20 Episode results for "River Kwai"

The Bridge On The River Kwai (1957)

Classic Movie Musts

31:55 min | 1 year ago

The Bridge On The River Kwai (1957)

"I'm Max Baril and this is classic movie musts where every week we breakdown. A classic movie while looking to provide artistic insight and historical context at the very least. We'll talk about what makes these movies classics. Classic movie must release his every Friday ready to complement your weekend. Movie viewing plans. Thank you for joining me this week as we discuss the bridge on the River Kwai which was selected by our Patriot supporters in our February movie. Poll if you WANNA help decide what movies we talk about on the show and you can vote in our monthly polls for one dollar a month over at Patriotair DOT COM SLASH CLASSIC. Movie Musts in this episode in our feature presentation we will discuss visual mirroring in themes of iron-willed men and in our buds from the back lot segment. We've got stories of director on the rise but first. Let's get into this week's credits. Our film this week is the bridge on the river Kwai which was directed by David Lean and was released in one thousand nine hundred fifty seven. The bridge on the River Kwai Stars William Holden Alec Guinness Jack Hawkins and Sosua Hirakawa in early nineteen forty-three British. Pow's arrive by train at a Japanese prison camp in Burma. The commander Colonel Saito informs them that all prisoners regardless of rank or to work on the construction of a railway bridge over the river. Kwai that will help connect Bangkok and Rangoon the senior British lieutenant. Colonel Nicholson informs psycho that the Geneva Conventions exempt from Manual Labor. Nicholson later forbids any escape attempts because they had been ordered by headquarters to surrender and escapes could be seen as a defiance of orders at the morning. Assembly Nicholson orders his officers to remain behind while the enlisted men March off to work site. Oh threatens to have them shot but Nicholson refuses to back down. When major clipped in the British medical officer warned psycho that there are too many witnesses for him to get away with murder. Saito leaves the officers standing all day in the intense heat that evening. The officers are placed in punishment hut while Nicholson is locked in an iron box. Meanwhile three prisoners attempt to escape to or shot dead but United States Navy. Commander Shears gets away. Although he's wounded he stumbles into a village of natives who nurse him back to health before helping him. Complete his escape by boat eventually reaches a British colony. Meanwhile the prisoners work as little as possible and sabotage. Whatever they can should side failed to meet his deadline. He would be obliged to commit. Ritual suicide desperate. He uses the anniversary of Japan's nineteen five victory in the Russo Japanese war as an excuse to save face and announced a general. Amnesty Releasing Nicholson and his officers and exempting them from manual labor. Nicholson is shocked by the poor job. Being done by his men over the protests of some of his officers he orders Captain Reeves Major Hughes to design and build a proper bridge to maintain his men's morale as the Japanese engineers had chosen a poor site. The original construction is abandoned and a new bridge begun. Downstream shears is enjoying his hospital. Stay at the British colony when British major warden invites him to join a mission to destroy the bridge before it is useful to Japanese forces. Shears so appalled. He confesses that he is not an officer. He impersonated one expecting better treatment from the Japanese. More response that he already knew that and that the American navy agreed to transfer him to the British to avoid embarrassment realizing he has no choice shears volunteers. Meanwhile Nicholson drives his men. Hard to complete the bridge on time for him. It's completion will exemplify the ingenuity and hard work. The British army long after the war's end Nicholson erects. A sign commemorating the bridges construction by the British army from February to May of Nineteen Forty. Three four commandos parachute in. The one is killed during his landing later. Warden is wounded in an with the Japanese patrol and has to be carried. He shares and Canadian. Lieutenant Joyce reached the river in time with the assistance of Siamese women bearers and their village chief undercover of darkness. Shears enjoys plant explosives on the bridge towers. Below the waterline. A train carrying important dignitaries and soldiers is scheduled to be the first to cross the bridge the following day so warden waits to destroy both however by daybreak the river level has dropped exposing the wire connecting the explosives to the detonator. Nicholson spots the wire and brings it to Saito's tension as the train approaches. They hurried down to the riverbank to investigate. Joyce manning the detonator breaks cover and Stabs. Sido to death. Nicholson yells for help attempting to stop. Joyce from reaching the detonator. When Joyce is mortally wounded by Japanese fire shears swims across the river? But is himself. Shot recognizing the dying shears. Nicholson realizes the gravity of his actions and ward and fires a mortar wounding. Nicholson the dazed. Colonel stumbles toward the detonator and collapses on the plunger just in time to blow up the bridge and send the train hurtling into the river below the bridge on the river. Kwai had a budget of two point. Eight million dollars and it brought in over thirty point. Six million at the box office adjusted for inflation. That is a budget of twenty five and a half million dollars and a box office hall of just over two hundred and seventy eight million dollars. The bridge on the River Kwai was nominated for Eight Academy Awards winning seven. It was nominated for best supporting actor for say Hayek Ottawa. And it won the awards for Best Film Editing Best Cinematography best adapted screenplay best original musical score. Best Director David. Lean Best Actor for Alec Guinness and Best Picture and finally the bridge on the river. Kwai is currently number thirty six on AF is one hundred greatest movies of all time. Now what is this madness? Because it's time for our feature presentation. Are you looking for a double dose of Classic Movie Must In Your Week? Then check out. Our patriotic exclusive show. Classic Movie Must Double Feature. The show costs one dollar per month and releases every Tuesday to all patriotic subscribers. That's four episodes per month for just one dollar. The show is the same structure as our normal show but for movies released from the year. Two thousand to the present and that I believe are destined to go down in the film books as classics. If you join right now not only do you get access to this week's episode. On the pianist you also get access to the entire archive of past double feature episodes so really for one dollar. You're getting dozens of double feature episodes and on top of all that you of course get the happy knowledge that you're helping support. Classic movie musts and letting the content continue to grow. We've also got a top five movie list show called Max's movie musts. It's a monthly show. That's exclusive to patriots subscribers at the five dollar level and the next episode is releasing next week. So now's the perfect time to head on over to Patriotdepot DOT COM slash classic movie musts and read all about Max's movie musts as well as classic movie must double feature and all the other awesome. Patriot's perks director. David Leans working relationship with producer. Sam Spiegel simultaneously. Both highly productive and highly antagonistic began with their large scale war. Film the bridge on the River Kwai Leans Carefully Planned Previous Project and adaptation of Richard Mason's Interracial Romance. The wind cannot read had fallen through enabling him to take up. Spiegel's offer for the bridge on the river. Kwai it is interesting to reflect that the bridge on the river. Kwai the film that is often seen as marking the watershed in. David Leans career his first in the epic mode that would become his hallmark henceforth and such a military masculine spectacle could so easily have been supplanted by an epic wide-screen love story instead certainly the bridge on the river. Kwai marked David Leans Decisive Entry into the world of big budget spectacular. Filmmaking bloody millionaire stuff in the words of his prop man and he fowley the emblematic image of this high end. Production is it's bridge meticulously constructed at great expense and effort to be dramatically destroyed in the film's explosive climax a departure from peer bulls original novel. Where the bridge remained intact. However despite being characterized as an absolutely perfect example of an action. Fill by admiring filmmaker. John Milius the bridge on the river. Kwai actually has fewer spectacular set pieces than one might expect from this description relying instead on. It's wonderful characters to propel the narrative. Indeed David Lean felt that the size of the bridge on the river. Kwai was dependent not on magnificent expansive locations or booming ballistics but on the central performances. Especially whoever played colonel? Nicholson Nicholson is juxtaposed. With a host of other male figures that cheerfully cynical American shears played by William Holden the SARDONIC medical officer clipped in played by James Donald. The Dawn turned command. Warren play by Jack Hawkins and Nicholson's opposite number on the enemy side. The Japanese camp commander Colonel Saito play by Hayek our. Although with hindsight it is impossible to imagine anyone other than Alec Guinness playing. Nicholson at the time. David Lean worried that the actor wouldn't be able to imbue the role with sufficient stature and his preference was for Ronald Colman. Or Ralph Richardson. It was Sam Spiegel who finally persuaded a reluctant Alec Guinness to take on the role. One of many important contributions made to the film by its producer. David Lean would subsequently denigrate Sam Spiegel as a meddler and a crook and even sympathetic accounts of the producer to picked him as a charming buckle near. Who could have slit your throat and convinced you that it was necessary but the bridge on the river. Kwai could not have been achieved without. Spiegel's backing a film of the scale however brilliant. The director depends on enormous financial support. Not only that but Spiegel was often brilliant in his interventions at the scripting stage with an ability to put his finger on what was wrong. The idea of the two men as complementary albeit quarrelsome opposites has considerable substance to it indeed when David Lean wrote to Spiegel about the conflict between Nicholson and Sido as a tremendous clash of wills he could have been describing his own working relationship with his producer one notable example of the authorities struggles in the film's creation comes with the film's opening sequences and the entry of Nicholson and his men into the camp. Spiegel was far from keen on David Leans idea of using the overly English tune. Colonel Bogey to accompany their arrival while forman insisted that leans ambition to make an entire sequence out of this moment betrayed his origins as an arthouse director with no experience of the international market. He said quote. You can't take up three minutes with British troops walking into a camp whistling a tune. Nobody's ever heard of you can't expect people to sit in their seats in the end. Of course the scene did hold and remains one of the film's most memorable moments and even made an international hit of the old marching song. After the opening shots of a train thundering past the trackside graves of perished laborers and a brisk funeral cynically conducted by shears. The whistling of the new arrivals signals the audacity of hope even in the most uncompromising of environments as the men under Nicholson's command march lean picks out details of their physical dilapidation. The dirty bloody bandages. The ragged uniforms the boots that flap apart with its owners rhythmical movements cut aways to. Nicholson serving his men. Coincide with the swelling of the music from digest whistling to Malcolm Arnold full orchestral version music which lean hoped would have as he referred to as a grandeur and a real swagger although the ostensible reading of the moment is in terms of defiance and indomitable -bility one might also discern a hint of incipient mania in Nicholson expression. At least the pulsing of his cheek muscles suggests strong emotion being kept under control while the heightening of the music inaugurated by Nichols. Point of view is to signify his increasing mental instability. The First Section of the bridge on the River Kwai Centers on the aforementioned Battle of wills between Nicholson and Saito. The unequal power relations between capture and captives are suggested visually by the shot of Silos Shiny immaculate high boots as he bestrides the platform through which he glimpses the troops with their as. We have just seen much shoddier footwear. Psychos attempt at benevolent dictatorship is challenged by Nicholson's insistence on adherence to the letter of the Geneva Convention a protest which earns him a slapped face and several days locked in the baking. Heat of tiny corrugated. Iron prison nicknamed the oven. Physical punishment doesn't break him. And nor does the temptation of English corned beef and Scotch. Whisky offered by Sido. Guinness's physical performance in these scenes makes us acutely aware of a man undergoing terrible bodily suffering but forcing himself to maintain his upright demeanor for the sake of his men Guinness. Later said Nicholson's curious slightly lurching bent. Walk was an imitation of the gate of his son. While recovering from polio in the end psychos only option is a humiliating climbdown and hence Nicholson enjoys. Victory raised on the shoulders of his cheering. Men All side is overcome by choking sobs back in the privacy of his quarters clenching his fist to his head at his shame allegedly. It was leans harsh treatment of Cecilia High `Akaola for necessitating retakes. The partly instigated the actors intensely poignant performance in this scene despite their obvious cultural differences and psychos insistence that he hates the British and does not want to hear of rules. This is war. This is not a game of cricket. The two colonels nonetheless occupied common ground in obeying their respective military codes as the opening line of Bulls novels insists quote the inseparable between East and West that exists in some is is perhaps nothing more than an optical illusion mirroring face to face profile shots become a presentational trope of scenes featuring the two men together during the course of one of their exchanges. We find out that psycho is a frustrated artist. Who studied for three years at the London polytechnic before being compelled to switch to engineering? This is an ironic counterpoint. To Nicholson's later admission that despite appearing to be the acme of Englishness he has actually spent fewer than ten months in the mother country in the past twenty eight years ironically. Enough that's less than Sido. Neither man's identity national or otherwise as monolithic as it initially appears and with Saito this cultural complexity is also indicated by odd details in the Meson Sen of his quarters which mixes traditional Japanese Tatami Mats and wall hangings with D. Tacky Americana of a girly pinup calendar for Joey's garage in Elk City Ohio however the destinies of the two men are intertwined as Nicholson enjoys his triumph at the celebratory concert. Party the first and only time. We see him laugh in the film psycho prepares for ritual suicide the preceding scene where the two men meet on the bridge. Beautifully shot in the warm glow of magic hour and movingly performed by both actors manages to encapsulate simultaneously the men's kinship and the Gulf between them site. Oh declares the sunset beautiful but Nicholson mistakenly and symptomatically. Thinks he's referring to the newly completed bridge however Nicholson's consideration of his life expertly timed by Guinness to coincide with the setting of. The Sun applies just as well to Sido. The camera focuses on Nicholson's back partly to suggest psychos point of view but also to make this a fittingly restrained and underplayed moment of English emotional revelation Nicholson's awkward covert way of expressing his deepest feelings in the bridge on the river. Kwai is complemented by. David Leans eloquently oblique indirect framing Guinness had wanted to play the scene in close up and the closer profile shot later on during his speech marked a kind of compromise but the maintenance of distance is crucial to the sequences power. This is a man inadvertently accidentally revealing his deepest feelings through what seems to be in idle conversation. All revealed through little details like the way he stretches out the words from time to time or telling unconscious gestures like his stroking. The Wood on the bridge lovingly a sudden outbreak of centralism in an otherwise buttoned up man and unexpectedly releasing his baton upon the words but tonight to let it fall into the river below a sign that he is losing his grip in the thrill of the moment the honorable self sacrifice of psychos. Bushido military code mirrors the ethos of writing faithfully into the Valley of death that she associates with. Nicholson shears. Also draws Warren into this comparison with his angry outbursts during their jungle mission. Thus William Holden shears the established American star of the film is characterized as the true lover of life in contrast to the military men of other nations half in love with ease. Full death. Shears is a civilian at heart by his own appraisal despite his eventual death in action the parallel shots of the building of the bridge and the commando mission to destroy it. Finally Converge in the film's climactic sequences. It shows war up from various points of view and each point of view is criticized by another. It's opposite and its complement. One ends up stimulated wondering and confused here. Wisdom one cannot fail to admire. But where does it begin and end? What is courage? And what is mere flag-waving what is cowardice? And what is prudence? Ambiguity is the keynote of the drama. In order to explore this irony is one of the primary tools deployed by the film introduced in the questions posed by the medical officer clipped in who dares to suggest to. Nicholson quite early on in proceedings. That what we're doing could be construed as forgive me Sir. Collaboration with the enemy perhaps even as treasonable activity only to be met with Nicholson's dismissive response that he has a lot to learn about the army. There is a lovely moment of misunderstanding when the men on the mission spy through their binoculars what they think is a commanding officer shamefully reduced to enforce Labor on his knees. When what they are witnessing is actually Nicholson's proudest moment the erection of a plaque commemorating his men's work on the magnificent bridge however there is no simple condemnation of Nicholson instead there is an undeniable validity to his view that it is better to maintain morale and to construct something of lasting significance than to let his men deteriorate into squalid dissipation. Although Clifton is clearly the voice of reason juxtaposed with Nicholson's blinkered Monomania some of the colonels responses to Clinton's inquisitions are harder to answer such as when he evokes medical ethics as comparison to his own decision to do the best possible job on the bridge. He says if you had to operate on Sido would you do your best or would you let him die? There is something deeply counter intuitive and morale-sapping about building a bridge badly. It raises the question. If what Frenchman Pierre Buhl was doing in his original novel and what bleeds into its. Subsequent adaptation was perhaps examining some of the paradoxes of collaboration using the captured British to elucidate his own countries. Recent history specifically Francis Collaboration with the Nazis during World War. Two Nicholson's insistence. That he is doing it for his men's morale bit allies his vanity and his own Ozzy Mandian tendencies to construct a lasting monument. That might endure for six hundred years for all his efforts to retain composure and self possession during his terrible punishment in the oven something changes irrevocably for. Nicholson during that ordeal in the crucible of the heat his future compulsion has been forged. It is shortly after his triumphant released from incarceration and victory oversight. Oh that Nicholson first announces. His intention to cooperate in building the bridge in order to rebuild the battalion and to teach these barbarians a lesson in western methods and efficiency. That will put them to shame. We'll show them what a British soldier is capable of doing. Interestingly this speech takes place on a floating platform crossing the river indicating Nicholson's parallel movement across a moral boundary from resistance to collaboration. However there is nothing cynical about Nicholson's resolution and the improve morale of his men in constructing. A Beautiful Bridge is vindication enough for his decision until the moment of his face to face. Confrontation with shears. Yet another piece of mirroring between characters takes place this time in the dialogue with Nicholson's incredulous. You met by Shears. Accusatory you. From this point onwards Nicholson's rationalization of his actions and his determination to protect the bridge cannot hold and his movement is suspended as he removes his hat and scratches his head as if emerging from a daydream. Finally asking himself. What have I done? His salvation only comes through an action that can be interpreted as partly premeditated or wholly accidental falling onto the plunger that intern detonates. The explosives packed under the bridge. There is a pleasing serendipity in Nicholson's final act bringing about the destruction of what he had hoped would be his lasting monument in some respects. It seems that madness is the only word that the bridge on the river. Kwai could end on a word harped on played with throughout its script from site. He's mad. You're colonel quite mad echoed by wardens. Later he's gone. Mad through to Nicholson's counter accusation of Sido. Actually I think he's mad and finally clipped INS. Are they both mad or am I going mad or is it? The Sun in Bulls novel clip loses his cynicism and goes along with Nicholson scheme whereas in the film. He never loses his ironic distance. Although he does begin to doubt his sanity in representations of English identity intense heat and incipient insanity are often intrinsically a notion given its supreme comic expression by Noel Coward Song Mad Dogs and Englishmen and outstanding tragicomic expression in the bridge on the River Kwai. Now it's time for our buzz from the back lot segment and let's start off with this story. Colonel Sido was inspired by major borough Saito who unlike the character portrayed in this movie was said by some to be one of the most reasonable and humane of all the Japanese officers usually willing to negotiate with the POW's in return for their labor. Such was the respect between Sido and lieutenant. Colonel Upon whom Curl Nicholson was based. Tuesay's spoke up on site does behalf at the war crimes tribunal after the war saving him from the gallows. Ten years after Tuesday's nine hundred and seventy-five death psycho made a pilgrimage to England to visit his grave at one point during filming director. David Lean nearly drowned when he was swept away by a river. Current and there was actor. Geoffrey Horne who saved his life initially Sir. Alec Guinness had doubts about playing the role of colonel. Nicholson Guinness had become a much loved figure on screen appearing in a series of popular comedies. The Nicholson characters seemed humorless unlovable and perhaps even Dole to remedy this Guinness tried to inject some humor into his portrayal of the Colonel Director. David Lean was very much opposed to this idea insisting that it be played straight thus began an argument between the two men that continued throughout shooting during shooting. Alec Guinness continued to have doubts about his performance and the direction he was getting from David. Lean to put Guinness at ease. Lean decided to show him a rough cut of certain sequences one night lean ran over an hour's worth of footage for Alec Guinness and his wife and son also attending to look at at the end of screening the footage the Guinness family thanked lean and promptly walked out leaving lean without a clue of what their perception of the footage was later that night lean received a visit from Guinness. Who told him that he and his family had decided that. Nicholson was the best thing that Guinness had ever done and was quite thankful to David. Lean for the role screenwriters. Michael Wilson and Carl. Foreman had been blacklisted. In Hollywood after having been accused of having communist ties at the time that the movie was made and went on credited the sole writing credit and therefore the Oscar for best adapted screenplay went to Pierre. Bul who wrote the original French novel but did not speak English clearly written in English script and this became a long running controversy between the academy and the actual authors to achieve recognition for their work in one thousand nine hundred four the academy retroactively awarded the Oscar to Wilson and Forman. Sadly Wilson did not live to see this and form in died the day after it was announced when this movie was restored. Their names were added to the credits. The bridge itself cost two hundred and fifty thousand dollars to build and construction began long before anyone had actually been cast and finally on the first take of the final bridge sequence. The explosives on the bridge didn't detonate the train. Crossover safely only to crash down a hill on the other side and after all his hard work Alec Guinness Never Actually saw the bridge explode. He had finished all his scenes and had already flown back to London and missed out on the final momentous explosion and an interesting tactic after the final scene was shot producer. Sam Spiegel shipped film footage on five different airplanes to minimize the risk of loss. That concludes our episode on the bridge on the river. Kwai I would love to hear what you think of. This classic movie must feel free to tweet at movie must potter email. Classic movie must edge email dot com. You can listen to all our episodes and learn more about the show on our website. Classic Movie Must Dot Com. You can support the show and get access to our weekly exclusive episodes. Classic Movie Must Double Feature as our monthly show. Max's movie must by subscribing on Patriotic. You can also become a producer of the show and get your name read at the end of every episode just like Eleanor. B Max Anri. Pedro Are Ryan D. N. Jonathan did thank you all so much for your generous patronage checkout all our support tears and their awards over at Patriotair DOT COM SLASH CLASSIC. Movie Musts on the next episode of the show. We're discussing the French connection. Remember episodes release every Friday on all podcast services? Thank you so much for listening. Tell the next episode. Keep up with your classics.

Nicholson Nicholson Nicholson Guinness Kwai Nicholson River Kwai Colonel Saito David Lean Commander Shears director Assembly Nicholson Sido Sam Spiegel David Guinness Alec Guinness officer medical officer producer William Holden Alec Guinness J United States Navy
Enduring When Obeying Hurts

Solid Joys Daily Devotional

03:15 min | 1 year ago

Enduring When Obeying Hurts

"June twenty eight. And during when obeying hurts. Looking to Jesus, the founder and perfect her of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him. And during the cross Hebrews twelve to what faith performs is sometimes unspeakably hard in his book miracle on the River Kwai Ernest, Gordon tells the true story of a group of POW's working on the Burma railway during World War Two at the end of each day, the tools were collected from the work party on one occasion, Japanese guard shouted that shovel was missing and demanded to know which man had taken it. He began to rent and rave, working himself into a paranoid fury, and ordered whoever was guilty to step forward. No one moved all die all die. Shrieked cocking, an aiming his rifle at the prisoners at that moment. One man, stay. Tipped forward at the guard clubbed him to death with his rifle while he stood silently to attention. When they returned to the camp. The tools were counted again. And no shovel was missing. What can sustain the will to die for others? When you are innocent Jesus was carried and sustained in his love for us by the joy that was set before him. He banked on a glorious future blessing and joy that carried and sustained him in love through his suffering. Whoa to us. If we think we should or can be motivated and strengthened for radical costly obedience by some higher motive than the joy that is set before us when Jesus called for costly obedience that would require sacrifice in this life. He said in Luke fourteen fourteen you will be blessed because they cannot repay you for you will be repaid at the resurrection of the just in other words be strengthened. And now in all your losses for Christ's sake. Because of the joy set before you Peter said, when Jesus suffered without retaliating, he was leaving us an example to follow and that includes Jesus confidence in the joy that was set before him. He handed his cause over to God. I Peter two twenty one and did not try to settle accounts with retaliation. He banked his hope on the resurrection and all the joys of reunion with his father and the redemption of his people. So should we?

Jesus River Kwai Ernest founder cocking Burma Peter Gordon Luke
FHP Presents: The Moscars!

Forgotten Heroes Podcast

06:50 min | 1 year ago

FHP Presents: The Moscars!

"A mosque this Jennifer Jennifer Love Hewitt is no longer basically a working actress. So I don't know what the fuck I don't know. She was in the marriage story. Jennifer Love Hewitt No. It was not in a marriage story. who was that all right now? We're best actor which is another category. I feel no strong feelings about everybody it seems like once walking Phoenix to win for playing. Joker I mean how many times can you give someone an Oscar for playing joker. He's ledger got it. He deserved it. It was the posthumous Oscar saying so no dispute that but it was Joaquin Phoenix. Is He a great actor. Yes was he so so amazing in this role was he. So was this such an amazing movie that deserve to get the most Oscar nominations of any movie of the year absolutely not. I'm ongoing with for best actor. Antonio Darris said a long career. This is a motive ours. Move Sort of comeback movie. This is the movie that he's so they sort of came back together to make the movie pain and glory best supporting actor. You got more people got Tom. Hanks playing Mr Rogers. We like Mister Mr Rogers but come on then basically come down to the two Irishmen. Although they're both Italian so you're gonNA Pacino Joe Patchy and Al Pacino. His great in the movie Eh. Joe Patchy definitely should get it. It's a much more dialed back role. He plays leaking. Hobby is with Robert. De Niro's fantastic. I don't know how he doesn't get a nomination. It's ridiculous but anyway my prediction best supporting actor Joe. Patchy he should win. He probably will win. But we'll see let's talk about best supporting actress. You got a lot of people who in this category who are good actors Margo later Yes yes you got a lot of people in this counterargument. You just said that she's also nominated for playing a Fox News anchor. I don't get this guys. I don't WanNa give awards the people woo-hoo Portray Fox News anchors so if Lawrence pugh one because it's in little women so little does get does get some attention and also Sephora has been in a bunch of movies and she's good and all the movies mid so mar which was an underrated movie she carries mid so marsh. He's really really good in that movie. She's going to be in a couple of movies up coming up this issues and lady Macbeth a couple years ago. She's a really good actress. She deserves more attention credit and I think she should win. I don't know if she will um what I did was I took the top thirty two movies by adjusted gross income Box Office That also won best picture so I. It's only movies that have won best picture and they're the movies that right one through thirty two that made the most I money adjusted for inflation and we removed some that mark. Hadn't seen because it would be unfair late around the world in eighty days which definitely lost the first fight which is between the number one seed gone with the wind show and the number thirty two seed. The king's speech King's speech was was terrible. Way Way over height loses okay Now moving on we have titanic the three seed against against Shakespeare in love the thirty seed. Now that's hard but I'm GonNa go with fuck pathetic actually I have a lot of nostalgia for titanic and I think it's actually a really well made movie but Shakespeare in love is like a fantastic. Tom stoppard script. I'm GonNa go titanic though okay all right our first upset avoided okay. This next one is the five seed forrest gump. Against the twenty eighth seed ordinary people forrest. GUMP fourth gone from my childhood salute. It's beautiful conic. I just prefer that the number seven seed my fair lady against the number twenty six. He'd whatever it is. I'm voting for Schindler's List Schindler's List and to be like into pick my fair lady over Schindler's List now. I'm going with shamelessness. My God all right concluding on we have the number nine seed Lawrence of Arabia against the number twenty four seed unforgiven Arabia Clint Eastwood Fuck. Lenny's good so now. Going further we have the number eleven seed bridge on the River Kwai Versus The number twenty two seed driving Miss Daisy. Neither movie he have. I seen bridge on the river. Kwai is a Classic Big Time movie driving to sit mistakes. He has a lot of problems. You think Morgan Freeman one of his best performances is what season Bruce Almighty and Evan Almighty This was kind of tough to accept. You might hate because you're weird number thirteen rainman against number twenty a beautiful mind. I only get beautiful. Mind way over height going right. And then the fifteen versus the sixteen seed platoon number fifteen versus gladiator number sixteen You making contest of champions. It's platoon soon. I mean Oliver Stone annoys me but not nothing annoys me more than gladiator Playing at the time.

Jennifer Jennifer Love Hewitt Joe Patchy Joaquin Phoenix De Niro Mister Mr Rogers Oscar Tom stoppard Margo River Kwai Antonio Darris Oliver Stone Fox News Phoenix Schindler Lawrence pugh Shakespeare lady Macbeth Bruce Almighty Morgan Freeman Al Pacino
AT#727 - Travel to Kanchanaburi, Thailand

