36 Burst results for "River"

Fresh "River" from Steve Scott

Steve Scott

00:35 min | 18 min ago

Fresh "River" from Steve Scott

"Can learn more at Corona Virus Doc go produced by the U. S. Department of health and human services at taxpayer expense. WCBS news time 508 traffic and weather together every 10 minutes on the H Good morning, Tom Kaminski and Steve. Good morning to you. Good morning, drivers were off to a good start around the area. Of course we are anticipating. Pretty light traffic this morning. We have alternate side parking rules suspended today for the Martin Luther King Jr Day observance, and we have really no delays at all. At the Hudson River Crossings. Things look good center, too, with Lincoln Tunnel still shut down. That's probably going to be the case for a little while longer. At the very least, we did have some delays on the Garden State Parkway. North bound side right around 1 30 right around Route one in Woodbridge. We have a collision and at least one lane was blocked and also trucker 19 right in the vicinity of the New Jersey Turnpike. We had a tractor trailer collision. There will keep an eye on that. I'm Tom Kaminski in the WCBS Traffic center. Now the WCBS ex surgeon, Weather forecast Chief meteorologist Craig Allen is with US today and Temperatures remain above average, right. They sure do 39.

Tom Kaminski Martin Luther King Jr U. S. Department Of Health United States Hudson River Crossings Chief Meteorologist Lincoln Tunnel Garden State Parkway Woodbridge New Jersey Turnpike Craig Allen Steve
Cuomo Plans Continued Development of Penn Station and Midtown | WNYC News New York

Morning Edition

00:44 sec | 2 d ago

Cuomo Plans Continued Development of Penn Station and Midtown | WNYC News New York

"Is proposing an infrastructure infrastructure plan plan for for New New York York City City that that he he says says will will jump jump start start the the economy. economy. WN WN Y Y sees sees Stephen Stephen Nessen Nessen reports. reports. The The $306 $306 billion billion plan plan focuses focuses on on midtown midtown Manhattan and would include a new train station called Penn South for NJ Transit commuters and a new Port Authority bus terminal and will be the most ambitious mass transit development in the United States of America. Large scale projects often get stuck in bureaucratic delays like Penn South, which will Is in a long stalled plan to build a new tunnel under the Hudson River and eight new tracks, all of which needs federal money. But with Democrats in power in Washington, Cuomo says these projects and more Will receive the support they need.

New New York York City City Stephen Stephen Nessen Nessen Penn South Port Authority Manhattan NJ United States Of America Hudson River Cuomo Washington
Ex.-Michigan Gov. Snyder charged in Flint water crisis

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 4 d ago

Ex.-Michigan Gov. Snyder charged in Flint water crisis

"Hi Mike Crossey you're reporting a former Michigan governor is charged in the flint water crisis former Michigan governor Rick Snyder has been charged with two counts of willful neglect of duty stemming from the flint water crisis the charges are misdemeanors punishable by up to a year in jail and a one thousand dollar fine flint became a national symbol of government dereliction and environmental injustice and racism after in twenty fifteen a manager appointed by Snyder to run the majority black city decided to use the flint river for water while a regional pipeline was under construction the corrosive water which wasn't properly treated released lead from old plumbing lead contaminated water was blamed for at least ninety cases of legionnaires disease and twelve deaths hi Mike Rossi up

Mike Crossey Michigan Rick Snyder Flint Flint River Snyder Legionnaires Disease Mike Rossi
Ex-Michigan governor facing neglect charges for Flint water crisis

KYW 24 Hour News

00:18 sec | 4 d ago

Ex-Michigan governor facing neglect charges for Flint water crisis

"Flint water crisis. Residents tap water became tainted by lead. Legionella outbreak has been connected by experts to a ruinous decision that turned a river into the city's water source in 2014 2015, U. S safety investigators say electric vehicle fires pose risk to first

