try and scare them away. That also did not work because the lines are like. Have you seen all of these fish? They also tried trapping the sea. Lions releasing them five hundred miles away. And would you believe that the sea lions travelled five hundred miles back so that they could eat at this fish buffet? They have had to start shooting the sea. Lions you guys. We were like. We built a dam. That was really bad for the Salmon. And then we'll build a fish ladder and then it's like well the really enjoying this fish ladder. So let's start to shoot the sea-lions unintended consequences man. It's hard so sorry for the to end on a low note but we are doing our best to protect salmon populations and hopefully we're doing something useful with the sea lions after we shoe so they're still shooting them to this day. They are shooting them to this day. Here I Imagine Sea Lion Yelp was very wild when they discovered the salmon ladder was like guys. I found the secret Sushi spot. Can you imagine yelp when they started to get shot? This sucks the service gone really downhill here. This might be foolish question. But how did they tell each other? That all the salmon were there. Did they decide? I know your own or a- witter I do not know an I mean like I was wondering two things I did not find good information for either of these like how did they find it in the first place 'cause sometimes Osaman will jump out and it will not back into the ladder and so you have the smell of dead and dying salmon and that is a smell that might attract an animal from a long way away. Yeah or maybe it was just accident. Then you have like okay like clearly. It wasn't like one showed up and then to showed up and then three showed up. It was like wanted to shoot up. And then four eight sixteen like it was clearly exponential like they grew very fast so like it it does seem like in some way there was like family communication going on like maybe the maybe the sea lions were extremely in. There are like well. I'll just bring all of my offspring. I am having no trouble creating because I get to eat ten thousand salmon. Rc lions fairly social creatures. I feel like you always see the clustered in bigger aisles and pictures That probably has something to do with it to where whether or not we've studied it. They might have some sort of communication of like. Hey there's food this way. If as long as in direct competition with each other they have some sort of sociality they have some communication seven so in Africa. There's the Mara River which I don't know what it ranks as far as lengths of river but around that river there is. I think it's one point two or one point. Three million Seren Giddy wildebeest that make their migration through that area and this is the largest remaining overland migration in the world and so during that they crossed this river multiple times and at four of those crossing sites. I guess the conditions of the river end up being pretty bad at certain points but they they're wildebeest and they're KINDA DUMB. They don't really realize that so they just keep trying to cross there and that leads to a bunch of mass drownings happening and so they're often migrating in like they're not like one big heard of million they're like packs of one hundred or several thousand and like the entire pack will get consumed and an end drowned in this river at these points and so on average this amounts to over sixty two hundred wildebeest deaths annually which is very small compared to the overall size of the herd so it doesn't actually affect them that much but unless you're one of the sixty yes it sixty two hundred sixty two hundred but still. That's that's a lot of wildebeest and so after this happens like obviously you have a bunch of like vultures and crocodiles coming into like chow down by a team of researchers wanted to see how these kinds of events were affecting the aquatic ecosystem because it's kind of similar to like a whale fall in the ocean so like when. Wales die they end up falling to the ocean floor and then there's this ecosystem that develops around its corpse for several decades as the corpses consumed. This is the same sort of thing happening in our a a river. And it's not a particularly large river and in the paper they. They did the math to compare it to how many like Wales worth of biomass. It is and it's about ten blue whales a year that is getting deposited in this river. The thing that I thought was the coolest was in the weeks after the events happen. Thirty four percent to fifty percent of the diets of fish in the river were wildebeest flesh. Even the fish are getting in there and chowing down and even four months later will be. Were still seven to twenty four percent of the fish's diet so this is after the flesh disappeared but the fish were still eating the biofilms that were being supported by the bones and they point out that like these were probably way more common back in the day when there were many more large herds of animals Romay the right road bison in North America and these are probably important or were important influxes of nutrients for the the river ecosystems. And it's not a thing that I think we factor in when we're looking at like how were modeling freshwater. Ecosystems or thinking about restoring ecosystems to how they used to be in nature we must let the wildebeest die yeah and and also. I'm really happy. That yours was kind of a Downer too because I was worried that just by the fact being about death I was going to have less less good chance but oh hey rijsel circle of why yes. Are you guys time to pick your fact? Are you ready three two one? Oh let it. We split the different stuff. And I'm just happy I got one. Point is a good fast any nothing about it. I've heard about Hippo Coop in those rivers and the River Mara not. There's.

Stephan Yangtze River Salmon Mara River Wales Sam Buck Hundred Miles Ken River Mara Sambuc Willamette falls Bonneville Dam Yelp yelp Anka Oregon Oceanic Atmospheric Administra Africa official Hippo Coop North America
"rivers" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