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

43:24 min | 6 months ago

AT#727 - Travel to Kanchanaburi, Thailand

"Bags back on the road. And read it's. Real. Fast Board. Amateur Traveler episode seven, hundred and twenty-seven today the amateur traveler talks about railroads and World War Two history waterfalls and Temples Pad Thai, and the bridge on the river Kwai sort of. As we go to contradictory Thailand. Welcome. To the amateur traveler I'm your host Chris Christensen. Let's talk about Thailand. I'd like to welcome to the show Michael Derosier 's from the ear goggles podcast who come to talk to us about a region in Thailand we have not talked about before and I'm going to try and say it, and then we'll help Michael pronounce it correctly, and that is contrary Michael Welcome to the show. That's perfect. Contradictory I did it okay. Okay. Excellent. Thank you so much I'm glad to be. Here and Michael's a longtime listener of the show and Michael you live now in Thailand. Yeah. That's right. I'm an American ex PAT I've been living in Bangkok since two thousand thirteen like a lot of people I came here on a one year teaching contract I fell in love with the city and I've always loved traveling and and now it's just sort of home seven years later it just feels like home. Will and why this particular region that you picked out why should we be talking about contradictory? There's a lot of reasons that people come to. Thailand. We'll come to Thailand for Bangkok or to go to the beaches and the south people come to Thailand to go to temples or to eat the food. But cutting Aubrey has some things that people don't necessarily think of when they think of Thailand at World War Two history that's a lot of our trekking and hiking that normally, you wouldn't be able to do as a tourist here. And as a matter of fact, I was doing research for this and I found that the provincial slogan of country really sums up the reasons that people should go here. It's quite a mouthful coming from the United States we have slogans like the Golden State or the lone star state, right but the slogan for Kanchanaburi Province is I'm going to just read the English. Translation. A province of ancient community three pagodas pass precious Stones River, bridge minerals, and waterfall resources and I think that just sums it up. Perfectly. Excellent and could you put it on a map for us? Absolutely, it is a little bit north west of Bangkok. It borders me and mar it's the largest province in the western region. So if you're looking at a map of Thailand and you're looking at the western region, of Thailand, you'll see it definitely the biggest it's much bigger than a lot of the other provinces in the area. Excellent will what kind of Tannery are you going to recommend for us when people go to catch and Aubrey there's really three categories of things to do and see, and so I really recommend grouping your itinerary around these three topics. The first one is World War Two history. The second one is nature in the third one is history and culture or ancient history and culture. Okay and. For me I'm a big history. So for me, the reason that I went there originally was to experience the World War Two history. And that's probably what the the province in the town itself catcher number town itself is best known for. So Catching Aubrey is probably the best known in the West as location of the bridge on the River Kwai. The famous but and film starring. Eunice. and. It was the site where sixteen thousand allied POW's and about ninety thousand Asian laborers died trying to build the railway all the way from Singapore to Myanmar during the Second World War. And it's a really powerful sight of his and there's a lot of historical places. There's Hellfire Pass. There's one Poe viaduct. There's the allied war cemetery, all of which are related to this historical moment in time. Will and you said that one triple I might have with their FAI getting a cab and I say take me to the bridge on the River Kwai. I may be confusing. My cabdriver. That's right. Why is that? Absolutely because even though the movie is world famous as the River Kwai that's actually not how it's pronounced in the thai-language in tie it's actually river quay I don't know why they spelled k. w. Ai i. think it should be written. K. W. H. E.. So as not to confuse people but in tie the word quiet means buffalo and so if you ask a driver to take you to the choir, the river, Kwai they're going to be yeah, definitely confused. You're not going to go where you think you are will. So if I go there now as I recall the end of the movie, they blew up the bridge but there is a bridge they're still right there is a bridge it was rebuilt the bridge in the movie was made of wood the rebuilt bridge is metal. Parts of it are original from the reconstruction back during the Second World War, but parts of it have been rebuilt since then. And the reason that it's been rebuilt is because it's actually still an active part of the Thai railway system. So getting to catch and Aubrey from Bangkok there's a lot of ways that you can get there. But in my opinion, the best way to go is to actually take the train along the Burmese death away from Bangkok to catch, and it goes right to the bridge will, and we should say that when you talk about it as the death railway, that is because of the number of the laborers and the prisoners of war who died building it not because that will be your experience necessarily on the trail. Not. If not the most comfortable train, but you'll certainly survive. Got It. And we can take that right from Bangkok. The main rail station in Bangkok is Elim punk station. You cannot get from there. You have to cross the river to a station called Bangkok noy station. And it's quite easy to get to. You can just tell any driver of Bangkok noy. They'll know exactly where to take you and the train ride takes about three or four hours depending on how many stops they make I believe it's only third class so it's not going to be the most comfortable trip, but it only costs the equivalent of three US dollars and you get to be on this historical railway and you get to see some beautiful scenery out the windows as you're going through the countryside. In. My opinion it's definitely worth doing. Do you say third class and we need a little bit of clarification there 'cause I think of the trains that I have taken in Asia First Class you had a private compartments second-class it was open, but you might have a space but. What is third class third class. I'm not hanging on the outside, right? Absolutely not no third class. You're not going to have an assigned seat over sell the tickets, but you won't have an assigned seat. It'll be a bench rather than an individual seat to sit in. The open there's usually not air condition, but it's more fun because there's going to be people walking up and down selling snacks and drinks. There's going to be people sticking their hands in the window trying to sell you mangoes and bananas as you're driving along and it's it's a lot more fun. I think to ride that way at least for a short distance you know for three hours it's okay. I wouldn't go across the country that way but for. A day trip three or four hour journey. It's great. Okay. So we get to the end of the line on the death railway successfully, and then what are we gonNA do? Well when you arrive at the Kanchanaburi Railway Station, you're right in front of the allied war cemetery in town and I really think that's probably the best place to start. You can walk through the cemetery and it's really well-maintained. It's actually maintained by the Commonwealth Work Raves Commission. And the soldiers interred there are mostly Dutch or Commonwealth citizens of the American POW's were are their remains were repatriated back to the US so you won't see many Americans, but there's a lot of commonwealth citizens buried there and it's it's kept up incredibly well, and just outside of that, there is the Thailand Burma Railway Center, which is a private museum that's dedicated to sharing the history of the railway in the history of the Second World War in country, and it's probably the best museum on the subject there several museums in the area This one is in my opinion the best one it's very informative. They've got a lot of great artifacts that have been donated by the. Survivors or by their families and I would absolutely recommend starting there. Okay from there. I would say go to the bridge, go to the bridge itself and see that you can walk across it. Be careful because the trains run on it, but people tend to know when the train is coming in and get other way in plenty of time. But yeah, you're allowed to walk across it. So if you've read the books or if you've seen the movies about this event, it'll feel very real when you walk across the bridge and if you're into history and if you know a lot about history or even if you're not I, think it's a really powerful moving experience to visit it. Further on well, okay I do want to back up for a second because there is a question that you asked and you would ask me what the guidebooks recommend that I would skip and I do WanNa talk about that because it is related to this part of the town. Okay. So when you're going to the bridge, there's also another war museum called the GP Newseum J. E. A. T. H. I believe it stands for Japan England. Australia Thailand. Holland Museum okay. It's officially a war museum and there's a lot of write ups about in guidebooks and the guidebooks recommended I. Don't know if I would necessarily recommend this museum is just it's it's kind of badly organized. It's really just a collection of of stuff from one thousand, nine, hundred there's this is a typewriter from nineteen, thirty six and you're like, well, that's great. But that has nothing to do with the bridge on the River Kwai, and there's a statue of Winston Churchill in a statue of hero he toe and it's just a very kind of odd museum. It's just a collection of stuff. And if you want to do it, it's fine is probably a dollar fifty to visit and they do have some some real artifacts. They have a real train engine to have some military planes and helicopters. But if you're on a time crunch I would recommend skipping. It is really just not not worth the time necessarily to visit. But while you're on the track of visiting the Second World War, sites I I, really can't stress enough. To Visit Hellfire Pass. which is out of town, you will need to get a driver or take a motorbike to get there. It's out of town about an hour and a half I guess the Hellfire Pass was the most dangerous part of of the railway construction where the the POW's had to chisel out a path through a mountain essentially and it was called Hellfire pass because just how awful it was working there they were working eighteen hour days. And Hellfire pass also has a very good museum that is maintained by Australia by the Australian government. And when you're there, you can actually walk through the the past they've carved out, and there's an audio tour that you can get from the visitor center that is made up of a collection of interviews by the survivors. and. It's incredibly moving. It is such a powerful experience and I can't recommend that enough. So it's worth the day trip to get out there. Okay. Sounds wonderful. That's what I would recommend for the Second World War. If you're interested in that history, the more modern history if you're interested in nature Canton Aubrey is also a great place to go, which is another reason that I'm a huge fan of it living in a city like Bangkok always happy when I can get away from the ten million people and just look at something green for a little. And I love catching Aubrey because of that, it's in the jungle. It has a fairly small population. It's a fairly remote and rural province. And it's home to six different national. Parks. ooh. So if you're into hiking if you're into tricking or camping, even it's great I love camping out there I love trekking if you want to go to the national parks and you can only go to one. I would recommend Erawan National Park. E. R.. A.. W. A. N. it's named after Erawan who's a three headed elephant from? Hindu mythology. And it's one of my favorite places in the whole country. It's got this seven tiered waterfall right at the visitor center and you can trek up to each level. It takes o two or three hours is not incredibly strenuous. but it's beautiful. It's absolutely beautiful and it each level you can stop in there's like a pool where the waterfall has formed natural pool and you can go swimming in it and you can also camp there you can contact the visitor center and hire a guide and go trekking through the jungle. So if you're really interested in experiencing the tide jungle, it's perfect Erawan National Park is the place to go. And if you're not brave enough to hire your own motorbike and you don't WanNa, spend the money for a private driver. There's actually a bus that goes from Kantian Aubrey town itself directly to Erawan National Park. So it's really easy to get to and when you say spend the money to hire a private driver how expensive is going to be in Thailand It's not that expensive. Especially, if you're coming on vacation and you have the money to spend even as a backpacker, it's not that expensive. I would say a driver for a day is going to cost you forty or fifty US dollars. Okay. So. That's the driver and the car correct. Yeah. Yeah. Excellent. But honestly, the traffic is not bad and if you're brave enough most hotels and guest houses will have motorbikes, you can use four free and honestly it's the best way to get around. I'm not that brave I would never write a motorbike in. Bangkok. But out in country Aubrey, it's fine. It's really not it's not scary so. If. You're brave enough. If you have motorbike insurance I would recommend getting around that way because that way you have the freedom to go where you want to go because some of the sites are a bit spread out and if you don't want to spend the money on a driver and if you want to control your own schedule, it's more fun to go on your own via motorbike. Okay. We're to next the third category of things that you might want to see in country is ancient history. And Culture Aubrey has a historical park called Moung Sing? And it's a Kamerhe style ruin. It's very different from. The ancient capital which I believe that you've covered in previous show a long time ago how UTA is tie style ruin but moung sing it's Kamerhe. It's actually one of the westernmost outposts from the Khmer Empire dates back to the thirteenth and fourteenth century around there. It was actually constructed under the reign of King. Jaya Varman the seventh I'm not sure if I'm pronouncing his name, right but he is the king who ordered the construction of anchor Tom in the bay on temples in Anchor Watt historical. Park in Cambodia. So it's kind of a miniature version of Angkor Watt and if you're interested in that kind of history and that architecture, it's really cool place to go. It's small it's about. I would say to collection of two temples and sort of an old fortress. But it's very informative and the cool thing about it. For a visitor is that you're allowed to climb on the ruins and it's probably not good for preserving the ruins. It's not great for protecting this history, but walking on the ruins and touching the stones and kind of standing were ancient people stood it makes it feel very real and that's definitely the trade off I would say the trade the trade off of. Allowing. You to enter the ruins and explore them on your own is that maybe it doesn't preserve them very well. But on the other hand, you do get to get a more up close and personal experience with the ruins, which is also very cool. Well, any when you say you were talking about time period when the king who are now trying to say. Jar Varman. The the seventh it live from like. Eighty two twelve nineteenth. So we're talking. About eight hundred years ago or so these go back. It's kind of rare. You don't see that many Kamerhe style ruins in Thailand, especially this far west. At this point, we are very close to the Myanmar border, and so this is one of the very, very furthest outposts of this empire, which is what makes it kind of rare in the region and really interesting to see excellent while you're at mowing sing definitely stopped by Wong viaduct it's really close. It's just a few minutes away. One Poe viaduct is a trestle bridge. It's also part of the death railway. It's a trestle bridge that goes over the river along the cliff face. And again to walk on it, which is kind of scary because there's no railings or anything, but just just keep your footing I guess. But what's interesting about the one paw viaduct is that there's also a cave right there and the cave was used as a store for the Japanese army and it was also POW field hospital. And it's been turned into a Buddhist shrine. So there's a big Buddha statue in there in lots of people will go there to pray to light incense to make merit. And It's just a beautiful part of the country and it looks over some of the prettiest scenery on the river. Kwai it's very, very close to moving sing. So while you're in the region, just stop by there just make may trip of both of them because you don't WanNa miss either one. And you see to make merit and I think your knowledge of Buddhism is a little better than sorry. Yeah. Right so making merit is basically giving an offering in the name of somebody. In this case, it would be in the name of the people who died in the construction of the railway and that would come in the form of maybe lighting incense saying prayers and donating flowers or maybe donating money. Basically, it is doing an act that gives good Karma to somebody who has died. Okay. Thank you that. I was not familiar with that term and so because a lot of people died there it, it's a very popular place that people will go to pray for the dead But yeah, definitely it's beautiful. It's a little bit scary to walk across though I will say that. It's not like it's not super high. It's probably ten fifteen feet, but it's still scary to walk across the bridge. But again, if you're brave enough go for it otherwise, you can still get some really cool pictures. It. So those are the things that I would definitely recommend as the do not miss. But there are some other things that I would also recommend if you have the time. and. One of the most most highly recommended one of the extra activities is visiting the nature? Park I think an incumbent operates a branch of the elephant nature. Park. That's called the elephant haven I'm always hesitant to recommend anything with animals especially anything where the animals are used for tourism. And a lot of times I think people come to Thailand and they they WANNA see elephants. So they want to see monkeys and they don't realize that there may be feeding into unethical organization or an unethical industry, and so a few years ago my mother wanted to visit Thailand and she she loves elephants. She really wanted to see some elephants and I did a lot of research to try to find an organization that was ethical. And Elephant Nature Park is very good. They're very, very good. They do not allow you to ride the elephants. They take really good care of them. A lot of the elephants at the Nature Park are rescued from the tourist industry or they're rescued from the logging industry. And they're basically able to retire and live out their lives in this large natural area just doing elephant things basically, and so you volunteer with them or if you go overnight to stay with them, you don't get to ride the elephants get to bathe them. You get to play with them. You've got to feed them, but really the elephants are kind of in charge just going where they want to go and doing what? They want to do and you just kind of get to tag along with them and hang out with them in their natural habitat. This organization is very good because they do fight against the exploitative practices that some of the industry does I recommend elephant haven at the Elephant Nature Park, and when you go overnight, you could to stay in a bungalow you stay in the elephant camp itself, which is a really cool experience. And you talk about the elephant experience there and I think I've talked about it once before on the show but I know that there are no pictures about it in amateur traveler on purpose. But when I was there for a tourism board event with teabags travel blogging conference, they had told the tours and people they specifically didn't wanted to go to some of the other non ethical kind of elephants shows which are. Where you could see the elephants outside a chained and these really short chains or where the people who were making the elephants go through these tricks have. Very, point Hook that clearly the elephant was trained with in a comfortable manner. But at one point, we had extra time in the schedule and somebody had missed a memo and took us to one of these shows and I'm sitting there going well, I'm not writing about this I'm not promoting this and it was uncomfortable because I'm aware that writing elephant for instance is not good for an elephant and all of those sorts of things. So yeah. Right well. And don't have any. No, they just don't know. Anytime an elephant now forming or anytime an elephant is being used to give rides. That's exactly the truth that Hook, and the chair sits on the elephants back is really really bad for their back and Colorado a lot of pain and so yeah, people come to Thailand I've had colleagues have come here to work in Thailand, and they're so excited when they see elephants and they see an elephant and they go and they put money in the hat and from the elephant and the elephant does a dance and it's it's really funny and it's cute but you just can't support that right and that's Why organizations like this one like the elephant nature park are really important because they do rescue these elephants that are in that situation and they bring them to this I guess sort of a rehabilitation camp where they can retire safely and they can just about the rest of their lives in a more natural way, and so they don't allow anyone to ride the elephants. They just get live elephant lives, which is I. Think Super Important. Yeah and I wasn't aware of this. I was the the famous went up in Chiang Mai that's similar. This one is a branch of that one elephant nature park is. In the elephant haven. But they're the same organization. But Yeah, you can understand why people are drawn to Elvis. -nificant animal. Really they're so smart. They're hilarious Wa. Oh yeah, and it's the national animal of Thailand. So of course, they're used in promoting tourism here and you'll see them all over the place. So. If you if you do have the time definitely volunteer overnight, it costs a bit of money not not a lot. Maybe a hundred dollars one, hundred, fifty dollars not really sure but it's not incredibly expensive but the money goes to help take care of the elephants and you get to Baid them. You get to the kind of swim with them. And just play with them and they're very playful. They're very playful and very sweet. Sometimes, if you're lucky, they might have a baby and there's nothing funnier than like a three hundred pound baby elephant they're very clumsy and they they're very pushy and they just WanNa play in. It's really really cute excellent. So those are really my my recommendations of things to do. But when you're there, there's a lot more than just that. So those are the top sites. I would say that you should not miss other than that. There are other things to do in town while you're there that will take up a lot more time for example, going to the night market or the walking street in Kanchanaburi town. When you're there, there's not much food that's unique to Kanchanaburi because catch Aubrey is still in the central region of Thailand. Thailand has four distinct cultural regions and catch knobkerries no central region just like Bangkok. So the food that you'll find is really similar, but they have a lot of great seafood or I Guess River. Food. Because they're on the river. So a lot of really fresh river fish river prawns, another dish that they're famous for is this mushroom soup. Okay. I guess it's made of mushrooms that grow really well, there I'm not. I'm not sure but sort of an herbal mushroom soup that's supposed to be really good for you. Other than that. He had the food in the market is very good. You can get Tom Google which is a spicy soup made of prins. And I guess pad, Thai Thai is not the most authentic dish, but it's still really good at so so good. Well, and the funny thing is we have Thai restaurants in the area I'm in. We have a lot of restaurants in Silicon Valley because there's a lot of people from all over the place more. Passports per capita than any other place. And I was convinced that Pattaya was just something that I didn't like because I went to some of the restaurants here that I, Lake. And try the pad Thai it was bland. And we're just noodles right and if you give me just a big plate of noodles that that doesn't do anything for me and and yet it is my Go-to dish when I'm in Bangkok. Thai. I mean it's definitely not inauthentic is tied. Actually has a really cool history because it was sort of invented in the nineteen thirties when they were trying to unify the country in each region had it unique cuisine and they were trying to create a tie identity and so the prime minister sort of ordered the invention of a dish that would have flavors that could appeal to people all across the country and they came up with Pad Thai and they call it pad Thai's in like Thai Patterns Fried. So Fried Tyou Guess Fried Thai Food and they said this is our national dish now and it's going to be something that's not too spicy not too sweet. It's going to appeal to everybody. So it is tie and it's really good and I'm a huge fan of it and I think that most tourists love it because it is really good. It's not too spicy. Don't have to worry about it being spicy well, I mean we shouldn't be too surprised that a traditional dish in many places doesn't go back as far as we think if you think about if you go to Italy, you're going to expect Pasta Pasta comes from China. So right it. Wasn't what they reading in the twelve hundred they didn't. They didn't have that same sort of invention than, and of course, tomatoes came from the new world. So that's right. Everything you're eating is from elsewhere if you go to did you get potatoes while you're having something you expect, but they also came from the new world and so a lot of places what was traditional dishes has changed over time. So which surprises too much. But I don't eat the food, my parents. or at least eight when I was growing up so that you having been exposed to many other more interesting things than meat and potatoes but yeah. Exactly exactly, and there's a lot of foods like that in Thailand foods that have become Thai food that have evolved from something else my favorite example is American, Fried Rice. Cow Pat, American. Which delillah thousand nine hundred seventy s when a lot of American servicemen were on our in our in Thailand during the Vietnam. And I guess I don't I don't really know how it happened. I guess that they were trying to come up with the dish that these Americans would like and they were thinking what do Americans like they like catch up they like hotdogs and so American Fried Rice is this fried rice dish made of hot dogs and catch up and raisins and has a fried egg on top and it's very odd dish. Oh I I think that it was invented trying to appeal to an American Palette and I just find it hilarious. It's not bad. It's not what you expect, but it's not bad. It's definitely not American it is one hundred percent Thai. Thai could make that into something edible. I know it's really funny. I can't imagine how they came up with it. Well, and Michael. Talks about people going to Thailand for the food. That is definitely one of the places where the food is is so good and is so good not just in Bangkok. But I've been spent some time in the in the hinterlands to in some lesser known areas and a very easy to get good food in Thailand. Yes. Definitely and I would say, don't be afraid of the street food either I've been living here for seven years. I've never gotten sick not once and I don't know why you're in a tropical area it seems like you ought to be but I agree with you that I a place that I am not at all afraid speed food I've certainly gotten sick traveling before I've gotten really sick and other countries but here I've never had any problems. Anything. Else people need to know before they go to this particular region, of Thailand, or Thailand in general well, this particular region of Thailand. One more warning regarding animals that would be important to say is the Tiger Temple I think they've rebranded hikers zoo. You might have heard about this when it made big international news a couple of years ago. It was a Buddhist temple that was famous for having tigers in the monks would walk around with Tiger and people would go and pay money and take pictures with. But there are always accusations suspicions that the Tigers were being drugged mistreated and a few years ago. There was a government raid and they found out that that was definitely true. So they've shut it down it's been reopened as the Tiger Zoo I'm not one hundred percent sure if it's ethical or not I would probably say Aaron the side of caution and skit. Even though it's highly recommended by a lot of people. So avoid the Tiger Temple but don't get confused. There's another temple called Tiger Cave temple, which is just called that it doesn't have any tigers at all and it's a really cool temple. It's got a huge Buddha statue might be the biggest Buddhist statue in the region I'm not a hundred percent sure about that, but it's really tall several stories tall. And if you want to kind of experience a beautiful style, Buddhist temple at Tiger Cave temple is it's not too far out of town is just a few minutes out of town. You can get there on a motorbike or or in a taxi it's good to go to so don't get the two mixed up don't get the Tiger Cave temple or the Tiger temple mixed up because they are different well. That it's that toll because there are those four things you're supposed to remember not to do in Thailand and one of them is don't be taller than the. Buddha. So if it's too straight talk arrest, that's always helpful. To have somebody on the head don't point your feet toward somebody in. Do say anything bad about the king exactly. That's actually very important. Let's Let's definitely reiterate that because that is highly illegal. So I would say just avoid talking about the monarchy in general just of yet because there's nothing good that can come of it. It's very respected institution in Thailand and the laws are are really strict and they do apply to foreigners as well. So as a tourist yeah and just show proper respect and that actually comes down to something. That a lot of people don't think about and that's the money. So right on the street and you're buying on the money yeah you're buying snack and you accidentally drop a coin and it starts to roll away. Do not step on. It goes back to what you were saying about the feet don't put your feet on the face of the king that would be really bad and you'll definitely get some dirty looks if you do that if your money's blowing away, just don't step on it, pick it up with your hand yeah interesting. Now you mentioned there were five. National Parks. If I had a little more time, which is the next National Park, you would add after Erawan. Okay. The second one that you should go to is called Sciatic National Park Sayek would right next door to its right. And you can get there actually by by train. If you stay on the train passed catching Aubrey town, it goes all the way to a station called Nam Talk Station, and from there you can just walk to the entrance of Seocnd National Park. A non-toxic means waterfall and yoke has a huge waterfall as well. And they have great camping, and if you're really interesting campaign, you can camp there. You don't even need to have your own equipment. You can rent all the equipment for about I, know ten dollars probably from the National Park Center. And Camp Right there at the park do we need to book that in advance you probably do you can probably do that by getting on their website although I don't think that many people in Thailand are necessarily into camping right now. He's not really a popular pastime, so you probably could just show up. But I would say, don't risk. It will in the fact that there to national parks here with a lot of waterfalls means that they get a lot of water. Is there any guidelines in terms of win? You would recommend people come to Thailand what's the best season for visiting this area? I would say, definitely avoid the rainy season, which is like June through October okay. because. It'll just be raining all day and it just won't be that fun especially if you want to do the outdoor activities if you come in March, April and May it's going to be very hot. Thus the hottest part of the year in it's it's miserable. It's really bad. So avoid that as well. I would say the best time to go to cavalry is in. They call it the winter, but it's really the dry season. So maybe November through February, it's not bad. It's really nice well, and is there any particular day that one ought to be in Thailand or more specifically encountered? Aubrey one of the two big tie cultural festivals is called Loy Krotov Day. And it's a day that happens usually in November each year it's lunar so it moves around a bit, but it usually takes place in November. It's the river festival. So in Thailand, the river is such an important part of life and culture. It gives life to the rice fields and everything, and this is a festival that is meant to honor the river. and. So this is a day where people will go out though build floats out of banana leaves and flowers, and incense and candles, and the float them down the river. And it's a really beautiful festival and it's great to see it in. Bangkok. But it's also really important in country as well because the river is such an important part of life in country. So if you happen to be in conscious berry in November, see if you can plan your trip so that you're there on. Sunday because it's it's a beautiful holiday this year. Okay. Well, Lloyd Song is on the full moon of the Twelfth Tai Month. So whenever that is usually it's at the end of November. Good to know before we start to wrap this up anything else we ought to know. Thailand is a really beautiful really welcoming place. It's really easy to travel here. You'll be very comfortable. The people are friendly. But just like what we were talking about earlier with talking about the monarchy. Be careful what you say the defamation laws in Thailand can be really strict and they do apply to tourists. Recently, there was news about an American tourist who left a bad review for a hotel got sued. With the country's strict defamation laws and and it's been kind of a big scandal in Thailand recently. So I would say wait until you come home. If you leave a bad review for for something that would be my advice other than that the people are going to be very friendly. People are very welcoming. It's an easy country to travel in I would say. You know what questions coming your standing in the prettiest spot in contrary where you standing, what are you looking up catching? Aubrey has the best sunsets in Thailand I think there are so many hotels and houses that are quote floating hotels that have built themselves on barges that are tethered to the east side of the river, and they look out west, and so at night, you can see the sun setting over the river quay. and. I think that the prettiest spot is one of the guest houses right outside the Wong. Po viaduct that that Trestle Bridge. When you can see the sun going down on the west side across across the river across the jungle the sky is just it's orange it's red. It's absolutely gorgeous and if you're there in the evening, can sit on the the deck outside your floating hotel have a beer or have have soda and and just watch this beautiful sunset. It's always incredible. I've been there so many times and I've never been disappointed by the sunset in Kabri especially right there. Especially right at the woven duct. Excellent. Is there particularly guest house you would recommend. I believe it's called the Flag House River. Quay it's a little bit expensive. It's about one hundred US per night I mean it's not that expensive but for Thailand is. If you are more incumbent Aubrey town and you're on a budget, maybe if you're a backpacker or a budget tourist. The. Hotel that I. Kind of uses my Go-to is called V. in guesthouse. It's walking distance from the train station it also faces West. is nothing fancy, but it is a flooding River Hotel and It's about twelve dollars per night. So you're getting very basic, very basic accommodations, but it is beautiful and it still looks out west and you can still see the sunset just as well from there as you could at the fancy hotel. Actually another hotel that I would recommend if you are into nature especially if you're into nature, but you don't want to really do camping, you can try glancing which is getting more popular in Thailand sure and one of the famous resorts is called the Hint Talk River camp and it's close to the Hellfire Pass. So you can stay in a fancy tint with all of the luxury accommodations that you're used to but. You can still say that you've been camping and it's probably the equivalent of sixty to seventy USD per night I i. Guess Excellent. Now, we talked about food and we're going to go down to the night market I assume is there any other place that you would recommend that we go for the Best Food Experience Continental Albery? Well, if you're if you're like me and you love a buffet, there's a really good buffet. Just, kind of beneath the bridge. and. If you're only in. Thailand. For a very short time and you want to sample lots of Thai food and kind of compare it. I would say it's a decent place to go because it's cheap and it's pretty good but it's not going to be the most authentic food I'm assuming this is tied buffet and not a Swedish. Mortgage. Board. Yes, you're right. But it's not going to be the most. Typhoon Food because it does cater more to tourists honestly, I would say stick to the night market if you want to try to really authentic food. Okay. Get some barbecued meat get some some grilled river prawns. Yuccas country number. Is Famous? For their river. Prawns. And what you can do is even take it back to your hotel get it to go take it back to your oatmeal and kind of have a picnic on the on the deck outside your floating hotel. It's probably the best way to enjoy the meal. Honestly. Excellent one thing that makes you laugh and say only and contrary. So okay, you know you know the the Colonel Bogey March that they that they whistle in the movie shirt and you know there are some not very polite words that go along to this song. Yes I did learn them as a kid. Right right. So when I was at the river last time, there was a guy they're playing the traditional Thai instrument it kind of looks like a one stringed cello I guess the closest thing I can. I can compare it to and he was sitting there and he was playing it and he was seeing those not very polite lyrics. And I just thought it was so funny and just so odd and so out of place in Thailand, he was sending them in English obviously to the tourists and it just made me laugh so hard because it was really. To See and hear that. Right there on this traditional, this beautiful traditional instrument. Excellent. Definitely well, and I'd have to say the question I don't normally ask you is how much you pitch me this destination, Jesse you could hear me stumble over saying contrary every time. Well. Gosh. I'm not even sure I'm saying at one hundred percent correctly I've been living here for seven years. I've been trying to learn the language for seven years and I'm still not that good at it is not an easy language. This morning I had my fiance who is Thai coach me like like several times to try to make sure I was saying avary correctly and I'm still not one hundred percent sure that I'm I'm doing it right and fiance in Thailand is the other reason I'm guessing where you have fallen in love with. Definitely Often the story as I understand it. Excellent and if you had to summarize. Contrary in just three words what three words Jeeze I'd say beautiful. I would say history. And I would save relaxing because it is a beautiful place to just experience nature. Excellent. Our guest again has been Michael? Durocher. There's and what is the goggles podcast? So I started the ear goggles podcast with a buddy of mine from back home. It's kind of an excuse for us to get together once a week and have a beer and just chat about life but we talk about our lives and we talk about experiences back home in the US experiences here in Thailand, how they compare how they're different. So I guess if you're interested in learning a bit about what just daily life for an expat in Bangkok is like. CHECK US out. Excellent. Thank you so much for coming on amateur traveler and for sharing with us your love for Thailand especially for one last time. Contrary. Well, it's my pleasure Sir conscious avary. That's right. As we go into the community segment of the show I, want to say that I'm probably going to have Michael. Back on the show relatively soon because he mentioned something about doing a show on Bangkok and we haven't talked about Bangkok and quite a long time and it's a very interesting city that I have a love. Hate relationship with. So we'll probably do that in the near future. Special. Thanks again to the patrons of the show who support the show on patriotic dot com patriarch dot com slash amateur traveler. We did a meet up last Saturday, which is always fun and the record for coming from the furthest distance for that meeting was somebody who dialed in from unduly Tanzania, which was great fun. In other news of the community I heard from Sandra who said I want to thank you for the recent podcast on Wales. I attended a summer school in an and it had to be a Welsh name here. Arbor swith back in Nineteen ninety-one and brought back a lot of lovely memories. The day I was in Cardiff we did get to Kessel Cook the Red Castle along with Cardiff Castle embedded in the castle walls you can actually see the original Roman fortifications. Up In north Wales we went to Anglesey and Penman Church, which is the oldest stone church on the island along with Saint Cereals as well. Thank you. Sandra. I also heard from becky recently, who said I just wanted to tell you how my husband and I went to Iceland last year at this time, we would have never thought of going there if I had not been listening to your podcast, I listened to those episodes quite a few times before going are Hawaii trip that was coming up in a couple of weeks had get cancelled. So instead, we're going to do a big US southeast trip starting with the Georgia I've never heard of them from anyone else. So I'm glad that information is out there. I have several episodes to listen to that apply to the area where you're going I plan on getting to all fifty states twelve left and you are nearly the here with your episodes. Thank you you and your guests that pitched the shows that are less obvious places to go becky sounds like I really do need to get that last state in there. We do not have an episode on New Hampshire and Vicky sent me a photo which will be in the show if I. WanNa remind people that this show now has in the MP three version of photos and links, and so if you're looking at it with a wide variety of podcast APPS, you can see those photos if you want to get your photo in an amateur traveler episode or your feedback, send it to host amateur traveler dot com I, especially love hearing how you actually went places because of episodes that we did on the podcast, and if you want to wear amateur shirt in the photo, you send me all the better. You can get those at amateur traveler dot com slash store. And with that, we're going to end this episode of amateur traveller. If you have any questions sent an email to host at amateur traveler, Dot Com, which I think I just said or yet leave a comment on this episode at Amateur Traveler. Dot, com and thanks so much for listening. See want. One Chap- The Man.

Thailand Bangkok Aubrey town United States River Kwai Amateur Traveler Michael Derosier Hellfire Pass National Parks Stones River Myanmar allied war cemetery Poe viaduct Elephant Nature Park Fast Board Temples Pad Thai Singapore Thailand Burma Railway Center Chris Christensen
The Evening Briefing: Thursday, August 20

The Briefing

02:02 min | 8 months ago

The Evening Briefing: Thursday, August 20

"Good evening I'm Chris Price with the briefing from the Telegraph. It's Thursday August twentieth, and the Jesus Grades Inflated, the most have been revealed. So more than a quarter of Gypsies resulted in top grades this year compared with the fifth last year. The surgeon comes as more than nine hundred and fifty thousand peoples in England received their predicted rates from their teacher rather than the controversial algorithm, not a single subject sore decrease in its pass, right. But some sort of big gains year-on-year than others annex. Clark. Dominic Gilbert reveal which subjects were inflated the most by teacher assessments. Some breaking news in the last hour, Portugal's being taken off the UK's quarantine list meaning holiday makers can control there without needing to self isolate for fourteen days on their return but has widely expected. Croatia. Has Been added to the Red List as well as Australia and Trinidad and Tobago I travel lifelock has the latest. Breaking this afternoon the news. Donald Trump's former top eight, Steve. Bannon. Is being charged with fraud is linked to a crowd funding campaign to build a wall between Mexico and America. One of Mr, trump's key election pledges back in twenty sixteen. The Fund raised more than twenty, five million dollars and it's claimed Mr Bannon and three others use the money for personal profit. He was Senator Ben Reilly Smith has the details. And, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex of talked about the dark side of social media in virtual discussion speaking to young leaders in the Commonwealth via Video Coal Prince Harry said, social media is a lot of noise competing for attention Megan people not to feed trolls sharing their offensive material. You can watch them speak along with all that you can read Tom Harrison. Why. It's far too soon for Labor to rejoice over the Tories polling slump and the lies that built the classic war film, The bridge on the River Kwai if you're listening on WHATSAPP passenger those links. Now if you're listening on spotify apple or wherever gets past, you find them in the show notes that sit your tonight's I'll have your next briefing tomorrow morning.

Mr Bannon Donald Trump Chris Price Tom Harrison River Kwai Dominic Gilbert Croatia Portugal England Senator Ben Reilly Smith Duchess of Sussex Clark spotify lifelock fraud Prince Harry UK Fund Australia
Introducing Inside Star Wars

Life is Short with Justin Long

06:51 min | 1 year ago

Introducing Inside Star Wars

"Who doesn't know about Star Wars? Everybody knows loves I love Star Wars. So my earliest memories involve Star Wars, it's something that I've lived with my entire life. It's been a part of the fabric of my life. I remember when I was two years old. Maybe two and a half of my dad took me to empire. Strikes back and I remember I kept I was I was so enthralled by the all of the characters, but especially Darth Vader that kept leaning over him and saying, now I know they call him, doc Vader, I was just I was just blown away by it. It's one of those movies that continues to hold up and continues to attract people's attention and curiosity. And so now there is a show. There's a podcast called inside Star Wars, it takes you behind the scenes of, of this iconic, film franchise, you, you get to learn all about the making of it. The, the good and the bad, the highs and lows. He'll hear about the struggles. I'd love stories like that stories like that are so intriguing to me. And if you're anything like me, and you're intrigued by store or stores you're gonna love. Inside Star Wars. Here's a little preview inside Star Wars, and while you're listening go subscribe to inside Star Wars, wherever you listen to life is short with Justin long, or find a Lincoln, the episode notes and enjoy. The following may contain mature content. From wondering, I'm Mark Ramsey, and this is inside Star Wars heart one. March twenty second nineteen seventy six it was the first day you're shooting in the Tunisian desert, the first day of shooting Star Wars. Down down the remote control droids kept falling over shorting out. Crashing into each other cut cut cut. Did we get at least five seconds of usable footage before that crash? Six seconds, George good. Let's move on. Wait, wait, wait, wait. Can can you hear that? What's that noise? The droids are radio control. I think I think they're picking up local radio. Fabulous. What if we pull them along with wires until they fall over sure? And we could also hide behind them crawling on the sand in push fabulous. By the end of the first day of shooting. Anthony Daniels is C three PO was convinced. He wouldn't survive the film his brilliant gold, plastic costume. Took two hours to put on. It was tight. It was bolted to his body above the waist. Another two bolt stuck into his neck. Every step was painful, he lurched in hobbled. He was sore. He was cut up covered in scratches and scars. And this was the very first day of shooting. Kenny Baker was inside are two d- two Guinea, lookout, there's a robot coming, Kenny watched in terror as an out of control, droid Corinne towards him. Down when are two and down went Kenny Baker. Some droids were radio controlled somewhere. Puppets on strings somewhere hydraulic in one head Kenyan side. And the chances that all of them would do the right thing at the right time on the right, Mark. Slim an hour passes in our two is ready to go again. Operated by remote control. Are two rolled into the distance over a sand dune. Can't stop over a sand dune in under the set of Franco, Zeffirelli's mini series. Jesus of Nazareth shooting next door. Oh, god. Help us outside his tent nearby. Alec Guinness watched. He was the most famous actor in the cast. He was an Oscar winner. He had been knighted by Queen Elizabeth. He was a veteran of Shakespeare and I- conic classics bridge on the River Kwai doctors Vago Lawrence of Arabia. And now here he was in the desert rolling around in the sand with children dressed as John was and a menagerie of malfunctioning robots. His head was in his hands. Gilded will never let me hear the end of this. At the center of this maelstrom was a moody bearded thirty one year old named George Lucas. This was the realization of everything he had dreamed of, and it was falling apart at the seams. Seems filled. With sand. Nothing was going right. Everything was screwed up in the director was desperately unhappy, this movie is going to be terrible. I wanted an epic. I didn't count on an epic disaster. Test test test is it? Okay. If we begin I know we have only an hour. Sure, okay. It's october. Twenty four. Twenty eighteen I'm Mark Ramsay. I'm talking with George Lucas outside his home in Marin county. Hold on Everest. How do you be careful on that swing? How would you daughter now five? She's fought. Okay. So. Again. Thank you for making time for this. I know it's a big ask are you? Are you ready to start? Sure start wear. Well, let's start with the original Star Wars naturally. How much do you think about that movie? Now every day every day. Somebody asked me about it every day. Somebody, thanks before. And how does that make you feel? It was a long time ago in a galaxy far far away. I'm reminded of it every day. But it's no longer part of me. You know. They used to be mine. Now. It's yours. Okay. Can we can can we go back to your beginning? We have to. That was just a preview of inside Star Wars. You're gonna love this series. We put our heart and soul into this thing to hear the rest subscribe to inside Star Wars on apple podcasts or wherever you're listening right now.

George Lucas Kenny Baker Darth Vader Anthony Daniels Alec Guinness Mark Ramsay Mark Ramsey Nazareth Justin long Queen Elizabeth Mark Oscar River Kwai director apple Marin county Franco Zeffirelli Vago Lawrence
The Bridge On The River Kwai