U.
Pablo Escobar's Hippos Are Out of Control

Kottke Ride Home

05:33 min | 4 d ago

Pablo Escobar's Hippos Are Out of Control

"A couple of years ago. I read a novella called river of teeth by sarah gaily. The concept of the story is based on a real world event. That almost happened smack. In the early twentieth century a bill was proposed in the us house of representatives and informally supported by theodore roosevelt. The us should import hippopotamuses from africa to the swamp lands of the gulf coast and breed them as an alternative meat source for americans basically starting a new industry in the us of hill. Ranching as you know this proposal never came to be but gala novella now collected into a volume with a sequel and some other stories under the title american hippo imagines magic in alternative history where this did happen only set fifty years earlier. You get kind of gulf coast cowboys on hippos tape story. It's great loved it. I highly recommend it. Or if you just wanna dig more into the facts. I put link in the show notes to a long read on the history of the hippo proposal by john. Mouallem will the reason i bring. This up is because americans in the early twentieth century. Were not the only ones with dreams of becoming hbo ranchers decades later pablo escobar would also get into the hippo game importing four of them to live on his estate in columbia and now forty some years later they have bread and multiplied and are spreading all over the wetlands of north bogo. Talk causing mayhem. Consternation and some real concerns for the region. Scientists say this now invasive species is competing with native wildlife polluting local waterways attacking humans and they project will grow in number two fifteen hundred hippos by twenty forty at that point the scientists say they will be nearly impossible to control their environmental impacts will be irreversible but never mind controlling fifteen hundred hippos. How do you control a dozen or even just one. That's not like you can just google it you know. In colombian officials are not hippopotamus experts and there are unique challenges levied upon this specific situation. I quoting the washington post in their natural habitat. Hippos spend the long dry season crowded into waterways shrunk to puddles. They're vulnerable to disease and predation not to mention one. Another as bad tempers but tropical columbia is hippo paradise. Environmental agency researcher david vary lopez said rain is abundant food is plentiful and they're no carnivores large enough to pose a threat. The animals spend five hours a day grazing on grasses and the rest of their time basking in the cool waters of the magdalena and surrounding lakes and quotes report from columbia not being the hippos natural habitat having in effect on the hippos behavior it also affects the surrounding communities impression of the hippos. The officials tasked with dismantling escobar's estate back in the ninety s. Weren't sure what to do with the one male and three female hippos so they just let them roam instead of sending them to a zoo with his other animals and mostly they did that because the hippos were massive and aggressive no one really wanted to approach them so we'll get the harm be and letting them go well. Kenyans and other african communities with native hippo populations could tell you a whole heck of a lot. You've got hippos from each sex so they can breathe for one and they're also hugely destructive to the environment into other animals. Hippos killed more humans each year than other large mammal. But when you don't grow up around hippos you don't necessarily know that so the hippos have become something of a mascot and columbia. According again gift shops in nearby puerto trail info sell hippo keychains and t shirts at the amusement park that was built on the site of escobar's former pleasure palace. Visitors can tour the lake where several dozen hippos now live occasionally one will plot into a nearby community looking as blase as a shopper on his way to the grocery store the hippopotamuses. The town pets resident claudia. Patricia camacho told the local news in two thousand eighteen. You could say that he now takes to the streets as if it were his own and quote but the hippos aren't as friendly as they may look on t shirts. They terrorize farms and hurt residents at times. The government has ordered the hippos to be shot on sight but there's been pushback from animal rights organizations and local residents so then they tried putting the hippos in a pin but and this is one of the mini quotes from this article. That honestly sounds straight hundred jurassic park. Etcheverry said i didn't know they could jump hikes so then they tried big pens with high enough walls that the hippos can't jump onto them. They've also been focused on trying to prevent them from breeding by cuisine. And then castrating the males. They've been through a steep hippo anatomy learning curve on that front though. Not even being sure where to look. For the animals external reproductive organs turns out. It's a bit complicated. They finally got a system of castration down. But it's costly and complicated so they can only do about one year but the estimates are that the population grows ten percent a year and apart from the bodily harm humans and the destruction of farms the hippos as they multiply host of other problems quoting again. A twenty twenty study of hippo inhabited lakes found that nutrients from the animal's feces were fuelling huge. Plumes of area an algae. These intern reduced the oxygen content of the water. Making it toxic to fish.

Sarah Gaily Gala Novella Gulf Coast Mouallem Columbia North Bogo David Vary Lopez Us House Of Representatives Pablo Escobar Theodore Roosevelt Escobar HBO United States Africa The Washington Post Patricia Camacho John Google Etcheverry Amusement Park
Michigan plans to charge ex-Gov. Snyder in Flint water investigation

Democracy Now! Audio

00:30 sec | 4 d ago

Michigan plans to charge ex-Gov. Snyder in Flint water investigation

"Michigan governor. Rick snyder and other former officials are being charged in the wake of a new investigation of the flint. Water crisis in two thousand. Fourteen flint's unelected emergency manager appointed by then governor snyder switch water supply to the flint river as a cost saving measure the move has been linked to at least twelve deaths from now break of legionnaires disease and widespread lead poisoning in residents including children in the majority black

Rick Snyder Governor Snyder Michigan Flint Flint River Legionnaires Disease
Many In Flint Question Whether They'll Get Justice For Water Crisis