11:42 min | 4 months ago

"rivers" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"Of our panelists is prepared. Three science facts for our education and enjoyment. But only one of those facts is real and the rest of us have to figure out either way deduction or wild. Guess which is the true fact. Seri is going to present these These facts to us. And if you fool us you will get a Sam Bucks for each one you fool and if we get it right we will get the sandbox Sarry. What are your facts? Niagara River was hard to cross by ferry since the currents were so rocky and it would have made things a lot easier to build a bridge between the US and Canada to help with tourism and other kinds of traveling and in eighteen forty seven. An engineer named Charles Eliot Junior was awarded the contract to construct a bridge across the Niagara Gorge above a spot called the whirlpool rapids. Because it's too dangerous for boat travel in that spot but it was the narrowest part of the river and because it was such a challenge. Charles rallied the local communities to help so which of these three things is. True Number One. He created a kite flying contests and offered a prize to the first kid who could fly their kites from one bank to another then. He used that kite string to pull across increasingly bigger ropes and start constructing a suspension bridge. Oh GonNa be mad. If that's not real numbers today. He created an artist's festival in a quarry near the river inviting sculptors to create large specifically carved stones which they could add personal touches to that locked together like puzzle pieces to make a stonebridge strong enough to resist the currents or number three. He invited chemists and engineers to test out explosives because the rocks that fell into the river altered the currents enough to break up the rapid so that it was possible to navigate ships and build a timber Ridge. One of these explosive experiments resulted in a mixture of black powder and liquid chemical fuel. That was the best explosive on the market until dynamite happened in eighteen sixty seven so we've got three facts here one of them's true. Two of them are fake the first one he did a kite flying contests and then used the strike string to draw cross subsequently larger ropes until they could build a suspension bridge number two he created a temporary quarry and an artist festival to have artists come and carve really good large bricks or a number three invited chemists and engineers to test out explosives so he could give big hunks of rock into the river to slow down the current enough to build a timber. Rich I WANNA go to straight to the artists quarry. Did they so they got to do? They get till like carve things that they wanted and they get a prize if they did something prettier than other people. He did have cash prizes to award. Which at the time. We're like five or ten. Us dollars. But I think the the main marketing behind this sort of thing was come to the Corey. I have designs for rocks and I need them carved in a particular shape but within that you can add your own signature to it or you can carbon designs and make a mark on this project on this bridge. That's uniting our two countries this like working for exposure totally is well. It's like working for impact like I'm going to have a legacy. Yes people find value different ways Sam. Walking across this bridge might see my special rock if I get a handrail piece. Yeah some of those rocks are going to be under the water. Yeah that one. I like these all so much the first one I loved the most the yeah. That's the kind of thing that sends just crazy enough to work that somebody back. Then when I thought of it I am like you couldn't get it across some other way because the rapids were so bad right. But couldn't you like go up with your big rope and like cross it up? I mean maybe not but a trees and stuff in the way is a very very big river at was that said how big it is. I think the gorge is eight hundred feet wide and two hundred feet deep okay. So let's totally totally doable to get a kite. Across that. Depending on which way the wind is what and like was that the American kids. Who did it were were? Did the Canadian kids do it? I think it was again like anyone who wants to can trying. But which kid did it. I want to know it was an American. I don't picture Canadian. Kids big type. Flyers is either not another wind or way too much wind. The Kite thing reminds me of spiders. Because I know there's some spiders that throw their web. They live on one side of a river and they like poop their web out into the air and it like the wind carries it across and then it gets stuck on the other side and then they can build a web off of that Sarah Space Looks. Very disgusted right now my thoughts and then the last one just seems too smart for his own good. I don't even understand what you're talking about. Arrowhead come tryout your blowups yeah Blow up the cliffs. Make the rocks fall into the river to disrupt the whirlpools logically sound as the eighteen. Hundreds you know Oh yeah. They didn't have ecology back then. That word literally didn't exist as so what year was this. He got the grant in eighteen forty seven and he built the bridge in eighteen forty eight or starting eighteen forty eight. I think wow so in any one of these cases you. He was extremely ingenious and his ideas for how to get this project started and I like to think that he was like. Here's what I'm GonNa do and the people are like. Oh yeah that's great. Here's the money you can do. My sense is that he was one of the only people who wanted to do this. A lot of engineers where like now. This is impossible here. Asks have and then Charles Eliot junior was like give me the contract. I have ideas. I'M GONNA go with kite flying you guys. Even if it's not real it is so good I wanna hear about the ways in which it Israel which I'm sure is something. I feel like the kite. Flying must be the spider thing and I just don't think the artists thing would work that does it. Sounds like you would take. I don't know it just doesn't sound right to me like they wouldn't work car. How many stone carvers are there out there? Yeah Nazis in that specific area of the world back then. Maybe they were a lot. I guess that's what you're building houses out of. Yeah back then masons were like everybody was a mason. That was one of the only job. Well then never mind. I'm going to go down as an IRO solitaire of now. Okay with other people working for artists shoot. I was GONNA go with number two two but do do WANNA double up okay. I'm doing it number two. I like I like the idea of this one. Oh okay okay. The real one is Kate's disgusted face on us. I don't know what my face looks like. I didn't given time so that's good to know I love it. Tell me more. It seems like you knew a lot about this. Why you gave you had too many fax. I was trying to not know what you kept asking questions and I was like. Oh I'm excited about this. I love it so the competition was held in January eighteen. Forty eight and the child who I succeeded to spend the gorge with kite which he named the union was an American named home in Walsh. He sent his kite from the US side to the Canadian side. I think that first time at crossed his kite string broke. His there was a son in like pull of the line and it got caught on the rocks and at broken and so he was stuck on the Canadian side for eight days while this happened this child. I don't know if you went there this family. Or how did he gets? He flies because they were all right. I don't know the the story does not have very many details. It's like on a website but also a children's book an economic us the full children's book to verify but he like sent his kite to the opposite bank and like ran up. Stream took a ferry across to go collect his kite and make sure the string was taught and then he found that it snapped instead so they were stuck in Canada for eight days and then was like okay. I'm going to try it again. And then repaired his kite. The Union did not go with a new one. He like had his trusty kite and then flew the kite across again. And then one was there a lot of other people trying to do this. I think so. I think it was promoted in local papers or whatever new system they had at the time on both sides of just like. Hey kids win five bucks flyer kite across this river in the middle of winter. He really wanted the five bucks. He's still alive. I think many says it's like a very good memory of his the one time that he flew a kite across there and that's basically what they did is they took his string and then they did a bigger rope. A bigger rope eventually steel rope way and that was how was how engine bridge. He's not still is still alive. Eighteen four heaven. Never mind ask discovered some Elixir. Was he was still alive at some point thanks. For fact checking man to be attornal. He died in eighteen ninety nine. That was a while ago when back all right well. I'm glad it was a big deal for them. And if you didn't get to live forever Do you have any real to the concrete? Corey Arts Festival. Not just that stone. Bridges existed time. I was looking at other bridges that were built in the eighteen hundreds and it seems like there are mostly stone. Stone was the next. Big Technology is putting pieces together without anything sticky Stinky Raka but together and some of those bridges are still standing today. But they're mostly over small rivers but they could whether the currents a lot more than mood and then there's a tiny bit of truth in the explosion story kind of cobbled together between two separate things the Leshan I think giant Buddha and China is a two hundred thirty foot high statue and when it was constructed the currents below it were really really rough and I think they partially created this Buddha statue to like hope that ships would be able to take safe passage but the so much rock fell off that actually made the current safer. It's also from Ottawa. Canada and other countries in wintertime have so much ice flow in their rivers that if it was allowed to continue building up it would become dangerous for the people who live nearby the riverbanks and so every winter they just bombed their rivers trenches and put dynamite in them and blow it up to break up the ice because it won't melt fast enough naturally we've just done a bad job with infrastructure and just been like. I WanNa live close to the river and then the river is like no no no. That's not how nature can say. We've we've done a bad job but like they solve the problem because they were like no we've got bombs. You're not a problem. I can blow you up usually. You can't blow up a weather but in this case you can all right next. We're going to take a short break and then it'll be time for the fact off. Welcome back everybody. Sam Buck total series in the lead with two points with her devastating stone quarry Deception I have one.