Unspooled

1:37:48 hr | 1 year ago

The Bridge On The River Kwai

"Right now on your Wolf. John Krasinski joined the office ladies to talk about the legendary Casino night episode and get to the bottom of the mystery. What happened to the teapot for more? Follow at Your Wolf on social media. Thanks for listening. This episode of unspoiled is brought to you by our buddies at Acorn Gino. What acorn is it is the service you need to know about. If you're looking for something new to add to your queue because it specializes in the awesomeness most cozy lovely heartfelt druggies these from all around the world. We're talking great mysteries. We're talking like raisins during Liberties Ashley. Jensen we're talking the detector which is a really wacky loopy. Crazy British comedies starring. Mackenzie Crook acorn. Tv's characters make fantastic companies. Invite them into your house right now. Visit sign up dot acorn DOT TV and use the code unschooled for an extended thirty day. Trial Acorn TV world class. Tv from Britain and beyond this episode of unspoiled is brought to you by our buddies at Acorn know what Acorn is. It is the service you need to know about. If you're looking for something new to add to your cue because it specializes in the awesomeness most cozy lovely heartfelt drama series from all around the world. We're talking great mysteries. We're talking like Agatha Raisin starring Liberties Ashley Jensen we're talking detectors which is a really wacky loopy crazy. British comedies starring. Mackenzie Crook Acre Grungy. These characters make fantastic companies. So invite them into your house right now. Visit sign up dot acorn DOT TV and use the code unspoiled for an extended thirty day trial. Akron TV world class from Britain and beyond its nineteen fifty seven and a bunch of men are whistling to work on the river. Kwai Hello and welcome to load and cousin and I am Paul Scheer in. This is the podcast. Each week. We Watch one film from the top one hundred greatest films of all time list two thousand seven addition to see if they really as good people say do they hold up and how have they influenced the films that we watch now today. We'll be talking about the bridge on the river. Kwai Now. Two weeks ago in our last regularly scheduled episode we talked about. Martin Scorsese's Goodfellas and we're GONNA get into all those comments here today. Amy Before that I want to say I loved your article in the San Antonio Express. That was such a great piece. Oh thank you. That's my hometown newspaper. I was so touched that they wanted to talk about movies in about the show. I I love said Antonio. I really appreciate all of the reading that I got to doing that. Newspaper when I was a trial to to get to be in. It is lovely. There's something about being your home done newspaper. Where like your best friend from from your first grade school like says hi. You're like Oh hi miss you love that and you know thinking of things that people loved people love this unspoiled Vertigo poster. That was designed by Kim trucks. Who does all of our amazing drawings? We actually made one for the winner of the unspoiled trivia contests that was part of the facebook. Group on dischord that hosted. Really more amy than I And we may actually try to release those because people really love those the way that that poster looked so stay tuned for that and just a reminder that in our T. shirts or t public dot com. You can still get one of our very cool shirts. Where one hundred percent of the proceeds goes to support independent movie theaters. You know it's so important to support these places so that when we are back to normal we can go there and enjoy some great films and also amy. I WANNA say that. I've been doing a show on Youtube right now. It's called Marvel presents the world's greatest book club. And I know you don't love the marvel world but this is not the movie world. This is the comic book world and I'm sitting down and talking to some amazing people about their favorite comic books. So if you've never read a comic before this might be a great place for you to start. People like deemed Lindelof Phil Lord Become Bell. Gillian Jacobs and they're all telling me like what was there. I kind of moral book. They fell in love with and you can kind of find them. And also we're talking about how you can support your local bookshops. Another small business. That needs our attention. I love that if we're talking about other podcasts. You might have. I make a plug because my periodic miniseries zoom where we like do dives did strangenesses of film film history. The creators stories. And you know we talked about horse actors and zombies and Jane Austen. We have a new episode coming out next week. That I'm in the thick of right now on divas which is the needing the grand history of the divas leaping all the way back from Italian Opera Mariah Carey and when they come in and out of cinema starting in this island era to glitter. It's Super Fun now. I sort of regret what I named my podcast zoom a year and half ago. It didn't seem like a big deal. Now everything is called Zoom. So what are you GONNA do? I don't know if that's good for us or bad for us but we are still zoom. Great for you. I mean now. Got into the normal Verbiage of daily life. I mean we had a very contentious I would say contentious we had different points of view about Goodell's and I think it was a very respectful conversation but we agree to disagree and so many people really got into the fray with their thoughts about goodfellas. We went to the message boards. We went on twitter and we pulled a couple of comments that I think kind of encompasses a lot of the way that people felt first of all start with Germany. Radic at Jeremy Radic. He says you know. I love this episode of Goodfellas. It's fascinating it's the best example that sometimes a movie is just not for you even when it's classic. Amy Nicholson feels about goodfellas. The same way I feel about. I think it's great to hear her. Paul Scheer go back and forth and I and I do like that. There's no reason why anyone has to like a movie. I think that that's always the the thing that I get angry at like. You don't have to like anything. There's no one great movie it's all about taste. It's like stand up comedy art everything. It's it's all subjective exact officiate. The Jeremy Put it in the Lens. Of Titanic because it's as bewildering to that somebody couldn't like titanic as. I'm sure it is people that I could find problems with goodfellas. So you know what we could be at peace about it Rene. Figueroa said you know Paul. I was fighting for you ball the whole way every step of the way on the on the unspoiled. Goodfellas episode is frustrating. But he at least appreciated that. I made him second guess. Some of the decisions made in that movie almost like I just want to clarify one more time about the age that can I even clarify. Wartime agents are you. Are you GonNa Age? Because he keeps coming up getting comments like since the episode of like. What's the big deal with the age difference? People like even dirk justly saying you know how could you be so critical of Joe Issues Precious aid in Goodfellas when kid and play where thirty olds playing teenagers and House Party to which I would say they were in their twenties? But I think I wish I would articulate this better. I'm just GONNA give it one more quick shop there with me all right okay. Here's the thing in something like House party. Say they actually. I think are very good at being people in their twenties playing teenagers and they captured the teenager. Nece there is even though the age is not exactly the same the spirit of the characters there whereas I'm just saying in Goodfellas because this is supposed to a story about young men who are idiots casting them as old people changes the story. It's different and I would appreciate it or be able to empathize at least with a position that I would be able to find a peace with it if the story had been been tweaked so it wasn't about young guys. It was about middle aged people who are kind of idiots in the mafia making self destructive decisions but the fact that the script left in all of the young men wild child whippersnapper kind of language to describe them in that acted like we would notice enacted like we wouldn't notice that Ray Liotta in Joe Pepsi's characters are supposed to be the same agent suddenly aren't the same age and acted like all this generational stuff that that was written in the script still made sense even though it clearly didn't make sense it's just the fact that the script didn't match the casting and they didn't you know come through it and make it work as a united piece of art others made and made me lose faith in the entire film. That's all okay. I'M NOT GONNA. I'm not gonNA dispute you. I'm just going to listen to you and I'll ask that you listen to me because I have on my third act issue the cooking part of it and I think somebody describe something to me online. That actually encapsulated what I was trying to say to you and I'm sorry that I don't have it in front of me but I can explain it. In a way and that Third Act Henry Hill is now in charge of his own kind of scam. Or He's running his own like where as before he was always running business for other people. This is where he's employing his babysitter. He's employing his wife so what we've seen throughout the film. Is that whenever the leader of the group is running a business? They also doing a lot of the cooking a lot of the time. That's a part of the thing so it's like I don't even think that he's a good chef because i. I was making this comment on twitter the other day. He's making chicken cutlets for appetizers like he doesn't even really know but he knows that he's supposed to go through the motions. Making chicken cutlets for appetizers say I very waspy Texan No. I don't think there's anything wrong with it. I think it just sort of like. I think he's trying to throw everything in like. I don't think there's any real idea about what the dinner is. I think he's a I'm cooking. I'm cooking picking on my brother. He's trying to be the boss and I think it's a frenetic thing like when he was. I'm just gonNA throw these chicken cutlets in there too. It's like I don't think there is a plan and I feel like there's a an element of that that I really liked him now. Play acting what it was like to be in charge and is like. Oh if I'm in charge and I'm making dinner picking up my brother and I'm running this con- and I feel like there was a part of that to it so I think that kind of answers a little bit of your your issue about why is he all of a sudden WanNa Cook. It's not like he has a love for cooking. It's said he has a love for kind of acting like the boss now like who is. He's running his own game. He's running his own things. So he's like mimicking things that he thinks is right and I feel like that chicken cutlet line is a little bit of a tip of the hat to that. He doesn't quite know exactly what he's doing. He's just trying to do what he saw. I can be open to that. I can be open at that. I wish you could could've burned the chicken fucked it up but I can be what we didn't we weren't there s saw we only saw when they finish and by the way they finished at like eleven o'clock at night which I thought was such a again like pointing at it. It wasn't like the right time for dinner. Like he was trying to do too much. But be that as it. May We had this conversation. But be that as it may be that as I listen Michael Michael Owl's Ab is right about the name joke at the wedding. My Big Fat Greek wedding pulled the same exact joke you know. This is the joke. Where like all of the people of the same name says the same exact joke with this is my brother x y and their children and needed Diana nick and it was better without a narrator. Think you Michael. I've actually never seen my big fat Greek wedding which is starting till I should occur up Greek Orthodox. I think I was kind of resentful of it. Like I never saw it. Either thingy Blah Blah three rights. You know on Goodfellas. I'll never forget a conversation. I heard around the time. This movie came out. A group of Italian Americans were talking and I heard one of them. Say The godfather is we'd like to think we are but goodfellas is who we really are which is an interesting point of view. I think that you know the the truth of that is one is based on real life and the other one is a fictional account about the mafia written by someone who did no real discernible. Researchy no is in broad strokes. You know I I buy that. That's fair and Getty Deuba nut jobs. One-two-three wrote you know the goodfellas up was great. You see Henry would not like sid vicious which is me talking about doing the grand altro. My Way Song is the point of the song of songs that the character would like them or is it for the mood saying that I think my problem with the choice of a sid vicious song that kind of sarcastic said vicious version of my way that the film closes out with is. It feels like that song is supposed to be kind of a kick in the pants. Go Out to the movie theater capita what we've seen it just. Is it going to be these days? Don't have any punk attitude to me. They screw up and they're eightieths but there's nothing. I think that punk rock about Henry Hill so it just kind of like a guest your toward a mood without actually fitting the film at all. Let me it does Absolutely and `isolation joy division nine hundred eighty at Casio Suzuki Right. I think this is an intentional enjoyable. Cartoon stated explicitly by Joe Patchy shooting at the camera and cut to sit vicious punchline. It's Scorsese saying you get off on this year pieces of Shit. I don't mind that point of view I definitely feel like it has some heightened moments in it and it's you know. I think that goes back to the Henry Hill narration. Henry Hill is an unreliable narrator. Think one hundred percent. And I think you see him make bad choices throughout the there my nevermind. Nevermind UH maybe they're just as a piece of we should talk about the grand gift that Marina. Carlson has given all of US Marina. Carlson has made a spreadsheet of the mini films that she enjoys with suggested cocktail bearings. I absolutely adore this idea of like you know special meals special things. It's the thing we're going to do in my house because my entire life sitting on my couch watching movies. So what can I do to make each movie feel a little bit more Special Maria? Carlson already knows this because I squeal her when I opened up her specially of films how happy I was that she had a cocktail for the paper void. That lead Daniels movie that I was talking about that. Was All Nicole Kidman being insane? The gross just grossest John Cusack of all time and her cocktail for that was the Alabama slammer which I had never had so I had to Google it and it turns out that the Alabama slammer is a cocktail made of a few things. It has amaretto slogan in Southern Comfort. It's a concern. Like a seventies bright fruity crazy cocktail. That is known for being like tailgate that the tailgate drink at the University of Oregon. Where are you oh yes I do. This yeah I mean. I don't know if I've drank it but I definitely knew of it. You ask the one. I Object Comfort in my house though. I don't like Southern Comfort. Made me super sick one time and I will never go back. I actually made a drink this week especially cocktail for the movie. Hobbs and Shaw. I had a theory after seeing that. Hobson Shaw was on. Hbo Max Has Like. I wonder if you can make a drink. Combining Ryan Reynolds Gin and the rocks Tequila and I met up with my friend. Who'S A I guess? A spirits Genius Pam was ser and we created a gin and Tequila drink that I thought was absolutely delicious. And you can see that on. My instagram page is a blackberry. Infused Champagne three liquors. It's it's amazing. It's a bramble but a little bit different than a bramble and Tequila. I'm trying to wrap my head around that you would really like it. Follow my tutorial. And you'll see all you need is blackberries Gin Tequila a little bit sugar champagne and lemon and you'll be psyched and I couldn't help but notice that also included a cocktail for best in show the amazing Christopher guest mcenery. So if other people out there are like me thinking about Fred Willard. Winder raise a glass to him and thinking about rewatching best in show in which he shows up in just destroys the whole place. Her for that is a mother's Ruin Punch which I have had. That is wrong like that. And you know while we're talking about people who passed away obviously federally so so sad but also lived a very happy life and was eighty six years old and and seem to digest peacefully in his sleep and that just seems amazing. He was working up until I feel like this whole pandemic started but I was really devastated to hear that Lynn. Shelton passed away Mark Maron did an amazing tribute to her. They were currently together as a couple. And I've worked with Linda a handful of times and always such an amazing Person in addition to being a great writer and director and if you have never seen or heard of her you should watch Hump Day. Sort of trust lag as There's so many great pieces of her work all over the over the place and she's directed some of your favorite episodes of TV too but just an amazing director who passed incredibly Too early I mean. She was fifty four Just tragic absolutely tragic I. I second that home days. One of those films where the first Semalaysia at this thought who had the guts to make this. You are incredible. Yes she's a really cool. She was a really cool lady and we didn't do a call to action this week. We didn't have anything because played house party last week. And I hope you enjoyed our house party episode. We did a really fun clue episode which is up right now on youtube if you missed that. It's very interactive Casey Wilson. Rob Hubel Mike Handford Jamie Dembo. So many people pop up in that episode and it was such a blast doing these. We're going to take off Memorial Day because Memorial Day but then we'll be back the week after that with the brand new episode and should we tell people we're going to be doing amy. Let's do it. Let's do it all right. We are going to be doing coming to America. That's right we're GONNA do a little bit Eddie Murphy. Which I'm so happy about you know how I feel about any Murphy And so what are we doing coming to America? Our next unspoiled Pool Party. And if you can't wait if you can't wait until that to see Amien I maybe the next best thing and look. I'm very hard pressed to replace amy anyway. But I'm going to be I ain't GonNa be hosting a live. Watch of galaxy quest with Griffin Newman. Who's been on our show before and Griffin You know him from his great podcast blank. Check and we are raising money for the Motion Picture Fund. This is the fund that helps actors directors who are older especially this time of crisis. So we're going to be doing this. Live event on Friday may twenty second starting at four fifty five Pacific Time watching galaxy quest having costume contests. It's really fun it's like it's like a screening room meets. Zoom Room. It's on this platform called SIA which is Cya dot live see alive and you'll see griffin and I chatting all things galaxy quest. This Friday may twenty second. You can look on my social media to find out how to get there. But it's four dollars and all that money is going to the motion picture fund which is very important Organization to raise money for always important. That's so cool. Yeah so that's what we got going on amy. It's time for us to revisit David Lean. Are you ready? Oh Am I ever. I got my sweatpants on Limbered up we have another ethic. Let's talk about it all right. Let's or think you actually mean. Let's on Spool it now. I didn't may not but keep trying it. The year is one thousand nine hundred fifty seven. Toyota debuted their first car sold in the US. It's called the toyopet crown in Little Rock. Arkansas nine black students dared to seek an education despite outrage from citizens and even the National Guard future astronaut John Glenn sets the transcontinental speed record the USSR launches sputnik one and Sputnik to the bladder contains the first animal to enter space. A dog named Leica and she was a very good girl. Amy You actually are big fan of like a huge fan yet. Like was a stray that they took from the streets of Moscow. They figured that she had to choose a tough woman that they thought could really handle the training. She's a complete bad in the saddest thing. Oh sorry to depress people at Star this big lake and not about like posters all over my house like and Belka Unstuck Belkin Stroka. You got me started. I've seen the texture made Them but yet the last weekend of like life one of the engineers who worked on on the ship took her to his house. Let her play with his kids. It the first time like ever went to a real house and was treated like a pet and then they blasted off into space and she died. Oh what's the end? We'll bring you down on that note anyway. And then t fifty. Seven audiences are watching around the world and eighty days jailhouse rock twelve angry men in today's film the bridge on the river. Kwai that ranks number thirty six on the two thousand seven Af. I top one hundred list down a lot since its original ranking of number thirteen. This movie was thirteen on the top. One hundred list. You hear disdained voice. We'll get into that in a second. Let's play a clip. Knows if we can return by this rule or whether we could find you if we did deny shoes joyce I wouldn't hesitate to leave you know that he doesn't know it but I do. You have your own mother here. Rules Call Fort. He'll go on without me. That's an older income on shares. I WanNa to that order. You make me sick with your Roy says stench of death about you. You're carrying your pack like the plague explosives and L. Pills. They go well together. Don't they? With which do one thing or the other destroy a bridge destroy yourself. This is just a game this war you will not Colonel Nicholson. You're two of kind crazy with courage for what out of died like a gentleman by the rules when they only important thing is how to live like a human be amy. Who's in it? What's it about the River Kwai? It is the story of a group of prisoners of war have been taken captive by the Japanese during World War Two. They are asked to help build a bridge to be part of this gigantic railroad that Japan. The Japanese army wanted to build to reach all the way up to India On the Japanese side representing the Japanese military. You have the Great Classic Massive Silent Sex Symbol Sesame Hirakawa As Colonel Saito and then on the English and American side. You Have William Holden face. We have seen it nonstop throughout this process as the American Lieutenant Commander Shears and you have Alec Guinness as Lieutenant Colonel. Nicholson one the RARE FICTIONAL. Nicholson's I have to admit my heart fluttered a little bit. My name is not usually a character named but he is the British officer who believes very much in the rule of Law Geneva Convention despite most evidence being everybody could give a flying about it. Well by the way you said Nicholson is a rare name. I felt whenever they were saying shares. I perked up so it really was cheers film. Yeah I think about that when I mean it's not the same we're united but there is a little bit of a connection there number one now. The Nicholson and Sheriff Phil. This is it this is this is our movie. This is that we've done it. I. There's so much to talk about in this film. It's an epic. David Lee directed it. Sam Spiegel produced Sam Spiegel again. Another person we've talked about a lot as a very hands on producer and seemingly from all. My research seems to be very hands on this but in watching this film I found it to be incredibly basic. Nothing that that's bad but it's a very kind of simple film. What what do you think about it? We have been. Let's talk about what we have happening here right in this. You have the Japanese officer who is under a deadline like he has to get this bridge built by a certain day on his calendar and if he does not get a bill his brought such shame upon himself that he knows he has to commit How to carry this man obeying the orders that he needs everybody else spend was obeying different orders principles that said that suit them you know. Nicholson very much believes in this British rule of law where it's a gentleman gentleman are in the army and if we all just follow the letter of the law surely believe that officers aren't entitled to Work Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah and. Then you have. Of course the American being the American who only looks out for himself and his like I'm a giant cynic. None of this means anything. Even life means anything. I mean you get this really sense of his point of view so early on in the film when he's burying yet another of the prisoners of war have been the camp with them and this is how he treats the funeral relies forgotten just bury Thompson S Corp. Herbert Thompson serial number zero one. Two three four five six seven violent member of the king's own the Queen's own or something died of Berry Berry in the year of our Lord Nineteen forty-three the Greater Glory. Of did he die for not come off at no need to the grave. The grave piece found little enough of it while he was alive. I with you Paul. I expected this movie. This is I hadn't seen before either. I expected this movie to be one of those John. Wany good guys. Bad Guys. Prison escape kind of movies and I guess I should have been clued off by the sign of of William. That bridge over the required is actually not that far away from something like Dr Strangelove that it's a movie all about how insane the military is but just done in that kind of straightforward. Here's our mission. This is what happening is happening. We're not making any overt jokes and yet the anger of Dr Strangelove is so all over this film. I was not expecting that. And you know. Here's an interesting clip. I found. It's actually a soldier that was a POW. They're reading from his diary of his time when he was building these bridges so take the appalling. Conditions have made us dangerously thin. We have no BADS INADEQUATE SHELTER. Atrocious Diet and no sanitation. We have lost all our clothes shoes and have taken to wearing our shirts loincloths in almost no time. We have become skeleton men nearly one third of the. Pow's die in captivity. It's I think really kind of fasting because they do actually capture what that camp look like and I think very similarly to the Grapes of Wrath. Really bring into the reality of it yet. It's a lot more cynical than I was led to believe. I thought this was going to be a very patriotic film. About you. Know soldiers teaming up to defeat enemy. And what you really get is a much more internal films the film about soldiers and their struggles with their jobs as soldiers and what they need to do to basically get ahead and and work in a war. I mean I'm calling. It worked. But they have deadlines. They need to keep their sanity. And I even found myself finding connection Saito. You know. It's not good and bad as much as I thought it was going to be. Yeah I agree. It feels like this is a movie that's all about call it quote unquote the principle of the thing and just everybody in the film has a different definition. Of what the principle of the thing is it. William Holden American is like the principle of the thing is I would like to stay alive and I would like to go home and I am sick of this whole war. This war is stupid. Scientists principle of the thing is I've been given order and I have to follow my order and Nicholson is such a fascinating cut. It feels like I'm talking about myself. Nicholas not fascinated because his principal is is so gentlemanly and so courtly and he so logical about it and so calm and explaining it and he's like oh no. I will be locked in a hot box willingly. If we're going to follow the principles of officers are not supposed to work. I'm willing to be locked in a hot box to have all of my men pass out. Or maybe even risking machine guns standing so I don't have to break the Geneva Convention and his principal the thing winds up being so self that he decides he's going to build the best bridge for the Japanese. That is logical system of like following. What a gentleman would do in war means well if I have to build a bridge for the enemy. I'm going to build them the best bridge. That's GONNA last for sixty years but it also speaks to the idea of you know Stockholm Syndrome right to a certain degree. It's sort of like he. I believe starts to align and find purpose in being a POW like the only way that he can get through. This is by giving himself a task and doing the best job at it because I think it keeps them saying I think when you look at cheers you're talking about a similar character. Who is getting through by lying midway through the film that you know he is kind of a soldier was valor. You know he's not who he says he is. He's not a little bit of maneuvering by the way he also escapes and the two people he escapes with they get killed and he just kind of moves forward and we're seeing him on a beach enjoying drinks like he he really has it you know. He's kind of made his own not excuses but justifications to be able to live in this war and live with his own decisions in this war so I I found that point of view to be fastening in the same way I could also say about site. Oh like Saito doesn't want to give in to Alec Guinness his character but then like using that data the Japanese battle against the Russians to justify releasing him from the hawks because he clearly lost but he can't admit that he lost and he doesn't really want to kill them. They there's so many internal politics going on with these characters that that was really fascinating And I think the movie just gets really driven down to one scene. Which is the blowing up of the bridge. But there's so much more kind of their before that. Yeah the jockeying for power in control between the different characters in the film. It really kind of just boiling it. Down to the jockeying for power. Between Nicholson and Saito. You know the way that Nicholson is. I have to keep my men in order and they have to leave the. I'm in command. Even though he is not the one with the machine guns and like the length is willing to go to to try to make men believed that still reigns even though he's not he does not have the power and the way he gets power from sight so and how Saito has to exactly try to save face and figure out excuses for the fact that it's okay. I'm allowing you this power now. It's my choice to give it to you. And it kind of isn't we're let at the beginning of the film. Beshir's to think that site so is this bloodthirsty killer is like most men. Here you know if they don't deny die of diseases they die of Saito and so we're built up to the city he gives you bet that first speech you hear from sites. Let's listen a little bit of that deal about the scape they know. Bob Dwyer know what style are not necessarily be on an island injured Deng rule. It's you so you're set up at the beginning of the think we're watching something like. Oh what was the Lena? Joe Lead Japanese prisoner of war movie for a few years ago. Do you remember the One? Oh yes it was yes. It was unbroken right. I'm broke yeah are unbreakable or unbroken those that you your setup you're thinking you're GonNa Watch one of those jingoistic military movies about how the Japanese or cold and bloodthirsty and yet site. Oh we have scenes of him crying alone. We have seen some trying so hard to get. Nicholson to meet him halfway. I mean one of the things that David Lean said about about the characters and I'm using his words in one of his words is very dated on cool But his point is more sophisticated on the word daily Lane said. I don't WanNa say that Saito is an uncivilised little oriental. I want the colonel to say he wants Nicholson to say he wants the audience to see him as another human being that he's almost trying to train late. The character of Saito so that you see. Nicholson be racist to him. And Nicholson think like anything he can do. I as a British man can do better but lean is trying to kind of twist that around and make the audience realized that the colonel is wrong and racist and that Saito Psycho isn't so bad he's just a man who you wanted to be an with jal in London doing his job exactly. I think what's so interesting is that these characters are actually based on real people. The Colonel Psycho in the film comes from Major. Syto who unlike the former was said to be one of the most reasonable inhumane of all the Japanese officers and Lieutenant Colonel Tuesay who's the basis for colonel. Nicholson respect the site of so much that he spoke up on his behalf. At the war crimes tribunal after the war effectively saving site. Oh from execution. So you see this. I can tell that lean wanted to at least acknowledges kind of mutual respect or you know. 'cause they're both soldiers doing their best at being soldiers to a certain extent. It's because sometimes I think win win a war like this happens. People can't really help where they're born and the little choices that make you do things that then become evil. I mean because I'm not at all saying that. The Japanese were nice during world. War Two on the whole. They did a lot of horrible stuff. Oracle Seth especially there. I mean in building the the Real Life Ridge. This is based on which is really to bridges. I think they killed something. The estimate is like eighty to a hundred thousand. Just of the local civilian population in another thirteen. Thousand are another thirteen thousand people from the allied. So it's it's not a question of good but there are individual men in there who are just like I. It's it's so easy to demonize on a large level and this makes a point of humanizing on the individual level and at this time in our culture. It's very I think. A very unique point of view to tell this story and I think we talk about that with Lawrence of Arabia. Obviously we've talked about that in platoon and this idea of like war is something that no one really ultimately wants to run towards. But when they're there how do you justify the person you have to become right and the person that you are and this movie is very subtle about about that but I really think that that's like to me the most interesting thing about this movie? Is that idea of that battle? Showing the emotionality that you carry with it and and seeing how you know. Alec Guinness at a certain point is so focused that he's stopping to look at his own soldiers and take care of his own soldiers because his ego is. I need to do the best job as my soldiers. These willing to take wounded and six soldiers out to finish this bridge just because his own ego needs it to happen. That's British are the best. Yes and site does like if I don't finish bridge and time I'M GONNA kill myself so you really have. It's it's this grandiosity in in or I should just say narcissism mean there's there's something about these two characters are incredibly narcissistic And and of course. There's there's a I think a mutual respect because of that. You know you can do better. Yeah like not having seen this movie before I really WanNa journey with this. Nicholson character of you. Know there is like are noble hero standing there like abiding by the principles Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah and. Then when he starts sitting down and like Saito is can I feed you food love a-block and I tell you a little about my story of my life and you see Nicholson become so cold. I mean that senior site is expanding. Let me tell you I will have to kill myself. When you hear Nicholson's voice. In this year he basically says like go ahead. Let's listen you'll know what will happen for me? If the bridge the entire I haven't the foggiest. I'd have to kill myself. What would you do? If you're mean I suppose if I were you I'd have to kill myself. I mean in that scene. I was so I suddenly went from. This movie is okay to Oh. That's such a compelling thing I suddenly was angry at. Nicholson and I was glad this movie. Let me take me on that path. Well also think what is kind of fascinating in doing. My research on this is that this is not a script that came easy to anyone. This is not a script that everyone loved to have that kind of nuance and scripted. Seemingly was rewritten and rewritten and rewritten lean hated Carl Foreman's original version of the screenplay and he asked Norman Spencer to come in write. A new treatment then formed rewrote the script. But then Sam Spiegel is unhappy with that finished product and ask Calder Willingham to come in and rewrite that and then lean was unhappy with his work. And then Michael Wilson was brought in to work with lean on the script and they don't know how much willing contribution was in the final script and that's not even really determined and then I mean the scripting issues of this movie are really interesting because The two credited screenwriters were blacklisted in Hollywood and their names were taken off the film They've recently been replaced on the film but when it won the Academy Award. They gave it to the author of the novel. Who Was French? Didn't speak any English. Downright any of this didn't write any of script but just was the basis of the book is a writer who I absolutely love I mean. Did you catch? That writer wasn't what else he did. Appear Boulet I don't know what else he did. No I only you're GONNA be able to picture these cuts as soon as I say after this whole thing with bridge over the river bridge on the river cry. He won the Oscar for this. Are Our man Pierre. The original novelist wrote planet of the. Oh that's where I know with that name. Okay yes yes it. Don't you sound a little bit of the planet of the apes in this like this idea of man's inhumanity man in a setting? That's just harsh and people are being put in cages and there's people who think one rule of law is is extreme and then it's like what happens when two people with two different systems of belief clash well it makes sense because plate of the apes is a POW movie. I mean it is a prisoner held in a very hostile and in a weird way. I kind of feel like it's directly the same movie you know without the bridge In in some respects yet like piecing these two movies together being a person who loves apes the original so much I had not realized I I feel like an idiot. I never looked into peer before. Pierre was a real POW like he was in the military and he was captured and he actually did two years of slave labor in the Mekong during World War. Two and so he came out and he was really purging. These ideas and putting them in and you know he was a French person In the military of course and he felt very touchy about the perception of the French. At the end of the war you know there. Was this whole thing like. Oh the French collaborators and the British would always look down on the French for being collaborators in World War Two for having the vichy government is actually the bishop government. Who helped arrest him and put him in prison. So he was fan of the collaborators either but he was so irritated by this perception that they gave in in. This country became a country collaborators. That that's what he put into this movie. He showed a British person using their logic to become collaborators to show those steps to really be like have empathy for the kind of position. A person gets put in. Well I think what you said earlier in the podcast is right. We are looking at war through the Lens of this group did this and at the end of the day there's a individuals there and what we're finding. I think a lot of the Times is that yes. Individuals were conflicted about having to do what they need to do. And we see that in platoon. I think that you know. So that's written. Obviously someone who served in Vietnam one of the first pictures that was written by someone who is there and not just wanting to be there or you know fantasizing about what it was like to be there and you have peer boulay. Who is the same way? I'm telling the story of the people that I know and I think that that's why those two movies feel so much richer because they lose a little bit of the the Hollywood Good Guy Bad Guy Rah Rah Rah patriotism and kind of show you what war is which is people having to do follow orders. I mean follow orders and that's it and if you don't follow orders their consequences and I'm not saying that you'd have to follow orders finally when you're in the service you've made that agreement to a certain extent exactly especially if you in the service at a time where you're getting drafted. I mean we've talked about this a ton of times on the show. Paul there are so many war movies on this list. There's to me too. Many were movies on this list however as putting them all together. I appreciate that the war movies on this list are for the most part really complicated about the cost of war. We don't have a lot of ro ro we the best thing. Those guys suck movies on the list. All of them are getting at the same point. Were is madness and to be even to even just exists as a figure in war even if you don't even survive through it even if you die in the middle of it means participating in madness that's the point of Mash. That's the point of. There's a touch of that. I would say in in Saving Private Ryan. Maybe not as much I feel like saving private almost safer than the rest of them. But that's definitely the point of Dr Strangelove it's just there over and over again. It's an platoon. You cannot go to war and emerge a clean soul. I do think though that when you're dealing with a very complicated issue like this I feel like mash is a flawed film. I feel like platoon is a flawed film and And you know I. I think there's something about. Can you tell the story and all make a great film? I don't know if I think bridge on the river. Kwai is worthy of being at number thirty six or definitely number thirteen. I think that this movie probably is up there because of that bridge scene. It's an iconic scene but I feel like there. There are things about this movie while really good that she'll incredibly bloated too. Because I was thinking during those what. I'd rather have cool hand. Luke on this because that's something movie also about being a prisoner and and wanting to fight back and fighting gets a system. It's a different movie. Great escape much more of a big Hollywood. That's the raw raw raw movie. It's fine. It's hard to find that balance. I think saving private Ryan probably comes the closest to being a really capable film that has these moments and I would also put on that. Probably Schindler's List as well as another movie that is dealing with more complex themes but then also a compelling film. Hey everybody let's take a break from the show for just a second to talk about today's sponsor which is a new spotify original. Podcast called son of the Hitman. So let me tell you a little bit about it on the morning of May Twenty Ninth. Nineteen seventy nine as he left his townhouse a US district judge named John H. Wood junior was shot dead. He was the first federal judge to ever be assassinated in. Us At the time it was called the crime of the century. The hitman implicated in that murder was Charles v Harrison but that is just the beginning of the story. Yeah crazy if you are true. Crime podcast nut as I assume many of us are. This is going to be absolute brand new obsession because what is going to happen in this. True Crime Series is going to blow your mind. I mean when they start doing the present day investigation into this murder. The people who start coming up our people like Charles Harrison who you might know that last name because he is the father of Woody Harrelson Woody. Harrelson's dead is a figure in this new podcast. There is a lot in this story that has never been shared in the media before and does about to get crazy. The person who is taking you through all of it is host and journalist Jason Kavanagh. He is the guy who's going to be at the helm helping you. Investigate the mini allegations against Harrelson is Harrelson. Murder IS WOODY. Harrelson said a Hitman. Don't done like this. And this podcast is going to go deep. And even maybe show connection into the assassination of JFK. Son of the Hitman is a spotify original podcast. You can listen to the series for free only on spotify so check out son of the Hitman. Only on spotify amy. I kind of feel like I have to reveal something to you about myself. Even tell me anything ball. It's it's a pretty big secret. I I love movies. I don't know if you are the same way. Are You amy? Just telling. Do you have movies? I never meant to say this rabbit. Yes I totally love movies. Gosh well guess what amy. You are not alone because you know who else loves movies. Oh IMDB yes. I am deeply loves movies. That's why they are launching. Its first ever podcast movies. That changed my life and this is actually so much fun. Movies that changed. My life is a weekly series featuring celebrities and filmmakers discussing movies that inspired them and you're gonNA launch their careers. We talk about that a lot in the show like how you know you see something in these films that other directors were inspired by in their later works. It starts to draw this line of inspiration to final project. I really love how this podcast bring celebrities to that point man. I wish I'd asked me to be on because if I was on I would absolutely talk about Edward Scissorhands. I think that's the movie that really showed me. Who had director was? I was able to put together directors. And what they looked like what they did what they brought to a film. But it's not me and I don't mind because I have a lot more cooler cooler cooler guests on. They've got Jeffrey Right. They've been Joel McHale. They've got my girl Judy. Greer FELICIA Day. Kevin Smith. I mean it's amazing and each episode gives fans like you and meet people who love movies. A unique an intimate look honestly into their favorite stars live to the lens of their favorite films. So if you like our show I think you're gonNA like this show because I think it shares his DNA about passion and creativity and also inspiration. We talk about. Oh I wonder