Environment: NPR

03:35 min | 4 d ago

Many In Flint Question Whether They'll Get Justice For Water Crisis

"According to multiple media reports michigan's former governor and other officials will be charged in relation to the flint water crisis seven years ago despite possible criminal charges. A lot of residents still question. Whether those officials will be held accountable. Michigan radio steve carmody reports. Nearly seven years ago government leaders here push the button that switch the city of flint drinking water source from detroit's water system to the flint river flag. The intent was to save money. The result was a complete disaster treated river water damage to pipes which then released lead and other contaminants into the city's drinking water eighteen months later. The water was switched back but the damage was done. Blood lead levels soared in young children. People were forced to use bottled water for drinking and washing clothes. The city was forced to rip out thousands of old pipes while testifying about the flint water crisis before congress. Four years ago former governor. Rick snyder acknowledged mistakes. State and federal officials failed the families of flint. Snyder was not among the fifteen state and local government officials face criminal charges for their handling of the crisis half of them pled guilty to lesser charges in exchange for no jail time and in two thousand nineteen michigan's new attorney general dropped charges against the remaining defendants citing problems with the original investigation. The investigation seemed over until yesterday when the associated press reported that several former government officials including former governor snyder. We'll be facing new charges. If that happens. Legal experts say it would be difficult case for prosecutors. Peter hammer teaches law at wayne state university in detroit. He says despite possible difficulty getting convictions. It's important to bring charges especially in an era where we're living where people are not being held accountable. This could be an important statement about the significance of the rule of law and that not even the highest public official in the state is going to get off. Scot-free a spokeswoman for former governor. Rick snyder calls the reports of impending charges a public relations smear campaign saying that if brought they would be meritless since during eighteen months of foul-smelling dirty tap water that made them sick flint residents have demanded justice and compensation a us district court. Judge is expected to decide in the coming days if she will give preliminary approval to a massive settlement agreement resolving most of the thousands of outstanding lawsuits last year. The state of michigan announced. It struck a deal with attorneys representing flint residents to pay six hundred million dollars into a settlement fund. A few months later the city of fled a local hospital and an engineering firm agreed to chip in another forty one million dollars. Nearly eighty percent of that money would be set aside for plaintiffs. who were young children or minors. During the crisis they are the ones most at risk for suffering long-term lead related health problems. But growing course of critics say it's not enough a group of flint. Civic and religious leaders led by pastor. John maclean gathered monday outside. The city's water plant to express concern about the settlement. We believe that the proposed settlement curly allocated is just as disrespectful as injury-cause by the water crisis tragedy itself in addition to tens of thousands of residents. There aren't the lawyers lots of them. More than one hundred forty took part in a zoom hearing with the judge last month. This is part of the challenge facing the judge how to divide a large pool of money without leaving some feeling victimized again. Flint's mayor says it's important. His residents have a belief in justice and developments. This week may help with that for npr news. I'm steve carmody in flint.

Steve Carmody Rick Snyder Michigan Peter Hammer Detroit Flint River Us District Court Snyder Wayne State University The Associated Press Congress Scot John Maclean Flint Npr News
Former governor expected to face charges over Flint water crisis

Atlanta's Morning News

00:23 sec | 4 d ago

Former governor expected to face charges over Flint water crisis

"The former governor of Michigan is set to face criminal charges in the Flint water crisis of contaminated water sparked a deadly health crisis, said the city when state appointed manager switched the city's water to the Flint River to save money in 2014. At the same time bacteria in the water closet outbreak of Legionnaire's disease that killed 12 people. Reporter Alison Key says the states agreed to a $600 million settlement if a judge

Michigan Flint River Legionnaire's Disease Alison Key
A Big Dose Of Perspective With Jack Kornfield