US Canada engineer Niagara River Union Stone Sam Bucks Seri Charles Niagara Gorge Charles Eliot Junior Charles Eliot Big Technology China Corey Bridges Sam Buck Corey Arts Festival Sarah Space
"rivers" Discussed on The Stephen A. Smith Show

The Stephen A. Smith Show

05:08 min | 6 months ago

"rivers" Discussed on The Stephen A. Smith Show

"That's the end of the season. And that's when you lose bobby. They wouldn't super bowl even as right the giants super bowls and the Eagles Super Bowl where they lost those are the three they lost. We're basically the same as all the other super bowls. It was a one score game at the end. You'RE NOT GONNA win those every time some time time. You'RE GONNA lose. Sometimes you're going to lose but the Randy Moss team when he put a great when he's given Brady a great receiver especially when Brady was in his prime long ago by the way Brady's balled all doubt. He knows he's a gay manager. Now who can be big on third down in the playoffs. He can't take your team. They're like Patrick Mahomes. There's someone like that. You're looking at that number looking at personnel missing. I really don't think you are if you're going to maintain that opinion about where he has a. He hasn't hasn't had much to work with this. I just think this particular season. I'm not saying there wasn't any slippage but I think this particular season he went others have could have adjudged him completely unfairly. He was giving nothing to work with this year. This remember bobby wasn't bobby wasn't the one that show when I said this. Keep in mind and Antonio Brown would all all the noise coming his way with the chargers. That's what makes us tomorrow right now with. The charges were levied against Antonio Brown. Tom Brady a married man with children. Invited Antonio Brown and stay. That's how desperate he was to to have a wide receiver. He'll go let this man living in Seoul and I'm not. I'm not I'm not. I'm not taking get any guilt. I'm not attaching any guilt to Antonio Brown's of I don't know what happened. I'm just saying do those issues and Tom Brady was so desperate lower receiver he was willing to give their Tony over our free room and board the one game. If four catches sixty yards and touchdown. That's all you need. Rainy needs is the greatest receiver since Jerry Rice. And then he'll be fine quarterback. Say That Josh Gordon match that would have sufficed if he could have stayed for now. Ri- yeah I mean that's it yes of course if Brady has elite weapons. It looked better when I did look good. Would all be honest drew brees. We've seen his accuracy is the same as ever much. The ball probably but mike is the same as ever. Tom Brady is missing. Guys everywhere you can miss a guy how the first thing your take on. ESPN RADIO AND ESPN news. I'm Jason Fitz. We can add another quarterback to this conversation that we have breaking news from Adam Schefter. This is the tweet end of an era. Los Angeles chargers quarterback Philip Rivers have mutually agreed that rivers will enter free agency and not return to the the team for the twenty twenty season. So at this point what we know is that the chargers who went in and gave their head coach and extension. This off season are entering the offseason with no no quarterback at this point foot. Philip rivers will not be their quarterback entering next season so Philip rivers now becomes part of this conversation. Is Everybody's looking again. I Argued With my goal of junior in your morning about this on on Golic and Wingo. We can have the conversation all day long about what we think's happening in. This is really happening. Because that hasn't signed quickly enough. I still think is going to get assigned and it's going to end much of this conversation. Because what did we see. It wasn't that long ago we were talking about Zeke. Who and the questions in Zeke's contract negotiation Jason With Jerry Jones? Would it turned into some lingering effects that hurt their relationship. Well Zeke got paid right and the mini. He got paid. Everything seemed to be fine moving forward. ESPN radio presented by progressive insurance drivers who switch and save pay an average of seven hundred ninety six dollars less per year. Get out there on twitter. You can vote at Jason Fitz. We've got a poll asking you who should be the cowboys. Starting quarterback this year Dak Brady or other so you now can add Philip rivers to that definitive other right now. Overwhelming almost seventy five percent of. You have voted Dak AAA wait say. ESPN eight eight eight. Seven two nine three seven seven six. That's how you get in on the conversation. Eight eight eight seven nine three seven seven six Chris in Illinois. Who should did start for the cowboys? Give us your take. I believe that Got A good army can Spain pocket. And he's got a good Sandra now but the conversation on Tom Brady Stephen I think he's off the mark Tom Brady take can take. Anybody has a defensive offensive and work with them. That's just who he is. That's how Tom Brady hit his not that he's that great but a quarterback should be able to work with anybody. He has always CAINE. Thanks for the call. I think he has worked with anybody. Has I mean that's Do we think that the Patriots would have one more or less games. Last year. It Brady wasn't the starting quarterback I mean the answer to that is less. The problem is quarterback take a just a huge dip at some point. Let's remember Peyton. Manning won a couple of super bowls with the broncos. And you could argue that the broncos won in spite of peyton manning not because of peyton manning as great as Payton's career was was towards the end of his career. He wasn't near the quarterback. The presumption is that Brady will hit that same wall because we're used to seeing penza synthetic motor oils.

Tom Brady Antonio Brown Jason Fitz ESPN Tom Brady Stephen Philip Rivers bobby peyton manning cowboys Randy Moss Zeke Philip rivers Jerry Rice giants broncos Seoul Adam Schefter Patriots
"rivers" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