if so and so was inspired by this and here we actually are finding out. Oh they actually were inspired by that. And I think it's an intimate look. That doesn't feel like they're just selling the movie that they're making. It actually feels like we're getting to know. The person has an artist and creator movies that changed my life hosted by the IMDB shows Ian Deborah and new episode every Thursday wherever podcasts are found including spotify apple podcast Google podcast and IMDB dot com slash podcast. Right but seriously I to be call me. Movies changed my life to you know. Come on could amy on there talking to you about it. I'm loving talking about these characters. In the moment of it was like it just felt more loaded than it needed to be. It's two hours and forty minutes Not that I judge movies by the length of time but it didn't show the story with worthy of that amount of time. The story is very simple to me. I agree I think there's something in the fact that we're doing bridge over the river. Kwai after Lawrence of Arabia when they're made in the reverse order Lawrence of Arabia. David liens follow up to require which also has Alec Guinness has this scope. That feels more like it. Deserves to be in epic. You're all of that space you. I am happy to fill up the space of that movie in a way. That bridge of the require doesn't to me like I know it's early in the episode to be doing this but since we are talking about our our war list of things I would be very happy if what we did on this list is. I would be happy just having Lawrence getting rid of quiet. Altogether to be honest. I'd get rid of quiet. I'd get rid of platoon. I get rid of Mesh Because at least re river requires making their points without just being a bunch of dicks and I would of course put in on the fourth July which I think is fantastic and I feel like I could be pretty much at peace with that. I have to Rewatch born on the fourth of July. I haven't seen it in quite some time But I think based on what we were talking about it definitely shows that other side and I think it has that element that we really loved about. the best years of our lives. You know this kind of dealing with the after effects of this because they think what we're showing right now. A lot of this is how it affects people in the moment and and there are some really beautiful things in this film but it does kind of like scope to it. It is and I think the moment that were getting that that really pop in this movie are a little few and far between That's a great performance and the performances are really great. William Holden. You know thinking about William Holden. I'm like why does he get the respect of Jimmy Stewart? Because he's in these giant classic films but I don't think he's on the tip of people's tongues as like one of the great actors of this era yet. He has about as many films on this list as what as Deniro does as as cary grant as Jimmy Stewart slightly more. But he's other here. We saw him in sunset boulevard already We saw him in Dr Strangelove. I think we've of again. The he's he's everywhere on this list. But you're right. We don't think of him at the top of our list thing. Let's say like who are the actors who define the list and yet when he made bridge over the river bridge? I keep going to keep calling a bridge over the river. Kwai I don't know why just because over and on in the same thing now and up straight but he was the highest paid actor in Hollywood like to have William Holden in your movie. Nineteen fifty seven was like. Whoa. I think he had a contract where he had. It might have as much ten percent of the box office. Gross in this being the number one of that year William Holden made bank on this film and you know and you we talk a lot about how these big stars were and apparently a lovely guy like he. I arrived on set. Everyone's like oh my Gosh David. Lean is the worst. We hate him and they said that he took on this persona of like a sports coach and basically got everybody excited about what they were doing in the movie. They're making and seemed to be the the real leader for. I think what you need sometimes on a film like this when you have a director like David Lean. Who is exacting and trying to get everything and like you said it's not the scope of Lawrence of Arabia but yet it is a massive film. I mean the bridge in modern day cost was two point eight million. They really built a bridge across two hundred fifty thousand back in the day. But that's two point eight nine our money. They've really blew it up we with a train. Yeah it's crazy. Yeah and the first time they tried to blow it up. It didn't even. They didn't even do it. They had this whole safety protocol. We're all of the different camera. Men who were stage at different points of the of the Bridge. They were supposed to hit recorded than run to safety when they ran to safety. They're supposed to turn on a light that let David Lean. No they were safe. The last guy forgot to turn on the light so as as train was coming. David leaders like that's one night to three lights. The V one's not on. We can't blow up the that we can't blow up the bridge. We can't do it so they had to reset back up the train. They lost a whole day all of the VIP's who came to watch the train blow up didn't get to see it because of the one man who caused them so much money which I can weirdly relate to. I enjoyed that. I talked about it when we did our When we did raiders of the last dark I went to that shot for shot remake in on the last day of shooting. We're supposed to blow up the German plane. I was watching them. Redo the scenery like German guy head in the propeller Blah Blah Blah Blah. The plane India runs away part of the movie. That doesn't actually have to be in the movie at all and the very last day. We're all sitting on his hill waiting to watch this airplane blow up nervous as hell because the guy who was in charge of blowing up the airplane was just putting in like C. Four in dynamite and he was some dude users some dude from Mississippi being like I got it. Put it all in. They ran away. The indeed the indicator ran away. It didn't blow up. We were all just like what's what's happening. People started burst into tears. Everybody started crying and the guy was like all hold on. I'll fix it wandered up childlike kick. Things hit things and it blew up and he did a somersault backwards and everybody lost their mind. You went unconscious conferences so I was thinking about that reading about the trade. That's even on a bigger level man. You've been out here in the jungle for eight months. This is your eight month. I was GONNA lose my mind after being in Mississippi for two weeks I mean I think that they do a great job of even parroting things like that and tropic thunder the opening sequence. Where they're like just blowing up everything in the field like this whenever you have a film set around explosives. It's such a nerve wracking experience. And then when you have somebody like James Cameron or David Lean. It's going to be ten times harder. Because they're gonNA want those close ups I imagine you know in Was it nineteen forty two. That just came out like the same idea like they want this realism. And so it's the tensions are that much higher And by the way when when the bridge didn't blow up the reason why they lost much money because the train went over and then crashed because they didn't build enough. They didn't build enough runway for because it was never supposed to go over the bridge and come back. It was blow up so the train crashed Which is crazy but this movie. I think you all the imagery. Is that bridge blowing up and there's something about it too. Which is kind of it makes me laugh because this is a fictional film based on a real life event like there were a few W.'s. That were forced to build a bridge. It didn't happen over eight months and happen over two years And those bridges I don't think we're really ever destroyed. Aren't destroyed like this by the way still go visit them. There's a steal one and a wooden one. You know it just sort of like all right. So they're creating this thing and they're they're wrecking the final act because really the the movie breaks into two halves when they get shears to come back because he knows the location of the bridge. He's kind of running this mission impossible unit To essentially take down the bridge. But you know it so I was even looking at old posters of. They're letting you know like when you come you're going to see a bridge explode and I almost found it to be. Maybe I've seen it too many times in like you know. History of film retrospectives anti climactic. But then I did some research and I saw that there is a UC or UCLA. Film School Class. That William Holden was doing the intro for the film on and he's narrating the making of the film and they show it and their to the film class like now the movie about the see. Now this is how we directed this scene and they show the exposure of the Bridgman. Oh this is their. This is their signature moment. This is their signature piece. And I don't know how you feel about that to have the climax of the film or the reveal I mean I guess. The movie is more than that but it also isn't more than that because it seems like. That's the price of admission to see this bridge blow up. Yeah and then the movie ends. Yeah it is. It's hard for be to imagine it being such a showstopper moment because we've seen this already in the general I mean when you like the bridge and the trombone up in the general movie that you know happened. What forty years before? That's not even a thirty five years before this. That's incredible you're like they did all of that in the silent era buster. Keaton happen so honestly now the sound like a jerk. But I'm like you see one train. Enbridge blow up. Kinda seen them all but no. I felt the same way. Look I'm way more blown away by what I saw on intolerance then or you know or even what we saw in them Murnau film then what was going on here okay. It wasn't even like a cinematic exciting explosion like you know I'm thinking about bringing up a lot of course but like even die hard takes time in the oceans of the buildings in the things it's like and that's a very simple you know you're not bringing a building down to the ground but you know there are. I've seen a lot of explosions and they're just shot. I think better than this. I rewound it actually twice because was like missing like like like I was watching credit. You with my son today and I happened to walk in at the very end. When Daniel does the crane move and emotionally? I connected that sort of welling up and like Oh the music and the and the way they photograph it. It's they really build to a crescendo. And I just didn't like I don't know maybe I'm being too hard and I just didn't feel that you know you're hanging your hat on this one moment and I would say it was fine fine moment like get like Ben Hur. The chariot scene. That's great I would never say anything bad about that. That seen lives up to it all this particularly but now I mean I'm Kinda with you like the most tens moment of that sequenced a whether where they're trying to the bridge to me is just when you have a. Nicholson on the actual bridge looking down. Feeling proud of the bridge that he's building and you you wonder if he's going to spot the wires intern in his own British. Yes countrymen like whoa silently beyond that emotional tension is is so much better than the actual explosion and then that fight in the water as they're about the cut the wire and they and they attacked the Japanese soldier and then the idea that moment where Nicholson is like. Oh my God who am I and you have this moment where he has to destroy the thing he built and I love that I mean that is. You can't get better than that. It's sort of like. He just realize he's been brainwashed or he he sees what he's been doing and you have missed weighed yourself. Yeah and by the way. I WANNA give a little bit of props to David. Lean like he did not like this bridge destruction seen by the way he didn't want it this way but you don't have many chances to book the bridge so he had one time to do it and he really wanted it so it would topple towards the camera taking the train with it but there are like the Sam Spiegel's like that's too risky. You can't do it so the bridge does just of sink look good enough. He says but it would have been wonderful to see the whole bloody thing Keel over with a moving train on top of it and I and I do agree with it that that must've been a as a director you really want to. Your home movie is building to this. And you don't even get it to shoot at the way that you want Let Sam St Louis. So nervous I think like what I what I read. Sam Spiegel was on tranquilizers that day he was like this is going to be a nightmare. My God this show right up to the hospital in Lawrence of Arabia. I guess if you're working with David Lean yes like I mean. This seems like member when we were talking about apocalypse now a mother another movie that I think is very much in this vein of like. Here's what seems like a aerobic act in the name of war is it here was in what is heroism. Let's go on this journey into the jungle of madness. We talked so much on that film about how Francis Ford Coppola was like. I'm going crazy. I'm going mental. Everybody has to get in my head. Space let's go nuts together. I was thinking how much of that was influenced by Francis. Ford Coppola Wind be like David. Lean making this movie making of this movie. But he's talking about how David Lean is going insane on people. Everybody hates him by the end of the film. Nobody wants to talk. David Lean because he's being such a crazy psychopath he's like we gotta do this hard. We got it is me. He literally your. There's that moment in the film where I love it. Where Nicholson is talking about his life. You standing on the bridge. The bridge is mean talking about his life. Listening to that loaf. India wouldn't have had it any other way times. Suddenly you realize you're near the end in the beginning wonder ask the total of your life represents difference being that in time made to anything of it made no difference at all really in comparison with other men. I don't know whether that kind of thinking a healthier but I must admit I've had some salts on those lines from time to time. Is it okay? That's beautiful and right at the end of it Lena's like okay. We got it and this is what he says. Now you can all fuck off and go home you English actors thank God. I'm starting work tomorrow with an American Holy Shit by the way I want to give props in that scene because Alec Guinness actually screwed over David Lean that scene. Because there's that moment where he kinda turns and the Sun is coming down into captures his face like David. Lean wanted it to be on his back. The entire time and apparently Guinness waited kind of procrastinated throughout the day. To Get the light right so he kind of was able to create that moment. And it's a beautiful shot like the sun coming down and this face glows. So there's a lot of tit-for-tat here best here. I mean it seems a bit kind of revenge. Apparently Win David. Lean sat down with Alec Guinness to tell him about. Colonel Nicholson Guinness. Thought that he was kind of a funny character. He was like he's going to be a little bit comedic. He's going to be a little bit big N. Lean was like no way. Like if you and I were having dinner with him right now you would find him. A Complete Bore and Alec Guinness is like well if you think you want me to play a boring character. I'm just going to quit and he really wanted to quit already. I'm Kinda shocked. They decided to work with each other again. Because attention on the set seems insane. I mean all of the British actors where like this is an anti-british film rolling surfaces the pro one like the British. They build this bridge. They're great in the British people like this foam is making fun of the British people in our decorum saying are decorum is useless. And that WHO? We are as psychopathic in the case of the the crazy guy who just wants to blow everything up or self self self proper. I guess to the point of being self defeating. I think the the issue is like they show the British basically following letter of the law so much. So that helping the enemy right where it's claimed that the actual general are the kernel that alchemists character is based on you know was secretly sabotaging at the entire way like he was bringing termites to the bridge. Do you know to make sure you know you like the showed him so blindly following. But I think that you need you need to show that because in the end works the end only works if he's blind to what he's doing and you know you can't have somebody who's trying to sabotage it to actually sabotage it in the does it. It's so much more fulfilling to see him conflicted. In that moment it is i. I love that scene where he's accused of collaborating where. Nicholson being asked by his own commanders. Like if you are building the best bridge possible. Who side are you really on almost except in times when I don't understand you at all I'm trying to make myself fast? The fact is what we're doing could be construed as collaboration with the enemy. Perhaps even as treasonable activity are you all right. Can we have prisoners of war? We have the right to refuse work. I understand that must be worked so well must build them a better Bridgeton. Negative built themselves. If you had to operate on Utah would you do your best or would you let him die to see this battalion? Disintegrate in idleness would you have said that? I can't do a proper job. Don't you realize how important is to show these people that they can't breakers embody take a good look? One day of the war will be over. I hope that the people who use this bridge in years to come we'll remember how it was built. And who built not a gang of slaves but soldiers of British soldiers kept on even in captivity. Just go to find a lot to learn about. The army makes perfect. There was this insane tension on the set because all of the British people were already sensitive. This was an anti-british film but be lean was being such a dick to everybody that they really became like an US versus them tension on the set then being late. David like you guys are mad at me. I'm going to be mad at you. We're all going to be mad at each other. Because that's how you direct a movie. Anger will by the way you know. David leaned didn't even really want Alec. Guinness David Lean Wanted Spencer Tracy to be the to be that part and they were trying to figure out how to get him in here but Spencer Tracy read it and he was like no no. No you'd part has to be played by an Englishman. You have to do that and I think the movie would have been a little bit different and maybe even confusing if it wasn't played by an Englishman but I think to your point about out Guinness like he does play that character in an enduring way. I don't know if it's funny but it has life to it. It's not just an a rule follower. I think there's an energy that performance that feels Specific that's there's something kind of like British schoolboy in him like a naive quality to that character. I can't imagine like a tra- Spencer Tracy working 'cause Spencer Tracy and his heart jaw doesn't really fit whereas you can see Alec Guinness wishing he was just at home reading poetry and his lawn. You know having a cup of Tea. Well you buy that. Al Guinness is like I'm not going to do manual labor that he is by by someone's offended by that and I think there's an energy and maybe there's like you know it's propaganda to a certain extent by Americans will get in there and they'll get their hands dirty and they'll do the thing but there's something so prim proper bridgman being like no no. I'm going to follow the rule of water. And that's something we're going to do. The I liked that distance and it creates such a brilliant character choice. He literally put his life on the line for such an inconsequential thing. I'd rather you kill me then for me to pick up a shovel and this is the same guy who later is trying to tell other people underneath you. So by the letter of the law. He's taking sick people out of the hospital just to do the job it's like. It's a very bizarre point of view. But it's all about that level of order in the caste system which I kind of I think anyone who subscribes to that in the middle of war is a fascinating character. Exactly I mean I love the that was the point of the Geneva Convention that they've picked out if you really the centerpiece of this ethical showdown. It wasn't like you need to be giving us this amount of food. You know something that we can really rally behind. Maybe that maybe that's can be you know it wasn't like you're not letting men get enough hours of sleep. I'm doing this for everybody's health. It was is specifically and the other officers. The other the other posh regiment of this troop will not do Labor. And so it's hard for me to root for them to not do labor even though it's in the Geneva code there's part of me it's like well if you're men were you have to work and so it's a fun trick. I think they play on the audience. That the that's the principal he's fighting on and not something like we need doctors. Well you know I wanted to talk about when we just we kind of just got into before too and the idea of like we always go back to the idea that oh well maybe that when directors hard on you he helps create this moment where you're feeling like you're actually in war. You're not being coddled and you know and then all of a sudden struggling. Yeah I went and trained with these people and if I trained with them I know how to fire a gun and now I am one of them I. I love my bare hands. I'm not just a Panzi actor. Yeah no I mean in that and I think there is this like a lure to justification to why I mean and I think that going through all of this. These war movies are always so interesting and such a psychological balance of bad guys because directors are making these movies about themselves. They're saying it's okay that I treat people like Shit because I am at war making. This movie is war so I can go do this this way. And so you get this kind of perverse This perverse justification is actually coming from such a personal place. It's telling a story about war. It's telling a story about people or are person putting someone in credibly uncomfortable situation for the greater good and I feel like that's David Lean. I think that that is. I think that is Copa in You know I think that I think Oliver. Stone definitely has elements of that. These are people that are pushing people right to the breaking point and I don't think you ever hear that about Scorsese. You don't hear like Scorsese made us. You know eat dirt. I think a lot of great story about Scorsese but there's a different personality that the James Cameron Personality. These this epic people make epochs make war movies because they are. You know avatars war movie. And it's like I don't know there's a key like if you're not in conflict or not ally. The stories that are about conflict were telling and it justifies the enemy. It just the big justify themselves. It's like I am the enemy. I am Saito. You get it you get it though why. I have to be Saito because I have to be thing aren't exactly I really wish. We had more archetypes of directors on this list. There's a person I keep thinking about more and more as a huge gaping hole who's not on this list embarked because you into Af. I David Lynch David Lynch nowhere on the AF Islas and he comes to film through such a more element of collaboration and peace. Like he's in charge is definitely in charge of his sets but it seems as though he's very in touch with the human beings who work on the set as well he. He creates such a different tenor. He is all about like what is uniting us in the universe in at. I don't know if you've ever listened like I started listening to some of his tapes about like transcendental. Meditation which I know. You're good at good at that and I can't take lessons because we're in quarantine but I could do it at home. Yeah but we gotTA CENTER LOOK Amy. There's ways around it. I miss you like like I think the tenants can be pretty easily found out. It's great to have somebody to help you go through it but I mean I learned everything in like two four hour classes. Maybe I'm not doing a full service by that but I think you can you can. There's meditation you can do even nap. Kidnap. I can't nap. I've never been able to nap even when I was a child. Oh an APP I mean. I wish we did have that role model of like the grounded. Peace Maker open-heart director. You know that was an architect. We put forward as a person who also makes really good quality work but like can we. Can I throw at one step forward because I do believe there are directors on this list that are not controversial and that You have a pleasant working environment but are there any war directors that are like that people who are known for ethics in big films? You know I wonder if that's something that they shy away from. I think that this movie went through so many different directors William Wyler Howard Hawks. John Ford All I think high noon and Fred Zinnemann didn't understand the movie. Apparently according to Sam Spiegel like he's a he said like you know he just you know just didn't like get it like You know he he. He didn't understand what he was trying to tell here. And I think maybe this idea of like putting yourself in that position. Maybe this is. These are the people worthy of telling these stories. Is that people who are a little bit. More narcissistic are a little bit more. Get testicle that see things in a very black and white way. See things in a way. Where maybe they're harsh. Actions are justified because the end result is so good at. Maybe that doesn't jibe like you know I for me. I don't know if a war would something that I would gravitate towards but I think other people do percent. Yeah I mean it's interesting that one of the directors who said Yes to making the film Was Orson Welles. That they offered thorson wells and they said yeah. Do you want to direct the bridge on river quiet? You can even act in the river. Kwai and he said Yes to both of these things and then he read in the newspaper. That David Leaner had the job and so he saw I think he saw Sam Spiegel at Kennedy walked over any port ice water on his head. As but. But it's hard to imagine Orson Welles making this film although I might WanNa see his version of it you know. Orson Welles is a person who was not a soldier. You're was was interested in complicated men like citizen Kane. I would love to see somebody with that sensitive touch. Take this on. That'd be interesting and yet you even that ends justify the means thing it doesn't even just extensively and it extends to somebody like speeco like there's this whole story that you know David. Lean was having a lot of problems with his wife. Layla at the time that they are making this layla. Was you know a very sensitive person? And so David Lean was wanting his wife at least to come and visit to kind of check in with each other and make sure they're okay and Spiegel secretly writes a letter to David Leans wife and tells her not to come in when David and finds out about this he gets furious any T. He writes this huge angry letter to to Sam Spiegel. And he's like you're a lousy leader. You're a dictator. You have no respect for human dignity. You have no respect for human development and you believe that the endo is justified the means and he accuses. Spiegel of everything that we just accused him of which he also deserves. It's amazing he didn't even see that parallel. I mean and I think that that's the that's what makes these movies greater memorable. Obviously this movie is incredibly memorable and cherished an but it's also a movie that I wonder how many people have seen recently. It's it's to me. It falls into that category of film. Oh of course bridge on the river. Kwai that's classic you just like you know it's a classic but I don't know if you see it as a classic you know it just sort of a again. We didn't know that much about it. It's it's sort of this outlier. It's a sort of like shepherded in. Of course it's on the list of course and I just don't think in my opinion and I know this is. We've talked about this a couple times. But in my opinion that it's worthy of being in top one hundred greatest films of all time. I think it's a great film. I think it's really amazing. I think what it tells us great. I think we've we've seen versions of this. I think what you said is completely correct. Lawrence of Arabia does this incredibly a better visually end from a storytelling point of view. And I I would even argue from acting standpoint it it. It's just I mean it feels that will be transported to a whole other world. I I don't know how many more stories we need of conflicted soldiers. I'd rather see you know like a cool hand luke on this list. Not that that these are the two that are going back but this movie. I kept on Longing I. This movie made me want to see that because I there's something about rebellion and and war and prisoners of war that that movie like left such a stronger impact on me movie. I think about a lot just for the human spirit the triumph of the human spirit. And I think that that at the end of the day this is a bit about that too I agree I would not even hesitate to take this off the list honestly. I think we covered it. You know I think this emotion is so is so interesting and I think it's covered. I think we we get this. We get the David landing. We get the epic thing. We get Alec Guinness being something. That's The star wars movie on this list when we have Lawrence of Arabia. I don't it. I'm shocked honestly Bridge over the requires in the thirties. I'm shocked that it was over thirteen. Heart why yeah. Thirteen blows my mind but look the solicit also kicked off. You know which is interesting and didn't replace it with a Coen brothers movie. So there's there's some always shocking changes and it's also let's bump stagecoach off the list. Do I think there's sometimes they popularity contest in the just the recognition of the title names? You know to certain extent with an older crew. The only reason side of this film was off. The list is just because I love that we have a movie with Sesay `Akaola who either has largely been forgotten day. He was such a huge star in the nineteen teens. He was so massive. He is considered such a heartthrob. He played kind of like manipulative. Romantic schemers fall under the way of. But you do fall under the sway of the fact that he was such a gigantic heartthrob and yet without this film. I've never heard his voice before because he didn't transition into this island in fact he didn't even get a chance to not transition into the sound era because by nineteen twenty two there was so much anti Asian tension in Hollywood that was beginning to rise that he largely retired early because it was harder and harder for him to have a career and so I love being reminded that when we look at the history of the biggest stars in Hollywood that we had sesame Hirakawa very early on into have him show up and have him imbue this character of Saito. I think maybe part of the reason why audiences loved that character so much able to even love him at the time is because of the love of Ohio and to get to see him on stage again to see him perform it. It's almost I don't even know what to be like like I've tried even think of like an equivalent of an actor that we love to retired way too early and then comes back. You're thirty forty years later. And you're like Oh my God here he is. I mean this is forty years after after. Sessa was making his biggest film in that charge of getting to see him again. I mean it breaks my heart that this was not many for a gazillion Oscars in the only one that it didn't win was for sesame. Hirakawa when I think I would. I would see him deserving and as much as anybody no I mean he was nominated for best bring actor at the Golden Globes and the academy. Awards didn't win either. But he said even that nomination was a highlight of his career KSI felt like he was recognized what he did and I love what he what he does. He retires and he devotes his life to Zen Buddhism. He becomes a Zen master And he wrote an autobiography called. Zen showed me the way. And I just love that it kind of like probably no reason to go back in you know it's like he doesn't need it like he's found enlightenment peace in a in a different thing And I thought that was kind of a beautiful way to you. Know kind of check out. We talked about it. A lot of people checking out On their own terms and a lot of them being actresses but I love that he did it in this way and and kind of found a new spiritual sense and you see maybe this could be your future Amy WanNa do. Tm maybe you should get into Zen. And I mean I actually no I love kind of mentally going back into the nineteen fifties seeing that William. Holden is just the guy who gets paired up with our silent movie greats. You know that you'RE GONNA put William Holden with Gloria Swanson that then you put him again. Necessity Hirakawa. I mean they knew each other in silent era. Hollywood glorious and I guess it's almost like if sunset boulevard is better returning sound matter who wasn't crazy and actually was great and deserved everything. Let's take this break to talk. 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You'RE GONNA go to apartments dot com to find a new space without leaving your place. Visit APARTMENTS DOT com. Find a new space with leaving your place. What'd people think when this movie came out? You know they didn't interesting thing. David Lean win. This movie screened for critics What he did is he was like. I'm not GonNa let any press people in their late right. I will admit press people. We can run a little late. We'RE HOUSTON MOVIE. Starting late so we arrive a little late and then it becomes a sliding scale of lateness of problem So David Lean was very stern. He was like. I'm not even going to lock the doors when the movie starts. I'M GONNA lock the doors five minutes before the movie starts like if you're not here that early you're not coming in to see this movie very serious about it. So a lot of major could showed up late. Didn't get to see the movie but we're too embarrassed to say they were didn't see it because they were late and so when all the early reviews that come out that are raves. Coming out the major folks are like yeah and then they finally go see themselves and also right raise because by then the tone was set. This movie was classic. Everybody loved it immediately. So there's kind of this pressure. Believe at the time to like it almost. Nobody didn't like it. Wow I think that kind of bullying that we've talked about here like you know like forcing forcing someone in is the reason why this movie is is navy. Beloved maybe a little bit more then. It should be like the fact that was thirteen on the list. Yeah it puts you a bit on your heels. I was only able to actually find one. Negative review of it and it was a Lindy Lindsay Anderson from the New Statesman. Who thought the movie was so slight that he didn't even bother reviewing it more than a couple of sentences. It seems like it was a pretty big deal the time like apparently David Lean was aware of this review was really mad at him about this review if became a touchstone which is surprising. Because it's just such short view. It almost seems like okay. Whatever of this is what Lindsay Anderson wrote in the New Statesman? He called it quote a huge expensive chocolate box of a war picture inside of it is perhaps better ironic idea but it takes more than the word madness repeated three times at the end of the film to justify comparisons with all quiet on the western front in the now. He's talking more about the critics being pressured to say the like. He says they'll be saying next at the new. James Mansfield is better than Lubich. So He's just like I. Oh people are just lockstep ing would even going to bother giving us a proper review. That's how I feel about this film and now that I think about it ending it with madness madness madness that's basically planet of the apes they're saying about planet of the Apes it actually tells the story in a more and this is going to enrage them sure some people but a classy way like there's a little bit more metaphor there. There's a little bit you know. There's there's more movie there because I do. I do agree with that. Review IS A. It's slight. We're doing a lot of the stuff. I think we're pulling like basically three or four scenes with some great performances them but they to me it failed. I think there was great flourishes here but it failed to capture me more than Just a Oh it's good. It's good it's fine. You know it's it's just not. I don't know I hate to say it's fine when it's a classic film but it's sort of like it didn't emotionally get me as much as I wanted it to be or as much I wanted it to and I don't know if I'm gonNA mean this tomorrow. But what if we took this off input planet of the apes on I mean? Look I'm a big proponent for putting these movies that are iconic in our world on this list and I think that you know plenty of the is a really beautiful Scifi film I. You know it's yes. It's got some over the top elements to it but I think as all great sci-fi Does it tells you a story and changed specific so you don't have to. You're not looking at yourself. You're looking at somebody else in your learning a little bit more about yourself. Whether it's the way star trek the original series did it to wasn't the best sets it wasn't the best makeup but the actually were showing you something about desires society. I like that. Yeah I mean I think the film is also. It's a complete examination of of society as you're saying and if hierarchy and of of the people that we see as less than human and humanizing them and Ito. Yeah I'M GONNA MOW on this thought a little bit but I do think that maybe part over on the river Kwai has been so elevated is because of it of sort of attempts to redeem the people who were blacklisted. By your once again. We have Carl Foreman writing the very first group to wrote high noon in once again like to be blacklisted. From being mentioned as one of the authors of the script and also Mike Wilson so as to screenwriters which you talked about for a second but it wasn't until the eighties that they were given this honorary Oscar. It was apparently this kind of a lovely story to it. You know lean was never polite about saying that. He didn't think Carl Foreman did anything you know he was always Carmen. Script was garbage and I do kind of believe him and yet there's something really beautiful in you know at the very end of his life. Carl Foreman asking his friend to really petition. The board of the WJ to try to get him his credit for the Oscar to really work on this and apparently they finally had this big meeting with the WG. A and finally on June twenty-fifth Nineteen eighty-four. The wgn was like what yes we're going to unanimously agree that we think. Carl Foreman should get the Oscar and also Michael Wilson for the script we hear bowl did not write the script at all and then the very next day ten in the morning call Kaufman dies. There's something beautiful in. He knew finally he was getting recognition desert or not as and he could like oh so I think there might be something in the guilt that we as an industry feel that also helps raise up bridge over quiet like you're going to do it. We can't honor this film that we should've thanked these guys for more while they were alive. And we apologize for giving into the blacklist and I do love that and I think that there's a lot of beauty here and I really enjoyed this conversation with you and I think the only way for me to end this conversation. I know we have a couple more things to do but is to kind of treat you to something that you always treat me to now. I'd like to introduce you to an animal that has a very close association to this film. Take a lesson you gotten away so bridge over the not even that good. I thought it was very good. Those those a little cockatiel art cockatiels the ones that they live until their eighty and if you buy a Cockatiel you have to have a living will so people know who gets your Cockatiel when you don't know about that but I know that my My stepfather had birds. We add many birds house. And yes it was a big source of contention of our. My mom moved out here to Los Angeles. Who got those birds because they can keep birds in her new place? That was such a good little cockatiel. I loved him. I Love Birds. You don't WanNa get me. Can we just do a podcast on burden intelligence? Because that's what my absolute passions various burden Tiller and and I love that. You picked that clip. Because I actually wanted to talk about that Song. The song that the that the cocktails whistling. It's the Colonel Bogey March And I didn't know this about it but apparently that song you know. They had to whistle it into the film because in nineteen fifty seven. If you heard that whistle you actually knew what the lyrics were in the lyrics? Were Pretty Nasty and you couldn't say them on TV but everybody knew what they were. It's like if I whistle What's really means. Aw I don't know if I whistle to run track or something. Everybody knew what the whistle was in again for that they were not allowed to sing the lyrics. But do you want to hear what the lyrics would have been in during World War Two? Yes Batmobile song or the Batman you know Christmas Song exactly but that means you know those soldiers in the walking into US. I think with the with the weight of with with so much history between it. We just think walking in being Johnson defiant. They they know that they're whistling about Dick's that they're whistling big old. Dick Insult in. That's the secret joke that the Japanese don't understand the film and that me as an audience does not understand in this year man. You know I can't imagine that the simpsons in every year they have done. This show has not done that whistle or done some sort of a bridge explosion gag. Maybe even for the opening. Amy Is there a Simpson's well before we get to that? If that whistle sounds really familiar. There is an eighty s movie. That made it incredibly popular to our generation. Because you know that we've heard this whistle before and one of the major eighties touchdowns. Yes No yes yes. Of course Bro. Benefits Club right earner amy. I'm going to go out on a ledge and say that if you can whistle. You've whistled the song I mean it's in cartoons and movies. It's this is a a whistling song. Yes now we know Dick Song but it's also whistling song. I'll just play a little clip from an episode of the Simpsons called Stark raving dad. Her teeth or big green. She not by the lean a book. I Mr on what so. Maybe the simpsons gets credit for actually knowing that this was supposed to have lyrics all along instead of being the Jonty Cellphone. Ringtone of PLUCKY DEFIANCE. I definitely feel that in a big way while I mean. I've actually enjoyed this conversation a lot. And they think I've found a lot more levels than I initially thought the movie had. I still am conflicted with bitten. Avin changed my mind but But that doesn't mean that this is not a great movie. No I'm not completed all this movies off the list in in my world and yet I am so happy that I watched it. I really thought I was in for like a Gras. We good them bad kind of workum. I was incredibly impressed. I get a a Y. It was big. I don't totally still get. I think why it was the number one box office of that year and yet I'm at peace with it. I'm happy I saw this. I thought it was really fun to talk and think about and now I say farewell to the I can. We can blow up the bridge now. Amy This has been such a great conversation. I think I have appreciated this movie. More talking to about it and I am really looking forward to next week's episode next six episode. We are doing a Tennessee. Williams Classic A STREETCAR. Named desire which I feel like I may have the most familiarity with incense. It's such a big film. It's an iconic film. I think up there with a wizard of Oz and star wars in the sense that we everyone knows that classic Marlon Brando. Scream like Steph. It's I mean that is Stan Which was done so well in the disaster artist when dummy was oh did it as well which is amazing but no. I love the screaming. That scream comes out of a primal want a desire right that moment and I think we've all been kind of trapped in our houses and there's things that we want to do whether it's good movies or go to a bar our friends and we want you in your best Stella Scream to yell something that you really want so you know it could just be like you know it could be CNI. Max Novi whatever you can I d one okay okay by a big Gulp. Put it one squeeze every single different Soda Flavor suicide. I love it aside. You know. Of course of course on the slouch will give us a at unschooled at seven. Four seven six six six five eight two four seven four seven six six six five eight two four and give us your best. Stella screaming about something that you want that you have not been able to get for a long time again. Seven four seven six five eight. Two Four Amy Streetcar. Named desire is available Bernie. Much anybody WANNA get movies and one thing that we ever really mentioned on the show is you can get movies through your local public library and you don't even have to go to local public library. You can actually go online and rent movies. Digitally it's like Apple. Tv But for the public library the so supporting public libraries and watch some of these movies that way as well yeah. It is a tremendous resource and also I can't praise archive dot org enough to if you're a person who also loves to go. Trolling for ancient old silent films are cub. Dot Org is amazing has been filling in the gap as I try to research this book without Being able to go to the library they have so many old books on there that I've just been able to pour through bless you archive dot org library subscription. You can also sign in there and use it. They are the and they're always fundraising so yeah. I love them all right well. We'll see next week. Four Streetcar Named Desire To.