10:09 min | 7 months ago

"rivers" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Brought it was a woman brought her backstage. I said first of all. She's fine fine and she's thinner and I probably so just lost four pounds so jealous and then we just went on. But it's you never know what's going to have a live show now. The film explores among other things. Your relationship with your daughter Melissa when she was young. And you were establishing yourself in show business. Did you have a conflict between career and motherhood which so many women go through now. Trying to balance wants the two but not that many women were going through it. When you were Chris? Many more women were full-time mothers and homemakers. Then I did something from the very beginning because I've been sitting when I was pregnant with a very famous comedian and a little girl who was in the park mark and a little girl fell down and cut her knee and ran to the nanny. And I said right then and then my child will run to me and I from the beginning. We stopped everything at six o'clock We always had a family. Didn't even we went out afterwards. It had another dinner with friends. Everything stopped at six. I was Brownie scout mother in those uniform. You don't know what I sacrificed uh-huh my daughter. I mean Terry please Jewish woman in a khaki dress not not no I think I was as good a working mother as you can possibly be. I was also lucky. I was in a position where I could take my daughter. Go to work when I was on Broadway. Melissa sat in addressing which he talks about and she would color and crown in the dressing room and she talks about that no such fond memories. She talks about growing up backstage in Vegas where sitting on a stool. We sat on a stool right off stage and wish you could watch me in every night. Jews allowed to re write one joke that I would say on the stage no matter how terrible the joke or and so she was always included included totally include as much as I could but I also had to make a living in the movie. I think it's you who said I'm tournament whether you say it or somebody says I think you say that you are perceived as an advocate for plastic surgery than the poster girl and then the joke. Yeah when did it cross over into joke Probably my first banned plastic surgery Probably I when I talked about it too much. I should have been like everybody else and not said a word and And Deny it. So why did you do. I talked about the very beginning but I'm a a comedian. So of course you walk on stage and say I just had my is down and let me tell you Dr Blah Blah Blah Blah and you start doing jokes and it was in those days shock to talk about it like everything else. Things have evolved and that was a very shocking thing to discuss. And then it became mm-hmm 'cause I dragged read. Some people thought that's all I did. I was very glad I talked about it. It goes back to what we started out talking about. Which is by talk talk about it? Maybe there's some woman somewhere North Dakota who hates her nose and she's shy get it fixed off friends align during saying don't do it betty and I'm saying betty to it going to feel better about yourself. Jewish we're listening back to you're twenty ten interview with Joan rivers as part of our end of the decade series of interviews. We'll hear more of that interview after we take a short break. This is fresh air. Hi It's Terry Gross inviting you to check out our new online archive collecting forty years of fresh air interviews and reviews. You can hear my interviews views with people like David Bowie aretha Franklin Johnny Cash. John Updike Tony Morrison searched for names. You're interested in make a playlist for yourself or friends at at fresh air. Archive Dot Org. That's fresh air archive dot org support for. NPR comes from whyy presenting the podcast. Eleanor amplified right and adventure series. Kids love here reporter. Eleanor Atwood crafty villains and solve mysteries as she travels globe to get the big story available. Where you get podcasts? or at WHYY DOT Org. Let's get back to our twenty ten interview with the late Joan rivers in the documentary You you say about your late husband Edgar who had also been your manager and producer you save a madly in love with him. No was a good marriage. Yes and I guess. I was surprised price to hear you confess that that you weren't madly in love with him. Well it's also twenty years and you could look. I thought he wonderful. I thought he was very funny. I thought he was so smart. I just knew he was right for me. I met him. I married and four days later. Four days later raise it four days later he was crazy about me. I just knew he was perfect for me. Perfectly perfectly smart smart funny terrific got the business got me had a great time together Both wanted the same things. We had a great marriage. Rich great marriage was madly in love with some thump thump thump thumping no but as my mother always said they should like like you more than you like them so it was he dumpy frumpy over you. Is that what you're saying. Yeah oh he throws a cutest Jiechi walking around but he had very bad eyesight so I think most people know that you know he. He took his life after killer. Yeah F F in this was not long like a few months after your late night show which he was producing on Fox was cancelled and apparently the network asked him to leave. You oppose that and then they'll show got cancelled and you in the movie so that you blame Fox for totally for his death but I I'm wondering if maybe he wasn't like depressed before that. And if maybe depression in co `interfering with his relationship with the network and if it all your tap app dancing everything is wonderful and something bad happens. You'RE NOT GONNA kill yourself. But this was the big thing and he was producing the show and they said to me You can say he can go history go and he I have a choice on a Thursday. I said no Then I go with my husband and we're off on Friday any annuity to my career so he had not only gotten us out of a job. my whole career was smashed. Everything everything was just very very bad and it had a major heart attack and he had a four way bypass and it was coming out of that and he was impressed over that and he just couldn't continue couldn't do it in the movie. You say that he left you high and dry and left auto debts because he wasn't a good businessman. Yeah so it sounds like you. Were you know horrified. that he killed himself but also angry with them beyond angry. Still Angry I. I work very hard for suicide survivors with suicides of ours as Missy Chris what it does to you. The anger never leaves you. There's sadness sadness that on we that sets in that You know and Melissa Walk down the aisle and it was ten years after her father kills. We both cried because Daddy Eddie was there walker down. I mean you never get over that missing that part of it But you still so furious what you did to us what you did your daughter. The selfishness of a suicide. What you've done you've just left all the pieces and gone John? You took the easy way and it's not an easy. They're very brave to do it. But it's a terrible terrible terrible thing what it does to family terrible thing. What does family do you feel like it it? It sends a knowing message to the family. It sends a bad message of family but it sends a lot of jokes. Mommy's a comedian right. Yeah my I joke was my husband killed himself and left a message that I have to visit him every day so I had him cremated in sprinkled him uneven. Marcus having list today and that's why get through life. Do you think of something like that. Because it's so the whole life so difficult and so cruel that you better laugh at it because you don't know what's GonNa hit your next Joan rivers recorded in twenty ten. She died at the age of eighty one in two thousand fourteen tomorrow. We continue our series. A favorite interviews from the decade s elected by our staff will feature highlights of three of our shows with musicians that included interviews and performances lear from the Carolina chocolate drops a ban that includes Rhiannon Giddens and plays music in the black string band tradition Katherine Russell. A great jazz singer who does a lot of early jazz songs. Her father was Louis. Armstrong's music director in the forties and pianist. John Batiste who leads the band on the late show with Stephen Colbert. Great Music Zik to start the new year. Fresh Air's executive producer is Danny Miller. Our interviews and and reviews are produced an edited by Amy Salad. Phyllis Myers San Brigger. Lauren Crenshaw Heidi some on Moody's Eighty Seth Kelly enjoyable from. I'm Terry Gross Post. All of us have fresh air. Wish you a healthy and fulfilling twenty twenty.

Fresh Air Terry Gross Melissa Walk Joan rivers Missy Chris Eleanor Atwood Fox betty John Batiste North Dakota Vegas John Updike Phyllis Myers San Brigger Stephen Colbert NPR David Bowie Amy Salad Danny Miller reporter
"rivers" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