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Geoffrey Horne and the Mysterious Disappearance of a Dreamboat

Here's The Thing

35:17 min | 2 years ago

Geoffrey Horne and the Mysterious Disappearance of a Dreamboat

"WNYC studios is supported by babble a European made language learning program. Babbel's ten to fifteen minute lessons, teach practical conversation in Spanish, French, German and other languages tribal for free by downloading the app or go to Babbel, B A B B E L dot com. Listener supported w in Y C studios. I'm Alec Baldwin. And you're listening to here's the thing. Geoffrey Horne is one of the greatest acting teachers ever to grace his craft his classes, at least Strasberg's acting school just off union square, my alma mater, have made him a legend. But he wants achieved fame of a much broader sweep scoring lead role in David leans war. Epic set in the jungles of Burma bridge on the River Kwai. Lovely. That was nineteen fifty seven and he was twenty five years old. Then he seemed to disappear. Porn had a few roles in the sixties but didn't resurface as a notable actor until the seventies in New York, several wives and children later and having survived and addiction crisis as horns career relaunched Lee, Strasberg, one of the three founders of method acting in the United States asked him to teach some classes. Corn taught me at NYU in one thousand nine hundred seventy nine he traveled a long way from a cosseted an isolated childhood. You were raised in Argentina boring Agentina moved to Cuba when I was five I came to the states to school. I got kicked was an oil. Exac my dad worked for the central company, which is now Exxon yet, a good job were you close to your parents when you were young I'm a momma's boy, more like my mother. My father was more of a go getter. When I was. Yeah, we tyrant. We invited to lunch at. Ernest Hemingway's house an event we went out to lunch there. My father, my mother, and I and we had lunch or this is good. You'll love this. He taught me how to drink out of a book, the Spanish a Gordon thing. Good good thing for future alcohol. Great from the great. And my father was always talking about BMI, man. You got to be a man. And I remember looking at my father and looking at him. And I said, wait a minute. There's only one man in his room and Hemingway was it. Yeah. Actually, I got I I was out in his home and catch him with my mother and his widow, and she showed me where he shot himself. Right. The spot. Oh, terrible. What a man he was. So what a strawberry. You love to Cuba to go to school boarding school a boarding school. Did you go to Millbrook school for boys? And you were there by yourself your parents overseas, they were in Cuba. I felt like a complete avian up here. I remember the first time I met someone that I could talk to and I liked and I put my arm around him like that. We don't do that in America. In cuba. You did that with your friends you walked with your friends with your arm around each other? It was in the wrong school. Did your mom come? Visit you when you were there. No, she came once and everybody in the school got an award. But me, I got kicked out just before graduating your parents stay there. How much longer they remain as day there for years though? My father moved to Venezuela with a different job. My mother remarried they both remarried within three weeks. It sounds grand. But it was sort of difficult mother stepfather. We're staying at the Gotham hotel, which is on Fifth Avenue and fifty fifth street at something else. I forget the peninsula pencil, and my father, and my mother my my stepmother was staying at the Saint Regis across Fifth Avenue. And we went back and forth. My station. I for the whole long weekend short story about you know, it's just sounds too. Rich wasn't your wife keeps saying rich. You're so you are so rich because she grew up poor and ally Bama now, and then I went to Stanford University which was because I had a connection. You know, who my first edition was with the New York because of contact was Kazan my first edition, you see my career was hit listened to frontier yours. Yeah. It was who told me to study with Li I was ignorant twit that I dish for Kazan. It was for tea and sympathy for the road show for the road company to get the job. No, no. I I read for fifteen seconds that he said, that's fine. You have a nice something. He said something pleasant to me and said, you need a good acting t-shirt the no I felt like a boil is. And so when I was playing a boy, I was okay. But if I suddenly had to be a man with a wife and kids, I don't know how to do that. Even though I might be with the kids. With the kids. You see it was still far it was alien. Which is maybe why some of those marriages didn't work out. So well, yeah. But in that heyday of your film career on these massive directors you worked with you felt awkward clumsy and pathetic. And the first bite when I was on live TV in the first days. Those have great days fifty four fifty five fifty six before I got any good jobs. I did Billy. But on television. I played Billy. But the boy live on TV, George ROY hill directed at Tanis significant with Adler and Joseph is men and a wonderful cast of people that was fun. I did feel free. Then what do you think made Kazan Kazan? What was different about him? I auditioned for Zan that first time then edition form again for splendor in the grass with Jane Fonda, Warren, Beatty part, and we'd read the scene, and we we were. Okay. So he said, well, let's try something. He put his arm around me. And even though he was not big, man. He seemed a giant. And I always thought that he was like a this Greek guy who smelled of olive oil. I don't smell. A strong smell from him. And he said something to me, you'll probably have to cut this. But he said, you know, in the scene say this when you talk, and he said, it's it's like somebody's fucked your mother, and I don't know why it happened. But it was a feed pressed a button inside me. And I gave really a good, and I didn't get the part. Warren got it of village walked in with more hunt right after I did my. But it felt better that on dishing felt as good as anything else. I ever did an acting. Well, that's what it was like incident years later, I figured something out. That is not that he knew me. So well that he picked the right thing to say to me to get me going. He was talking personally about himself and his mother who loved it was lending that to you, and it happened to where he complained about modern because my number here three words and walk away from him. And he said God it would drive me. Crazy. He just walk away. I was saying something and I realized that's all he needed. Was. Those three words he didn't need. A long speech. Okay. So all right. So at least Trostberg nineteen fifty-five. I said LeBron been studying with you for a year. Now dish in for the actress studio he said you can. But you're not ready. That's how he talked after two years. I said Lincoln edition for the actor studio. You said was senior doing and I told him he said good. So the part was tin sympathy. I don't know if you remember that way, there's a boy in prep school who feels different he's accused of being gay. He's not gay just different. He's a little more sensitive than the other ones and so forth, and he gets kicked out of boarding school for whatever it was guess, what Jeffey went to boarding school felt different. He came from Cuba got kicked out of boarding school. It was a good part for me. And I got in my first audition Harvey contel took six dishes. He's a much better actor, I don't much better action. Does different. I know he is much better than I ever was. I think I can't imagine you if I may say so masturbating against the side of the car as evil detective in badly. No, no. There's things that Harvey doesn't this does that very well. Howard him and other things you do. Well, anyway, so I got him because that was right for an I understood it, and I got it. And I was moved by it that was the peak of my career twenty three years old everything went downhill after that, I played your lawyer one day soap opera, I'd say he's my goddamn student, and I'm playing his lawyer and had three lines. Look your life in my life different. You grew up on Long Island. I grew up in Cuba. You went on a soap opera you worked at NBC. That's what you did the so. Yeah, I remember somebody told me said Alec was great. He knew everybody in this building. He knew how to push himself, but happened to me was just the opposite. I was able to live at my mother's apartment. My mother's. They lived on Fifth Avenue. So that's where I lived in New York so start not really hardship. And I got a lead on a television show. Rod Steiger was my father, and I was his son. That was my first job a lead. And then I was doing these leading roles on television before you made a movie how long was it. I didn't make a movie till nineteen eighty six I was in TV for six. She's six years. And and so I went from there to a movie to a Broadway play to the big movie. So I didn't have to do six years of terrible television show. You said this is not what I wanna do. I don't wanna be on knots landing the rest of my life. But anyway, that's a lot seven years or six years. That was the beginning of some weird choices for me because I was offered a television film fatal vision the Joe McGuiness book about Jeffrey MacDonald, the Jeff rattle murder case. I went into a bar on eighth avenue and knocked out two huge shots of whisky before I wanted to that interview. And I can nailed it. I mailed it. And I got that part. And then I turned it down. And I try to say to people, you know, what you gotta do when you have a career as you point where you make peace with those decisions that you made you make peace with them. You know where I am now. Right. Where I wanna be I got married to a wonderful woman. I got four great kids. I work when I need to work. Everything's going pretty well. The thing about drinking into I auditioned for a period of judgment in London at the Royal court theatre. And I went into bar have to I the best. Oh, it was good. I got the part, and then British equity didn't let me work 'cause I tried to do it another time after that it didn't work. It just worked once. I mean, I drank a lot. But I didn't in my book, I wrote all about my own situation. Right. And now, I think to myself with Trump if I was drinking now. Oh my God. My God you and I would be in that bar on six seven and watch the ballgame. We wouldn't go anywhere. Let's face it. Drink. His fun. You know, that's why we do it. I mean, I drank a lot. If you've been affected your career. It affected my life so much that that affected my career and life is so. I have a son who's a drug addict. And he says, it's fun. You forget it. You know, don't don't forget that it's fun for peer until it's not five. Right. Exac. And and when it was not fun anymore, then I stopped. Thank god. I was able to stop some people. Can't I want to ask you, you know, for me one of the most memorable moments in my life was when I did the movie the aviator because it was my first time working with Marty. And I know he's dreamed about working with the greatest directors, and I didn't have that chance and member that was a problem that I had to fight the it of which was I almost couldn't concentrate on my work as I was so intimidated to be on set with Marty the, but you're there, and you're going to be that next guy. Everybody thinks you're so handsome when you show up to do bridge on the River Kwai, and you with lean a God, you're with a God making film, we ready. I was so frightened. How to terrify lean? He was he was not an actress director Kazan or like, some of them are wonderful actors that he was so sensitive to people. He was always moving things around and I asked David about and he said, oh, oh, I don't wanna make the actor self conscious. So I'll take a glass and move at three inches to the left. And they'll think, oh, I guess, I'm okay. The glasses fine. I'm okay. And he was a little technique that he'd worked out to make people feel comfortable, but when I had lines. I'm rub sick to my stomach first day. I had to throw up off so panic-stricken because it was all action at first getting the bridge and trampling this stuff and all that stuff. I was fine. Doing throwing people in a box went with doing that. I could do that. But River Kwai was in the early sixties not enough fifty seven fifty seven fifty seven, but I'm assuming even then someone like lean had his own financial edicts than in order to make the movie he wanted to make you needed a star. Oh, yeah. So hold on was was the whole. Well, they Cary Grant. They talked about of the wanted. They wanted to star in one of these roles. They had Guinness was a movie star. But not the Dow Jack Hawkins was actually. A bigger star in England at the time bigger than Guinness. Yeah. But hold him as the in the whole of movie stardom was he the same withholding as he was did he treat everybody like a company or did? He treat his star. No just say he with the same. Did you become POWs with any of those guys elegance was very nice. Jack Hawkins Mr. big snob, which was really peculiar who would have thought that. No like like, like, a tough guy like an English tough guy. Not like a gangster tough guy. But like a man he was kind of snobby hold on about have you met this. He was a boy he was a thirty eight us only thirty eight he looked much older s- thirty eight year old boy, he was a boy, he he'll get bored. And so he'd throw firecrackers in the dining room. I mean, just like a kid of my favorites. I worship world. Well, he was he was always very friendly and very helpful in his body on camera, so relaxed, I'm Tammy. Hi, Akao Hayakawa. What was he like? Oh, he's speaking English. Yeah. It was rough. But he when I went to Japan afterwards, and he took me to a geisha house. He's cheated on me to dinner at a geisha house, very classy, very lovely lovely place. No, sex, proper, and in fact, even in the middle of the dinner, he got up and danced. He was eighty. I think at the time he did some Japanese dance. I remember all these things if I see the movie, I remember all the sensory things. I remember what the smell in the air was. I remember the trees. I remember the water. I remember there was how hot it was. I don't think much about the the movie itself. But the companionship the fence you make oh, and I had a girlfriend on the movie too. She one of the tiger. That was great. She was lovely. What a great thing in your life. You've got to make that movie with one of the greatest direct to be in the jungle with. Lean your career when people take the time to examine your career. You're in that beautiful fold in live TV and film for you know, you're the next James Dean. Okay. So you know, macaroni is a disaster. Right. I peaked at twenty three and I went downhill after that, it's like Matthew Modine when he does his full metal jacket diary, and he writes, a lot about working with Kubrick on jacket, which I love because you can tell he to soaked it up and loved every minute of it new. I may never have it this good again as long as I live. So as funny when you think my first thought when you were talking about how great it must have been in the jungle. I saw David lean in Venice one time the Italian fourth of July we honor and a gondola with the bread and cheese and a huge thing of wine. Actually, I brought that and it was absolutely lovely. He and his wife, and that I have a wife, then I think maybe there were four of us did and apparently is at the conclusion of your biographical material that our producer voted to me sources differ on wives and children. He's either. Been married four or five times and has eight or nine children. We're gonna give you the opportunity now to clarify. How many times have you been married? Well, I've had more matches and two long term relationships, which I call marriages it makes six before a legal beagle. And how many children do you have? I have three daughters set are my daughters, and I have six adopted kits. Wait a minute. That's nine. Yeah. You'll give nine. Two of them have died. But so that only seven left. Left amid nine children altogether. You like kids where your wives like you? And didn't always like this. I like kids. Yeah. And do you know the of the top of the stairs? Ashley, the young boy. He's jewish. He doesn't fit in. He's in the military school, and he's going to go to a party, and he goes there, and he's dancing with the daughter of the hostess, and she comes and pulls her daughter way, my son. My daughter is not going to dance with any dirty Jew. And he goes back to his hotel that night, and he jumps out the window and kills himself and Bill engine little essay about the play. He said he had. No sure connections Bill was the nicest man, I thought that was so interesting and moving and I thought about it a lot because Bill out in California Jove his car into the garage one day left the gas on because he had no sure connections in spite of all his success all his place. He was so alone out there. Yeah. I only met him a little bit in California, actually, where he shouldn't have gone to live where it even prior New York in New York, he should've been why did you never move out there? I did move to California. How long thirteen long years. I said that for a long time. Why did you? Come back here. I wanted to act. And he did Geoffrey Horne packed up his Hollywood apartment and moved back to New York. Nineteen seventy-five another great artists who had a second act is Mickey Rourke, but I came a brutal intermission nothing fell on my plate. There was no work coming in because waiting for you know, Camino or go blend. It didn't happen. So did happen. What happened was his piece of shit fell on my plate. And they offered me a boatload of money, and like a whore, I took the four million or whatever it was and bought a big fucking Elvis Presley house that I couldn't afford. And I remember doing this film and Haiti myself every day my full interview with Mickey Rourke is in our archives at here's the thing dot org. WNYC studios. Supported by Wells Fargo, whose global operations are one hundred percent powered by renewable energy. They've also helped finance more than eight percent of the nation's solar and wind energy here in the nation's capital. Wells Fargo and nonprofit grid alternatives. Recently worked to install solar panels on the roofs of the park, Chester apartments. Helping nearly one hundred residents in the affordable housing complex save on energy costs. More at stories dot W, F dot com slash DC. This is Alec Baldwin. And you're listening to here's the thing. We left Geoffrey Horne in nineteen seventy five he had moved back to New York after his career flamed out in Hollywood that ended up being his next lucky break. I hadn't revival of my career and my forties. I came back to New York. I did some plays off Broadway. I was in a musical Mary rolled alone windows idea. Come the you're going to teach acting how has asked by who at least translate. Do you recall what year that was what decade sixty seventy eight seventy eight. I always liked teaching. I always taught something I taught yoga for a while gardening. I taught hurts back writing because they had all these kids around that I would do that. And I was working a lot at the actress studio during scenes a lot and Lisov in do a play there. And he said on he grudgingly said. All right. Try one class. I never worked Monday night since I always taught it Monday night class that was my beginning. And then NYU that's when you were there seventy nine I don't even teaching for a year. God knows what miserable stuff I told you this. I didn't know what I was what made me famous. I've lived on every word of you. I didn't know what to do. And I was crying during a sense memory exercise. You poked me in the stomach, and you said I want you to work on your insides as much as you're outside. It's funny too. I remember that too. You told me that Milton could sell us said the same thing to you. Well milk. It tells walked number when I was with you. I was skinny I was lean. And then when I go with him I met him. In nineteen eighty three eighty four. But I'll never forget what the first thing you do when you're a poor kid, and you make a lot of money as you start to eat, whatever you want to eat, and and you don't hesitate. You know what I mean? I'm like, well, I discovered sushi when I moved to LA eighty three and I haven't turned back since but I'll never forget could sell us walked up to me. He never said one thing to me the whole time in walked up behind me. And he whispered in my ear. He said lose eight pounds, eight Weaver specific. He was a genius about who about that kind of estimation. But when you began teaching how's it changed for you over the course of I feel liberated. It used to be what in what is it? Now, I'm not very confident never have been. And I felt anxious all the time and worried that I wasn't doing it. Right. And then I wasn't helping and maybe five years maybe longer. I suddenly felt liberated. I felt like I could be myself. I think really for the first time my life teaching. I never felt that as an actor. I could be myself, which is what you always had from the beginning. How have the students change to come into these spaces that you teach him? It is the same students is more diversity. Now, they're getting much more hip than much more knowledgeable about stuff. The world is a little sometimes little to political. They're like wary about what you say. You're like, I can't you should be able to say that you can say this. You can't say that. I know there's some things probably they were massively offensive fifty years ago or forty years ago when I started teaching, but that we can't say now, but I think sometimes it gets looks like they're looking for something I mentioned suicide one time in class and a girl said trigger and her friend said, oh, that's. Trigger? I thought that's stupid. And I got really upset. And I said my eldest son committed suicide. I can't talk about that. Well, it might hurt. Someone does the institution tell you that you have to honor that when they say that not. Yeah, they directing. Not yet. Why don't you just get up and leave? That's it perfect. There was a girl in class who obviously had some issue about a scene because it had involved sexual assault. And she said, I think I'll sit this one out and she left the class my fine. And she works very well. She's very good. She's very talented. So she said I can't deal with that. Now, the thing I noticed, and I don't expect you to agree or whatever. But I did interested to get your thoughts as that when I would teach school, and I would guest at NYU I'd walk into a class for a day. And I give my thoughts about whatever. And then I did the full semester, which was very interesting, and we had eleven pairs for Saint study, we had twenty two people come when I realized was that now in the modern world, there are young people who come to acting school who have the Cubans and the SAT's to go to law school or medical shift the criminal creme, academically, and they're coming here to study acting, right? But a lot of them aren't very talented. They're not very talented. It'd be better lawyers. Right. And I said to the school. So they're all very smart. I'm gonna room for really smart people who aren't very adventurous actors are. And I said what I would encourage you to do. And they and you could see them twitching. I'd say you need to take two slots one man one woman and lower to a certain floor like nothing below three. Oh, nothing below a specific SAT, but Tara out to coupons and invite people in her youth are just purely talented that you think gave an audition that just blew away. And it's not just for their. It's for the benefit of the other kids to see what good is. Yes. And who can take direction because in the studio at Strasbourg right went when I studied with you. It's a lot more result oriented, and so we which is good. I'll never forget. There was a guy I won't name his name I'm so tempted to but he does over on in the class. And when he's done the teachers stands there and stares at him. And she literally looks over her shoulder at the rest of the class like. There. It is. He just fantastic. I saw him twenty five years later. He's a conductor on the subway in amazes mocking that I'm just saying he's not he what happens in the classroom. And what happens in the outside world is a very very different thing for me, the kinds of people that are going into the business. They wanna be famous. I really get that much. When I was no school has changed a lot. And of course, back in fifty four when I was in my first class. I didn't know anything like Nichols was in the class Atlantic and was in my class everybody in the class worked professionally they were fewer actors and more jobs and a lot of them were really good and had really long wonderful careers. I think this changed. I just changed a lot. Why do you stay here? Why why God? I don't want to go anywhere. I have sure. Connections. Now had this job. Great job. I love going to work every day. I only work three days a week. So she's nice because I am eighty-five those along days eight hour days, and then Graf you'll great I have four days off a week. I have a wife who's great. She reached him at nighttime. Every night, we read Anna Karenin, we read Warren piece, we read a wonderful book gift. He's doing created this expert company out of her immagination. And so I get the director Shakespeare play radio we're doing hamlet this year when in June. We have an apartment that I love we had a cat that we love both of us and wonderful cat, but the cat died recently. And so suddenly you feel a little bit diminished. You have four sure things announ have three have you ever been tempted to teach somewhere else. No Strasbourg works for you based on. What was the belief? I think the hurts. We have in childhood and the hurts me never get over wounds of the spirit that never heal. Tennessee Williams writes about it beautifully. So I can't say it it's beautifully as he says it no matter how famous no matter how rich no matter. How successful it never goes away. Modern Brenda was hurt the day. He died as he was when he was a child with a brutal father just breaks stressed, childhood memory emotion. If you get in touch with the hurt of your childhood through memory, the emotion will be there. I would teach acting. I'd hire a piano player. So I have a guy who was local that come and play the piano, and we'd have a range of just very basic song you'd think climb every now Newton the sun will come out tomorrow. And I made them get off the I made him saying. Yeah. And I said if you can't do this you can't act you gotta pull your pants down. You're you're you're you're not a singer. So what I always remember this that Maury Yeston who wrote nine. I was at a party, I was at a benefit for the roundabout or something, and there was Nathan lane and this one and that one, and they're all talking about Broadway musical tonight on sing and Maury Yeston said to me, he said, you don't sing. I really don't see. And I wish I did. I can't sing. I really can't. I don't have Queant. And he said, you know, Dustin Hoffman said the same thing to me. And I said the Dustin sing the star spangled banner in the style of Jimmy Durante and doesn't happen said. Oh, say can you see a said now I want you to sing a happy birthday in the style of Louis arms vote. We birthday he said see you're on key. And you can sing when you're imitating. Somebody else you go because you don't have your own style. His we have to find your style. And you're gonna wind up doing an impersonation of some of that doesn't exist actually, which is the style. We're going to create for you to sing at that. That was fascinating when he said that about singing, you know, my my wife, we did bust. We I directed by stuff. Wonderful part for her. She was very good. But she can't sing it. All she sings one note one hundred times, it's the same note. It doesn't go up. Then go down doesn't go faster. Didn't go slower cannot do it. Now. Maybe someone could get. No, she even went to a singing coach, nothing nothing. Everybody can act. I think I think some people have Meryl Streep is wonderful actress, right, and she can do almost everything, but not everything. Yes. Marlon brando? David lean offered him the part of the Buddha make a movie with you the Buddha. He said about right for the part. He knew himself. Well, I don't think it was just laziness on his part and said I'm not right for I want to go to India, Jack, Nicholson's wonderful, actor he can't do everything this girl in my class. Just yesterday. She worked on two scenes in the first one. She was so terrible. It was just painful to watch. And then she did another one. And she was just couldn't have been better to the right part. You have to find something you connect to and then eventually e- keep putting it out there. I really believe this. And this is very, you know, kind of metaphysical maybe, but you keep putting it out there. It's going to come back to you. Do you feel the same way? So I remember, we regularly pack. My second wife was in a tequila Mockingbird. She played the girl that accused the black guy of rape. May Allah, vile. You'll know that was my second wife your second wife. Played may yellow you. Yes. Yes. Yeah. Where did you meet her at the studio we were on the same TV show? And then we both remember to the studio. And then whatever what have marriage him yet that I think I was still married. I had never mind anyway, Gregory, Peck, who I just met to say Hello. I shook his hand who was actually the most beautiful man I've ever seen in my life. He and his wife. I bumped I walked into an elevator. And there was standing there. I think I stood there with my mouth open like an idiot. I felt like I was this big. And they were these giants. He said when he was eighty I should've taken more risks. And then just yesterday, I read this in class one of my students sent it to me. It's the actor something that Kazan wrote and one of the things don't be timid. That's the thing that I don't like when people say if you're shy. You can't be an actor. When I don't think that's true. I think I remember meeting Robert deniro he was Amos, but he was not in his element. He was at a party, and he felt awkward, and he seemed really shy shy. So does that mean he can't be an actor? If anybody had said. That no Bobby forget it just forget to do something else. You're too shy. I think that's why I like Strasbourg is that there's no rule about how you supposed to be or might career. And I don't like that word, but I'll use it anyway, because it's handy in my career this to people who I studied acting with who said things to me that were pivotal one was Elaine Aken when I went to meet with her privately to get a little bit of coaching. I did about five or six sessions with her about streetcar car. I remember when we did the play. I had an instinct all I want to not just work with Gregory who was directing. I wanted to get a little private thing to give a little jump on it and were there in her apartment on central park west. And she said to me when we reached a juncture in the scene as she said to me, she said baby this part, you know, he's an animal. He just went any want something he just takes. He's gonna go right through who severing his way, she goes. And really, you're either sexy or you're not there's nothing we can work on their you'd be. Got that. Or you don't. And then of course, you who said I want you to work on your insides as much as you're outside. And I saw you, of course, streetcar, whatever it is that she how she coach you work because you were very sexy. And I know it all to you and Eli very funny. You were very funny. Is there any part? You wanna do? I kept thinking of what part should Alec do that. He hasn't done. I think to myself, you know, obviously, I think about my age, I have an unshakable interest in trying to master after the fall by Miller 'cause that take on his marriage to Monroe is what's in the relationship between a man and a woman, and that attraction we have to the wrong woman and women's gonna kill us. If we if we hang on there. We're going to go down with we're going to sink on that ship with her. I was intrigued by the maybe not so much anymore because I'm very happily married, but when I was coupling with the wrong person. Yeah. Almost addictive -ly. Yeah. I was obsessed with that piece. And then the other piece is iguana. I dislike I just love when they roll that old man out there, and he says the poem. Yeah. He drops dead. I wanna play that ornery alcoholic fornicated. Ing mad men. I wanna play Shannon. Yeah. But the problem that's part. It's a great. But the problem is that in the Williams cannon everybody plays, Shannon. Yeah. You played. Chance you play Stanley you play brick all the young parts. And then there's nothing until Shannon. Yeah. And then after Shannon. There's only the last stop is your big daddy. Yeah. Right. So I mean every guy my age play, Shannon. So I've kind of backed off of it. But I'd like to do at one day when the went direct me and Shannon as hard play. I, you know, I only work with my students. Well, you as a former student, I could direct you. I everybody that I worked with that directive I've taught and so. I don't have to. I don't have to cater to anybody sometimes actors even though they've never done a job in their lives. You can have to cater to them a little bit. But. That'd be hard for me. I do you know, you know, burial seen him. He was the Shakespeare guru at the public. And now he's in San Diego artistic director. And he is coaching some very well known actors in his technique verse technique, and he's really very good. He's extraordinarily knowledgeable about various. And they were arguing with him because they were more famous than he was. And I thought fuck that. I don't need that. I don't wanna do that. I wanna get an argument with anybody. Not that I think you would argue or be a pain. But I'm thinking of other people that I've known because actors are always insecure when they go into a job, aren't they? Yes, they are always. And they need someone to let them know. They're going to be okay. You know, you're smart. You're inciteful put your kind, and I feel that's essential. I'm not gonna name names. But number teachers there would Strasbourg who you do the same. They go. Why did you bother? Oh, I'm other was nice. So I learned that she was kind. Thank you for doing this. With me. Explain what a nice thing to do. Geoffrey Horne from lonely child to movie star to obscurity and a spectacular second act as you heard his teaching isn't his only gift to New York theater. The theater company. He started with his wife, Billie. Anderson is called Shakespeare downtown tickets are free. They rely on donations at Shakespeare downtown dot org. The hamlet we discussed opens June thirteenth and runs through the twenty third. I'm Alec Baldwin. Here's the thing is a production of WNYC studios.

Alec Baldwin New York Geoffrey Horne David lean Cuba WNYC studios NYU Kazan Kazan Strasbourg Shannon director River Kwai Dow Jack Hawkins Kazan Mickey Rourke Ernest Hemingway Millbrook school Tennessee Williams Exxon
Episode 28: Elliott Hasler

You Really Shouldn't Have

12:40 min | 6 months ago

Episode 28: Elliott Hasler

"Hello and welcome to you really shouldn't have the podcast where we unwrap some of the best stories behind some of the worst case. They have ever been given them a bit of a download Milestone this week. So I just want to say thank you very much for checking out the show and listening continue to follow a really do appreciate it. You can check the show out as always online on Twitter and Instagram and bad gift card as well as the website which is bad gift spot.com where we have a brand new feature, but I just wanted to let you know about under the menu item of got a bad gift story. Not only can you leave a comment bring your own bag if story and you know, we rent them out on the show before you can help also record the audio clip yourself and we can play it and that's exactly what Ben's done. So here is Ben's back your story off. So I have a story to input into one of your shows if you don't like to or not and it's not very big amazing story, but it is quite funny basically and there's an ex-girlfriend of birth. And who has very minimal charge appearing with show. It doesn't matter. I suppose if she does basically I unwrap a present on Christmas Day at her house and my oh my God, that's awful cold. It's a it's like an iPod dock life on those boomblaster. I thought doxing someone. Oh my God, that's amazing that you shouldn't have that's so cool. And they're like, yeah, then you'd realize we we use old boxes for things and put other things inside, you know to wrap them up for four more mistake. And so oh, oh, okay. Oh, so it's not an iPod dog known know and open it up and it was a hairbrush and that's that was disappointing when you consider that you thought you've just got like a a proper call like iPod. Club. So I will never wrap people's gifts in boxes of other other potential gifts ever biggest because I understand the emotional trauma that can come from it off. Thanks so much been so if you'd like to send your own bag if story and you can do so by clicking got a bag if story on the website, which is bad gifts pod.com now onto the episode and joining me. This week is film director Elliot Hazlet and just twenty years old Elliott is the UK's youngest feature film director. He dropped by the discuss the release of his debut feature film World War Two the Long Road Home his upcoming film projects. And of course took up a story behind the worst gift. He's ever been given off the earlier. Thanks so much for joining the show today. It's great to have you here and I worry. Yes, it's good to be here. See if we go right back to the beginning. Where did your interest in the script writing and Film Production first begin? I suppose it back up again. And when I was about ten and they're always been into films and stuff growing up in the things but when I was ten they did this little project at my primary school where we the whole class took a week off and made off. Will film and that was sort of my first experience never filmmaking and things that I was kind of hooked. And then on I kind of made a little films after that which got bigger and better, you know, as I kind of improved and that was kind of how it all started really see here to talk about the release of your debut feature film The Long Road Home World War Two the Long Road Home pretty one. That hasn't seen anything about the film give us a brief overview of what it's about. Yes. Set in in World War Two and it's based on my own great grandfather's wartime experiences. So he was a prisoner of war in Italy and then he escaped and made this sort of 400 kilometre journey across country and you know living with the resistance and innovating Germans things like that. So yeah, I dramatize into a into a movie now. I know the production process but his films band across a number of years and yet a lot of patience as well. So how did you find that logistically? Oh, yeah. I mean they always say with independent films limit the amount locations you have and you think about like Reservoir Dogs and I know loads of movies that are small independent in one month. Location which obviously makes them so much easier when you're filming like that, but I always thought you know, it would set me apart massively from everyone else if I did the movie where there's you know, like a hundred different locations. Whatever it really sort of changes the dynamic of things that have we'll give you as a filmmaker. So I always went a little kind of an ambitious I from from the start so it was cheaper to do and I just kind of worked around that so it was never too much of a hindrance. Really. I know you filmed it across quite a long time frame. It was a couple of years wasn't it? You took the film in total? Yeah free years. Yeah, that's up to go back and forth. I guess there was a long period of gaps between the filming was that was that difficult. It was I think the longest Gap was about six months because I was I started at fourteen finish the 16th. My exams and the school exams in the middle. So I had six months off where I finished those and that was kind of the biggest break, but I don't remember there being any sort of specific like, oh wow. I kind of lost track of it or anything like that. It will kind of flowed nicely. It was all right. Now I know during the production process of the film you walk quite a lot of hats yourself Elliott. I mean not only did you write the film and direct it but you're always lead actor you edited the film. I mean for someone so young that must have been quite a lot to juggle. It was actually yeah. I mean, I think I approached take a step back from the acting side of things now folks home directing which almost what I'm doing for my my my new phone. I'm looking at the moment. I'm purely, you know directing now, but I still write on my own stuff and I think it's the job of a direct to be very Hands-On in all different aspects of or is this your vision at the end of the day so you have to make sure the costumes fit and you know, the location is look good at everything you have to really have a finger in each sort of Pie as it were in a movie making thing. I guess the upside of that is a big give you a creative control to get the end product you want to achieve when you first started writing it Exactly. Yeah it did and it also gave me a big overview of you know how to deal with each aspect of a production. So I mean obviously now I understand quite a lot about all of it really writing the production post-production all that kind of stuff. So I know how sort of each thing works which is good cuz then it gives me a view of you know, how other people should should be doing their jobs and and how I want them to be done then that kind of thing. So I'm able to see what I'm good at and what I can do and then delegate elsewhere so it did work well in that respect now we're at the film is also already graced a few film festivals. How was that experience and didn't get the reaction you'd hope for. Yeah. I mean the reaction wage was fantastic really so culture trip said I was the next Bill Burr going to be bad because I get much better than that. So yeah, it was good. Now you mentioned that you're working on your next project which is a film called Vindication swim which tells the story of the first British woman to swim the English Channel. I wondered what dreams about story in particular. Yeah. I mean, I've always grown now. Around to see and stuff living in in Brighton my family sort of I think way back the sort of sent from fishermen and all that sort of maybe kind of seafaring stories and stuff is in my blood a bit but it was a 1018 story really about this woman who is kind of two battles in a sense cuz she's fighting against Society at the time being a woman in the nineteen twenties and things and it's also got this battle against nature against the cold of the English Channel and then the waves and all that. There's a lot going on in the story that I think is really tangible and and translate yourself really nicely into you know dramatised film. I can imagine the logistics of getting a bit difficult filming on the water. How have you found that and must be something new for you? Yeah, it's tough when shooting actually out on the English Channel. It's all real there was no, you know filming at anchor down or anything like that. It's all done out on the English Channel, so we wouldn't vote, you know, I mean, it's safe. We have support boats and everything out there, but It's tough. Yeah, I mean nothing really prepares you for the what that's that's going to be like but you have to kind of learn on your feet and literally it's jumping into the deep end now I know she can't get away from it, but it was a covert has been such a big thing this year how have you found that logistically in terms of trying to get this new film off the ground? Well, we were halfway through shooting actually when the the whole thing hit home. So I was in it was annoying really cuz we had, you know, stopped three months. It was like a Hiatus on the production and stuff. So there was nothing going on but in terms of filming but it was good in a way because Monday we will have her production. So we're able to sit back and you know reflect what we've done and really sort of refine the script and we added a few new scenes and things like that. So in a way it was quite nice because he got set and sort of study what we've done in the middle of production which you know, obviously never normally get to do I wanted to touch briefly on another of your short films. I have the opportunity to take a look at I would just go to Hunter tiger. I'm home. The cinematography in that film is absolutely breathtaking. Just tell me a bit about the process of putting that one together. Oh, yeah, I mean that that that was done a couple of years ago. Yes. So I've always been a big fan of David Blaine and his films. I mean, he saw my biggest influence as a filmmaker. So on that one, I mean, we actually shocked in one of the cases from Bridge on the River Kwai and stuff. So it was really nice. It's kind of a nice little homage to walk in and and and his films and stuff with that one. So, I mean that was but that is the kind of look I go for that epic, you know, wide-screen television that type of thing that's that's what I like and what I strive for a walk. So obviously as we've said next up you got Vindication swim but looking further ahead what is next for you in your career. I don't know. I mean, I'm so involved in this this indication off the moment it was you know, we've gained momentum against in stove and stuff even really busy but Yeah, well, we'll see where this goes. I mean the aim is to have this this Premier in Canada the festival in in 2022, so we'll have to just see what happens there. Now we've reached the part of the show. I have to ask you. What is the worst gift you've ever been given the worst gift. Yeah. I had to think about this. I think the worst gift that had been given was I once woke give him one of those you know those little Airsoft BB gun. Oh, yeah. Yeah. I'll give him one of those and I shot my my eyebrow off of it, but I part my eyebrows. I mean that was that was a long slow. I mean my career will be ruined by just shut my eye out. So that would have to be the probably the worst the worst gift. I've been given. Yeah cuz it could have been a lot worse could have been it could have been much worse, but we're glad we're glad it wasn't. I'm glad it wasn't time. My eyebrow grew back. So I mean, that's fine. Wrapping up. It seems like a strange question to ask someone so young normal ask everybody. If you go back to the beginning of your career and give yourself a gift to help to get where you are. Now what gift would it be but it seems you know, your career is only just beginning. So perhaps if we go back to fourteen-year-old Elliott, right and the first draft of the new film what gift would you give that idiot to help to get to where you were at the moment? Well, that's a good question. Yeah, that is I don't know. I don't feel like I have the the wisdom yet to answer that something but I suppose I could go back and you know, give myself maybe a book on screenwriting or something cuz one of the issues sort of with that but when I first started because the script sort of didn't really exist on that one, but you kind of got off it was it was evolving constantly throughout the production. So I think you know having done over films since I like having a you know, a cohesive script where you know you're doing and if everything's sort of fleshed-out and I mean obviously things change but took that back burner as I find really useful. So yeah, I think I would go back and and kind of give myself instruction on screenwriting fantastic and finally Elliott. Where can people find out more about you and what you do wrong. Yes, they can follow me on on social media and whatever and there's a real star Productions is is the company I make the films through so that's what that's my name backwards, by the way, so we're kind of like we're not yeah, well, it's been great. I have you on the show. Thanks so much for dropping by and best of luck with the film. Yes. Thanks again for listening to this episode of you really shouldn't have bought a shirt to subscribe to us on your chosen podcast service to make sure you never miss another episode. You can also find us on Twitter and Instagram at bad gift Parts as well as online at bad gives birth outcomes.

Elliott Twitter Ben Film Production director Instagram Bill Burr David Blaine Brighton UK River Kwai Italy Germans Elliot Hazlet star Productions six months
Friendly Fire Crossover #2: The Great Escape

Movie Crush

1:32:56 hr | 1 year ago

Friendly Fire Crossover #2: The Great Escape

"Why wait for Black Friday November when Dell's black Friday and July is on and it's the biggest one ever score up to four hundred dollars off the latest Dell and alienware computers with Intel core processors plus get free shipping on everything including their amazing zing selection of electronics and accessories just call eight hundred buy Dell or visit Dell Dot com slash blackfriday welcome to movie crush a production of iheartradio the it hey everybody welcome to movie crush and friendly fire? That's right. It's is the annual crossover edition of your favorite little show here and friendly fire which is one of my favorite movie podcast Co hosted by my Pals Ben Harrison Adam Practica and John Roderick <hes>. It's great show everyone and I enjoy sitting down and talking to these guys about war movies every year. We did platoon last year. If you haven't listened to that one go check it out. We did another cabin sess- different cabin this time it's going to be it's going to sound like <hes> Adams. Episode did <hes> quite a few weeks ago <hes> but but you know I think we might just leave everything in there. I think there's some weed wacker's at times and I think a housekeeper comes by so we may just leave it. All in there is <hes> window-dressing <hes> so we got together on <hes> the old text thread started talking about what movie to watch and been suggested Tropic Thunder as a war movie and Adam agreed and I thought they were kidding and I said can we do a real war movie and it turns out they were serious. I guess they consider Tropic Thunder a real war movie and maybe it is for all. I know it's been a while since I've seen it. I guess it was war stuff in there but a real war movie. Everyone is the great escape. Can we all agree on that. So that's what we went with kind of one of the all time classics <hes> really good movie. I've seen a bunch of times over the years and <hes> had a little bit of a different take on this viewing than I normally do as did <hes> John Roderick so check it out here my pals Ben Harrison Adam Practica in John Roderick of friendly fire on the great escape. Hello and welcome to friendly fire. The war movie podcast is that puts Elliott's rotten eggs in one basket. I am Ben Harrison and that impre Annika. I'm John Roderick and I'm Chuck Bryant. It's our annual tradition of doing a crossover episode with movie crush. The great podcast hosted by Chuck Chuck. Check you the rottenest egg okay. I was waiting to introduce myself in for one of you to go your papers. Please papers good luck good luck so how's the sound good. I hope so I yeah I mean it's it looks good on on the little postage stamp size screen on our recording device great. This is a movie that I had seen a bunch of times as a kid but you said you'd never seen it before right. Oh first timer yeah yeah yeah it. Does it hold up. Is it seemed like a good movie to you. I mean that's that's the review portion of the show. We don't have a lot of time. Does it hold up considering. You've never seen it before yeah well. I mean like you want compared to the first time I never saw the second time was much better. There are lots of movies that like if you see them as a kid are very meaningful to you and if you are introduced them to them as an. I've heard I've never seen goonies but I've heard that like it's not worth trying to get into it in your thirties. I WANNA spend an entire. Show interrogating your non seeing of Gooney interrogating drink. I never saw goonies either. What we do a special episode? That's just goonies. These two do a bit of a war movie. Wow suddenly your your definition of war movies loosened up well he has wanted to do fucking tropic. Thunder check was being a real SNOB. Let's do a real war movie. It's really a AH jailbreak movie more than it really is and I was struck by the va like late Motif in the theme song being really really similar to the one in bridge on the River Kwai and the <hes> The little like whistling theme that they come back to over and over again so much so that at the end of our River Kwai episode. I whistled the wrong song and it was this song that I was whistling wow. How did you know to do that? He when he was a kid he had an album of all the great jailbreak roar two movies play by Elmer Bernstein also an album of nothing but whistling songs. I wonder why that is like was there like in the sixties where they're like yeah. This is the kind of music you have to have in a prison war prison jailbreak movie yeah kind of Jonty because although this movie isn't very it's about to say you don't WanNa bring anyone down but there's not a lot in this movie to nothing today. Thank you that happened last year to housekeeping just came by the Academy Awards and sixty three was this one of the best songs like they had a whistler out there on stage. There is no whistling fife. It's Fife Mus- yeah but but this was the heyday of the great movie score the score that would define the super catchy music that right that and this score is kind of insane because it beeps along for a little bit in the fife and then all of a sudden it gets really dark and serious and then it pops back up into a different kind of second theme with a three hour movie movie you can really like dig into a lot of different emotional territories and then like recover from them and go somewhere else and this movie really does that like it has moments of like beauty and joy and moments of real real darkness. Does it read to you as a comedy Adam seeing it for the first time does it did it feel like a feel comedic. It didn't veer all the way into comedy but it definitely got out of the lane of serious war movie P._O._W.. Piece there's a little Hogan's heroes the field to parts of it where like you never feel like the in the camp that they are truly like threatened and I'm always amazed as a sort of like with Hogan's heroes too with these camps that they're just allowed from the moment this film opens they're planning their escape and they have a big meeting in the big meeting room and there's guard raining abby to that it's so awesome like every like everything they try like Oh. That's a great idea yeah. They're really supportive of each other. In a way that I found surprising although Edberg was a bit of a Dick at times yeah that was his job my God big axe. That's true the big excess around Said Ladies Ladies and gentlemen welcome to stalag seventeen guide you know the premise of those loofah prison camps was that they treated the prisoners really well because of this whole like Nick Aristocratic to the Manor born quality that the air force had still is it airman jail airman and army jails army. Is that how it worked. That was the idea yeah. The Navy Navy Sends Navy to Davy Jones. It's Walker yeah the yeah. The premise was read that the loose waffle was hosting the enemy combatants their their air peers. They have a much better working relationship ship with their jailers in this movie than on the River Kwai don't think you see them saluting each other but they straight up say in that first meeting between the big who kind of looks like you've been weirdly just pick up on that the main Nazi no bad knocked. He looks like a little bit notice that he oh the British Guy Yeah I do look. I don't know the French. You'd have a hard on right now. They had that first meeting where he's basically like. You know you know we're going to try and escape like what do you expect us to not do that. That is our sworn duty as officers in the Germans guys like yeah I I understand how they make the case they make the case that they're sworn duty because it will like tie up resources and material the Germans would otherwise be inflicting on the front and I don't feel like they pay that off in the actual jailbreak scenes. There's Steve McQueen for sure does his part Chur like he is lifting his weight in terms of like drying troops one hundred guys at least yeah and trucks and stuff but everybody else is just getting nabbed by the Gestapo right well the what's interesting about the geography. If this movie is that the stuck Luft three year whatever wherever they actually were was in Solutia like it was in Poland and they look at him because the resident a Polish authority it's in Poland right at it is yeah they said Germany in the movie because it was in occupied Poland well subsumed into the nation no kind of the opposite it was Prussia that became after the war turned into Poland but traditional Prussian territory but way way east so in that early scene where we see the Russian guys with for hats going out to chop wood bright which is weird because we never see them again and it seemed like at that moment they sort of lived in the camp or something. I didn't understand why those guys were there and a fresh built camp and my theory was that they were like the people that built it and now they're leaving. They were just finishing up the punch list. We'll so those guys you know. If if this I mean th taking place in Poland like they were sort of a natural maybe not locals but it wasn't that far anyway so in the course of these guys escaping we see them make Paris. We see them make it to Switzerland yeah make get to the Baltic Sea coverage going to Spain so for these guys to have to like spread all across Europe like that yeah it and then we see them. One by one get nabbed. It would have meant that people that cops were on the lookout for them. The troops were chasing them kind of throughout Germany and that's pretty that would expend some resources. That camp didn't read this Polish to me because the barbed wire fence wasn't inside the barracks. You just wanted so you want to get there. I Yeah I'm GonNa take that one and now you don't get but you're gay was the coolest one of the guys in the movie the Polish Gay Jokes Chick Branson man and how handsome a how handsome is he able and how fucking handsome James Garner Man Yeah I mean I saw him and he's like thirty five thirty six. My key looks like fucking George Clooney Yeah everybody in this movie movie all the bottleneck or at least thirty. I think Steve McQueen was probably thirty. Three Garner was thirty five Bronson was like forty two already but he was shocked like a Jack Forty two. I I have a very distinct memory of watching this movie when I was a kid and my mom leaning over wouldn't Charles Bronson was on onscreen all sweaty and muscle you going. He was kind of the Arnold Schwarzenegger of my child except five four sure yeah I mean at one point. Steve McQueen says that he's like just got out of college or is in college. There's there's a lot of age fudging yeah because these these guys probably most of them would have been about twenty three twenty four right yeah. That's true well. Maybe he got held back he will he took all those summers off. Racing motorcycles took him a little long. There was a moment when this movie didn't have much Steve McQueen green in it from what I read and Mclean director for more him and mcleans a guy who was taking a limo to and from the set every day like he had a lot of power at this time in his career. You remember the famous there's a famous story about him. Making a movie with Yul Brenner and every time he was in the background of a scene he was always fussing with. He was either putting with his gun. It's like a Western yeah. He's always loading his gun or or <hes> like famously kind kind of a plane with a cigar or something and eating an orange peel still on to the extent that you will brenner complained like this guy's trying to steal every season right because you're you know you're I would be drawn to the background the fuck you Steve McQueen doing so he he knew what he was doing. I love how early on in the film though when they immediately they're they're and they're immediately checking out how to get out. One guy just jumps in the fucking Christmas Tree Trust so lo fi boy all right. I've been here for three and a half two minutes. I'm going to I'm going to get out of here. Guys low key one of the scariest stunts in movie history as the guy stabbing the heap of Christmas trees with a giant pitchfork and then a guy. That's like six inches behind where he's going like. Take safety back. Then wasn't exactly they're like where is he just stab low yeah. There's a lot of those opening moments have a ton of comedy. I love the the smash cut when like Steve McQueen and the molar describing their escape plan of pushing the dirt behind them by channeling three feet under the wall. They're like going over this planet. That's so stupid it just my word and then smash cut to them going into the cooler just caked in mud like what a great moment between McQueen's definitely the comic relief of this film brighty there in the scene the Americans right I mean yeah he's he stands in for all Americans there. Yeah gotTa have that Swagger Point. How many Americans are the three Garner three guys that do the Yankee doodle Dandy Garner McQueen and the guy whose job it is to throw McQueen's baseball glove back at him captured that Tapie who clearly doesn't throw isn't real mean Joe Greene moment right there was a little before your time Adam knows right and I am a collector of Pop Culture Trivia? It was crazy to me because for Steve McQueen to leave his baseball glove behind suggests that he doesn't think he's GonNa make it because that is a great glove hands headed his whole life and as I read that that that was an anachronistic glove it didn't didn't they didn't look like that. During the warriors parents at your moment of pedantry or the warm up that is a moment of pedantry but it might have been his grandfather's clothing. Don't put the little the little sound effect on that rob. That's not the official. I was hoping that everyone would come in here with I could actually do my moment of pedantry right now. It wouldn't be terrible well. Let's hear it so at the conclusion of the March of seventy sixty Americans present to the British with invitations to join or a celebratory drink. I should preface this because we have movie. Crush listeners always do like a moment of pedantry which is something that I found in the goof section about the film that somebody somebody took exception to and I try to find the most pedantic one I can. I can find usually that doesn't have to do with epaulettes yeah so this is the fourth of July set piece. The Americans present invitations for a celebratory Tori drink at the door to the hut gaffe declares down with the British to which Roger Mac Enthusi- enthusiastically reply here and quite right too goths error was saying British when the correct usage would be the the English in this context the appeal of an inebriated goth to a bemused Roger Based on South African Roger Rochelle and the Scottish McDonald would be sufficient to excite a moment of humor between the three historical enemies of England. Oh Wow so this depends on took exception to the construction of a joke that a drunk guy made well done though I mean he's right right. He's not he's not right. I don't I think I think he's wrong because we can assume it's a he but it's like the the phrase the excitement of humor that's great. I have done the math on how jokes work you have been at the pointed end of the it's the British English English British Internet pet and stick that was before. I started muting everyone on twitter today. That called me ding-dong. John Roderick calls calls me Ding Dong all the time but now people on the Internet think it's fine to call me anytime just muted him just because he called you a Ding Dong Ding Dong infection. I have taken an extremely liberal approach to my use of the mute function. He'll done boys not even dangling blink didn't even use dealing which is slightly less bad. I guess how great does this panavision look. Though it's spectacular it's also just a great a great transfer to H._d.. I D I mean it's a beautiful movie. I don't think I'd ever seen it in high def but it looks well it really shine you know in the camping only do so much but it really shines once they get out of there. Yeah Yeah like those flying. Territorial stuff is really really gorgeous. Those sequences really struck me because I wasn't conscious of feeling like closed in and confined in the first two hours of the movie but that's Kinda like the the you know the mark between two and three hours when a all get out and it is like suddenly like the tone of the music changes and you feel like like free and there are these long meditative moments where like the two tunnel kings are like in a row boat and they just hold the shot for twenty seconds while they row across some beautiful Bavarian River and like wow which was a great like as it turns out plan. There's no one out there. They were kept wanting attenborough and the other Guida hide just like go hide somewhere for a few days quit just walking around cities yeah very noticeable birthmark on your face to play low man even the worst police sketch artist. I would be able to make something that looked a little bit like he's got this here. What do you think about the attenborough head tilt one of the better hat till it's a great hat tilt great hat? I feel like it might've heard no expense. It might have been a little John T for Nazi Germany. You know they had a lot of uniform Jeunesse. The Nazis did in the sort of set so they're not all bad no not everything but it's sort of the black trenchcoat era of German civilians and that that hat looks a little bit like New York Broadway nineteen thirty nine right. I wondered about it yeah well. He also tilts his Fidora once he gets out so that's his move for sure yeah. He's he's the only hat tilt her on the on the side of the allieds well except if you if you zoom back biography rewind to the to the first two hours of the film his Royal Airforce Service Cap is also tilted at a junkie angle throughout the film he's really like. Is that what you're referring to in the first place. Oh I thought you were talking about his civilian hat both yeah. He's got hat tilt going the whole time yeah that's his move so the civilian clothes are all made out of uniforms perform that they like put mention of disbelief going with how much just raw material they needed. I love the like level of sophistication they bring to the jailbreak though it's it's totally unbelievable capable and it's yeah and it's a real story right like like this actually kind of happened right it is but this is way fictionalized. It's a real story and I think the the the moment of pedantry that was true at the time was that what got left doubt was how many German civilians actually helped including guards helping them in their escape so a lot of those documents that they actually used weren't forgeries they were just brought in by German civilians codes and tools tools and maps and all that stuff it really felt like the Ferret would become a composite character for that type of person but they never position the fair at that way and it'd be useful idiot yeah some of it was that the looked Wafa offer just like the German Navy was not full of Nazis so there were a lot of people that because they were these sort of great upper class Lugar is definitely like disgusted by what happened to the fifty that get murdered Luger's. Here's he's the camp commandant and he gets replaced by he's super contemptuous of the High Hitler how Hitler like you can from the very beginning interesting. He thinks of himself as Hitler as you guys. I don't WanNa say anything right <music>. I'll hit learn now. Is that true to how it could have been absolutely and what about what else I've wondered about was not to both sides it fuck the Germans in World War Two but there were a lot of great movie if you're against it's the Germans in World War Two because you get to see a lot of them. Get kicked in the teeth but what about the the notion that the prisoners had things that the guards wouldn't have red cross pack chocolate and coffee and they could get mail from home interesting but and and they didn't just take that it'd be like I'll be taking s- coffee because of the Geneva Convention and the Red Cross I mean there were all these rules would they didn't have was their own luggage and their own personal items that was greatly exaggerated in this fill that they would <unk> have baseball mitts and that makes sense I guess but that's the whole notion with the Ferret was Brian with cigarettes and chocolate J. Garner basically molesting him trying to shove out and chocolate down his pants. What come up for those <hes> those Russian would woodcutters at the beginning where they get a bunch of cigarettes for like their acts in there and their hat and coat and they they get the axe hat and coat back immediately? I did not cigarette cool. I mean there's a ton of on the allied side but also there's a ton of sophistication on the German side in terms of like nabbing ebbing these guys unlike catching the escapes like the cases made that this is like an elite unit of prison guards right right right these are the best of the best although I think all the guards and all the people that would have been in the Wafa and working at this prison camp would have been stationed here because they weren't. They didn't have flight status was it is this a plum gig like the ferrets constant. Fear is getting sent to the Russian front grant right and I was like yeah. This seems way better than that well. The commandant says like let's just wait out the war here. That's a pretty like all of it yeah. That's a that's a pretty tempting offer like oh right. Just wait out the war <HES> NO WE'RE GONNA escape and make Your Life Hell and get shot in the end yeah here. You'RE GONNA get fired and probably killed but the weird thing about the that that in a war full of atrocity murders millions getting murdered there were these little pockets of Tallyho this is this is good sport. <hes> what yeah like it suggests the fraternity of airman yeah and a higher class of of respect respect and you see it and you see it in war movies where the the ship will get sunk by the sub and the captain will be welcomed in given a cup of coffee like all these rules of engagement that the make worse fun fun. I mean this definitely had that feel of it's one of the least threatening World War Two Krizan camp films and fairly nonviolent in its depiction of of death I mean when when the prisoners are marched out of the truck and shot with a machine gun you only see the machine gun yeah for example and like I think the most disturbing depiction of someone dying was Donald pleasants character and the blood that went <music> over James Garner's face very <hes> for as much implied violence is there isn't as there isn't a film there isn't a lot of like disturbing bloody debt and no attempt was made to make that blood looks like blood yeah either. It looks like pomegranate like Garner was eating a delicious Cherry Pie field boy. You knew Donald pleasants was going to be a problem from the very beginning when he walks in and talks about being a bird watcher boy Oy guys he's great in this movie. A pay only was familiar with him through the Halloween films. I've never seen him play a role like this before he played himmler in the sequel to this movie he likes switched sides and the Raider escape. It's called the great escape to wow he was the president of the United States in escape from Oh yeah <hes> but <hes> but weirdly Donald pleasants was actually in Royal Air Force shot down over Germany and imprisoned in a in a wartime prison camp easier yeah so and there's a story while they were filming this movie where he started to kind of offer some suggestions to the director like it'd be good if the lamp hung like so and the director was like thanks kid and chased him out and then somebody was like a little boy he actually was in the camps and then all of a sudden he was brought in and given the right <hes> really he added a lot of very tough and he meant hey. How'd you like to pay M Ller but but going through all of the actors they all served in in the marines or the army or the Air Corps like this this whole cast is that World War Two generation yeah I think <hes> Garner is maybe the youngest and he was in Korea really but a lot of a lot of them were World War Two vets various theaters? I read that Charles Bronson was a coal miner before he became an actor and so he actually similar to pleasants brought a bunch of like tunneling technique to the film film that they didn't have he was a teenage coal miner N.. LEGIT CLAUSTROPHOBIC which is really a weird plan be like if this acting thing doesn't work out. I can always go back to coal mining a only tate species you know he got his where he got his name right that story <hes> because he was Charles you know insert Polish name results he went to audition at paramount pictures and win through the Brunson Gate and what his name was and that's where he got it just from the you know the Bronx paramount pictures of cool store yeah last name was just ceesay case easy. I kept thinking to the reservoir dogs line to from the beginning of reservoir dogs. He's like Charles Bronson integrate escape. He's digging tunnels. I've kind of three tunnels theory of this movie <hes> Tomko. I never go in the in Dick Tunnel. Do they sure don't they spend all the time and Tom Tunnel and Harry tunnel. It's right it's too bad that would have been great for us. You need to prepare Harry tunnel before entry entry. I think so which one gets shut down with the discovery of the coffee by the Ferret. Tom Tunnel Tom. I was surprised at how little like after that I mean there was no lock down it. It was just sorta like well. We found this and I'm sure you guys weren't doing anything else on well. It's a major operation that tunnel. It's kind of astonishing. They have three going at the same. Well that's true. I guess that was the point. I was surprised that the Germans didn't do a little that more like in-your-face dunking on them yeah having discovered their tunnel when there's not even a hint of a rifle but smashed against the face of a guy he lives in those barracks they all just come out and go. Did you miss that part of the story darkness of it. The thing is there's no even though it's not a comedy the the movie is extremely light. We don't really we get a little bit of back story of everybody in minutes from the end. You're reminded Oh yeah. Nazis are evil people could die but but it's there's everyone is friends. If there's not a single competition between anyone in the camp nobody is a traitor. Nobody is no. Nobody's a coward given there are a couple of guys that have some issues but but they're not played Bronson. His fear is not played as cowardice right right. It almost upsets the apple cart but anyway you never get. There's no there's no actual tension and it's is a little bit. It's a little bit unreal in the sense that it's it's. It's a it's a cast of like fifteen big stars. There's six hundred extras and everybody's hero hero yeah they're. They're having a great time. I I mean like if you if you believed that they're like focusing one hundred percent of their energy on the escape attempt. You couldn't also hold in your mind that they were growing enough potatoes to still three huge jugs of moonshine. You know it takes a long time to grow potato and that many potatoes they do interesting things with the passage time in this film like with the raking of their their <hes> of their plots and then few scenes later you see some growth there like they are suggesting time passing here I could never way when it was because they were singing Christmas carols but it was they also fourth of July. It should have been really cold during the Christmas carol singing and but I feel like it was all I can't. I don't know how much time elapsed at all staff. I feel like the director just didn't care. It seemed like wherever wherever they shot this was super far north because the light is outside Munich cooper angrily like yeah it was it was a studio in Munich and they built this like kind of at the edge of the woods next to the studio so kind of right beside this is a big film lot wow that's why it was so beautiful when they when they after the escape when we see them there in perverted very yeah not like they're in Poland. Gosh you don't know did you guys pick up on James Coburn being Australian at all. Oh I picked up on what like Mary poppins Dick Van Dyke level bad accent. I I thought he was American. There was really no hint of Australian accent. What's interesting is? I don't think they gave him very many lines. He He's in the movie a lot and he's he's doing a lot but he he really chokes his lines back because I think he recognizes and everybody recognizes that he's not he did not nail the accident. I expected him to fuck up. Everything likely spend a lot of time on boy. His big bag is going to be a problem hole and I'm like Oh shit. He's the guy that's GonNa. Blow it for everyone. What was in the Jack? Why is it so important yeah? I don't know that was where the macguffin was. He made I needed that for pulp fiction. How about that pomp though that he made that's pretty cool bellows cool like I mean I never really considered what tunneling out means but you know having to create like a mine shaft basically support it get air and they're get light in there? They didn't show up but there was a scene where he constructed another pump in his barracks. which you know for a long time this one's just for me me and my Australian cock boy good they might the concept of the tunnel falling on you so scary and I feel like the maybe the movie undercuts fat a little bit by just dumping like one bag of potting soil on somebody when they need to have that effect yeah that'd be pretty crushing right? If you look at the you can go see pictures of the camp where they were this actually took place and they have outlined the the tunnel dimensions on the ground so you can kind of walk around and look at what where the tunnel started and where it ended and it's insane it is insanely long yeah and to imagine being in there where your shoulders touching. Your head is touching like there's just just that you're not really even enough room definitely not enough to sit up for that distance and the idea that any amount of potting soil would fall on you. I was just I was crossing and crossing my legs through all of those I was not expecting Brunton to pull off the pace of the lights going out and him being stuck in the tunnel. Oh Yeah that was legit scary yeah. He and James Garner released steal the movie for me. In terms of like real illness performance they just yeah are so subtle and and like garnered darn it doesn't have anything like super deep to sink his teeth into that but like all his little kind of messing with the with the Ferret the fair you know the mall. The mall was although like mind games he plays on the German guard stuff and the kind of like casual bravado he is like I got all those documents that are impossible to get here. They are like right like those. Two performances were just like totally my favorites and movie apparently he actually was the scroungers in his unit in the Korean War and I wasn't I had never really heard the term. Methodist people forget that that's why most people forget James Garner. Was this counter but it's a great. It's a great nickname to have her. It's a great job in any heist caper yeah. I'll be the scratcher yes. The shawshank redemption thing like the guy who can get things is like serves the most useful purpose and is often like the most fun in the group right who can magically just produce yeah and they also because that character also always has to have some level charm yeah because it has to come through the guards most in most cases that day Danny the tunnel king growth through five hundred feet of potting soil came out clean on the other side all right not bad bad bad bad why wait for black Friday November when Dell's black Friday in July is on and it's the biggest one ever score up to four hundred dollars off the latest Dell uh-huh and alienware computers with Intel core processors and free shipping on everything plus an amazing selection of electronics and accessories like bose headphones. Just call eight hundred buy Dell or visit Dell Dot com slash black Friday. That's eight hundred by Dell for massive deals today. I think it was kind of disappointed disappointed team this a few times but I'd forgotten how sort of Jokey McQueen was like this is the least cool Steve McQueen part he was not McQueen cool. He was Joe Really surprised by a couple of his facial expressions in this film like like when they're about to leave the tunnel any pops up and he realizes that they're sure yeah and McQueen scrabble's back. It's like I need the rope and then he like presents the case in the tunnel for the new plan the plan b they they stay on him for a moment any like makes us pitch and he's like he makes this weird round face about it it. I don't know what that was about. He was making a lot of those choices throughout the film. I mean he shines with the motorcycle stuff. That's when he because period and all that stuff is genuinely fucking cool yeah to see like it's clearly him. He didn't do the jump which at the time was like one of the greatest stunts ever performed just that jump over the barbed wire could still considered pretty great stunt yeah like when you think about the kind of motorcycles they had. It wasn't like you know there wasn't a stunt cycle. They dislike painted this triumph for whatever and green the choice of composition for that jump. I think so great because like Sturgis was never he never never thought about a teaming that sequence shot at wide like three quarters like a little bit above like you see the whole thing and it's realism is like unquestioned. It's great. No trickery involved yeah. I love how they made that a barbed wire. Did you read about this like Sturgis had everyone on the entire crew from like crafty to camera people to Electricity Lines <hes> make rubber barbed-wire barbs and then tie them to a longer piece of rubs like in their spare time yeah and so that length of barbed wire that's jumped and then landed in later is all rubber rubberized and it's made by the entire crew like a like a quilt pretty cool. It is really up to see him. <hes> like languishing in the yeah. If you really sells it yeah I had a experience as a kid where I was like on a camping trip or something and did not had never encountered the concept of barbed wire before and tennis academy academy and I was like really squirming listen to that John raised without barbed-wire. Imagine what that's called. Privilege folks three Roman I laugh but we had barbed wire. We had a barbed-wire dog pen so yeah I mean it wasn't razor-wire. We've found last goats goats and dogs in the same pin. Oh it's that you showed pretty interesting magazines to get into that. What was your take on the mole sort of a under abuse character I think in some ways there seemed to be a lot more like consciousness of what his mental status was on the like leadership part then they show on screen like everybody's like you knew he was has to breaking and I'm like Z.? It didn't seem like that. He seems alright to me. He was starting to starting to come unraveled. He was spending all that time that bravado time in the cooler but they never show any of that they don't but but I think it's gotta gotta be. It's gotta be harder to sit in that cooler for twenty days right then it looks and and Steve McQueen was was was making the case again like <hes> like bridge on the River Kwai like I can take ticket to put me in the cooler over and over. I don't care I said that cooler is twenty percent worse if you're in the one next Steve MacLean bouncing his fucking that's what drove him mad fucking baseball you know that baseball is driving him betty to you by the MO had malicious face. He really looked like his nickname yeah while you hit the Scottish people not all scots the the <hes> the guard and the cooler was like boy. You really can't have any job other than German soldier with a face like that. I don't know if this is true or not but my feeling was that the that the soldier that ultimately captured Steve McQueen in the barbed wire was that guy rewind to put it all together but it really felt like they they lingered on the the soldiers face some nice head can and it was like oh him him God. That guy has some bone structure <hes> yeah yeah. I'm not sure if that guy was the guy but you guys can there be. I'm GONNA script through and see if I can verify you guys. Keep talking scrubbing through. I feel like it seen that Ferret guy before what is he he. What does he been in? All these dudes were in everything Robert Groff. I thought I mean they all had German accents which is for the time a little different because you know famously honestly the SORTA British accent for any German right but less well. If everybody yeah they really made his position I think and I think even had some real Germans like playing some of these roles yeah yeah I think like a couple of Germans had had like like experiences similar to the jobs that they were portraying also a wartime experience. You feel like it was too long. Yes three hours long. I think it's a different German that capture Stephen Different German but it does feel like the dragged a little bit there. Was that guy then where's the other guy. I don't know those are the two guys oh the two is side by side yeah anyways <hes> it's long but I feel like it's it's like the summer movie event of Nineteen Sixty eight sixty three. What's the difference guys? Honestly there's an enormous difference between nine hundred sixty three nine thousand six hundred say whereas there's no difference between nineteen ninety four and nineteen ninety-seven you're probably right. I felt like it did even though it seeing this movie. A few times felt they get dragged a little bit for the first time I was aware of how long that first two hours was without a lot of like it's kind of repetitious in parts with the cooler stuff and I felt like the could have kind of gotten through that a little quicker now the payoff of all that hard work being the tunnel the the getting everybody out scene where we see all the work that we've watched meticulously put together for two hours homers then we then we start to see it unfold and there's nothing that they build in the first two hours that we don't see it employed in that scene the pomp the ventilation I._D.. Cards each thing then has its reappearance saying but yeah. I'm not sure we needed. It's feels like one of those things if you'd taken if you take a minute here a minute there minute here minute there could have made a tightening tightening up by half an hour but there wasn't any one thing there wasn't a character. You didn't WanNa see or any one thing you didn't. There aren't any scenes that feel like they're fat. Though you know like I feel like every scene. Kinda unfolds at a at a pace that feels right to me. It's just that there's a lot of scene like there's so many set pieces like I feel like everybody gets their feature. Yeah it might be kind of movie. That's tough to cut stuff from because you know he each. Each scene leads right into the next like there's there's so much connective tissue in the script like the fourth of July seen leading to the leading to Tom being discovered by the Germans and and like like that that emotional arc is it doesn't work if you cut out the although like you know the fun fun and games with distilling the moonshine which is the scene right before you know so I think I just. I could use more threat and menace. Although clearly sturgis was going for just sort of a light adventure film that wasn't the movie he was making but I could have used more cooler time of like despair and maybe the Germans really really shaken them down after they find the first tunnel and it was all just sort of Hogan's heroes trolls all very light. Do you think that tone for so long makes the moment where they're executed outside the truck back more acute like do you think that really fucked people up in sixty probably because you know and Hannah comes out of nowhere right. I've never felt more alive was like one of the last things he says yeah before they get mowed down that that was pretty tough and we get that contrast again. You do see in Hogan's heroes. which is that when the Gestapo arrives? You're you're reminded oh there are baddies out there. Bad Hogan's heroes is yes yeah okay. Let's the don't want to assume anything T._V.. Show that was kind of a copy of stalag seventeen watchdog seventeen and talked about Hogan's Heroes Hogan was the Mug that Conan O'Brien had on his desk for a long time right. Oh no eisenhower I think then an Eisenhower Mug that was Colonel Klink that he was on his desk. Is this going to Segue into conversation about the sexual dual proclivities of Bob Crane do five minutes green is it also that like the scariness of Nazis is more is more like contemporary in nineteen sixty eighty three like is it still is it like is is a Western audience still like trying to kind of dispel some of the horror of World War Two by making a AH lighter movie like this in nineteen sixty. It was a gradual realization. We've talked about before over over twenty years. How bad it was because there was a lot of whitewashing but I think I think the Nice Germans ends or the fact that the Germans were in this movie mostly portrayed sympathetically right was the was the thing you wouldn't see now right? Would you go see a World War Two movie now and have any any Germany like like yes. I'm more or less a reasonable man not unless it was sort of a spooky send up of like Hogan's heroes they would either be like I'm on your side or I mean it would be. It'd be played much more broadly than this. which is kind of like I'm doing my job? I am a member member of the German military but I'm not a monster. I I remember thinking it was really addressing the scenes around the train like there. I mean there's a lot of interesting social interactions like the S._S.. Guy Like with his feet up on the bench kind of which doesn't seem like something S._s.. Soldier would do that that seems sort of casual that might be pedantic. They had a lot of this as privilege and then when they get off there's like a Hitler youth kid short shorts and like Elaine the handing out flyers and I was like are those like like true believers. Did you say short shorts yeah. He's got black shorts that are like they're like real up high short short it'd be I missed. Maybe Miss Remembering now now they were. They were pretty short but that was the style and sixty three. Did you guys think about <hes> what sort of tunnel person you would be and this is a little bit guy adjacent but like when people were popping up out of the tunnel and then running for the forest uh-huh <hes> a few of them would you know throw their bag up pop up look around right periscope like and then run for the forest and and other people would just get up and run trusting the rope signal to tell them that no one was watching. I feel like I would have a hard time running for the forest not looking behind me at any point and that was some of the most nerve wracking <hes> sequences of the film for me was seeing all the differences in how people approach that strategy of Escape Yeah I would have been the guy that went back and found the surveyor and was like what the fuck man. You're really left us out to address here. We're fourteen feet shy. Yeah they kind of started but they were like you know. Don't like don't waste time arguing about that can gye yeah so let's just go on the survey or ended up being the one that attracted the attention of the guard and really blew it big a white paper package seems like bagging bubble wrap do that with a low Albedo package to take in your but also why did any of those guys have packages single. One of them has a has a an item that they're carrying with them. Talk about provisions in rations like I guess that's a good point saying they had some stuff their sandwiches but in terms of the action figures they want them each to have an accessory. That's right <hes> in terms of which tunnel guy you would be. I think that's a really interesting question. Because of course there were hundreds of guys that helped build it that didn't go yeah and not just because it was cut short but there were a lot of people that either opted <unk> out or work chosen you WanNa talk about darkness unseen in this film like they never cut back to a barracks of Guy Washing his hands after having dug the tunnel knowing yet everyone's leaving him right yeah because everybody was in on there wasn't a single person in the camp was just like unaware that this was happening. Is it part of it that like they needed to be plausible like they do all that testing of can you can you present your papers and kind of carry on the the like functionary our mission in almost possibly yeah sure anybody could speak German or French had had a better chance yeah then like somebody with a deep southern accent. I've always wondered like what a what a slightly bad frenchaccent be detectable dateable to an average German security officer like 'cause 'cause they're brench is not perfect at all when they're like on the train and they're saying like just we Francais. Oh see I got the Guy Hands <unk> hands in their papers back like I I guess I just I just don't know 'cause I don't live in in Europe but like would would they know or where we just asked to suspend disbelief. They're totally depend on who you countered right right. I mean there were there. Were there was an entire movie going audience that was expected to to accept James Coburn as Australian so accent sensitivity isn't right but that's a big scene in inglorious bastards right where he he's finally discovered by the way he holds up his fingers to indicate three whether he has not to this a little bit yeah for sure that he gets busted at the end with is he the one that earlier had said yea McDonnell. We're going to find out who he was portraying. The Nazi officer in the practice run right right like does him chuck yeah very good. That's a great line reading. I'm Clark so is that guy just going around saying that everybody just testing them or he's. He's been he's been scrambled because they know huge. Jailbreak has taken the thing that you have to wonder is any any male all civilian in Germany at this point yeah. They're all of war fighting age right. So why aren't you in the army would be the automatic question that you would ask anytime you saw thirty five year old guy walking around yeah good point and so that would dress up as an old but like they didn't have to. You're never too old for the volks terms or get like a cane or something and act like you know you clearly have some some malady yeah. That's that's a great great idea. Why why more people didn't affect a limp gets into escape? Put some tar on a couple of these teeth. I can't be in the military. That'd be no good. They did check papers of of people just in Germany at the time. It was part of the just walking around yeah. It was just part of the control system of of the Nazis to have everybody always spying on each other and it's Kinda like you have to show your driver's license cents at the airport now man. It's kind of like when the cops pull you over. They want to see your I._D.. Bullshit I liked how the <hes> how it was like you know one by two by air air to buy see on a motorcycle gown coburn the OSCE on his bicycle. The train is the bicycle that was absolutely some of the best escape for me is just like Oh you get on a bike. Nobody's GonNa stop you. I believe you could rive weeks. Yeah that plane escape scene was fun to starting. The motor of an aircraft without being able to see has has got to be the scariest thing. Don't go that way. Once you've motor the engine great yeah pleasants was great at portraying. Someone who's blind or severely compromised vision like that seems like like there's act drunk as the difficult thing to do and the blind has got to be a totally different cat Lai <hes> he was great at that he was yeah. Those flying scenes were gorgeous. Don't I mean that that plane was real real but it's it's t six is all the time so all the planes on the runway there on the taxiway they were all t six Texans which is weird that at that point which are American okay and those are also the stand in planes for Japanese Zeros and a lot out of these movies they were American trainers that that we had a lot of but you would think a movie of this kind of budget that was filming in Germany with a couple of yeah. That's not too or whatever I like to low. He was flying to just sort of skirting the treetops which there's not like radar cover to be worried about at this point. Is there like within German airspace. They didn't have radar did the fuck is running that airbase also they never launch a fighter after the guy they just watch him. Go visit the that he gets too much of a head start. They would never be able to catch him well. He's like you'd want to at least try. Yeah Yeah 'cause you would be shot or something. That's just plain on the the two I ran out with the pistol. You really have the jump on us so they have radar in World War Two but maybe like ground radar at a at a training airbase. I thought the British really only ones with radar is a I'm reading about the reader was invented and developed and perfected throughout the course of the war. I mean it was like it was in its infancy. It's plane crashes. Go though for the time not bad it came in pretty hot and got clipped by that tree I mean it was believable enough. Yeah they wreck that plane yeah so James Garner a Eagle squadron guy like he's an American in a WHO joined Rhodesian when he joined the Canadian Air Force before we entered the war wow so there were there were quite a few of those yeah I can pile it. He's he's Ben Affleck but then actually that didn't go well. I didn't Pearl Harbor was also the doolittle raid and also also but there was one of the people that escaped one of the actual people that escaped during the during the real escape was a doolittle raider. Wow One of those doolittle raiders got made it through China China got repatriated while and then went to Europe and flew as a bomber pilot got shot down and was at the camp and was part of this whole escape. Where is that movie holy life well? It's Pearl Harbor starring Ben Affleck except a and we didn't really focus on him as much as we could have yeah that guy incredible life incredible how many people got out seventy something oh seventy six and three of them actually made it and in real life the three that made it Philip two of them were Norwegians and one of them was Dutch so no Americans were British or anything like that and presumably because they probably had pretty good language they could bind in a little bit better. You know it struck me that like the escape in Europe is greatly aided by everybody's like European heritage like most of them are British but like the couple of Americans like like that like if you're you can have this movie in a war in Afghanistan like nobody would buy it and we're in the Japanese theater that was right. That was the thing about <hes> about the doolittle raider movie was these guys were in China and they stood out like sore thumbs it wasn't it's not possible to hide them or deny. They'd been there on. There's no fence in bridge on the river requires. Like where are you going to go dork yeah like the resistance seen in the cafe that that kind of had forgotten about that and that took me by surprise a bit when when Coburn got up the phone rang and they basically he was like you might WanNa. I love the physical comedy of that scene scene where the two guys do the elevator behind the new. My daughter loves that yeah but that was a straight up drive by yeah. Yeah guys are just having some the what were they having by the way it was something they're having heard owed little per no but you mix it with water. It's a prestigious yeah. It's a little like <hes> like AH absence makes an absence but I don't think it's their absence that there were drinking but it's like I think everybody in France is either like a per node person or ricard person they all like have a feeling about which is the better one to drink drink and they're owned by liquor mega conglomerate Pernod Ricard. Are you more of a graveyard man. You'll do support them. Both into the same glass. Every Nation of Europe has an Anna set a little like aperitif right and and they all taste exactly the same and I'm sorry to say this to all the people out there who are like no Ouzo is amazing. They all just are they taste like licorice and they are awful. Was that realistic though for three German officers and afternoon just sitting down at a cafe. F._A._A.. And having some drinks like everything's just seem so it none of it seemed like wartime lear occupied France so does they some of them might have been vichy Frenchies in German uniforms. I think Um I don't I don't think that we got enough of them talking to establish whether they were of German or French distraction but but before d day there were Germans all throughout France and it was kind of like considered a posh a place to sit out the war right because they're not on the Russian front they're just they're right having per no yeah sitting out the war ALFRESCO little know they've really <hes> not great reflexes on those on those officers officers by stand up and built Fed machine-gun coming out of the back of that situation so the three coburn makes it right presumably and the three in its Bronson Bronson and the other guy and their rowboat which again was his genius. Yeah had a really easy time of it. They rode right up to that Swedish boat. It would happen to have a ladder level trick Swedish boats where they <hes> drop the panels on the sides. It's an suddenly a German warship. sturgis paid the captain of that bigger boat to turn around and and position in the right light for that team. I kept waiting on a Nazi Jetski. The come around the corner there was <hes> there was a Goof who fund I._M._D._b.. About that scene too because there's like automated crane container cranes in the background of that and that's that's like nineteen fifties and and and more recent invention like containerization wasn't invented until after the war which is like so weird to think about like I mean like the biggest project of moving crap all over the planet and they didn't have shipping containers stevedores lights unloading unloading ships good union job anymore. That's why stevedores are always throwing their wooden shoes into the into the container cranes these days well if you haven't heard this show before I think one of the things you have to do on a movie podcast is review the film and for every film. We didn't know that when we first started how many episodes did we go before we figured out we had to. I think it was super really wasn't many I think it was like twelve what now because there was a we had a listener make like a spreadsheet of all our rankings and share with US reason l.. I think it was kind of dragged us for not reviewing a bunch of the movies. I'd ends really helpful. There was one episode might be wrong. I remember you guys one of you went to your spiel but never said what the actual rating was. Oh yeah well we cut the boring stuff might be wrong but wait a minute. It's like you've reviewed it. Suck at this. We've learned a lot while making this show offered me about your show all right Adam Adam for the one that Bob the rule is like for every war film we discuss us so too is attached a custom rating system. We do that so that films aren't compared to one another and four which is like totally ignored by this guy with this spreadsheet. It's not like he has different columns for for all of our different rating systems yeah get it all rows reverting at the stars and that's not what they are no. He needs to have a new column on his spreadsheet that that describes the the rating is doing rating erasure and substituting with stars because that is fucked up. I actually I mean just just to throw off all the math. I'm retroactively reviewing all of the movies that we did not give reviews to One-star all sucked yes test fair. I think we talked a lot about the tone of this film and maybe the issues we had with it being not quite as dark as war films typically are for their time and there is an item in the film. I think that embodies that feeling the most it's a scene between blyth and Henley where Blyth is making his shitty and he can't do it without the milk and he's like you know Oh a p._o._W.. Camp you can make tea the tower right but if you really WANNA class it up he need the milk and almost immediately blyth returns with the milk and changes the whole game and it's heavenly returns with the milk and Henley returns with the milk and changes the whole game and it's really like that's the sensibility of the film this is this is milk in your World War Two film Thi this is like an enjoyable apple war-film hang it is not meant to evoke a sense of roughing it or or darkness or hardship in any way he's no menace not much at least yeah and that is one aspect back to the film that is unfortunate for a film that I approached expecting greatness yeah the other aspect to it is that we have been watching a lot of ensemble films where you get hyper efficient efficient character development and I think one of the ways that this film does not succeed entirely for me is that these characters are defined by what they do and not who they are and to me the nickname is not a substitution for a character and for as much time as this film takes to give you plot and for what you guys believed to be deep character development. I didn't get that feeling much yeah and a lot of these characters felt the same to me other than their nickname and so like while I liked the film Allo- I did not love it and those are two ways that I didn't and so for that reason listen. I'm going to give it a good but not great four cans of milk for cans or k still pretty thick rating. That's that's some thick milk. That's the daddy milk. I don't like tea. I don't like milk in my tea either raising his great best really yeah it really is you need to you need to reprogram your brain a little bit because you spend a lot of time being the enemy of milk all things it's true now that milk is back on the menu boys all right I think you should I think you should give it another chance. Let's have some Milky Tea together later great. I'm into it. What would you do for a Klondike? Bar is back in a new snacks. I series starring Ana Farris US watch on a disguise herself and go undercover with a hidden camera to find out what crazy things real people would do for their favorite ice cream. You can see the full videos at Klondike bar dot com slash videos and I'm telling on you guys. My favorite Klondike bar is the old standard Klondike Vanilla in the center. It is so delicious and I'm going to be checking these videos out for sure you can also share what you do for a Klondike bar using the Hashtag at four the the number four the letter A. Klondike Hashtag for Klondike. That's Hashtag the number four the letter A. Klondike and show them what you do for a Klondike bar and you know what I would do for a Klondike Bar <hes> <music> just about anything. This is a classic for me and one that I I love rewatching. I have nostalgia for watching it with my mom and dad when I was as a kid and I feel like it's it's still great and <hes> I I love all the characters in it and I think that <hes> I think it's it's going to be one one of the movies that I revisit throughout my life so I'll give it a four and a half cans of milk so I found myself when I watch movies for movie crush through more studied studied lens and a more critical eye than just every other time. I've seen this film. I found myself liking this one a little less than I had in the past it felt a little long and a little too light and goofy at times sometimes with the McQueen stuff I think I would like I mentioned earlier. I it could've used a little more minutes a little more like show the mole losing his mind in that cooler a little bit don't just say well. He's going mad and then he has his one scene where you know runs and does suicide by cop basically so I found myself a little more critical this time for movie that in the past I just sort of enjoyed thoroughly so I'm GonNa going to take it back to <hes> take it back to four cans of milk but still high but previously probably would have been in the four and a half range well you don't have to you don't and have to be influenced by me. I'm not good in no way is influenced by you good. Yeah I agree with you chuck. I watched to this movie a bunch of times. This was late night television with my dad watching. I've seen this movie on a black and white TV of seen it on early color T._v.. And how does it look black and white because I feel like it's it's a very spectacular movie and you shoot a little differently for color than you do for black and white but this is in the Arab went. I think they probably had to think about both yeah. panavision is is not like super super snappy colors. It's all pretty muted yeah and I mean the colors are beautiful but they're not they're not like hyper real their avengers endgame or Thor Ragnarok level but at the time during the black and white television era. You didn't really think about it you just that was what you got right. You get what you get. Don't get upset right but watching it this time I realized yeah it's a it's like a boy's life movie there at Camp Camp isn't that bad they're away from their MOMS and DADS which is sad and the beds are uncomfortable but we never even there's never beds that you fall through punks like that. Moment is so okay movie yeah it's Goofy and the really lingers on him being like my arm but you know we never talk about that. The comeuppance that cavendish gets for doing a bad servic and for and for attracting the attention of the Guard cavendish could get a lot worse than this movie named after my favorite variety of banana though really took off but we never we never confront lice lice we never we never see a latrine right. We don't see them drink digging or cleaning a latrine or latrine at all. It's just not even in the in the movie and so the really so obsessed with poops and peas John Well and I'm auditioning to be on greatest jen but I but I feel like that's an example of how much I mean. There's a lot of this movie. That's like no the war was just it was just a Lark but this movie really really washed it clean and so so yeah you have to ask like what what is the message of this movie vis-a-vis war and it's from that era of just like wars good sport and this is right before Vietnam kicked off sixty three is still in a time when the greatest generation is still young and still dominating the culture and we still believe that war war is is just and that we defeated the hunt and we're only a few years away from the country taking a dramatic turn in how it thinks about war and so you could get away with a movie like this and I think of this movie came out in sixty eight it would be it would start to look like John Wayne's green berets where the culture would have responded to it like this is corny right. We the country evolved so much in the next five years yeah that does it the fact that it comes out in the era before that mean that there's no there's no sense even subconsciously that they're working in defiance of a shift in the in the mood so it doesn't have have that Cornelius to it. There's no there's no defiance in it because it's because the only alternative culture at the time was like beat beat poets or whatever but there was no. Nobody was making critique of the U._S.. War machine right except like Eisenhower kind of generally saying hey look out I could see there being a potential downside to this but like a bunch of British guys in prison camp like coming making a Rube Goldberg Berg State machine it was just it was just for fun and so so the three hour caper movie with no complexity was harder to watch this time yeah and just surrender render to I had an maybe it's because we've been doing this this podcast and looking at war movies. I've started to wonder what are what is this movie saying about war and this movie isn't saying much that said as a oh boy the idea of escaping from a prison camp and trying to make it across Germany without getting caught and not speaking German was like from watching this movie for the first time when I was probably seven or eight that became a constant fantasy game foundational element of your personality is right. This movie was made for though I think looking back it was made for like Dad's in their sons to go see sort of an fun adventure film any time I was alone in town or in the anchorage anywhere walking alone I immediately was like I'm in Nazi. Germany GonNa make it all the way home without anybody. You know figuring out that I'm GONNA escape prisoner. That's adorable big right. I still think about it. When I lay in bed last night? I was like okay. How would I make it? I was in enemy territory. Few people compare maximum con with Nazi Germany it but I have to you know I have to Dan for the reasons that you described so I'm going to say that. It's you know when you're you're. You're you're somewhere else. You're you're making. Making some milk and some seventy trump you're looking for some milk and you open up the little mini fridge in the dressing room and there's a there's a thing milk in there but it's open yeah and so you open it you lifted up and you kind of give it a sniff to see. I was hoping this would happen to see if if it's like still good because you bring that up because we were in the midst of our friendly fire tour as as of this record and we were in a in a green room and found just such a carton of milk in Seattle I want to say and I wasn't having coffee but somehow I was the one that got nominated to smell the milk that the happen. That's your call sign. Smell the milk so I'm going to give milk smeller big ten for unopened cans of milk and one open can of Mel suspicious wishes open can where you're like this could be a full and fresh delicious can but there's the uncertainty whether or not this can has been sitting out poquito space says great rating so the other thing we always do on friendly fire is is we pick the the guy that we spotted in the film that we most identify with check. Do you WANNA lead us off your Guy Yeah so in a moment you know they're rehearsing Christmas carols through a lot of this movie to to cover up that they're like banging on on ductwork that their manufacturing serves nothing covers that up than and like nine guys singing silent night go clink so there was there was one of those moments where who who's the guys at cavendish the surveyor yeah the key the choir leader and the surveyor enquirer did either the shot was from behind him facing the choir and I don't know if you remember there was this one guy on the left of the frame that by all accounts should have been just hidden behind the guy in front of him and he was completely leaning out to the left to show his face was was not very expressive he did. He looked like a bad extra. Leaning way out to decide on if you note is totally bad guy but that was my trying to get a little screen dime Ma look exactly Mike is Tunnel King Willie. Who is the there's there's the two diggers Danny as the Charles Brown's character and Willie is the other the other one who really <hes> I mean like you know it's kind of a thankless thing that he does but he really like goes out on a limb for Danny and really really cares about him and make sure that he gets through the tunnel but also in a way that like he can in cope with and I think it's one of those guys made some good points about the kind of lack of characterization in the film but I thought that was a very like human in and and and humane thing and I liked that they had that kind of that bond with each other that that they that they could trust each other that much and I thought it was so awesome that they like Willie saw Danny through the escape and then they actually make it in the end yeah so willie was my guy for being for doing danny that solid how great would it have been if the continuation of this movie was those guys just in a relationship together in Switzerland as just like walking down the cobblestone street holding hands so from the beginning eight? You said You'd go get some milk and bread appear you didn't you did this scene over when they first appeared. There is at the beginning of the movie always together these two there is extremely homoerotic feeling to their relationship yeah. They're similarly sized. They're they're. They're very touchy with each other in the beginning at the tunnel kings. I mean come on they have they have. They have several moments including that one where the tunnel though it's no me baby. They're both figures. It's pretty clear. Who's the bottom here? There's a moment where Brunton takes the shower and I think it's it's the Australian guy that's like. I'm a lifeguard watching him. Take US yeah yeah. I'd be watching do man Charles Bronson shirt off back then make crank anyways. The points sounds made. I really like Willie in that scene Ben because he like his encouragement is never shaming. There's no judgment of this being a big problem for Danny and it's never made into a Jew. GonNa fuck us if if you don't go through the tunnel like kind of a lot is riding on you buddy. It's always like Hugh Doug the tonal man it's only right that you go through just summon the courage for the five minutes needed through and then we're yeah yeah and that was an area that it could have gone darken Eric and didn't he really cares about him in a way he's the that's the only relationship between anybody in this movie where you feel except for Garner and pleasant garden pleasant to have a very similar sweet relationship and they also play H._H._s. with each other so there's another element to it so it's a very three dimensional relationships what I'm trying to say so he's your guy. Did you already done my guy. I know okay well. I mean I'll I'll do million yeah. I'd like to hear it. My guy is the is the German officer who is like in charge of the camp and not not the commandant the the officer he's the tallest guy in the movie and he's the day to day running the camp guy. He's got a lot of so the commandant has gold epaulettes which means he's like a general staff officer in the loose Wafa. This guy has red epaulets which means he's in Loofah but he's a artillery officer so something happened in his career where he ended up here. This isn't like this wasn't his original job. Well he was working at today a secret sub base in in the North Sea and he bulls side an American submarine as it was leaving there any jab yuan but but of all the I mean we've talked a lot about the kind of humanizing of the Germans but this guy is just a mench right. He's the one with the pitchfork right but he's clearly doing it not intending to stab anybody. He's doing it as as theater. Guess I gotTa Use the Damn an pitch for here we go. He's the one that recognizes. He pulls guys out of the line. He pulled pulled Bronson out of line because any new him by name he's like he's like memorized the facebook of the incoming class of stalag luft three or right yeah but he's he's never cruel to anybody. He's the guy that discovers the tunnel like he's the May never punitive never he's the main sort of German antagonise but you also get the feeling that you could just sit around with this guy and he's like a he just I liked him from the moment arrived on the screen and I and through the whole movie the One person that I felt bad about in this movie was when when the escape was made like he he was going to although wait no. That's the best part about this guy. The commandant loses his job and he's still he's still standing on the porch when the new covenant comes like he's he just sort of he's they're getting it done never never does anybody mean only in the great escape tape. Can you be like the Nazi running the prisoner of war camp great guy sweetheart the idea of there being a Nazi Manch is not a hell the combination and he's just a German doing his German job. Yeah always a great pains to make that distinction. I know I know both sides. You see my guy in maybe the most stressful part of the film film which is the train station scene and the reason it's so stressful in that moment is because they're so close to the end and yet they're altogether in in such close proximity to being caught like they're out in the open and yet they're confined signed and yet they're about to go into an even more confined space so the entire scene is very pregnant with guys like looking at each other like going when on the fuck is going to be here it's nuts and when the train finally arrives so too does my guy because because we cut to a shot of the train coming at screen which I heard you yelling hotel room last night. There is a guy standing foot away from the rails as the a steam engine comes through and does not flinch or move whatsoever and it comes a foot away from his face admired because you're watching it on your IPAD screen and you ran out of the room. I think that guy low key steals the scene because because of that like you're that feeling of dread of Oh my God the trains finally coming and then things just don't feel right in that scene at all because they're Nazis there and there cops there and so our heroes and we're waiting and just waiting in waiting and then when the train comes like only GonNa get worse and people don't look like they're acting right and one of the ways one of the things that embodies that is that guy just not moving next to the train and it's creepy. I don't think I'd noticed that and that hey guys my guy for it is the implication that the commandant is going to be put to death over the center of the Russian front or something I mean he was a known quantity to and I think he did get sent to the Russian front in real life mentioned Nazi he wasn't as you guys should pick another film the way we pick our movie on friendly fire as we roll one hundred sided die. I wanted to see that thing and so I have it right here. So here we go oh. We're GONNA roll the Die Ready. Wow that's some stellar foley works and this podcasting thing doesn't forget you get a job into production Santo. You're near dripping coffee on your show. John was it worth it. Seventy two seventy two is a two dozen eighteen movie about a war correspondent called a private war this. Is that one with the what's your nose. It's brand new. What's the The lady the lady that called? He's gone great. I'm trying to click on the link and it won't doesn't work because it's the stupid APP. Look it up. I've never heard of this movie. Oh Cate Blanchett. Emily Blunt Rachel Rosamund Pike. It's it's Rosamund Paik playing a war correspondent. She's got the eye patch on the poster. This was on every bus bench in L._A.. For like one week interesting yeah so I don't really know anything about this one but <hes> I think basically put it on our on our list on the strength of it being the bus ads worked a bus ED movie with the Word War in the title so I guess it takes cover up part of Roseman bikes face for the film one of the most celebrated war correspondents of our time. Mari Colin is an utterly fearless and rebellious spirit into the frontline line of conflicts across the globe voiced voiceless well so that'll be next week on friendly fire give based on the poster. It doesn't appear that she gives sight to the sightless. Wow sick burn. Well very great. Regret is a great way. I love it. Roderick just left the show big time just well. We'll leave it with house wraps from there so for John Roderick and Practica and the great check Bryant. I've been Ben Harrison to the victor go. The spoiler alerts all right everyone. I hope you enjoy that as much as I did. I like this little tradition recording show with these guys crossing over always curious to see if they edit. There's down in a different way so I might even listen to their version version rather than my own. <hes> those guys are great though they do a good job on that show <hes> you can check out Ben Adam if you'd like what they're throwing down and if you're a star Trek Fan you would love the greatest generation. That's a show that really put those guys on the map <hes> and if you like Mr John Roderick well I mean he has a host of things you can listen to the omnibus podcast which is Great. You can listen to <hes> roadwork. You can listen to on the line with John Roderick another one Ramsey. John has four says oh well friendly fire there you have it so <hes> those are John's four podcast army one that makes them a true professional and you can follow them on facebook which is where they do. Their friendly fire stuff hashtag tagged fire. <hes> Rican follow them individually <hes> adamant at cut four times U._T.. F._O._R._T._R._A._N.. Me Roderick is at John Roderick. That's a power move and then Ben Harrison is at Benjamin are and that is B.. E. N. J. A. M.. I N. A. H.. R. Everyone going to have to ask them. What the hell that's all about? Surely that's not a pirate reference. If so then I'm never speaking to Benjamin again all right thanks everyone I hope you enjoyed debt <hes> discussion on the great escape and I'll talk to you next time breath Louis crushes produced edited and engineered by Ramsey aunt here in our home studio at Pont City Market Atlanta Georgia for iheartradio for more podcast from iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows.