11:46 min | 7 months ago

"rivers" Discussed on Fresh Air

"React to our interviews on twitter twitter in real time as you're listening like when you tell us that you can't get out of your car because of an interview. That's my favorite kind of interview is when we feature a topic topic or a guest. I know nothing about or I think I'm interested in. And then it's a total surprise like the interviews. We did this year with a cave diver or or an Episcopal priest or the author a book about the Secret Mind Control Experiments and those tend to be the interviews that we hear about the most from our listeners. I also see on social media. How many of you appreciate our news coverage we live in such an overwhelming and new saturated time and we work really hard to find the best journalists us to unpack complicated issues? And of course I'd be remiss to not mention the big name interviews like Howard. Stern Reese Witherspoon Eliza and even when those guests go on the late night. Talk shows or other podcasts. You know that the fresh air interview is going to be different. Because it's Teri. She's a legend. So the best way you can keep these shows coming and to tell us that you like what we do is to give to your local. NPR Station go to donate dot NPR dot org slash Josh fresh air that's Doni Dot. NPR DOT ORG slash rusher. Thank you from. WHYY IN PHILADELPHIA. I'm terry gross with fresh air. Today as we end the decade we continue our series of favorite interviews from the decade as chosen by our staff. We'll hear from the most famous voice in Radio Howard Stern. He used to sound like this. My voice I tie. This is Howard stern and I was like I don't sound like a guy on the radio radio and we'll hear my twenty ten interview with the late Joan rivers. She felt her comedy got better as she got older. What are you gonNA? Do you GonNa find me pin five. It could be bankrupt. been bankrupt banned from networks happened. So I can say anything I want and it has re totally to very entertaining interviews on this final day of the decade coming up on fresh air on this final day of the decade were continuing our series featuring some favorite interviews of the decade as selected by our staff. We start today with an interview from this year. Howard Stern I spoke with him last May after the publication of his book? Luke Howard. Stern comes again collecting some of his favourite interviews. He has become a really good interviewer at the age of sixty five. He says he's changed over the years and has moved away from some of the crude sex talk and sexism of his earlier years and has been emphasizing empathy over outrageousness in his interviews but he admits his shows still contains a fair amount of what he calls second-grade humor. He show became nationally syndicated in nineteen eighty six and moved to Sirius Satellite Radio in two thousand thousand six. Here's our interview Howard. Stern welcome to fresh air. I am so excited this is happening. You know like some of our listeners. I think just a few but some of our listeners. They're outrage that Howard. Stern is going to be on our show and some of your listeners. Probably think public radio so incredibly boring. Why are you wasting your time on public radio? No no I actually got a really great reaction when I when I said on my show that I'm coming on the Terry Gross show. Everyone was like Oh. She's the best interviewer in the world to hear you two guys together. It's GonNa be Awesome Blah Blah Blah. And I was like. Oh this is great so no no I. I don't know about your listeners. But certainly mind we seem to be pretty jacked up about it. A lot of our listeners are too I just know some of them are like what but those are. I tell you one thing this morning woke up and I said to and my wife I'm going onto terry gross show. I'M GONNA I'M GONNA go learn about her. And the first thing I learned was that you had written a book. Yes and so yeah. So I went on my kindle account you know and here you have written a book on interviewing which is why. I'm here talking to you and I went. Oh Wow I should've read read this. So I on my kindle you get a little Chapter for free you know so I began reading it and the first thing like literally that you wrote is Hey when when I was writing a book about interviews. I didn't know if they'd be good to read. Because you know people have heard them on the radio and that was my whole dilemma. That's why I almost didn't write the book. It was as if if you were talking to me and then I read a little further along and you said something about when you interview people that you cut them off quickly. If they're boring warringah going on too long and then I got filled with dread. Because I don't know that I'm a really good interview to be honest and I go on for bose so I said. Oh she's GonNa be cutting me off every the minute and when she puts me off my ego is going to be destroyed because I think I'm pretty good broadcast but I don't know if I'm a farmer good interview so because I was thinking like Howard GonNa give have long answers and I thought no I mean Howard knows what good radio is. So he's not going to go on too long. He knows exactly what timing is. So listen I'm in a studio in Philadelphia. You're in a studio in New York. I didn't know if you admitted that or not so I didn't bring it up. Oh Yeah Yeah Yeah. I usually don't get to see my guess because they're not in Philly so we just connect via high-tech stuff but I was shocked acting your book. The part I read today. You said you liked that. And I would dread that that would be the worst thing in the world not to look someone in the eye while I'm interviewing interviewing them. I don't think I you know I'm not comfortable with that. I'm surprised to hear that. Because let me describe your set a little bit or maybe ask you to describe it. I mean you're in a desk that it almost looks like a barricade. Turn this big s that has like big Half Oval Rim around. That really looks like your barricaded barricaded in and then your guest is like a bunch of feet away from you on a couch and it's a pretty big distance like it's not a distance you typically glee set from someone. You'd sit much closer if you were having a conversation. That wasn't on the radio. You just talking to each other in a room. Why do you have the barricade in the distance from your? Wow that is really interesting that you say that and I hadn't really considered it. Part of it is that I work my own equipment and I say this in my book that if anyone is serious about radio that I think they should work their own equipment. They should learn how to run a board as we say in radio and I for me. I'm such maybe it's the control freak in me but I I liked control every microphone the volume the sound effects going on whatever it might be so all of that equipment in front of me in that. Big Barricade has a lot to do with the the physical equipment. I'm running the show so anyways a question for you. You're interviewing approach has changed over the years. It's you go deeper you. You have more empathy. And you've said when you think of the interviews you did during the first couple of decades on your show that you cringe you say I was an absolute maniac. My narcissism was so strong. I was incapable of appreciating what somebody else might be feeling in your introduction to your interview with Gwyneth Paltrow in your book you write that. On terrestrial radio might interviewing technique was like bashing someone in the face with a sledgehammer. I treated my guess as props all I wanted was to cause chaos. And you've said that you know therapy was a turning point for you. You start a therapy. What twenty years ago Is it too personal to ask you. What the therapy approach is is that you know not personal I'm happy to talk about it and I hope something comes out of this book. That people aren't afraid of therapy. I think it is the most useful tool world and I talked to people who are really uptight about it and I understand that it took me five years before I called this guy that I go to see and it psycho analysis. It's I WANNA say it's more Freudian but I you know I don't get that sense. I don't lay on a couch. Although he suggested that I do but I was not not comfortable with it. I couldn't I couldn't get used to it. Even the thought of laying down on a couch and not being able to look at a person speaking about we spoke about. I need to look person in the I and I think it's my own insecurity I I'm afraid they'd fall asleep on me or they weren't really paying attention. I really I have a lot of issues. I didn't go there. Air Thinking that it would affect my radio show so much. I went there because you know I wanted to examine my relationships How I related related to the world and the people around me and I felt that I was in a bit of a crisis having gone through a divorce and with all of that going on and and I have three young children so I I? I really wanted to be the best father I could be. I had a lot of lofty ambitions. So how does it work well. What was so profound on for me and why I signed on I sat there with the psychoanalyst? The psychiatrist and I said I guess I'll tell you about myself. Spend I started to go into a fabulous routine that I'd done many times on the radio. I would start talking about my parents and with complete with impressions I was like I Listen my son. This is my mother talking. My son was raised to please me and then he knew how to behave. And I taught my son how to respect people and I. I told him angering to dress like he was meeting the governor. And I'm going into these routines and then I bring my father into it. I told you you you. You'll burst stupid. You're going to make a million dollars on the radio you don't even you don't even know how to speak properly. You don't even know how to speak properly. Why are you Tony Yelling at each other so I would start to do this routine? And I'm going into this elaborate thing and he stops me. He stopped me. Cold looks at me and he says I don't find any of this funny now. I was like hey what the hell is he talking about. What do you mean is that funny? I get paid a lot of money to do this stuff he goes. I find it rather said and why are you telling thing me stories. Why you're not talking about anything real? I no clue what he was talking about. I had never sat alone in a room with any human being on this planet and been listen to in a real way everything with me with stick and funny and that's how my family related we didn't Sit and ask about feelings. This took me years to get used to. It wasn't like all of a sudden. I had an epiphany I was freaking out. It was like man. This guy wants me to talk. What does he mean He? He doesn't want me to be funny. I'm funny you know. As I was going through therapy I was also making a transition from terrestrial radio. Commercial Radio to satellite radio on satellite. They were giving me the time to do whatever I want. And Terry I mean whatever I want I had no government restrictions and I could be as dirty as I wanted to be. I could be as outrageous as I wanted to be and I realized rather quickly. That's so boring on satellite radio. You have to rail against someone. All of the outrageousness that I was about was because the government hated it. Religious groups hated it and now suddenly. I'm in the wild west. I can talk talk about anything I want. It's paid subscription radio so with that I started to not only get turned on by how I was being heard in that psychiatrist's office but I began to contemplate wait. What would really be interesting? Now that I have this format how about bringing in a guest here and there and really having a real conversation and what that meant for me and and this was mind blowing to me not to you but to me what if I could let the other person shine what if I could shut my big gap and not make it about me. Was it hard for you to not make it about you. Oh my God.