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12 Angry Men (1957) Ep. 62 w/ special guest Aaron Tracy

Classic Movie Musts

1:02:14 hr | 2 years ago

12 Angry Men (1957) Ep. 62 w/ special guest Aaron Tracy

"I'm max Baril. And this is classic movie musts where every week we breakdown classic movie while looking to provide artistic insight and historical context at the very least. We'll talk about what makes these movies classics. Classic movie must release his every Friday ready to your weekend movie viewing plans classic movie. Muss is supported by listeners. Like you. If you want to help support the show, I thank you so much and second head on over to patriotic dot com slash classic movie. Musts every patriot subscriber earns cool perks and ways to engage with the show, including the opportunity to vote every month on a movie they'd like to hear discussed on the show. All it takes is one dollar per month. A huge thank you to our current patriot subscribers you make the show possible. You can read about all our support tears and their awards over at patriotic dot com slash classic movie. Musts thank. You for joining me this week as we discuss Sidney lumet's twelve angry men in this episode during our feature presentation, we welcome screenwriter, professor and podcast her Aaron Tracy to the show to break down twelve angry men, but first let's get into this week's opening credits. Our film this week is twelve angry men which was directed. By Sidney lumet and was released in nineteen fifty seven twelve angry men stars Henry, Fonda and Lee J Cobb in a New York county courthouse. The judge is instructing jury who are to deliberate the case of an eighteen year old male from a slum who is on trial for allegedly stabbing his father to death. If there's any reasonable doubt, they are to return verdict of not guilty if found guilty he will receive a death sentence in a preliminary vote all jurors vote guilty except ger number eight played by Henry Fonda who argues at the accused deserves some deliberation. This irritate some of the other jurors who are impatient for a quick deliberation. Especially juror number seven who has tickets to that evening's Yankees game and jerk ten who demonstrates blatant prejudice against people. From the slums jer eight questions, the accuracy and reliability of the only two witnesses and the prosecution's claim that the murder weapon a common switchblade of which he possesses. An identical copy was rare jer argues that he cannot vote guilty because reasonable doubt exists conceding that he has merely hung the jury jer eight suggests a secret ballot from which he will abstain he states that if all the jurors are still agreed. He will equa yes. To their decision. The ballot reveals one not guilty vote Gernon reveals that it was he the changed his vote agreeing that there should be some discussion. Juror eight argues that the noise of a passing train would have obscured. The verbal threat that one of the witnesses claims to have heard the accused tell his father I'm going to kill you juror five then changes his vote juror eleven. Changes his vote believing. The defendant would not likely have tried to retrieve the murder weapon from the scene. If it had been cleaned of fingerprints, jer eight also points out that people who say, I'm going to kill you. Do not often literally mean it jurors five six and eight question the witnesses claim to have seen the defendant fleeing fifteen seconds after hearing the father's body hit the floor since he was physically incapable of reaching an appropriate vantage point in time having once suffered a stroke an angry juror number three play by Lee J Cobb shouts. They are letting him slip through our fingers, and that he's got to burn jer accuses him of being a sadistic public avenger juror three then tries to attack your eight shouting out kill him. But is restrained by jerus- five six and seven ger eight calmly replies. You don't really mean that you'll kill me? Do you proving his previous point? Jurors two and six then change their votes tying the vote at six to six jer four doubts the alibi of being at the movies because the accused could not recall it in much detail jer eight tests how well juror four remembers previous day's which he does with difficulty. Jer two questions. The likelihood that the accused who was almost a foot shorter than his father could have inflicted the downward stab wound found on the body. Jurors three and eight then conduct an experiment to see whether a shorter person could stab downwards on a taller person. The experiment proves the possibility but juror five drawing on his experience growing up in a slum then steps up and demonstrates the correct way to hold and use a switchblade revealing that anyone skilled with a switchblade as the boy would be would always stab underhand at an upward angle against an opponent who was taller than them as the grip of stabbing downwards would be to. Awkward and the act of changing hands too time, consuming, increasingly impatient. Juror seven changes his vote to hasten the deliberation. Which earns him the ire of the other jurors, especially number eleven for voting frivolously still he insists unconvincingly that he actually thinks the defendant is not guilty. Jurors twelve and one then change their votes leaving only three dissenters jers three four and ten juror ten than vents a torrent of condemnation of slum people claiming that they are no better than the animals who kill for fun. Most of the others turn their backs to him with your four. The only one still facing him telling him sit down and don't open your mouth again when the remaining guilty voters are pressed to explain themselves jer four states that despite all the previous evidence. The woman from across the street who saw the killing still stands as solid evidence juror twelve then reverts his vote making eight to four. Four juror nine senior for rub his nose, which is being irritated by his glasses realizes that the woman who allegedly saw the murder had impressions on the side of her nose indicating that she probably wears glasses. But did not wear them in court out of vanity other jurors, including juror for confirmed that they saw the same thing juror eight adds that she would not have been wearing her glasses while trying to sleep and points out that on her own evidence. The attack happened so swiftly that she wouldn't have time to put them on jurors twelve ten and four then change their vote to not guilty leaving only juror three jer three gives a long increasingly tortured string of arguments building on earlier remarks that his relationship with his own son is deeply strained, which is alternately why he wants the accused to be guilty. He finally loses his temper and tears up a photograph of him and his son breaking down sobbing. He mutters not guilty making the vote. Unanimous as the jurors leave juror eight helps the distraught. Jer three with his coat outside Jour's eight and nine exchange names and all of the jurors descend the courthouse steps to return to their individual lives. Twelve angry men had a budget of three hundred and forty thousand dollars and brought in over two million at the box office adjusted for inflation to budget of roughly three million dollars in box office hall of eighteen million. The film was nominated for kademi awards in the categories of best director best picture and best writing of an adapted. Screenplay it lost in all three categories to the bridge on the River Kwai. Now, let's get into the deliberations because it's time for our feature presentation. Joining us for today's feature presentation is Aaron Tracy Aaron is a screenwriter. He's a professor of screen writing at Yale University, and in the capacity where we really came across each other. He is the host of to live and dialogue in LA podcast. Aaron welcome. It's a pleasure. Thank you, very happy to be here in sorry. I've got some kind of sore throat. I feel totally fine. But sounds like Demi insane almost fire. Well, you'll have to listen to Aaron show to to understand what he sounds like most of the year round. But this is a nice complimentary thing, really it's Aaron just going out of his way because he just told me that twelve angry men are movie today was the film that was kind of his sick day movie in his so he's kind enough to get in the mood and hit jury duty last week. So it's like you're doing all sorts of nostalgic research as right and the coolest thing about going to jury duty in New York where I live is that you literally go to the twelve angry men courthouse. It looks exactly the same. It's sixty center street downtown and you show up, and it's those famous steps from twelve hundred men, and you can walk up and walked out and feel like Henry Fonda. And you know, there's that amazing shot when you first walk. You know, Sidney lumet shot from overhead at the beginning of the movie, and that's. Still exactly what it looks like it's very cool now where you kind enough to get onto a murder trial just to kind of help seal the process here somewhere between praying with everything I had that I would not get selected for jury. So that I can continue my TV writing. And also got a hoping that you know, I get the chance to do it because I've never sat on a jury and original rose who wrote till the your men. I read that you know, he got the idea from sitting on a relief citing jury on the prize. So yeah, I mean, I guess I missed that opportunity to have some incredible idea for a movie or TV show. I feel like once you would have told the lawyers that that your screenwriter who has kind of a specialty in legal dramas that they probably would have said, you know, what let's let's not Jerry. So they make you fill in a questionnaire. You know, when you're waiting to see if you're going to be called in and asking, you know, do you have any lawyers in your family to have any preconceived notions about criminals about the Justice, and that kind of thing and what you do for a living. I was I did make sure to let that I I wrote on law and order as you because I thought that might help disqualify me. Which feel guilty about now. But one of of of of TV when I when I'm my law and order we filmed on those steps, which was really highlight for me. Because like I said twelve is really one mile time favorite movies. And there we are shooting on the exact same. Steps ahead. Mirsky argue there, right? We're Henry Fonda was and it's such a good feeling. Yeah. That's been pretty surreal now before we get into twelve angry men. I was hoping you could tell a little audience a little bit about your podcast to live in dialogue in LA because I would imagine if you're interested in screenwriting screenwriting process writing in general that that you might find Aaron show quite fascinating. Erin tells a little bit about your show. Yeah. It's basically each each episode is of our so on conversation with screenwriter or TV writer, and it's really about craft. So it's about how they write what they write. And they right where. They why they right. And we've had some really terrific s we've had turns winter who was Oscar nominated for the wolf of Wall Street and also one of the key writers on the sopranos creator. Boardwalk empire. Billy Ray who the hunger games, captain Phillips, Nancy Meyers, who's the most successful female writer director history. We've got Richard Curtis coming up who wrote forwarding a funeral of actually it's it's just a great opportunity to really sit down with his top top raters and just sort of, you know, get a sense of of their craft. And so not just you know, the nuts and bolts of writing that we do that. But also what their office looks like. And what their typical day looks like and we're ratio comes from. And then let's stories behind the scenes, we agree conversation with Eleanor Burstein who wrote dirty dancing a where that came from. So it's a really fun sort of insight into t. TV and screenwriting, but he was interested. Yeah. I highly recommend it. It's it's a very engaging show. You have fascinating guests, and it makes it all very interesting to get a little bit of insight into that creative process. Now, we're talking about twelve angry men, and this is especially apropos to have you on the show, and it wasn't really planned this way beforehand, but you wrote a TV show called sequestered, which is very much an adaptation of twelve angry men. Yes. Yeah. I wrote that for Sony's crackle network, and we ran two seasons. There's a fun little show. You know, my jumping off point four. It was I wanted to write a thriller. And you know, like I said I love the setup for twelve angry men. And so I thought you know, what if we can have twelve angry men the action show, what would that look like? And so on the one hand, that's very sort of silly premise, but on the other end when you think about it, you still get a lot of the drummer of twelve hundred men of jurors debating, an important case, and you add onto these outside elements of people who are trying to influence the verdict. So we terrific cast Sar Jesse Bradford and some are Clough. And yeah, it's you know, I think it's a lot on on crackle. If anybody wants to check it out. Please do so let's get into twelve angry men Aaron right before we started recording. I told you that I still hard times. How many times I watched this movie on the edge of my seat the entire? Time. It is such a suspenseful just taught film, and I'm curious as a writer as someone who crafts stories. What is it about it to you that makes this film? So engaging. So suspenseful film that never really leaves one room. What is it? I mean, it's it's so many things I went to see Aaron Sorkin speak last week. Who is just always tastic when he speaks in public, and he talked a little bit about to kill Mockingbird, which he just dropped it for Broadway. And he's always about in general, how he likes a court dramas, you know, which is a bunch of to kill Mockingbird. Few men the social network, and you know, coming thinking about why writing courtroom dramas are so terrific. You know, one reason is the jury, and this is something Sorkin pointed out, the jury doesn't know anything right in any courtroom drama. The lawyers are explain. Winning the facts of the case of the jury, which is incredibly helpful for a writer for exposition. That's how you can get everything out and twelve angry men. Similarly, these jurors, you know are going over all the facts of the case. So it's just such an easy way to get out Xposition. You also have a genuinely organically diverse group of people, you know, in most dramas everybody is either, you know, the same race or the same class the same social economic class with a jury you naturally have people of different classes, different walks of life different professions. People who would never be together in a room otherwise forced together, which is obviously great for conflict. You also have a group that has a tremendous amount of power. I mean think about how often life you have a group that actually has power over someone else's life. And it's a rare thing here, it's they have literally the most power any group can be given. They have the power of. Of life or death. You know, if they decided to go guilty as explained the movie a couple times this defendant is gonna get the chair. So you have great steaks. And then lastly, everyone is forced to be a confined room. If I were to write a family drama, you keep asking when they get into fight. Why doesn't the daughter just take off what isn't the father go into a different room here? They are forced to stay together. And it could find room for confined amount of time. And so it's just when you put all that together is just the perfect setup for drama, and I really think that's a big part of courtroom dramas work and a big part of why twelve hundred networks. So I'm interested in your talk about courtroom dramas because I was struck rewatching the film. I don't know. I guess it never really occurred to me before looking at it through this lens of talking about it with you that part part of the, you know, what makes this film so engaging to me. And I I love a good courtroom drama. I love a good police procedural, and this film, you know, nineteen fifty seven it really manages to combine all of these elements in. In kind of unexpected ways where normally if it's a police procedural, you know, we see the detectives analyzing evidence. Putting the case together trying to repeat all the clues. But then once they've done their job, you know, it's just it's in the either that it goes off to a courtroom somewhere, or if it's a courtroom drama. You have the lawyers making their arguments, and it's the drama the tension is tied up in their battle. But then once the jury goes off into liberates, we leave it behind with the tension of is it going to be guilty or innocent in this film. We get we lose all of that with. That's not a part of it at all. But we get both pieces of it. Right. They reconstruct this crime in such interesting detail that you get that kind of element of a kind of detective procedural film. And then you get the arguments between two conflicting sides in as though it were courtroom arguments between better lawyers than what apparently. Listed in the actual case. And you have that tension in a way, but it's not at that same time confined by some of the the the morals of the restrictions of well, it's a courtroom you're going to have objections, right? These are people, and they can make whatever argument they want based purely in whatever prejudice they have. So you you have all of these elements at play and in the jury room is really kind of this brilliant place to let it all out. Yeah. And I mean reginal rose who wrote the this cream pie. He really constructed as a thriller. So if you open up the screenplay, you'll find that something really dramatic happens. You know, sort of in the classic sense of thriller. Even though it all takes in one room. You know, every fifteen pages are so there's a big turn. And, you know, whether it's when Henry Fonda, you know, whips out the switchblade that he bought that's exactly like switch play that the defendant was accused of using, you know, they're constant reveals. So that it really does feel like a thriller. You know, the movie that that most mind to me of in a weird way when you sort of just take the overview, you're talking about is reservoir, docs, turns interesting because what would that movie did which was which was so revolutionary at the time was was Tarantino said I've seen a million crime thrillers. What if I try to make a movie that's exciting as any crime through? Hiller where we never actually see the crime. And that's what Reservoir Dogs. It's all about the aftermath of the heist. Similarly, here you spend a grand total of two minutes in the courtroom. All you do is you hear the judges instructions and you have a quick shot of the defendant. And then the rest of it is the aftermath of the trial. And I think that's such an incredible such a brilliant move by Reginald rose to really just flip the court drama said, yeah, you're so right. I I'm I've never read the screenplay of. And so it's it's fascinating to see hear you say that where you know. It's it's paste in such a way that every fifteen pages as you say, you know, you have this kind of some escalation in the suspense into into the thriller and find I think of it in terms of what you know, kind of Sidney lumet does the director because it's the same heat compliments it so well, which is you do the film is rhythmic in its pacing of this kind of building of tension and then a release and then a building in a release in these. And he does it so well with kind of his you'll get these shots of the whole kind of jury room in a wide angle. And then you'll get the little pairings of medium shots, maybe two people and how what their tension is. And it builds and builds until the point that you're usually in an extreme close up in whatever is kind of the moment of release. Whether it's you know, obviously, the conic moments like juror number three. Saying I'm gonna kill you or the racist. Tirade of journ ten but you have the the building of the tension, but then being able to release it and start over again. And then just keep doing it had such as I said like a rhythmic quality of the film. That's it's very satisfying. It really is. And you know, rewatching it those close ups to work so incredibly well. And I think one of the ways that it doesn't feel hokey at all to have these close ups is that it's made clear in the script. This is the hottest day of the year in New York. And so all of these close ups, you are just watching the sweat, drip. Huff of these actors, and you can just feel how incredibly uncomfortable. They are. You can really feel the heat, which is which is an incredible trick by lament. But it's also right there in the script, right? Yeah. I mean combination of written word films is fantastic. And I mean, yeah, you know. You know, I really do feel like it's a thriller. But it's also a character study Reginald rose is just a master with character work. So I mean, you know, when I read something it is pretty hard to write more than let's say four or five characters and have them all be distinct. You know, have them all have unique voices. Here we have twelve jurors. None of them are even given a name right here. Just jurors one through twelve and you literally if you you could just ice one person's line of dialogue, and who was saying it. That's how unique these characters are. We know most of their professions, but other than that, we know almost nothing we know a tiny tiny bit about a couple of their home lives, but he's able to sort of give sense just simply through their dialogue all taking place in the present. No fush forwards. No Bax just in the present through what they're saying. And how they're communicating with each other. We know a tremendous amount about who they are which is which is just I mean until you try it you sort of don't realize how hard that is. I can't even imagine. Yeah. I mean, he also he does a great job of not protecting his characters. You know? I was talking about Aaron Sorkin a little bit before the west wing is sort of the famous example of TV show. We're every one of the league characters is a protagonist. None of them are antagonise here you have several antagonise. And you know, you you mentioned. The sort of bigoted hateful speech that one of the jurors goes on several of these characters are completely judgmental Arkham, printing, prejudiced or bigoted or hateful. But they're also incredible human, you know, by the end of the movie, you really understand why are tag nest Jakub why he is the way he is when he's breaks down, and you know, sort of gives that incredible, you know, mo- into when he rips up the photograph of himself with his son, and you really feel the pain that he went through with his son and clearly how he was projecting his own relationship with sun onto this case or son is accused of killing his father, you really feel for him which just not an easy thing to do, you know, most movies have their entire Guinness. Unfortunately, be very one dimensional and in this case, no one is one dimensional. I love his transformation as a character. Right. I mean, we meet him. The I kind of go around the table. And he's the character who says, you know, all I care about is the facts like, you know, and he takes out his book. And it's like, you know, at at twelve ten this happened three ten this at the beginning. He tries to portray himself as I am purely fact driven, and then as you save the final release of his emotional breakdown at the end where we really understand this is about his relationship with his son. I'm glad you of all the close ups in this film the moment when he I mean, I can't even really imagine as an actor. I mean, as you say, this is such a character study film that all of the act the acting in this film is unbelievable. But his that moment, it's a split. Second of him, ripping up that picture in pure anger and immediate regret. It's heartbreaking, you know. It's just like a whisper of him saying no that he immediately regrets ripping up that photo. That's really he real probably his only only vestige really of his relationship with his son left. And he's just destroyed it it's hard. And then the moment of him trying to piece it back together realizes what he's done and he tries to put the phone back together. And it's just so heartbreaking. Yeah. You're absolutely right. It it. There's so much. I mean, obviously, this is such a rich film that you can't help. Obviously talk the film foreshadows these things. So well, I find the foreshadowing I mean, you know, in any good I feel like any good kind of mystery right where you plant the seeds for the audience. To kind of get their hopefully, a second before even the film. So that they feel really great about themselves. And early on J Cobb has that speech where he talks about you know, I got a son, and I was going to make sure that he became a man when he was nine years old. He ran away for from fight. And I almost threw up I was embarrassed. So I made a man out of him. And and yeah, that you almost you know, you wonder if that's going to go anywhere because might just be Reginald way of just LUSA dating his character. But of course, we find out that it is the most central fact about him, and since he's our whole out in the end, it becomes the most central fact of the movie. Yeah, you're absolutely right. And what I find is. Also, very interesting about this film is you know, thematically actually how it transforms cobb's character throughout the film into, you know, a kind of the metaphorical or symbolic son. I mean, he here he is the tortured father and throughout the. Film. Right. I mean, I think of the staff the mock stabbing scene where he has to he has to physically make himself smaller than Henry Fonda character and take the role of the son killing the father. And then, you know, so here he is he's kind of miniaturized himself before the man he's arguing against taking the role of of the sun. And then you have the breakdown at the end the way Henry Fonda character helps them put on his jacket. Like, there's to me, very interesting. Father Sunday namic between these two characters in this film about this hatred. That's fueled in the father son dynamic as interesting. I had never thought about that before. That is interesting. Yeah. I mean what I just kept thinking about is. You know, the way that this case Mirroring his life, which makes sense whenever one of Reginald's points. I think she'll call your Reginald. I'm gonna call them rose one of Rose's points. I think is that whenever any of us are in a group dynamic. We can't help but bring our own personal baggage with us, the reason that the sort of anti Guinness in this movie are tagging. Is because they're bringing their prejudices with them their close mindedness. And so, you know in this case league Cobb is bringing you know, his relationship with his unto this. If a cop is forced to vote not guilty in this case, then he's sort of the boy get away with what he's done what he believes he's done to his father. And of course, in that case that means that Lee J Cobb sort of metaphorically is letting his own son of Huck for what for the pain that he caused him and that's brilliantly done. It's not it doesn't hit you over the head with it. It lets you sort of work that out for yourself and it. Yeah. It's it's taking. Yeah. Now for fear of making it all about Henry, Fonda and cobb's character. I mean, the other characters in this film, obviously are so pivotal. I mean, you can almost go round the table and spend lengthy amounts of time discussing what the you know, what each character brings? But I find. Interesting kind of the duality and the juxtaposition 's between these characters which kind of provide this. I mean, very rich, you know, both a rich room of characters which we talked about. But as well as dealing with the themes of the film, I love the kind of contrast between jer number seven our baseball attending fan who's just desperate to get out of the room. And Jack what he goes. I think my favorite performance he gives such perfect performance of the jerk. Who just absolutely once a you know, sort of talk trash everybody and just to his baseball game and doesn't care about anything else in the world. Yeah. And then then, of course, it's your number eleven and the tension that that they have right. I mean, this the moment where jurors seven flips his vote to not guilty. And the only reason is because let's get out of here and the contrast, and then you really start to get to the themes of democracy and the role of you know. The jury room, and this responsibility, we have I mean, that's such a poignant moment, perhaps maybe the where the film gets most heavy handed as well. The speech of you know, kind of the importance of democracy, and we have this east European character who obviously has lived through other forms of government, you know, kind of singing its praises, but the tension there is palpable. It is I don't know. Did you re watch the movie before this, of course? Yeah. So I re washed it this morning on the train up to New Haven and was absolutely shocked at the contemporary relevance. Is you know, as you said movies from nineteen fifty seven, but this very much felt like it was written in response to Donald Trump. You know, we're living in an era where the president where a lot of our top officials are asking us to believe that what we see with our own eyes is not true. And this. Is about pushing past prejudices to uncover the truth. That's really what it's about in the end, you know, the the legit Cobb character the other at big Leigh's character. It's about forcing them to see beyond this Puerto Rican defended who grew up in a slum and actually examined the facts of the case. It's absolutely could be written. You know next year in response to Trump. Yeah. Yeah. That's that's an excellent point. Obviously, you know in part. What makes this film so timeless? Is it kind of cuts to the core of our, you know, our moral leanings our ideologies, and all of these things, you mention you know, that this is a film about getting to the facts. And to me draws in contrast than the scene towards the end. I mean that you have kind of Cobb journal three and g Marshall journal number four as kind of the last two real holdouts in many ways, and they I think they represent the flip side of the same coin Cobb, obviously so emotionally invested in his desired outcome and Marshall who thinks of himself purely as a logical fact driven man, and so it's really Henry Fonda is ability to try and convince both of these people. And the scene, of course, when he convinces Marshall of his interrogation of what movie he saw. And again, it's what you talked about earlier with lumet's ability to kind of convey the heat that camera just comes in closer closer to marshal's face. We've already established that he doesn't sweat right until the questioning gets going. We has nothing on the line. But that little bit of sweat forms. And we know it's over forward. So cool. Yeah. I mean, it's so well done the fact that, you know, Henry sort of know from the beginning that he's eventually going to sway all of the all the eleven other jurors to his point of view to not guilty. And so many ways, you know, I was pitching this. The executive say how hell is going to be interesting. We we know that our hero character is going to sway JR. One of them. So what we're going to watch him sway number two and number three. And then number four it's going to be so boring, but rose brilliance in part is that he comes up with a completely different way to sway each. So as you say with Marshall, who's just, you know, he's he's painted as this guy who you know, is sort of not swayed by motion. He's very matter of fact, he's gotta be convinced by the facts. And so Henry Fonda really convince him with the facts of the case and then with Legia Cobb who's next when he's going to convince it's all emotion. And you know, we could go down the line and come up with the way he can visits each these jurors and each one has a very different way of being swayed and that way of being swayed is inherent. Who their characters which makes the whole thing feel so well plotted out so smart, you really feel the author's voice behind the movie in sort of the best possible. Yeah. I've always struck. I think one of the first time I saw this movie. I was always struck the moment when journal seven whoever he talked about, you know, he leaves the room after an argument, and nothing it's jerked nine is trying to say something and Henry Fonda says to him don't he can't hear you? And he never will. And I was always struck. I think probably I never seen it before. Well, obviously, we're going to have to convince him somehow. So he's how're you. How is he going to hear him? But he'd never does. Right. I mean, he is the character who as you say every characters convinced by the means that really speaks to who they are and he's just outlasted. He just doesn't want rate anymore. And I love talking again about that tension between juror eleven seven jer eleven flips vote and someone asks him to explain himself. And he says I don't have to explain myself to you like I've analyzed the situation, and I'm changing my vote, and then, but he asked jurors seven than when he flips his vote like how can you change your vote? And it's because he knows that like, no real logic has gone into it whatsoever. And he can't stand that kind of lack of more strength or scruples or whatever they about it. Yeah. I mean, the movie is very high minded in that way. It really, you know. Champions. Sort of group excuse me, it champions groups being able to work together for the common. Good. You know, I'm not sure that always works at a real life. So this is sort of an idealistic version of what the best possible sort of group tiny could be, but you know, the the way that the way that each character really does feel like at heart. They want the system to work in a by the end of the movie, of course, is just so incredibly well done. You made me think also of what was really one of my favorite moments, which I didn't really remember from previous watchings, which was I forget which was but the one who's a construction worker, right? And he's in the bathroom with Henry Fonda and his screen line. Where Henry fund says suppose, something or other and the construction worker turns back on them, and he says, well suppose. In is really my bag. You know, my form does suppose him, but I'll give it a shot this supposing. You talk us all out of it. And this kid really did murder his father, and it's such a powerful moment because you realize had might be completely wrong. You know and refund never says he or this kid didn't kill his father all these saying is he thinks there's a reasonable doubt. And as the audience we have to wonder at times what if this kid really is guilty and goes off kill someone else. Because they you know, they let them go here. And so I I I love that. Because it takes away a little bit of sort of the high horse at Henry had fun does on and sort of really shows that you know, he may be perfect to and he may be allowing killer to go three to go free this possible. Yeah. I mean, it's a it's a line that cuts right to your heart. Obviously anyone. Watching like well. Yeah. You know, we're we immediately kind of align ourselves with Henry Fonda being. He's the hero that you you don't necessarily take a moment to stop and say, well, yeah. What if what if the guy is guilty? I find it interesting that that particular scene, you know, it happens. Quote, unquote outside the jury room, it's in the bathroom. Right. And I I think it I don't know that line trips me up because to me it cuts to a question. And I think Henry Fonda, obviously, he accepts that that's a possibility but his ability to move on. And the fact that it's never really raised per se in the in the the battle that ensues is that right that we need to prove that he's guilty. We don't need to prove that he's innocent. Right. And that is you know, it's it's he's flipping juror. I think it's juror. Whatever six I think I always just use the table of where they're sitting in relation. I think you're right. I think is. Which is so fascinating these characters kind of given somewhat in their identities about where they are in relation to other characters. But. That his. Distortion of the whole purpose of them. They're right. That you know, you can get so caught up in making sure a guilty man doesn't go free that you forget that. That's the burden of proof is to actually prove that they're guilty completely. Yeah. I mean, definitely watching it. There was an element of rooting for Henry funds at a win simply because several of the other characters were so close minded and prejudice. And so in that situation, you feel like he could have been arguing anything he could have been arguing coke versus Pepsi us wanted him to win. Right because everyone else was so close minded, and that's problematic right because it's not about coke versus Pepsi. It's about whether or not someone committed murder, and so you really want to be on the on his side because he's got the facts on side. And I think by the end of the movie, we can all agree. He obviously does he's poked holes in everyone of the prosecution's witnesses. But yeah, it's in in the way that this movie is a metaphor for how all groups work together. I think is something to be careful of that. You never wanna sight of the fact that it's very easy to root for an underdog the man who's out there standing all by himself. You always want to be cognizant of what the actual facts. Are that you're debating? Yeah. I love you bring up, you know, the man who stands all by himself because there are a few moments that always stand out to me in this movie. And I'm always amazed. You know, we talked early on about the physical space. You know, they're in this. What's clearly a super cramped room? Just feel the claustrophobia kind of setting in. I love how they kind of make the most of the space where you have to me almost kind of layers of kind of physical space, which is the table itself where you have these where the arguments take place, you have the building up of that tension, and you had the perimeter of the room as kind of the. The reflective space where characters are constantly stepping out from the table and removing themselves to the perimeter almost as just to breathe for second. Yeah. And then it kind of, you know, talking about those escalations, obviously, Henry Fonda very much by himself for the early part of this movie. But the two moments always stand out to me are the two moments when I think are most hateful antagonists, find themselves completely alone. The to me, frankly, the first one I is one that happens. I, and it's extremely powerful is the moment after Cobb says I'm gonna kill you to Henry Fonda and the two men have to be separated. And it's the first time we have eleven men standing on one side of the room with Henry Fonda and Cobb -pletely by himself in the foreground. And it's and it's almost like how did we get ourselves into this situation just escalates so quickly and other auger Fay's perfect atrophy is perfect. The other. One which happens much more slowly and makes much more profound statement is of course, when Ed Begley as journal ten is in the midst of his most racist tirade and every character just removes themselves right from that situation till he is completely alone, even even Cobb, right? I mean, even someone who so invested in the outcome. He has emotional reasons, but he's not a racist. And in the way, they kind of put juror ten by himself saying this is its own issue. And then from that point on the rest of the movie, he's completely isolated in the corner. She's exiled it's a beautiful metaphor for exiling that kind of hateful person from society. I think the only person who stays at the tables e g Marshall, and that's just because that character each Marshall. He's not he's not a passionate guy. He's someone who would get up and leave. But instead. He turns to basically he says sit down and don't open your mouth again. Yeah. And it's just you're like all of a sudden Marshall was very much a one of our antagonist. But now you're completely on his side. You're like, yes, he knows right from wrong. And it's just so. You made me think when you're talking about the table. You know, in many ways this film does feel like. We've called a thriller. It's a little bit like an action movie, you know, the way that they dance around this table and some characters are held back from fighting others and some characters you know, sort of walk on the table to opposite ends there in a fight. The table being the main set piece, and as the movie ends, I was really struck by the fact that lumet of has caused camera to you know. All of the characters walkout, and then when the final character Henry Fonda has walked out the door instead of walking with the camera, then pans Oli over the table to see exactly what we've gone through over the past hour and a half, you know, all the torn up. He's paper, the empty coffee cups the cigarettes, and it's a really strange choice. But I think you're right that that table so important to everything that our characters just went through its symbol as their battle. And so it's worth just hovering over for five seconds, or whatever it is. Yeah. I think you're absolutely right. There's a select few moments. I think what makes limit such interesting. He's not a he's not a filmmaker who'd necessarily draws tremendous amount of tension to the craft of filmmaking. But he picks his moments. Very well. Right. As you say, it's a very poetic pan. Across the table is kind of the battlefield is left after you know, and there's just a select few moments. I mean, there's obviously the moments of kind of those extreme close ups in the building of that tension, but there's those few moments where he kind of really emphasizes the mood of the scene. And I think there's the few that jump out to me are after in one of the moments of release after one of the big moments of tension. I forget which one it is. But all of a sudden that room is very dark, and you feel the mood of that room being very dark. But then it's number one the the format who goes and flips the lights back on and we're able to continue and specifically then when in that scene with the kind of inquiry about German number fours movie, going experience, the rain outside gets louder and louder as we push in into that tension, or there's a moment of silence once jers seven his finally gotten that fan. To work. And now all we can hear is the fan cutting the silence, right? It's elements that are just like they hit. There's there's sort of a truism in writing that creativity can come from limits not from complete expense. If you wanna create something really interesting, really creative. Then you want to put some limitations on it. Because if you know if you're just writing about anything and everything, you know, the canvas it's just too big. Similarly here was Sidney lumet directing and it's shocking. This is first movie, but being forced to set the entire thing in one room forces him to be creative in a way that he might not have been if the canvas had been, you know, his canvas have been the world. So just being in the room. What what are the things he can he can play the lighting? He can play the heat. He can play with different sides of the table. He can play with whether or not the fan goes on or off. And and he is just masterful with each of those elements because he had so little else to play with. And it really did feel like it allowed him to flourish creatively. Yeah. I think an awareness on his part from what I've read, you know, he really wanted. He understood that the lack of I dunno access to other things was part of what was going to drive this movie. So I think in the in pre production. They had thought about justifying the the jurors room as being in the basement. So you'd have all these kind of exposed pipes and things like that was to add a little bit more dramatic, flourish. And he was like, no it's going to be a normal room. And the other big one is they wanted to put a glass glass version of the table. So that you could have all sorts of evocative shots from underneath the table or the middle of the table. And he's you know, we're not this is he uses his camera to great effect. But not it never kind of violates the realism of the room. Interesting camera always must fit into that physical space and a logical way. And he goes I love how he puts the cameras so frequently behind characters so they're in the foreground and we're seeing wherever they're arguing with in the background. It never it's hyper realistic. And I think that's what it makes you feel like you're in that room too. Yeah. Yeah. I don't know what you're mad about cinematography. But I really recommend Sidney lumet's book making movies, which is just all about his process in a really nuts and bolts way, it's it's it's an easy quick read and just so eliciting, but some you know, DP that I've worked with talk about this movie with such reverence because, you know, the the choices that that makes along with cinema tougher just as you're saying about, you know, who's in the foreground and who's in the background. And you know, I believe most shots in the second half of the movie are shot from under, you know, the sort of the classic hero shot as a way to sort of opened up the movie a little bit and sort of give the give the sort of impression of moving a little bit faster as we move toward the end. It's just so brilliantly done. Now, I want to get your thoughts on one last thing. I feel like we've covered a lot of the major the major thrust of. But I'm always increasingly interested. But jer number twelve are ad agency. Man. Because I find the right? That's where the film really, I think, you know, brings a little bit of satire into the into the Fillon. It gets in many, obviously, we journey eleven has his great speech about the value of democracy. But it's journal twelve where I think you really have kind of a little bit of a statement on what's going on kind of culturally in the United States aside from all of this. What do you make of journal twelve isn't there for a little bit of comedic relief? Or is it is there more than I think definitely there's some comedic really for. Sure. It was interesting watching it post madman. When we all now have figure this very distinct image of what guys in the fifties were like in New York. I mean, this basically is you know, someone for what worked with, but you know in the fifties. There was this image of the man in the gray flannel suit, which in fact, J Cobb calls her number twelve at one moment. And you know, I think you're right that it's that's rose making fun of the sky because you know, these guys oftentimes fancied themselves as creatives and sometimes they work up -solutely. But a lot of times they really weren't. And rows, of course, is you know, coming from Hollywood and from play writing and sort of the ultimate crate of. And so they're very well may have been a little bit of professional jealousy there. How dare these these new hot at guys making all all this money sort of on top of the world. How dare they call themselves creatives. You know, there's a great moments and journal twelve you know. You know, is sort of telling a joke to adjourn number one about how you know in an adn eating a lot of times. Another adman will start a pitch by saying. Well, let's put this up the flagpole and see if anybody salutes, and it's meant to just show the the absurdity of people in that business. Yeah. I you know, I definitely will have to allow a couple of times his lines just how incredibly wish wash he was going back and forth between guilty and not guilty. He felt a little bit comic relief. But he also felt incredibly real as there are a lot of people like that who, you know, want to be created of wannabe writers haven't for some reason, maybe because like this guy they're more drawn to the the riches and the wealth the status of of Madison Avenue. Yeah. I think you make a great point. Which is you know, it's almost surprising. But he is the only juror to flip flop more than once. You know? It's everyone else's they go from guilty to. Innocent or not guilty. And he's the only one who will go back and forth more than once. And there he is something, you know, so a lack of conviction or no shortness of substance him. It was like, you know, the version of the gray flannel suit, the admen just no substance flash. Yeah. I mean, I love makes me live every time as you say that line about saluting give a salute. And of course, he's so pleased with himself when he tells that story, and it's part of an and of course, he saying like, oh, I always get a kick out of one other guys do this kind of silly thing. And then of course, later in the movie, he does it himself with let's put this out on the stoop and see if the cat licks. And then never never goes on to make the point that he was gonna make exactly never makes a point afterwards. But I do I mean one of his moments the big kind of final evidence moment involving the glasses and the old lady. Again, I love that detail of you know, it's the moment when he's kind of being convinced to vote not guilty over the glass, and but we haven't gotten yet to the glasses. And of course, it's a conversation between him and journal number four journal before he's been wearing his glasses the whole time in Germany twelve whose constantly taking him on and off, and he puts them on very pointedly in this scene. You know, after the fact when you're watching, but when you're watching it again that kind of subconscious influence that we're building towards his big reveal involving glasses smart editor. I I mean, you've never seen Moore glasses than in that conversation. Right. But I love it. Yeah. Yeah. I mean. Yeah. Watch at this time. I really did find a cure to your talking about EG Marshall to be so incredibly important to the storytelling in a way that maybe it didn't realize I'm previous watches because you're so consumed by Henry Fonda versus Lee J Cobb. But watching it this time, you know, that moment when edgy Marshall finally admits that the woman who testified had sort of little indents on her nose, and therefore must have had glasses and chose not to wear them to court, and certainly would have would not have worn them when she heard a scream in the middle of the night and looked at the window when he realizes that that all means that her testimony must be called into question is such an important moment because he has proven himself to be smart and logical and not swayed by motion, and it's so important for Henry Fonda, not just to win over the bigots and the people who are just ruled by their. Our emotions, but to actually win over someone who's ruled logic. And when he does that you just feel like okay, Henry Fonda you deserve. This. You deserve this win. It totally. And and I also appreciate as you said earlier about characters are convinced in a manner that is appropriate to who they are that. Yeah journey before is not so emotionally caught up. His ego is not tied to this result in such a way that he's now going to be like, well, I don't know, you know, did he immediately. Like what you're right. She had glasses. He is fact driven until the end, even if it means he's wrong right to admit it. So rose adopted this a few times, you know, originally rose wrote for TV he was he was one of the all great TV writers, by the way, Reginald rose back in sort of the first golden age of television. It was it was him, and it was petty tchaykovsky and a couple other people. Like rod Serling who are writing these searing moral dramas for playhouse ninety and. Yeah, study a one and a mardi. Maybe being the greatest example, but also twelve angry men and then rose adapted it for the stage. I've seen it on the stage. It doesn't to me. Anyway, doesn't have the same impact partly because Mets camera is so important to the story the confinement of the room when you see it on a big Broadway stage, it just has too much room to brief you really need. This be you know in a confined area. And then I think it was about eleven years or so after it aired on TV rose adopted it for this film. And it's that's that's a very rare thing at a very exciting thing for a writer to have written something that can work in so many different forms that he's asked to adapt into so many different forms. I believe he got the EMMY for the TV show and got nominated for an Oscar for the movie. Yeah. I mean, that's such a Aaron credit. It's it's the the writing dream right there. Yes. Obviously if he was around today, maybe would have as podcast, but like no other forms that can really go into twelve. Angry men, the true crime podcast. I think. It'd be very who wouldn't. And it brings us. I'm always there's something so poetic in the ending of this film finally leaving that room, and I don't know if it's just, you know, the being trained by Hollywood all these years, but when Henry Fonda and Sweeney at the ends journal jersey nine Sega by to each other. They finally say their names as you said they've been nameless. This entire time. You almost want them to be like, well, you know, you wanna get you wanna get a Cup of coffee, or you almost feel like there's a friendship brewing here. But no like, you know, they just go their separate ways. And that is what this whole process is. Right. And it just hits it home so hard at the Emerson twelve people who couldn't have less in common come together with the biggest responsibility and then with Nope. In theory, no personal investment in it. And then they go their separate ways. And I to me it's such a it's such a good release at the end. I couldn't agree more. I think that's exactly right interesting that he picked that rose picks those two characters to introduce themselves to each other at the end of courthouse steps, you know, they were very much the first compatriots in the room. You know, the old man was the first one to come to an refund aside invoke guilty. And I think you're right. I think the reason that they introduce themselves and give their names, and as far as I can tell there's no greater significance to the name. That give it's not like it. It's suddenly reveals their city of reveal something that we didn't know before it's more just hit forces the audience to become aware of the fact that these people were just sitting in a room for all this time battling it out. I mean, just like an epic battle for ages literally deciding the life or death of someone else, and they did it even know each other's names. Right. It's such a beautiful thing. Man. I love this movie. I'm I'm glad that it was on your list of films that were excited because soon as I saw it. I was like we gotta do this. And by the way, if you're you're out there, and you're interested in acquiring it. I watched this film on criteria. They've got you know, Blu Ray of it criterion. And it's it looks fantastic. It's also I watched it it's on Amazon prime right now better on the money watch it for free. I mean for as long as you subscribe. Still getting your money. But Aaron it's been such a pleasure talking about it. It's really fun. I hope people check out your show to live and dialogue in LA because it was your episode on Paul Tosoh. Interview. I've found it. Absolutely fascinating. Great. Thank you for coming on the show. Yeah. No, this is incredibly fun. Yes. Please. That concludes our episode on twelve angry men, I would love to hear what you think of this. Classic movie. Must feel free to tweet at movie must pod or Email. Classic movie. Musts edgy mail dot com. Listen to all our episodes on our website classic movie must dot com. You can support the show and received cool perks on patriotic. I becoming a producer of the show and get your name read at the end of every episode just like, Don Hoffman Lee. Eleanor b and max on redid. Thank you, all for your generous, patronage checkout, all our support. Here's and there were wards over at patriotair dot com slash classic movie. Musts on the next episode. We're discussing Roman Polanski's Chinatown. Remember episodes release every Friday on all podcast services. Thank you so much for listening until the next episode keep up with your classics.

Henry Fonda Sidney lumet Lee J Cobb murder Henry Aaron Tracy Aaron Reginald rose Marshall New York jer director Aaron Sorkin professor writer Yankees River Kwai Yale University max Baril Muss Gernon
Two Suns Setting  | 1

Inside Star Wars

28:38 min | 2 years ago

Two Suns Setting | 1

"The following may contain mature content. From wondering, I'm Mark Ramsey, and this is inside Star Wars heart one. March twenty second nineteen seventy six it was the first day you're shooting in the Tunisian desert, the first day of shooting Star Wars. Down down the remote control droids kept falling over shorting out. Crashing into each other. Did we get at least five seconds of usable footage before that crash, six seconds, George? Good move on. Wait, wait, wait, wait. Can can you hear that? What's that noise? The droids radio control. I think I think they're picking up local radio. Fabulous. What if we pull them along with wires until they follow? Sure. And we could also hide behind them. Crawling on the sand in push fabulous. By the end of the first day of shooting. Anthony Daniels is C three PO was convinced. He wouldn't survive the film his brilliant gold, plastic costume. Took two hours to put on. It was tight. It was bolted to his body above the waist. Another two bolt stuck into his neck. Every step was painful, he lurched in hobbled. He was sore. He was cut up covered in scratches and scars. And this was the very first day of shooting. Kenny Baker was inside are two d- two Guinea, lookout, there's a robot coming, Kenny watched in terror as an out of control, droid Corinne towards him. Down when are two and down went Kenny Baker. Some droids were radio controlled somewhere. Puppets on strings somewhere hydraulic in one head Kenyan side. And the chances that all of them would do the right thing at the right time on the right, Mark. Slim an hour passes. And our two is ready to go. Yeah. Operated by remote control. Are two rolled into the distance over a sand dune. Can't stop over sand dune in under the set of Franco, Zeffirelli's mini series. Jesus of Nazareth shooting next door. Oh, god. Help us outside his tent nearby. Alec Guinness watched. He was the most famous actor in the cast. He was an Oscar winner. He had been knighted by Queen Elizabeth. He was a veteran of Shakespeare and conic classics bridge on the River Kwai doctors Vago Lawrence of Arabia. And now here he was in the desert rolling around in the sand with children dressed as John was and a menagerie of Mel functioning robots. His head was in his hands. Gilded will never let me hear the end of this. Witness the rise of a hero marvel studios presents captain marvel an all new adventure from a previously unseen period in the history of the marvel cinematic universe in this action packed story, the MC, you introduces its first standalone female franchise, title character, Carol Denver's aka captain, marvel set in the nineteen ninety s captain marvel sidesteps that traditional origin, story template with Carol danvers already. Possessing her superhero powers, leaving her earthly life behind. She joins an intergalactic elite military team called star force, but after Dan versus trained and become a valued member of star force she finds herself back on earth with new questions about her past. She quickly lands on the radar of Nick fury, and the pair must work together against a formidable enemy in the form of the scrolls who are planning an invasion of earth. Get marvel studios captain marvel on digital and movies. Anywhere now in Blu. Ray June eleven new on four k ultra HD at the center of this maelstrom was a moody bearded thirty one year old named George Lucas. This was the realization of everything he had dreamed of, and it was falling apart at the seams. Seems filled. With sand. Nothing was going right. Everything was screwed up in the director was desperately unhappy, this movie is going to be terrible. I wanted an epic. I didn't count on an epic disaster. Test test test is it? Okay. If we begin I know we have only an hour. Sure, okay. It's up. Toby twenty four twenty eighteen. I'm Mark Ramsay. I'm talking with George Lucas outside his home in Marin county. Hold on Everest. How do you be careful on that swing? How would you daughter now five? She's okay. So. Again. Thank you for making time for this. I know it's a big ask are you? Are you ready to start? Sure start wear. Well, let's start with the original Star Wars naturally. How much do you think about that movie? Now every day every day. Somebody asked me about it every day. Somebody, thanks before. And how's that make you feel? It was a longtime ago in a galaxy far far away. I'm reminded of it every day. But it's no longer part of me. You know. They used to be mine. Now. It's yours. Okay. Can we can can we go back to your beginning? We have to. Why not? Planet billion adventures of flash. Gordon Bill Hardin may nineteen fifty four Modesto California. Don't get George Lucas is ten and he is lost in the fantasy of radio. One of the radio staring at the console he was anywhere. He was everywhere. Other worlds other times it was thrilling and it captivated him. Hey, george. Wanna come over and play plumber. I don't know. I'm listening to the radio, George. We got a TV. You got a TV. This was nineteen fifty four nobody had a TV George had only seen them in store. Windows, glowing blue and black come on, over my dad has it in the garage. We got some Bleacher setup. So everyone in the neighborhood can watch. Ladies and gentlemen, that was plumbers, dad. He was a ham proudly present Tele vision. Just takes a moment tomorrow. Moment, warm. Oh. Well, there's nothing on right now. But there will be soon, and it's going to be great now who want some high C. John plumbers. Dad was right. Things did come on and it was great in the afternoon and evening local broadcasters had more airtime than content. So they filled that time with the cheap and the plentiful, they filled it with old movie serials. They filled it with flash. Gordon. Spaceship? Gordon swashbuckling hero, nemesis of intergalactic, evil photo of the villainous. Ninguna merciless born is a comic strip flash was transformed into a movie serial in the nineteen thirties, thirteen twenty minute episodes per story sandwiched between feature showings. Each episode ended in a cliffhanger to ensure the audience return for the next installment. It was the perfect prototype for television. Flash was portrayed by BUSTER, Crabb a handsome, Olympic swimmer who would also go on to play. Buck Rogers Tarzan he bleached his hair blonde for the role. He was so embarrassed by the attention. He wore a cap, whenever he went out so men didn't whistle at him. Universal produce the flash, Gordon serials for next to nothing recycling props wardrobes sets in the occasional gorilla suit from whatever else happened to be shooting at the time. The result was both Ernest and cheesy. And for a ten year old boy named George Lucas, it was utterly enthralling and unforgettable. Like all kids is George got older. He went to the movies, too, but rarely and usually to chase girls is taken. Yes. Lots of chasing not so much catching some of the movies were good. He remembered one it was about British POW's ordered by their Japanese captors to construct a strategic bridge, even as the allies plan to blow it up. It was called bridge on the River Kwai and it starred William Holden in a forty three year old English actor who would win kademi award for his role. Alec guinness. Home, another long day at work for Lucas, dad. George senior, what's for dinner. George senior owned the most famous stationery store in town. He was a conservative man a Methodist with a strong work ethic and the highest expectations for his son. What are you doing? George reading comic book and he was usually disappointed. He was so irritated by Georgia's comic books. He built a shed in the backyard. How's the mall and to get them outside the house? He didn't like Georgia TV shows or his favor movies school, George. What about school? Lucas was sixteen now school was a boar Modesto was a boar life was a bore. And then he discovered something new. Something that excited him engaged him. Something that would become the most important thing in his young life. He discovered. Speed. Jesus christ. That was George senior, not one to take the Lord's name in vain. But those were the only words that came to mind as he watched his only son last that motorcycle from one end of the road to the next with no evident care for safety. This speed demon had to be stopped. Inside Star Wars is sponsored by whic Stott, calm. You know, DIY is all the rage these days, but doing it yourself can be hard, whether you're wrestling with malfunctioning droids in the desert or say, building a website all by yourself. But with wicks building a professional website is easy. Just ask the over one hundred forty million people who have already done it. In those include me, by the way, you can start and publish for free with wicks by choosing from five hundred wonderful stunning templates, or you can start from scratch and build it yourself from there. It's easy to change. Customize at anything you want from video background social bars galleries menus, it's all there, folks with which they're hundreds of design features to choose from and everything automatically optimized for any device desktop or mobile Bill website of your own with wicks today, four free. And if you go to which dot com and use the coupon code Yoda you'll get ten percent off any premium plan with. Twix premium plans to get more storage, a free domain for a year. And you get to have the same plan. I do. That's wicks dot com code Yoda for ten percent off any premium plan looking for something to give your dad or your Lohan. Well, give him a one-size-fits-all gift like a new oral health routine with quip with the quip electric toothbrush. You can show your thanks where really counts the guiding features like quips built into minute timer makes sticking to good habits simple, plus signing them up for a subscription helps him. Save in refresh their brush, on time, you know, that's probably been the most useful thing about quick for me. The subscription new brush heads are autumn delivered me on a dentist recommended schedule every three months for just five bucks a friendly, reminder when it's time for a refresh into stay committed to oral health. Quip is one of the first electric toothbrushes accepted by the American dental association. They're backed by over twenty five thousand dental professionals, and they have thousands of verified five star reviews. Look, I love my quip in over one million other happy healthy mouths due to quip starts at just twenty five dollars. And if you go to get quip dot com slash Yoda right now, you can get your first refill pack four free that your I refill pack free at G E. T Q, U I, P dot com slash Yoda. Okay. Jurors come out come out. Come on. Come on, keep the blindfold on. I hate surprises. Dad just keep it on sun. Okay. Okay. Now take it off. Well, what do you think they're in the driveway of the Lucas family home was the smallest car? George Lucas, had ever seen a tiny yellow Fiat with a two cylinder engine. What is it? Happy birthday. George. Lucas didn't know what to say is, is, is this a joke? What's with the scooter with four wheels wouldn't have bicycle be faster? Instead, he settled on thanks. And then he got to work. His father thought he could squelch Georges need for speed with a car that rolled down the street fairly faster than gravity. He would be Rahm, George rebuilt that Fiat from scratch souped, up engines news dispension racing Belton roll bar. He cut off the roof and lowered the front windshield. That tiny motor scooter with four wheels was now. Reese blight. So George Lucas, did what every other young man with a fast car. Did he raced any cruised? Lucas would drive in circles all night fishing for girls. Sweetheart. How 'bout ride? No, but, but, but I'm I'm going away. You're going in circles. I certainly am. If there was one thing George was good at. It was racing if there had been a kessel run in Modesto George Lucas would have made it in less than twelve percents. Collected speeding tickets like baseball cards. License registration. Hey, george. Order please order, please. George lucas. Slow down. Lucas kept rayson even winning trophies along the way. He loves speedy. Loved cars everything about he wanted to race. He wanted to work on cars. It was everything to him. It was all that mattered. George senior stared across the dinner table at his only son, George passed the potatoes, please. George. Yeah. Okay. I'm sorry. Where's your head? Boy, don't talk to me like that. This is my house, and I could talk to you anyway. I like. Fine. Well, I have to go down to the garage. Anyway, just a minute. The father son tension had been building for some time, and now it was about to explode you go away every night, George, yes, I do play in that garage. Yes. I do you know how hard I worked to put a roof over your head. Yes, I do. I don't think you do look at you. Your hair's, too long your grades are an embarrassment ad against you. A job at the stationary your bed chance for meaningful employment, and what do you do? What do you do? You quit best chance for meaningful employment. That's right. Oh, excuse me. Mr lucas. Do you have a rim of eight and a half by Levin, paper, not that blank kind. But the kind of the lines. Oh, no known Mr. Lucas, I need mine. Three hole punch. Oh, and pens need. Some pens BIC of Parker. Do you have found? What about the ink? You can't expect me to write a letter without Nick, Mr. Lucas, George. You call that meaningful dad is that meaningful to you. This is my life's work George. It's our family business, and I worked very hard to be able to give. This to you one day. Well, I don't want it. Don't you understand? I don't want it. Don't look at me like that dead, I am doing all of this for you. George. I don't want it dead when school ends, I'm leaving. I'm leaving Modesto and I'm leaving you. You'll be back. I'll never be back. You'll be back. I'll never be back. Are you going to work in a garage all your life? George, don't you know you will never amount to anything. Thanks for your confidence debt and dad. When you go to work tomorrow. And you start the letterhead and the pen, refills, I want you to remember this. I'm going to be a millionaire before I'm thirty. Somebody pests potatoes. June twelve nineteen sixty two high school. Graduation was three days away, Lucas was failing several classes term papers were still do odds were good. He would flunk out. Maybe odds were good that his father was right. It was a blistering hot day. He tried to study. Eat tried to finish those term papers at four thirty PM. He gave up and headed home. On Sylvan road. He slowed down the dirt entrance to his family's ranch was up on the left his mind. His mind was everywhere. I wish I was dragging tenth wish was in the garage. I wish it was out of Modesto wish wasn't about to flunk out of high school. Which might dad didn't hate me. And I didn't hate him. Life is so full of wishes. He slowly turned left across traffic into his driveway. He didn't see it. He didn't hear it. It was on him before he could do anything about it. A Chevy Impala roaring down the road in the opposite direction. Frank Ferrara seventeen was at the wheel. He he tried to stop. He tried to scream. It was all too late. The Chevy t-boned the tiny Fiat smashing into it from the side. The impact was heard for miles, it flew into the air crashed to the ground and rolled several times. It was finally stopped by an enormous walnut tree. The mangled Fiat wrapped around the tree like a glove. Gas oil dripped to the ground. The tree was torn from the ground hanging at a sharp angle, any observer would describe this accident as fatal. Georgia's parents were home at the time. Did you hear that? I, I heard something the accident was at the bottom of the dirt road, but who wasn't? George Lucas had installed the racing belt himself. It was built to keep him fastened to that seat. No matter what. The belt and snapped and Lucas was thrown from the car just before it catapulted into the tree. Right. Lucas was in shock unconscious a fractured scapula Bruce lungs. He was turning blue. He began to vomit blood. It was a miracle. That's what the doctor said a miracle he should have been dead. There was some, some hemorrhaging, but no other internal damage. He was breathing. He was intact. He was alive. When he awoke several hours later, he was groggy. His dad was there. Standing over him. He was holding Georgia's hand. Dad. I something wrong. His father started to cry. Lucas would spend the next four months in bed? That's a lot of time to do a lot of thinking. He'd stare out that window day after day. He installed that recent belt to protect himself. And his life was saved because it failed. The irony of it. I should be dead. But I'm not. So every day is an extra day every day is a gift. It's time to make the most. It's time to start a new life. How's it going boys? Nineteen seventy the Hollywood hills. Sergio Mendez is a famous Brazilian musician, who would collaborate with cons from her Albert to John legend. But right now he's building a new recording studio in his backyard. How's it going going pretty well, Mr Mendez? Well, okay. He's not building it a crew of craftsman are doing it for him construction guys electrons, plumbers, and one particular carpenter. You're the carpenter. Right. That's right. This is this is really great woodwork. Great craftsmanship. Thank you. Good looking guy twenty eight years old no-shirt, Hollywood Sergio Mendes had to ask. The obvious question you're not you're not an actor. Are you? Oh, no, no, no, no, no, sir. No, sir. That was this carpenters stock answer. He didn't want to explain his bid part as bellhop in nineteen sixty six or irate motorist in nineteen sixty seven. No. It was just playing easier to say, no, sir. Well, you could be an actor you. You have the look. But why deprive the world of such great carpenter? You know Jesus was a carpenter. Yan look what happened to him. Okay. Well, keep up the good work, the carpenter picked up his hammer and a handful of nails can win pack to work acting fun. But he had a family to feed in credited roles in unspectacular films. Well, they don't put food on the table is name is the problem thought maybe should try ditching his middle initial j simplified. Make it a name that just rolls off the tongue Harrison Ford. From wondering this is a seven part deep. Dive inspired by the story behind an unforgettable. Classic movie. This has been part, one of inside Star Wars. Listen for a new episode every Wednesday. Written and narrated by Mark Ramsey audio design and production by Jeff Schmidt produced by Mark Ramsey media, executive producers, marshal Louis and Hernan Lopez for wondering subscribe on eople podcasts, Spotify NPR one hundred com or wherever you're listening right now, if you like what you're hearing. We'd love you to give us a five star rating in review us, and be sure to tell your friends and show them how to subscribe finding linked to subscribe to inside Star Wars and more information on the episode notes just tapper swipe over the cover art. You'll also see some offers from our sponsors, please support this show by supporting them join the conversation on Twitter at wondering media and at Mark Ramsey media. Use hashtag inside Star Wars on Facebook search inside Star Wars, or follow wondering, dot FM slash inside group. See you there. Desk inside Star Wars inspired by the stories of the making of this iconic Bill. Some cases we can't know exactly what sent dialogue. Scenes have been reconstructed based on extensive research. You can type this shit. George bush. Assure can't say it.

George Lucas George bush Gordon Bill Hardin Modesto Alec Guinness Mark Ramsey Anthony Daniels River Kwai Georgia Nazareth Kenny Baker John legend marvel studios Nick fury Mark Mark Ramsay Queen Elizabeth Blu Franco
Goodbyes | 7

Inside Jaws

31:18 min | 1 year ago

Goodbyes | 7

"In the following may contain mature content from wondering I'm Mark Ramsey and this is is inside Star Wars Heart seven the final Chapter Nineteen ninety-six San Francisco Sir Alec Guinness Is Eighty Eighty two. He's one of the LIVING LEGENDS OF FILM AND THEATRE UP Mr Guinness he had been playing Shakespeare since the nineteen thirties he had starred in Lawrence of Arabia. He had won an Oscar for the bridge on the River Kwai. Excuse me Mr Guinness but to contemporary audiences all of that was a long time ago in a galaxy very far away Mr Guinness I just I just want you to meet my son. He's a huge fan of yours. The boy was twelve a sweet face and a heart full of good intentions Mr Guinness. He has seen star wars well over a hundred times. The boy looked up at Alec Guinness with wonder here before him was the legendary Ben Kenobi Kanobi Guinness glared at the boy peering into his eyes. He detected little star shells of madness beginning to form. He knew one day they would explode young men man. I'd love for you to do something for me. He would do anything anything for you Mr Guinness Sun. Do you think you could promise never to see star wars again. What a dreadful thing to say to a a child? He dragged the boy away leaving Alec Guinness Alone These Star Wars Fanatics Guinness Road. They're living in a fantasy world of secondhand childish L. Dish banalities but what even a great jet I night sometimes fails to see is that one man's banalities are to another a new hope. Wonder is a forced that surrounds us and penetrates us it binds the Galaxy Together <music> August thirteen twenty sixteen Kenny Baker the man inside R. Two D. Two was sick he had suffered for years. There's with a lung condition and it had been getting worse. He was in good spirits. He'd been watching the Olympics when he fell asleep. Kenny Baker never expected to live a long life but a long life is what he lift he fell asleep peacefully that night. He never woke up. Kenny Baker was eighty one. He died eleven days. Shy of his eighty second birthday many miles away the news reached forty six year old Shane Townsend as a boy townsend withdraw all of the characters from Star Wars but his sentimental elemental favourite was r two D two and then one day his mother shared news with him that would rock his world forever. She was eighteen nineteen sixty nine. When she met Kenny Baker her he was on stage working as a comedian and she was smitten she would become pregnant? Kenny wanted her to have an abortion. No she said I'm keeping this baby. Our Baby Shane was born in one thousand nine hundred seventy a few months after Kenny left to marry another woman Shane's mother would marry a retired soldier in nineteen seventy two and move to Canada ed to begin a new life. Kenny Baker's name was forgotten it was removed from Shane's birth certificate and then there was star wars. It was early two thousand ten when she pulled aside her son. Shane was now forty she had she had something important to tell him something something he deserved. No Shane was chain was stunned and he was five foot nine but his adult daughter was only four foot eight. He always wondered why in December of two thousand ten Shane spoke by phone for the very first time with the man who was his father. Other yes did you. Did you ever know about me. I don't wear Shane didn't know what he was waiting thing for in the aching silences in their conversation. Maybe I'm sorry maybe I WANNA know. You may be telling me what kind of a man you become. Maybe I hope you've had a good life without me in it but he heard none of that biography Kenney sent that autobiography Shane opened the package inside the book an inscription his father did not write love. He did not right dad. He wrote only Kenny Baker. It was a week day in Los Angeles lunchtime. The finest power restaurants are mobbed at this time but not today not this restaurant. Welcome Mr Lucas right this wing place. The restaurant was empty every table but one the man at that table had reserved the entire restaurant and for this one meeting George welcome good to see you good to see you buy meagre was the chairman and C._E._o.. Of The Walt Disney Company one of the most powerful and respected media executives in the world eiger had overseen the acquisitions nations of Pixar and marvel for more than twelve billion dollars for both men. This would be a meeting that would change their lives forever. Hope you're hungry George. He wasn't not at all but he knew Bob Eiger was and that's why this momentous meeting was happening. They sat across that table quiet for a long time. EIGER was leaving space for Lucas focused talk shrewd right George would have to exile the words and he didn't know if he could Bob I've been I've been thinking of selling the company. Selling Lucasville Eiger leaders sat tight lipped he was salivating and not at the thought of a fine filet Mignon Lucas film he knew wasn't just the key to every star wars movie ever made it was the key to every corner of the Star Wars Universe yet to come Tom. It's worth to Disney was beyond calculation. Bob WanNA retire I want. I want to do something else. Do what George Lucas had no idea in just the thought of it gave gave him agitator. I don't know something else Bob no matter who owns star wars it'll always be linked to me. It'll be on my tombstone. I we it Lucasfilm. We understand understand the franchise better than anybody else. We know how to make marketing license these films. We need to keep Lucasfilm intact. We need to retain some control George. If Disney owns Lucasfilm UH Disney calls all the shots all the final say his ours not yours. You'RE GONNA have to surrender control bread. No thanks Lucas didn't want bread. Lucas didn't want lunch he he might not eat for days. He spent his life battling for control. He had been the rebel bucked the Hollywood system he fought against shortsighted studio executives and was proved right again and again control it was priceless to him and he would have to give it up Bob. When I was a kid in nineteen fifty five there was one place I wanted to be in one day? I wanted to be there only one. Oh and that was opening day at Disneyland. I was eleven. I remember the rides the bumper cars shooting galleries. The jungle rides the rocket to the moon. It was aw Magic Bob Disney is the only place in the world I would trust with Star Wars but eiger bid is lip but I'll I'll sell on one condition. I've written outlines for episodes seven through nine the final episodes of the skywalker story. I want you to sign an agreement limiting the number of people at Disney Disney who can read these. I think they're a great start to the story ARCS for the final three films here take a look from a storytelling perspective. These have a lot of potential okay. Okay George then we have a deal. We'll take good care of you. Baby on October thirty two thousand twelve George Lucas signed an agreement selling Lucasfilm in star wars to Disney for more than four billion dollars. The media were present as he signed the papers. His friends looked on he was smiling but he was nervous. Those who knew him best could see the stress on his face. Star Wars had been almost forty years of his life it was in and he was in it and yet curie was he was saying goodbye. If there's one thing I hate it's packing but it's a necessary evil. If you're going on vacation still anything that makes thanks packing a little easier is my new favorite thing. That's why I love the quip electric toothbrush because it works as well on the go as it does at home in fact it takes basically zero effort to turn this thing into a travel brush. I just just put the cover on it and go I really do with quips built in two minute timer insensitive sonic vibrations. I can be sure I'm still taking good care of my teeth. While I'm away from my normal routine there are no wires no clunky chargers the three month battery your life will last you all the way through a season filled with weekends away. That's why I love quip and why I'm taking with me on my travels this summer. Every place I go oh camping under the stars and indoor you name it. I'm still working out. The details. Clip starts at just twenty five dollars and if you go to get quip dot com slash Yoda right now you can get your first refill pack for free that you're I refill pack free at G. E. T. Q. U.. I. P. dot com MM Slash Yoda. I've seen a lot of ads for the buffy comforter. Maybe you have to it's this big Puffy rhymes with buffy comforter that looks like a cloud. I've been wanting to try to for a while so I was thrilled when they came on board as a sponsor answer for inside Star Wars because well because now I have one buffy products are made using only sustainable and recycled materials which makes them as soft on the planet as they are on your bed their latest product the breeze is a comforter made entirely from one hundred percent eucalyptus fiber to regulate temperature and keep you cool and comfortable all night long that means is comfort or keeps me cool throughout the night. I'm telling you I sleep better under this comforter so one hundred under percent plant based betting that's better for you and the earth that's a no brainer and if you WANNA try buffy for yourself and I hope you do listen up you can try buffy comforter in your own bed four free. If you don't love it return it at no cost cost for twenty dollars off your Buffy Comfort or twenty bucks visit Buffy Dot Com and enter Code Yoda. That's Buffy Dot C._O.. Code Yoda Y.. O. D. for twenty dollars off your buffy comforter December Twenty Third Two Thousand Sixteen Christmas Time Carrie Fisher was in London filming a project and promoting her latest book. She was at Heathrow at the gate waiting to board waiting with her French bulldog Gary. Excuse me Miss Fisher. Can I pet him sure gary was a constant companion companion. He was her emotional support. He was what she needed when the anxiety threaten to overwhelm her as it often had over the years. She texted her half sister Joely Fisher. How does it it feel to be sixty carry awful? I was just getting used to fifty nine united flight nine thirty five from London to L._A._X.. Was a long one eleven hours Gary would would be at her side that would help. She settled into her seat. I'm asked check neck pillow. Check treats for Gary. CHECK CHECK A couple of soft tip pens for the steady flow of fan boys and fan girls on every plane to every place every time check. Maybe I'll even get some sleep she thought can I pet him. Sure Excuse me this Fisher. Could I <hes> trouble you for an autograph short. Who Do I make it out to? Maybe I'll even get some sleep. Maybe she had long battled drug. Addiction severe depression bipolar disorder Gary was a great help so were her years of electroconvulsive therapy shock treatment all that self abuse over the years had taken its toll on her. It would weaken anyone. You boy gary good point. No one knew that swirling in her system were trace amounts of heroin morphine an ecstasy. No one needed to know it was nobody's business but curse. Would you like anything to drink Miss Fischer just some water. Thanks more than ten hours. Later Carey was asleep. The plane was fifteen minutes from L._A._X.. Fifteen minutes her breathing became a regular. It would stop for seconds at a time if breathing stops long enough if an often enough it can cause abnormal heart rhythms in extreme cases and when the body is stressed by other factors it can lead to cardiac arrest. It can stop your heart. Excuse me U._K.. Nothing uh excuse me pleaded flight attendant. I think there's something wrong with her then you'll write them. Can you hear me ma'am. It's going call the captain. We have an emergency uh-huh gentleman. We have a medical emergency doctrine or plans for in your call Dr Can I do. We have an unresponsive female passenger. She's not breathing okay. I need your medical emergency kit and your defibrillator and and I need people to move. We have to stretch her across. Those seats need some help here you. You helped me here compulsive okay. I need you to steady her while all I give her chest compressions. The plane was descending towards L._A._X.. But all anyone noticed was the woman stretched across the row with several very alarm medical professionals hovering over her. Oh you should not been breathing minutes that is right. I know that is it out of the way please twelve eleven p._m.. On the ground emergency personnel were standing by will the passenger had no pulse paramedics administered lifesaving treatment and transported to U._C._l._A. Medical Center in Santa Monica. She was moved from the emergency room to I._C._U.. At four PM that afternoon carries brother Todd spoke to the media todd what's carries condition. She's in intensive care. We have to wait and be patient. We're all praying for her. What about her dog? Gary is he with her now. Gary hasn't moved from her side since she got here. Todd how is Carrie's mother Debbie Reynolds taking all this <hes> she's heartbroken. She's grief-stricken. How else could she December twenty seven two thousand sixteen eight fifty five A._M.? A six in despondent Debbie Reynolds is at home and todd. I'm so sorry carries God one day later. Debbie Reynolds died a blood vessel had burst. I can cause bleeding in her brain. That's what the doctor said but Debbie son in Carey's brother Todd told a different story. I mother went to be with Kerry for every kid who had ever grownup worshiping the princess with the buns of navarine there were shock and dismay. It was a tragedy the reflections and tributes poured in Mark Tamil. I was just in awe of her. She was so committed to joy and fun and embracing life. She was a handful but my life would have been so much drabber if she hadn't been my my friend Harrison Ford she was one of a kind brilliant original. She lived her life bravely. George Lucas Carey was smart and talented with a colorful. Personality that everyone loved in Star Wars she was are great and powerful Princess Feisty wise and full of hope she will be missed by all she will be missed by me. December twenty seven two thousand eighteen the two year anniversary of Carrie Fisher's death carries daughter Billie Lord paid tribute on the piano. The one carries father had given her she played a song that had been carries favor. This was something vulnerable for her it. There's something she did often with her mother and now she would do it alone for us. Take your broken heart. Her mother used to say and turn Senate into art after thank you again George for allowing us to interview you hear outside your home. It's my pleasure really no not really it's pulling teeth. How much more you said an hour ride someone's lunchtime? I'm sorry not much more. We're almost done <hes> when when we lost Carrie Fisher were you surprised that her loss affected star Wars Fan so deeply no we lost Kerry. We lost a friend and partner but you lost Princess Leia or did you know I see her everywhere. She's every woman engineer and teacher and housekeeper an astronaut. She's in the eyes of your wife and your daughter. She's in your eyes. She's in the face of every woman who protests for justice every woman who fights for what she believes against overwhelming hang on I see her everywhere. I had saved one final question one that went to the heart of his creation star wars in his lifelong desire for control. I knew it would be sensitive. Georgia in two thousand twelve you sold Lucasfilm in star wars to Disney. The deal included your notes for episodes seven to nine. Those notes were ignored. Little or none of them was used in the making of those final films. How does it feel to have spent your life creating something and then to have Disney? Turn their back on you and your final contributions attributions to it. Lucas was quiet for a long time. He looked again. It is five year old daughter Everest playfully swinging back and forth mark when you create a child when you bring new life into the world you invest all of yourself in you feeder you clothier teacher right from wrong you help her discover herself so she can smash her death star so she can conquer her dragon agate and then one day after only a few years. It's time for you to say goodbye. It was a point where I lived only for movies and then I they had children you know Steve Spielberg once said something to me in close encounters Richard Dreyfuss flies into space aliens right. He leaves his family but that was before Steve had kids kids now. Steve says the better ending isn't up on the screen in the better ending Dreyfuss stays home. Are we done. I want to take my daughter Taco Bell. We're done George. Lucas walked me back to my car. Good bye bye. Thank you as I pulled away. I look back at the men in the rear view. HUMIRA jeans button up shirt faded white sneakers. George Lucas was waving at me. I saw him turn back to his daughter. He turned back home. When he walked like my car? He said something that kept ringing in my head. Star Wars was a fairytale. He told me but that doesn't mean it's not true. Someone once said fairy tales are more than true not because they tell us the dragons exist but because they tell us the dragons can be beaten. <music> June nineteen seventy seven a boy sitting in a movie theater Colorado Springs he lived in upstate New York but he was here in the shadow of the rocky mountains for the summer with family and friends. Everybody had been talking about this movie star Wars. You had to see it. They you said a long time ago in a galaxy far far away it is a period period of civil war was watching crawl. What was a crawl? You'd never seen that before. The camera hands down to beautiful planets glowing blue in the vast emptiness of space and then something else l. c. had not seen before a rebel shifting chased by an imperial destroyers so massive it devour the entire screen. His jaw dropped in unison. Every person in the theater moved to the of their seats space battles that were fast and furious. This was all new wipes between scenes where did that come from beat up space skier a used world of the future sure wow quick cuts exciting battles action adventure thrills chills. This was an altogether new kind of movie for him for everyone in that theater on that Summer Day in nineteen seventy seven the climax luke his flying as rebel fighters through the treacherous trench of the desktop at dizzying speed. An entire theater is holding its breath. The boy in his seat is trembling forced loop. Trust your instincts. Trust your heart everything you need to slay your dragon. Wagon is within you the rebel basis and range the death star is about to fire a planet is about to be destroyed. You may fire when ready looks running out of time was hot links tale if he gets Luca's Bullseye Hoyas all over things look dire clear kid now. Let's do this thing and go home. The boy in the theater grips tips the seat. He bites his lip. It's now or never home what happens next was heard by no one and that's because that boy every boy girl men and women around him in that theater jump to their feet at erupted into applause it went on and on George Lucas One said the whole point of Star Wars is for you to be uplifted emotionally and spiritually to feel absolutely good about life that boy standing shouting screaming it was overwhelming. It was a once in a lifetime experience for him. It was a once in a lifetime experience for me yeah from this has been a seven part deep dive inspired by the story behind an unforgettable classic movie. This has been part seven of of inside star wars written and narrated by Mark Ramsey audio design and production by Jeff Schmidt produced by Mark Ramsey media executive producers Marshal Louis and Hernan Lopez four wondering subscribe on Apple podcasts spotify N._p._R.. One one DOT COM or wherever you're listening right now. If you like what you're hearing we'd love you to give us a five star rating and review us and be sure to tell your friends and show them how to subscribe find a link to subscribe to Incite Star Wars and more information on the episode notes just tap or Swipe over the cover art. You'll also see some offers from our sponsors. Please support this show by supporting them. Join the conversation on twitter at Wondering Media Edmark Ramsey media use hashtag inside star wars on facebook search inside star wars or follow wondering dot F._M.. Slash inside group. I'll see you there from the legal inside Star Wars Yours is inspired by the stories of the making of this iconic films in some cases. We can't know exactly what was said by dialogue and scenes have been reconstructed based on extensive research poets from Alec Guinness Come from his biography positively final appearance and or from his biography.

Star Wars George Lucas George Sir Alec Guinness Kenny Baker The Walt Disney Company Shane Townsend Carrie Fisher Lucasfilm George Lucas Carey Mr Guinness gary Ben Kenobi Kanobi Guinness Mark Ramsey Olympics Disney Disney Oscar Bob Eiger L. Dish River Kwai
Enduring When Obeying Hurts

Solid Joys Daily Devotional

03:15 min | 10 months ago

Enduring When Obeying Hurts

"June twenty eight. And during when obeying hurts. Looking to Jesus. The founder, and perfect her of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him. And during the Cross Hebrews twelve to. What faith performs is sometimes unspeakably hard. In his book miracle on the River, Kwai Ernest Gordon Tells The true story of a group of POW's working on the Burma railway during World War Two. At the end of each day, the tools were collected from the Work Party. On one occasion, a Japanese guards shouted that shovel was missing and demanded to know which man had taken it. He began to rant and rave working himself into a paranoid furry and ordered whoever was guilty to step forward. No one moved. All die all die. He shrieked caulking and aiming his rifle the prisoners. At that moment one man stepped forward at the guard, clubbed him to death with his rifle while he stood silently to attention. When they returned to the camp. The tools counted again. And no shovel. Was Missing? What can sustain the will to die for others? When you are innocent. Jesus was carried and sustained in his love for us. By the joy that was set before him, he banked on a glorious future blessing and joy. That carried and sustained him. In Love! Through his suffering. Woe to us if we think we should or can be motivated and strengthened for radical costly obedience by some higher motive than the joy. That is set before us. When Jesus called for costly obedience that would require sacrifice in this life. He said in Luke fourteen fourteen. You will be blessed. Because they cannot repay you. For you will be repaid at the resurrection of the just in other words. Be strengthened now in all your losses for Christ's sake. Because of the joy set before you. Peter said when Jesus suffered without retaliating. He was leaving us an example to follow. And that includes Jesus confidence. In the joy that was set before him. He handed his 'cause over to God. I Peter Two Twenty one. And did not try to settle accounts with retaliation. He banked his hope. On the resurrection. And all the joys of reunion with his father and the redemption of his people. So should we.

Jesus Kwai Ernest Gordon Peter founder Burma Work Party Luke
Introducing Inside Star Wars

Safe For Work

06:49 min | 2 years ago

Introducing Inside Star Wars

"All right, everybody, I'm gonna date myself, but I saw Star Wars eleven times in the movie theaters when it first came out. Yes, I am that big of a geek and come on. So were you perhaps, and probably to a lesser extent? But you all know Star Wars, you know, the heroes, the villains the action it has captured many people's imaginations, and our hearts and our wallets for decades. But what did it take for this series to come the life? Well, I'm going to tell you about a show that helps answer that question. It's called inside Star Wars, and it takes you behind the scenes of one of the most iconic film franchises of all time. You will learn about the highs and lows that went into making the first film of, what would become a worldwide phenomenon. You'll hear about the struggles onset the doubts the krypton during production and the resilience of one man to bring his alternate vision to life. Here is a preview of inside Star Wars. I myself, I'm going to be listening, very carefully to see if there's information I did not already know that big of a Star Wars geek and. While you're listening, probably not with quite, so John distal near go subscribe to inside Star Wars, wherever you listen to safer work, or find a link in the episode notes. The following may contain mature content. From wondering, I'm Mark Ramsey, and this is inside Star Wars heart one. March twenty second nineteen seventy six it was the first day or shooting in the Tunisian desert, the first day of shooting Star Wars. Roy down down the remote control droids kept falling over shorting out. Crashing into each other uncut. Did we get at least five seconds of usable footage before that crash, six seconds, George? Good. Let's move on. Wait, wait, wait, wait. Can can you hear that? What's that noise? The droids are radio controlled. I think I think they're picking up local radio. Fabulous. What if we pull them along with wires until they fall over sure? And we could also hide behind them crawling on the sand in push fabulous. By the end of the first day of shooting. Anthony Daniels is C three PO was convinced. He wouldn't survive the film his brilliant gold, plastic costume. Took two hours to put on. It was tight. It was bolted to his body above the waist. Another two bolt stuck into his neck. Every step was painful, he lurched in hobbled. He was sore. He was cut up covered in scratches and scars. And this was the very first day of shooting. Kenny Baker was inside are two D two Guinea. Look, there's a robot coming Kenny watched in terror as an out of control, droid Corinne towards him. Down when are two and down went Kenny Baker. Some droids were radio controlled somewhere. Puppets on strings somewhere hydraulic in one head Kenyan side. And the chances that all of them would do the right thing at the right time on the right, Mark. Slim an hour passes in our two is ready to go again. Operated by remote control. Are two rolled into the distance over a sand dune. Over a sand dune in under the set of Franco, Zeffirelli's miniseries. Jesus of Nazareth shooting next door. Oh, god. Help us outside his tent nearby. Alec Guinness watched. He was the most famous actor in the cast. He was an Oscar winner. He had been knighted by Queen Elizabeth. He was a veteran of Shakespeare in I contact classics bridge on the River, Kwai Doctor Zhivago Lawrence of Arabia. And now here he was in the desert rolling around in the sand. With children dressed his jaw was an a menagerie of malfunctioning robots. His head was in his hands. Gilded will never let me hear the abyss. At the center of this maelstrom was a moody bearded thirty one year old named George Lucas. This was the realization of everything he had dreamed of, and it was falling apart at the seams. Seems filled. With sand. Nothing was going right. Everything was screwed up in the director was desperately unhappy, this movie is going to be terrible. I wanted an epic. I didn't count on an epic disaster. Test test test is it? Okay. If we begin I know we have only an hour. Sure, okay. It's october. Twenty four. Twenty eighteen I'm Mark Ramsay. I'm talking with George Lucas outside his home in Marin county. Hold on Everest. How do you be careful on that swing? How would you daughter now five? She's okay. So. Again. Thank you for making time for this. I know it's a big ask are you? Are you ready to start? Sure start wear. Well, let's start with the original Star Wars naturally. How much do you think about that movie? Now every day every day. Somebody asked me about it every day. Somebody thanks before and has that make you feel. It was a longtime ago in a galaxy far far away. I'm reminded of it every day. But it's no longer part of me. You know. They used to be mine. Now. It's yours. Okay. Can we can can we go back to your beginning? We have to. And that was just a preview of inside Star Wars. You're gonna love this series. We put our heart and our soul into this thing to hear the rest subscribe to inside Star Wars on apple podcasts or wherever you're listening right now.

George Lucas Anthony Daniels Alec Guinness Kenny Baker Kwai Doctor Zhivago Lawrence Nazareth Mark Ramsey Mark Ramsay Shakespeare Mark apple John Roy Queen Elizabeth director Marin county Franco Arabia Zeffirelli
Introducing Inside Star Wars

Inside The Exorcist

06:48 min | 2 years ago

Introducing Inside Star Wars

"Hi, it's Mark Ramsey creator and host of inside the exorcist, you know, one of the questions I always get his, why does it have to end Mark, isn't there anymore? Well, I'm happy to announce now there is more a lot more a new show in. It's all about the people behind a little movie called Star Wars inside Star Wars is the show, the people who made it the people that were made by it and the people who did everything in their power to kill it. It was a weird little low budget movie dumped into a handful of theaters. And then it changed the world, please take this ride with me. You won't be disappointed here. The first two episodes of inside Star Wars right now by subscribing today on apple podcasts or wherever you're listening to this, or you can listen to the entire seven episode series, plus a bonus episode right now an ad free by signing up for one three plus at one we dot com slash inside. You'll even receive a one month free trial. That's. W. O. N. D. E. R. Y. Dot com slash INS ID. And while you're searching for inside Star Wars, checkout, this preview of the first episode. The following may contain mature content. From wondering, I'm Mark Ramsey, and this is inside Star Wars heart one. March twenty second nineteen seventy six it was the first day you're shooting in the Tunisian desert, the first day of shooting Star Wars. Roy down down the remote control droids kept falling over shorting out. Crashing into each other cut cut cut. Did we get at least five seconds of usable footage before that crash, sixty seconds, George? Good. Let's move on. Wait, wait, wait, wait. Can can you hear that? What's that noise? The droids are radio controlled. I think I think they're picking up local radio. Fabulous. What if we pull them along with wires until they fall over sure? And we could also hide behind him. Crawling on the sand in push fabulous. By the end of the first day of shooting. Anthony Daniels is C three PO was convinced. He wouldn't survive the film his brilliant gold, plastic costume. Took two hours to put on. It was tight. It was bolted to his body above the waist. Another two bolt stuck into his neck. Every step was painful, he lurched in hobbled. He was sore. He was cut up covered in scratches and scars. And this was the very first day of shooting. Kenny Baker was inside are two d- two Guinea. Look, there's a robot coming Kenny watched in terror as an out of control, droid Corinne towards him. Down when are two and down went Kenny Baker. Some droids were radio controlled somewhere. Puppets on strings somewhere hydraulic in one head Kenyan side. And the chances that all of them would do the right thing at the right time on the right, Mark. Slim an hour passes and are two is ready to go. Again operated by remote control are two rolled into the distance over a sand dune. Can't stop up over a sand dune in under the set of Franco, Zeffirelli's mini series. Jesus of Nazareth shooting next door. Oh, god. Help us outside his tent nearby. Alec Guinness watched. He was the most famous actor in the cast. He was an Oscar winner. He had been knighted by Queen Elizabeth. He was a veteran of Shakespeare iconic classics bridge on the River, Kwai Doctor Zhivago Lawrence of Arabia. And now here he was in the desert rolling around in the sand with children dressed as John was and a menagerie of malfunctioning robots. His head was in his hands. Gielgud will never let me hear the end of this. At the center of this maelstrom was a moody bearded Thirty-one-year-old named George Lucas. This was the realization of everything he had dreamed of, and it was falling apart at the seams. Seems filled. With sand. Nothing was going right. Everything was screwed up. And the director was desperately unhappy, this movie is going to be terrible. I wanted an epic. I didn't count on an epic disaster. Test test test is it? Okay if we begin we have only an hour. Sure, okay. It's october. Twenty four. Twenty eighteen Mark Ramsay. I'm talking with George Lucas outside his home in Marin county. Hold on Everest. How do you be careful on that swing? How will you now five? She's fuck. Okay. So. Again. Thank you for making time for this. I know it's a big ask are you? Are you ready to start? Sure start where. Well, let's start with the original Star Wars naturally. How much do you think about that movie? Now every day every day. Somebody asked me about it every day. Somebody thanks before and has that make you feel. It was a long time ago in a galaxy far far away. I'm reminded of it every day. But this no longer part of me. You know. They used to be mine. Now. It's yours. Okay. Can we can can we go back to your beginning? We have to. That was just a preview of inside Star Wars. You're gonna love this series. We put our heart and our soul into this thing to hear the rest subscribe to inside Star Wars on apple podcasts or wherever you're listening right now.

George Lucas Anthony Daniels Alec Guinness Kenny Baker Mark Ramsey apple Mark Ramsay Nazareth Kwai Doctor Zhivago Lawrence W. O. N. D. E. R. Mark Roy Queen Elizabeth director Marin county Franco Gielgud Zeffirelli John
Introducing Inside Star Wars

Business Wars

06:33 min | 2 years ago

Introducing Inside Star Wars

"We all know that movies are big business blockbusters at the cinema can bring in hundreds of millions of dollars. And sometimes if they're big enough, they can impact our culture for decades to come. I want to tell you about show that delves deep into one of those movies, it's called inside Star Wars, and it takes you behind the scenes, a one of the most iconic film franchises of all time. You'll learn the highs and the lows that went into making the first film of, what would become a worldwide phenomenon. You'll hear about the struggles onset the doubts that crept in during production and the resilience of one man to bring his alternate vision to life of vision, that would become one of the biggest names in the movie business. Here's a preview of inside Star Wars, and while you're listening go subscribe to inside Star Wars, wherever you listen to business wars, or look for the link in the episode notes. The following may contain mature content. From wondering, I'm Mark Ramsey, and this is inside Star Wars heart one. March twenty second nineteen seventy six it was the first day of shooting in the Tunisian desert, the first day of shooting Star Wars. Roy down down the remote control droids kept falling over shorting out. Crashing into each other cut cut. Did we get at least five seconds of usable footage before that crash? Six seconds, George good. Let's move on. Wait, wait, wait, wait. Can can you hear that? What's that noise? The droids are radio controlled. I think I think they're picking up local radio. Fabulous. What if we pull them along with wires until they follow? Sure. And we could also hide behind them. Crawling on the sand in push fabulous. By the end of the first day of shooting. Anthony Daniels is C three PO was convinced. He wouldn't survive the film his brilliant gold, plastic costume. Took two hours to put on. It was tight. It was bolted to his body above the waist. Another two bolt stuck into his neck. Every step was painful, he lurched in hobbled. He was sore. He was cut up covered in scratches and scars. And this was the very first day of shooting. Kenny Baker was inside are two d- two Guinea, lookout, there's a robot coming, Kenny watched in terror as an out of control, droid Corinne towards him. Down when are two and down went Kenny Baker. Some droids were radio controlled somewhere. Puppets on strings somewhere hydraulic in one head Kenyan side. And the chances that all of them would do the right thing at the right time on the right, Mark. Slim an hour passes and are two is ready to go hug. Yeah. Operated by remote control. Are two rolled into the distance over a sand dune. Over a sand dune in under the set of Franco, Zeffirelli's miniseries. Jesus of Nazareth shooting next door. Oh, god. Help us outside his tent nearby. Alec Guinness watched. He was the most famous actor in the cast. He was an Oscar winner. He had been knighted by Queen Elizabeth. He was a veteran of Shakespeare and I- conic classics bridge on the River, Kwai Doctor Zhivago Lawrence of Arabia. And now here he was in the desert rolling around in the sand with children dressed as John was and a menagerie of malfunctioning robots. His head was in his hands. Gilgal will never let me hear the end of this. At the center of this maelstrom was a moody bearded thirty one year old named George Lucas. This was the realization of everything he had dreamed of, and it was falling apart at the seams. Seems filled. With sand. Nothing was going right. Everything was screwed up in the director was desperately unhappy, this movie is going to be terrible. I wanted an epic. I didn't count on an epic disaster. Test test test is it? Okay. If we begin I know we have only an hour. Sure, okay. It's october. Twenty four two thousand eighteen Mark Ramsay. I'm talking with George Lucas outside his home in Marin county. Hold on Everest. How do you be careful on that swing? How would you daughter now five? She's fought. Okay. So. Again. Thank you for making time for this. I know it's a big ask are you? Are you ready to start? Sure start wear. Well, let's start with the original Star Wars naturally. How much do you think about that movie? Now every day every day. Somebody asked me about it every day. Somebody thanks before and hasn't make you feel. It was a long time ago in a galaxy far far away. I'm reminded of it every day. But this no longer part of me. You know. They used to be mine. Now. It's yours. Okay. Can we can can we go back to your beginning? We have to. That was just a preview of inside Star Wars. You're gonna love this series. We put our heart and our soul into this thing to hear the rest subscribe to inside Star Wars on apple podcasts or wherever you're listening right now.

George Lucas Anthony Daniels Alec Guinness Kenny Baker Mark Ramsey John Mark Ramsay Kwai Doctor Zhivago Lawrence Nazareth Roy Mark apple Queen Elizabeth director Marin county Franco Arabia Zeffirelli thirty one year
Introducing Inside Star Wars

One Plus One

06:39 min | 2 years ago

Introducing Inside Star Wars

"All right. Listeners you're all familiar with Star Wars. I know I am. I grew up with it. I kind of can't believe that we haven't done you back in Han solo as a pair right here on one plus one, the heroes villains the action, it's captured our imaginations, and our hearts and our wallets for decades. But what did it take for the series to come to life while I'm going to tell you about a show that helps answer that question? It's called inside Star Wars, and it takes you behind the scenes of one of the most iconic film franchises of all time. You will learn about the highs and lows that went into making the first film of, what would become a worldwide cultural phenomenon you'll hear about the struggles onset the doubts that crept in during production and the resilience of one man to bring his alternate vision to life. Here's a preview of inside Star Wars, I have listened to it, and there's information in it that I had not known, and I am a big Star Wars geek, and while you're listening go subscribe to inside Star Wars, wherever you listen to one, plus one or find a link in the episode notes. The following may contain mature content. From wondering, I'm Mark Ramsey, and this is inside Star Wars heart one. March twenty second nineteen seventy six it was the first day you're shooting in the Tunisian desert, the first day of shooting Star Wars. Down down the remote control droids kept falling over shorting out. Crashing into each other. Did we get at least five seconds of usable footage before that crash, six seconds, George? Good. Let's move on. Wait, wait, wait, wait. Can can you hear that? What's that noise? The droids are radio controlled. I think I think they're picking up local radio. Fabulous. What if we pull them along with wires until they fall over sure? And we also hide behind them crawling on the sand in push fabulous. By the end of the first day of shooting. Anthony Daniels is C three PO was convinced. He wouldn't survive the film his brilliant gold, plastic costume. Took two hours to put on. It was tight. It was bolted to his body above the waist. Another two bolt stuck into his neck. Every step was painful, he lurched in hobbled. He was sore. He was cut up covered in scratches and scars. And this was the very first day of shooting. Kenny Baker was inside are two d- two Guinea, lookout, there's a robot coming, Kenny watched in terror as an out of control, droid Corinne towards him. Down when are two and down went Kenny Baker. Some droids were radio controlled somewhere. Puppets on strings somewhere hydraulic in one head Kenyan side. And the chances that all of them would do the right thing at the right time on the right, Mark. Slim an hour passes and are two is ready to go again. Operated by remote control. Are two rolled into the distance over a sand dune. Over a sand, dune in under the set of Franco, Zeffirelli's mini series. Jesus of Nazareth shooting next door. Oh, god. Help us outside his tent nearby. Alec Guinness watched. He was the most famous actor in the cast. He was an Oscar winner. He had been knighted by Queen Elizabeth. He was a veteran of Shakespeare and conic classics bridge on the River, Kwai Doctor Zhivago Lawrence of Arabia. And now here he was in the desert rolling around in the sand with children dressed as John was an a menagerie of malfunctioning robots. His head was in his hands. Gilgal will never let me hear the end of this. At the center of this maelstrom was a moody bearded thirty one year old named George Lucas. This was the realization of everything he had dreamed of, and it was falling apart at the seams. Seems filled. With sand. Nothing was going right. Everything was screwed up in the director was desperately unhappy, this movie is going to be terrible. I wanted an epic. I didn't count on an epic disaster. Test test test is it? Okay if we begin we have only an hour. Sure, okay. It's october. Twenty four. Twenty eighteen I'm Mark Ramsay. I'm talking with George Lucas outside his home in Marin county. Hold on Everest. How do you be careful on that swing? How would you daughter now five? She's fought. Okay. So. Again. Thank you for making time for this. I know it's a big ask are you? Are you ready to start sure start where? Well, let's start with the original Star Wars naturally. How much do you think about that movie? Now every day. Every day. Somebody asked me about it every day. Somebody, thanks before. And how's that make you feel? It was a long time ago in a galaxy far far away. I'm reminded of it every day. But this no longer part of me. You know. They used to be mine. Now. It's yours. Okay. Can we can can we go back to your beginning? We have to. That was just a preview of inside Star Wars. You're gonna love this series. We put our heart and our soul into this thing to hear the rest subscribe to inside Star Wars on apple podcasts or wherever you're listening right now.

George Lucas Alec Guinness Anthony Daniels Kenny Baker Mark Ramsey Mark Ramsay Nazareth Kwai Doctor Zhivago Lawrence Mark Queen Elizabeth John director Marin county apple Franco Zeffirelli Arabia thirty one year twenty second
Introducing Inside Star Wars

Bald Movies

06:31 min | 2 years ago

Introducing Inside Star Wars

"Star Wars has literally always been part of my life, the movies the novels. The video games have all preoccupied, a huge chunk of my childhood and adult life. Of course, it's gone on to become a worldwide phenomenon raking in billions and box office merchandise. There's a new podcast called inside Star Wars, the aims to document the humble beginnings of this star spanning franchise. They're calling it an immersive audio bio-pic using Santa affects and dramatic readings of interviews all to tell you the story of George Lucas, and his dream, we know Star Wars. It's a story of the people who made the original classic and the people who did their very best to stop it dead. Now, I've consumed a lot of making Star Wars material and even still I got a lot of stuff about his early life in relationship with his father that I did know here's a sponsored preview inside Star Wars, and why they listening go subscribed inside Star Wars, wherever you listen to bald, new podcast or find a link in the episode notes. The following may contain mature content. From wondering, I'm Mark Ramsey, and this is inside Star Wars heart one. March twenty second nineteen seventy six it was the first day you're shooting in the Tunisian desert, the first day of shooting Star Wars. Down down the remote control droids kept falling over shorting out. Crashing into each other cut cut cut cut. Did we get at least five seconds of usable footage before that crash, sixty seconds? George good us move on. Wait, wait, wait, wait. Can you hear that? What's that noise? The droids are radio controlled, I think I think they're picking up local radio, fabulous. What if we pull them along with wires until they fall over sure? And we could also hide behind them crawling on the sand in push fabulous. By the end of the first day of shooting. Anthony Daniels is C three PO was convinced. He wouldn't survive the film his brilliant gold, plastic costume. Took two hours to put on. It was tight. It was bolted to his body above the waist. Another two bolt stuck into his neck. Every step was painful, he lurched in hobbled. He was sore. He was cut up covered in scratches and scars. And this was the very first day of shooting. Kenny Baker was inside are two d- two Guinea, lookout, there's a robot coming, Kenny watched in terror as an out of control, droid Corinne towards him. Down when are two and down went Kenny Baker. Some droids were radio controlled somewhere. Puppets on strings somewhere hydraulic in one head Kenyan side. And the chances that all of them would do the right thing at the right time on the right, Mark. Slim an hour passes. And our two is ready to go. Yeah. Operated by remote control are two rolled into the distance over a sand dune. Can't stop over a sand dune in under the set of Franco, Zeffirelli's mini series. Jesus of Nazareth shooting next door. Oh, god. Help us. Outside his tent nearby. Alec Guinness watched. He was the most famous actor in the cast. He was an Oscar winner. He had been knighted by Queen Elizabeth. He was a veteran of Shakespeare and I- conic classics bridge on the River, Kwai Doctor Zhivago Lawrence of Arabia. And now here he was in the desert rolling around in the sand with children dressed his John was and a menagerie of malfunctioning robots. His head was in his hands. Gielgud will never let me hear the end of this. At the center of this maelstrom was a moody bearded thirty one year old named George Lucas. This was the realization of everything he had dreamed of, and it was falling apart at the seams. Seems filled. With sand. Nothing was going right. Everything was screwed up in the director was desperately unhappy, this movie is going to be terrible. I wanted an epic. I didn't count on an epic disaster. Test test test is it? Okay. If we begin I know we have only an hour. Sure, okay. It's october. Twenty four. Twenty eighteen I'm Mark Ramsay. I'm talking with George Lucas outside his home in Marin county. Hold on Everest. How do you be careful on that swing? How would you daughter now five? She's fought. Okay. So. Again. Thank you for making time for this. I know it's a big ask are you? Are you ready to start? Sure start where. Well, let's start with the original Star Wars naturally. How much do you think about that movie? Now every day every day. Somebody asked me about it every day. Somebody, thanks before. And how's that make you feel? It was a long time ago in a galaxy far far away. I'm reminded of it every day. But it's no longer part of me. You know. They used to be mine. Now. It's yours. Okay. Can we can can we go back to your beginning? We have to. And that was just a preview of inside Star Wars. You're gonna love this series. We put our heart and our soul into this thing to hear the rest subscribe to inside Star Wars on apple podcasts or wherever you're listening right now.

George Lucas Anthony Daniels Alec Guinness Kenny Baker Gielgud Mark Ramsey Nazareth Mark Ramsay Kwai Doctor Zhivago Lawrence Santa Mark Queen Elizabeth director Franco Marin county apple Zeffirelli John Arabia
Introducing Inside Star Wars

Inside Psycho

06:47 min | 2 years ago

Introducing Inside Star Wars

"He psycho fans. It's Mark Ramsey creator and host of inside psycho. You know, one of the questions I always get is why does it have to end isn't there anymore? Well, I'm happy to announce now there is more a lot more a new show and it's all about the people behind a little movie called Star Wars inside Star Wars is the show. The people made it the people were made by it and the people who did everything in their power to kill it. It was a weird little low budget movie dumped into a handful of theaters. And then it changed the world, please take this ride with me. You won't be disappointed here. The first two episodes of inside Star Wars right now by subscribing today on apple podcasts or wherever you're listening to this, or you can listen to the entire seven episode series, plus a bonus episode right now an ad free by signing up for one three plus at one dot com slash inside. You'll even receive a one month free trial. That's w O N, D E r y dot com. Slash INS ID. And while you're searching for inside Star Wars, checkout, this preview of the first episode. The following may contain mature content. From wondering, I'm Mark Ramsey, and this is inside Star Wars heart one. March twenty second nineteen seventy six it was the first day of shooting in the Tunisian desert, the first day of shooting Star Wars. Down down the remote control droids kept falling over shorting out crashing into each other. Did we get at least five seconds of usable footage before that crash? Six seconds, George good. Let's move on. Wait, wait, wait, wait. Can can you hear that? What's that noise? The droids are radio control. I think I think they're picking up local radio. Fabulous. What if we pull them along with wires until they fall over sure? And we could also hide behind him. Crawling on the sand in push fabulous. By the end of the first day of shooting. Anthony Daniels is C three PO was convinced. He wouldn't survive the film his brilliant gold, plastic costume. Took two hours to put on. It was tight. It was bolted to his body above the waist. Another two bolt stuck into his neck. Every step was painful, he lurched in hobbled. He was sore. He was cut up covered in scratches and scars. And this was the very first day of shooting. Kenny Baker was inside are to d-2 Guinea, lookout. There's a robot coming Kenny watched in terror as an out of control, droid Corinne towards him. Down when are two and down went Kenny Baker. Some droids were radio controlled somewhere. Puppets on strings somewhere hydraulic in one had Kenny side, and the chances that all of them would do the right thing at the right time on the right, Mark. Slim an hour passes and are two is ready to go again. Operated by remote control. Are two rolled into the distance over a sand dune. Over a sand, dune in under the set of Franco, Zeffirelli's mini series. Jesus of Nazareth shooting next door. Oh, god. Help us outside his tent nearby. Alec Guinness watched. He was the most famous actor in the cast. He was an Oscar winner. He had been knighted by Queen Elizabeth. He was a veteran of Shakespeare and icon classics bridge on the River, Kwai Doctor Zhivago Lawrence of Arabia. And now here he was in the desert rolling around in the sand with children dressed as John was an a menagerie of Mel functioning robots. His head was in his hands. Gilded will never let me hear the end of this. At the center of this maelstrom was a moody bearded thirty one year old named George Lucas. This was the realization of everything he had dreamed of, and it was falling apart at the seams. Seems filled. With sand. Nothing was going right. Everything was screwed up in the director was desperately unhappy, this movie is going to be terrible. I wanted an epic. I didn't count on an epic disaster. Test test test is it? Okay. If we begin I know we have only an hour. Sure, okay. It's october. Twenty four. Twenty eighteen Mark Ramsay. I'm talking with George Lucas outside his home in Marin county. Hold on Everest. How do you be careful on that swing? How would you daughter now five? She's fought. Okay. So. Again. Thank you for making time for this. I know it's a big ask are you? Are you ready to start? Sure start wear. Well, let's start with the original Star Wars naturally. How much do you think about that movie? Now every day every day, somebody asked me about it. Every day. Somebody thanks before and has that make you feel. It was a long time ago in a galaxy far far away. I'm reminded of it every day. But this no longer part of me. You know. They used to be mine. Now. It's yours. Okay. Can we can can we go back to your beginning? We have to. And that was just a preview of inside Star Wars. You're gonna love this series. We put our heart and our soul into this thing to hear the rest subscribe to inside Star Wars on apple podcasts or wherever you're listening right now.

Mark Ramsey George Lucas Alec Guinness Kenny Baker Anthony Daniels apple Mark Ramsay Nazareth Kwai Doctor Zhivago Lawrence Queen Elizabeth Mark director Guinea Marin county Franco Mel Zeffirelli Arabia John