Howard Stern Sirius Satellite Radio Terry Gross Luke Howard NPR twitter PHILADELPHIA Reese Witherspoon Eliza NPR Station Doni Dot Gwyneth Paltrow Joan rivers Josh kindle WHYY Philly New York Tony Yelling
"rivers" Discussed on The Free Agents

The Free Agents

10:21 min | 9 months ago

"rivers" Discussed on The Free Agents

"Twenty five points apiece Minnesota seven and four looking good tied for fifth in the West guys. Are you upper down on the wolves and specifically Andrew Wiggins being for real upper down. I'm up your outlets do it. There's always a surprise team in the Western Conference and I. It sounds is pretty stupid to call a team that has an NBA player surprise team But they haven't lived up to expectations. Maybe just maybe when the expectations are down they grow and they decide. Hey we're going to become men at our at our trade. And that's that's what you have to put stock doc. In that Andrew wiggins decided this this off season that he was going to be better at his trade and according to my sauces. He was working harder in in the summer than he ever has. You know it's always it's Andrew Wiggins so you always take it with a grain of salt but but but but but there's some openings in the Western in conference well it's because the Golden State Warriors let's buy in. Let's buy in. I'll give them credit for last night's win both wiggins and towns because against San Antonio we know a good team not having the greatest season so far but that was a sort of game as another opening which is nice. But that's sort of game where you would see the experience of the spurs coming in there and a and put in a little bit of a muzzle on the good start there for the timber wolves but instead it was the opposite and say this. Because I'm not ready to buy property on weekends coming out for a weekend man. I'm coming out to rage a weekend this weekend. What do we do it Because last night what. I'd like to bed him. He mixed up his game again. Sometimes he went and saw it sometimes. They hit the three and it was very very presidency. But also Karl Anthony. Towns is has had a bit of a reputation for being a bit soft. I will say through his career. So far we've seen keenum get into with embiid and get a suspension and last night with Rudy. Gay like Rudy. Guy was upset. He thought he was starting to think. That was the case. I think it was two more towns. Being man making a grown men moved in and he did not back away for a second well. Vets don't like elbows by there. I didn't think it was like a embiid. WACK Jared Alma was not my dad was just he's trying to establish position and that I think is a very very important growth metric therefore county show. Hey I'm a I'm a man. I'm a big royal so but again that's stuff has to come from from your star player. who was kind of funny town so I saw some very very positive the things out of that win for them last night? Hopefully they can continue it. Will they make the playoffs. Yeah the thing that all MBA player. So he's not fading. It's true it's nice just to see him being a man being being bullying around his seven just playing playing with a chip on his shoulder but but he also chip got got onto on category sorry the athletic subscribers. You're not going to get that because you don't hear ads but he's already you know. NBA Player. It's up to the rest of the cat has to be a better defender but If you're buying in to the wiggins renaissance which is lasting longer than pass renaissance's I think is a cause skeets. I tweeted last night. I had it in my notes for yesterday's show as well. The sixteen seventeen season wiggins was the shooting basically fifty percent from three out of the gate. Put up a forty seven spot. A thirty six thirty five all in the first eleven games of the season and then it was more like eight Eh. It's almost the exact same what he was doing now in sixteen seventeen but it looks better. Now he's got the ball when he's dribbling it's not at his face. It's below his waist. He has finished. It's figuring out how to finish in the short mid range area and those sort of things. Hopefully we'll stick around. That's why I'm no longer down but I will stay middle. I'm not ready to go completely up on wiggins island but you know at this point I will sit through your presentations. I will maybe invest in timeshare. I don't want to own property there but if somebody else does I'll spend a week weeks put an AIRBNB and when we go there. I'm not going until they get better food options. I saw Robert Covington head Stroup waffle on the bench. If there's troop awful awful. They're in his troop level subway sandwiches. Okay it's getting better. I think the difference with Andrew Wiggins if you're looking at the stats at this point taking far fewer long twos. Yeah the first time in his career shirt only eleven percent of his shots come from sixteen feet to the three point line. That's by far the lowest of his career. One in ten shots is a bomb that you would consider a bad shot and more are going coming from the three point line. Where in the old wiggins days you'd think? Oh this is a bad shot even even from the three point line because he's just putting them in. I mean that's a simple as there's a lot of guys around him but he's he's got the highest point percentage of his career and I think that comes from working at. He looks also just I test he looks thicker. There's a couple of examples from last night's game where the Spurs where he was showing off that size and like you were saying Li the biggest thing to me is. He is mixing it up right now. It is. It's a little different than that. That sixteen seventeen I eleven game run where he was averaging twenty seven points per game and he couldn't miss a three. It is different because first quarter. He back actor John. Murray's asked down into the block like that was a man move to go back to that easy little hook shot. I love you like you. Just sometimes don't see that aggression aggression from a guy like wiggins where you're like dude you might be the most athletic guy on the floor. Show it don't get you say nothing wrong with a little dinky dump on. Yeah second on no dunks understand understandable. Why you'd be on the island? Second Quarter he ran a nice little two man game with gorging on the side key key cut backdoor Jiang found him. Here's the funny Bartram. He could've probably the help the spurs help defense I think he came across but he said he saw Covington Covington cutting baseline and he made a nice little sexy. Drop off for coming in. That's just a play. You don't see wiggins make a lot or you haven't in years prior and then in the third quarter near the end of the third quarter thirty five seconds left he got into the paint and I think all the spurs thought what wiggins shooting this and. He's shooting at he shooting at. He shouldn't three spurs sort of collapsed on them. And there's Jake Jake Lehman he sneaks back door and wiggins like the wherewithal finds them the pass inside Lehman gets the dunk. It was those type of places. You're right trey. Ah Task Test Man. The numbers are sexy. They're they're twenty six five assists now. Just watch this guy play right now and it's going to shock you. This is not the wiggins from the two years prior for by any means he is engaged and has confidence so. I'm up on them making the playoffs. I think it's going to be near the near the the lower part of the playoffs in the western conference seven three. But that's fine that get in there again with Jimmy and see what sort of star Max guys can do this. It's fun to see this. It's been fun. Blasting out the wiggins islands tweets and trying to convince people like you come over and stay a little while. That's fine. I get it come for the weekend long weekend as you said. And we'll have some subway sandwiches and some people. It's been a great month for him. They really every single game except he's GonNa win well hard. It's been destroying. Might Win a player of the Curson but every every single game except for one he's had five or Morris's which that's just a key you're talking about is plays like he's actually aware you don't have to shoot or score when you get the ball all the time. There are other guys who are cutting moving and if he can find me can do it and that opens up. He's game as well I think. Because in the spurs understand that he's you know he's got a bit more corporate so it's great great. I just let's just hope that it does continue so bledsoe and we're only a few weeks in just over three weeks but the Western Conference playoff picture is looking like people predicted to start the season. There's five Lakhs for the postseason and they're already in the top five slots both teams Houston Utah and Denver and then there's three spots up for grabs and like we mentioned the warriors are completely out of it. The trailblazers are not themselves at all at four eight. The PELICANS have sort of dropped out already. And and so you've got the timber. Wolves mavs the surprise size spurs in there and then a couple of teams in the king's thunder. So there's more spots available for sure and what will any these teams that are. Struggling out of the gate make moves will the blazers try and get a big will the spurs look to move the. Marta rose and there are rumors that the magic are interested. Will we see some of these teams that like you said tasks are sort of disappointing here early. Will they make a move to try and get back into that little mix. They're in the playoffs. Should be all right. Moving on Guys Austin rivers. This was seen last night calling for the referees to give his father Doc rivers technical foul during the game. The moment came with just under two minutes left to play with the rockets up. Eight doc was exploded slowdown on the ramps. And Austin was right there behind one of the officials making his hands into the old T to signify. Technical foul dog was eventually dinged a Texan. He was objected in Austin rivers. Was Loving it. Guys are down though Austin rivers encouraging the refs to give his dad to get his dad tossed or up and down. Who could possibly be down on this? That was just such a great moment in the NBA. Last night because game. But I'm guessing the clippers were if I were going in rockets played pretty well hard and had an incredible performance and then at the end duck lost that. Take my dad my dad get Outta Eh and just Kinda do it like once and then I know he'd like to eventually was waving or colleague. Call me or something. Yeah what a great great I was. I'm up and down. I started down. I'm never GONNA cheer for Father Son Split never going to cheer for that. He looked adamant he look mad. And I was walking away and he said call me with the mocking call me later but down at that point but up afterwards Austin posted on Instagram and Doc rivers verse verified on Instagram. Doc rivers comment that and said love you or Hilarious love you son and so I think everything is right in the in the rivers rivers households Austin rivers. He tweeted WELP. Thanksgiving is going to be. That's a great great great timely tweet of timely tweet ah do they really get together on Thanksgiving..

Andrew Wiggins Spurs NBA wiggins island Wolves Austin Doc rivers Minnesota San Antonio Golden State Warriors Rudy Karl Anthony AIRBNB Guy clippers Jake Jake Lehman
"rivers" Discussed on The Woj Pod

The Woj Pod

06:23 min | 11 months ago

"rivers" Discussed on The Woj Pod

"And it's it's not to diminish that but but it's a different sport I will agree with you. what it is yes and for whatever reason it's not looked upon that way for all we want is a reason yeah just for it to be addressed with a coherent reason why the idea now. I think in your profession of of how competitive it is between organizations wins front offices owners are competitive with each other. How much are you ever willing to share with guys you compete against. I've I've had coaches in a league who who are great admirers of yours who'd say I'd love to build a relationship with them. I really we WANNA see how he does it. But you know Miami's a little more close off their. You've been in Miami your whole career. You haven't been the different guys have different places because they've worked. If we're you know lots of people but I think there's always been a sense of like the Miami Culture has been a little more. We don't we're not opening. We're not swing our doors wide open to see you how we do it but sharing among each other like you said when you saw him at a clinic and you're going. I don't know maybe I don't not that. You're going to give something away there that he had scouted her scene. But how do you guys view that within balancing act you know I think it turns out to be relationships ships. As far as I'm concerned I don't go out my way to call share and I get calls. They get a lot of calls and so does slow but it is. You know it's it's a it's a telephone you know when you go to a clinic or something you share with whatever you're trying to share but it is a competition still too and I understand. That's another thing that I've learned. I remember we had Riley opened the door. We had a practice I had practice at your facility because rows at anticipation ship. We'd practice at your facility and we beat you. Guys and Tim comes up to me well. They'll be no more practicing at the Miami Him. Eat you know and that's how you feel like. I have things that I'll do. Anyone can practice in our facility. I'll do that but then I have things things that I am very quirky about you know earlier when I was very quirky about if I saw my assistants talking to the other systems like what are you guys talking talking about what possible conversations right now and this is are complaining about. Ah There's like I say we're not quite as iron curtain as we used to. Yeah we do open up our doors a little bit and you know we don't really necessarily go out of our way to network and kind of an introvert anyway and it just kind out of lines up during the off season. I like to go visit football programs. Just because it's different catches my interest a little bit more on it. You know you talking basketball with your staff and the other people all year long. I like seeing something a little bit different. I relate to them and and it usually ends up being not tactical discussions but it always comes down to personality management and and that's what I find you know probably most interesting about this business. What's the one or two days you guys ever spent outside of basketball whether it was at a football football facility you around ballot check in Boston spinal. You've gone all over. Nfl College football what was one you walk out of there said wow how or a dinner with somebody who was completely outside your element and said I got more out of that than I would have to for a specific reason I saw Pete Carroll uh twice just because not because he's winning super bowls actually before his first super bowl there and there's more just his personality as a so much different than me. I have mentioned I'm an introvert and I like to seek out people. That are a lot different so two years goes you know who is going to see in college. Football is going to see a Dabo swinney any and I'm friends with Butch Jones is very good friend of mine so these to compete against each other but he's such an incredible personality as man if I could have like one percent of so much better coach and ideal relate to my players better but I walked out of both of those not only amazed at thera ability to relate and just the one in nine personalities but also just how you you walk out of their thinking wow. This is my best Ashrat in two days later. They probably have a twenty five other people say to care for me as well just his energy who if you ask anyone. HP Carol Everyone's getting the wrong all coaching and there's no way you see that you know how Bella check with the one for me just because he's so different and I had a chance to speak a couple of times and I love that's phenomenal to there. I would always go to their offense of meetings right before the game I would he gives you great access and you would sit there and I remember the one game they basically said what they were going to they do and they did it and then one guy is outside of sports that just blew me away as Malcolm Glatt well. I had a meeting with him and I realize I said I'm not very smart. You know at that but his ability to kind of understand people was incredible. Docs Bo this was this was a lot of fun. I appreciate you guys doing this. We could do another hour on a whole `nother set of topics but I appreciate you guys doing it. It's data yeah yeah. I love getting spokesman. Listen to what he's really thinking definition of introvert. That's that's great. Thanks for listening to this episode of the woods Pod a big. Thank you to our guest today. He coach Erik Spoelstra all strobe and clippers coach. Doc Rivers be sure to subscribe to the which part on Apple podcasts spotify or wherever you get your podcast the season training camp. It's just around the corner. What can you do.

Miami Football basketball Erik Spoelstra Tim Doc Rivers Dabo swinney clippers Riley Malcolm Glatt Butch Jones Nfl Pete Carroll Boston football Bo HP Carol Everyone spotify
"rivers" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"rivers" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

"Have you been to even coliseum at night and i've been there three times sixty thousand empty seats michael bolton concert you don't see it that off he's you know it's funny i was talking to manager the other day said they're probably booking the wrong venues i should it's a joke let's go to the for the great joan rivers in the back we're ski caller what's your name and where you calling crystal and trixie from thin augustine florida what your question gotta first of all were huge fan and our question is for jong rivers all right well we are wondering when the last time she smoke weed was she said the last time you smoked weed was were you ever a pot smoker yes real you're not a big win because i like to be in control okay yeah and also you gain weight right cheetos can you stuff in your mouth not worth less we did on journalists right you did and that was the first time you smoked by about fifteen years edgar looked to me i never met him but he is was extraordinarily english you know english and he spoke and he did yeah but that's very back to the phones for joe and max caller what's your name end from where you calling hi my name's nicole from buckeye from okay you and your brother i would have fought over the girl what what was six years apart well that's all right i mean would yeah but you know there would be probably child molestation at one point right okay so you know we didn't besides i go i go for what seemingly you know is older women but not not like dead you know.

jong rivers edgar joe nicole buckeye michael bolton ski fifteen years six years
"rivers" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"rivers" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"We don't we are unaware of them nearly as much as we probably used to be i mean i think uh in a lot of ways were uh we drive over them we might notice a little sign that says something about george washington or or fdr something like that on the side of the road but we we tend to be very separated from from rivers so just general awareness i think a big thing is were not aware of the central role that rivers play in our modern economy whether it's through hydropower in stabilising the grid whether it's through irrigation out west or probably more than anything else that's overlooked is the the central role that barge traffic plays in moving heavy commodities around our nation and around our world and so that those herb it's just do it we tend to forget the fact that our cod that our economy is based on these currently we also tend to forget the fact that a lot of our regional economies were started by doing something with rivers you write about those big barges to which you just referred when you took a your trip along the mighty mississipi river with all of its levy systems and flood controls tell us about that trip about that tow boat trip on the on the mississippi it was definitely probably the highlight of my career it's one of those random things one of the things that i did discover writing this book is that people who work on and around rivers are in inordinately fascinated with them and they're also very quick to to help other people understand them and so this was one of those moments where i just randomly said i wonder what it be like to ride on a barge into c of the river from uh from the river out rather than looking down at at called a barge company and floated the idea by him and to my schalken possibly horror they said i could tackle of tag along.

george washington mississipi river mississippi
"rivers" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"rivers" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"We don't we are unaware of them nearly as much as we probably used to be i mean i think uh in a lot of ways were uh we drive over them we might notice a little sign that says something about george washington or or fdr something like that on the side of the road but we we tend to be very separated from from rivers so just general awareness i think a big thing is were not aware of the central role that rivers play in our modern economy whether it's through hydropower in stabilising the grid whether it's through irrigation out west or probably more than anything else that's overlooked is the the central role that barge traffic plays in moving heavy commodities around our nation and around our world and so that those herb it's just do it we tend to forget the fact that our cod that our economy is based on these currently we also tend to forget the fact that a lot of our regional economies were started by doing something with rivers you write about those big barges to which you just referred when you took a your trip along the mighty mississipi river with all of its levy systems and flood controls tell us about that trip about that tow boat trip on the on the mississippi it was definitely probably the highlight of my career it's one of those random things one of the things that i did discover writing this book is that people who work on and around rivers are in inordinately fascinated with them and they're also very quick to to help other people understand them and so this was one of those moments where i just randomly said i wonder what it be like to ride on a barge into c of the river from uh from the river out rather than looking down at at called a barge company and floated the idea by him and to my schalken possibly horror they said i could tackle of tag along.

george washington mississipi river mississippi
"rivers" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"rivers" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"We don't we are unaware of them nearly as much as we probably used to be i mean i think uh in a lot of ways were uh we drive over them we might notice a little sign that says something about george washington or or fdr something like that on the side of the road but we we tend to be very separated from from rivers so just general awareness i think a big thing is were not aware of the central role that rivers play in our modern economy whether it's through hydropower in stabilising the grid whether it's through irrigation out west or probably more than anything else that's overlooked is the the central role that barge traffic plays in moving heavy commodities around our nation and around our world and so that those herb it's just do it we tend to forget the fact that our cod that our economy is based on these currently we also tend to forget the fact that a lot of our regional economies were started by doing something with rivers you write about those big barges to which you just referred when you took a your trip along the mighty mississipi river with all of its levy systems and flood controls tell us about that trip about that tow boat trip on the on the mississippi it was definitely probably the highlight of my career it's one of those random things one of the things that i did discover writing this book is that people who work on and around rivers are in inordinately fascinated with them and they're also very quick to to help other people understand them and so this was one of those moments where i just randomly said i wonder what it be like to ride on a barge into c of the river from uh from the river out rather than looking down at at called a barge company and floated the idea by him and to my schalken possibly horror they said i could tackle of tag along.

george washington mississipi river mississippi
"rivers" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"rivers" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"We don't we are unaware of them nearly as much as we probably used to be i mean i think uh in a lot of ways were uh we drive over them we might notice a little sign that says something about george washington or or fdr something like that on the side of the road but we we tend to be very separated from from rivers so just general awareness i think a big thing is were not aware of the central role that rivers play in our modern economy whether it's through hydropower in stabilising the grid whether it's through irrigation out west or probably more than anything else that's overlooked is the the central role that barge traffic plays in moving heavy commodities around our nation and around our world and so that those herb it's just do it we tend to forget the fact that our cod that our economy is based on these currently we also tend to forget the fact that a lot of our regional economies were started by doing something with rivers you write about those big barges to which you just referred when you took a your trip along the mighty mississipi river with all of its levy systems and flood controls tell us about that trip about that tow boat trip on the on the mississippi it was definitely probably the highlight of my career it's one of those random things one of the things that i did discover writing this book is that people who work on and around rivers are in inordinately fascinated with them and they're also very quick to to help other people understand them and so this was one of those moments where i just randomly said i wonder what it be like to ride on a barge into c of the river from uh from the river out rather than looking down at at called a barge company and floated the idea by him and to my schalken possibly horror they said i could tackle of tag along.

george washington mississipi river mississippi