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:43 min | 5 d ago

A Big Dose Of Perspective With Jack Kornfield

"Jack. Great to see you and thank you for coming Great pleasure thank you. Dan also for having me. It's time when we. I think we need to all come together and use our best wisdom and understanding of how to navigate. I completely agree and so let me. Just start with your mind. What are you doing to stay even in your own mind. Of course i meditate some but more importantly arrested in place that has a lot of spaciousness in it and a kind of trust. I'm old enough at age. Seventy five to have seen revolutions. Common go and difficulties arise in pass. Have and i also see that. There's i guess it was martin. Luther king talked about the moral arc of the universe being long but advance toward justice. I see that there's ways that systems also regulate themselves so whether it's the pandemic that we are in the throes of that is really causing enormous amount of suffering and loss whether it's the political disruptions in the capital and otherwise were just the calls for racial and economic justice that we needed for so long. I feel we're in a evolutionary process with its fits and starts. And i think about people like one gary mata who won the nobel prize for the greenbelt in east africa. She started by planning one to ten. Twenty fifty trees got other people to do. It eventually was thrown in prison on. I think that's a requirement for nobel peace laureates mostly And ended up planning fifty one million trees in changing a lot of the face to be africa or or or ellen sirleaf in manga bowie also nobel prize winners who said their country. Liberia used to be known for its child. Soldiers in had these terrible civil wars and now it's known for its women leaders and so there is some way in which just as the green sprouts come up through the cement in the sidewalk. There's something about life in. it's also the human heart that wants to renew itself. And so i rest back in kind and loving awareness to say yes. Let me turn my gaze away from the from the needs suffering the things to respond but also to hold it in a much bigger context justice. I agree that universe in the world is breathing. And that's how i keep my mind on a good day not the mean. There are bad days a bad moments but mostly my heart is pretty peaceful but you know there are things. I get a call from my daughter. Dad you know. This terrible thing is happening. At the nonprofit she runs for getting asylum for all people whose lives are endangered. What do i do our calls from dear friends. Oh my family has covid. So i'm deeply touched by these things and responding. Sometimes they really affect me. And i can feel the pain of it. You know or give worried but with all of that. There's a rounded a field of loving awareness of spaciousness entrust. That gives a much bigger picture and there. I'm just going on back away trying to answer your question and also spread out a little bit. When i was a monk training in the forest monasteries in southeast asia as a buddhist monk the main forest temple i lived was in a province adjoining. Both laos in cambodia was during the war in vietnam and laos cambodia. So we would see fighter jets going overhead and bombers and you know in some of the branch monasteries you could even see flashes from the from the bombs and people would come visit us. I had friends who were working in. Vietnam laos people that i knew as i had been working on medical teams in that ray calm river valley saying what are you doing sitting on your you know. There's a war to stop. There's things we need to do and my teacher would say. This is the place where we stop the war.

Gary Mata Ellen Sirleaf Luther King Greenbelt DAN East Africa Jack Martin Liberia Bowie Africa Laos Cambodia Vietnam Laos Cambodia Asia River Valley
Michigan plans to charge ex-Gov. Snyder in Flint water investigation

KNX Evening News

00:32 sec | 5 d ago

Michigan plans to charge ex-Gov. Snyder in Flint water investigation

"In the United reports States. that Michigan's Then some former people governor said all you and shouldn't use that others because will soon they thought be in it court was a campaign over to eradicate the Flint. Michigan the real water word disaster. Christmas, But in Lead reality, contaminated it's really water a very sparked legitimate a deadly term health that's crisis used in with the city the Greek when Orthodox state appointed Church. manager switched the city's water to the Flint River to save Pulse money of in the 2014. planet is presented by the At National the same time Endowment bacteria for the Humanities. in the water closet outbreak I'm Jim of Metzner Legionnaire's disease that killed 12 This'll people. archival Now there's program word that is former part Michigan of our 30th Governor Rick anniversary Snyder, celebration. his health director, and other former officials Breaking are news being charged in a new when investigation. it happens, Southern Allison California's Keyes, CBS only News 24 hour local Dow

United Reports States Michigan Metzner Legionnaire Flint River Rick Anniversary Snyder JIM Southern Allison California CBS
Michigan plans to charge former governor in Flint water scandal

KYW 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 5 d ago

Michigan plans to charge former governor in Flint water scandal

"Will soon be in court over the Flint Michigan water disaster that became a symbol of environmental racism. Former governor Rick Snyder was still in office in 2014, when state appointed managers moved to save money by switching the city's water to the Flint River, which allowed left contaminated water into a system used by nearly 100,000 mostly black residents. At the same time, there was an outbreak of Legionnaire's disease 12 people died. Public officials insisted that the tap water was safe. Despite the dangerously high lead levels. Many they're still don't drink the water and the fall out from the scandal has left many afraid to take the covert 19 vaccines as well. Allison Keyes, CBS news

Rick Snyder Legionnaire's Disease Flint River Michigan Allison Keyes Cbs News
Rain, Potential Flooding, Landslide Threat: Washington Forecast

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

01:52 min | 5 d ago

Rain, Potential Flooding, Landslide Threat: Washington Forecast

"Is going to stay rainy for the next two day or so, But by the time we get to Thursday, it looks like we might have some sunshine breaking through Friday. It appears we're reigning once again and all through the week with the exception of today about 50 is what we can expect to see on the temperature gauge. Right now, though, in Seattle 54 degrees with still very cloudy skies and potentially some more rain on the way All this rain means the possibility for flooding to flood watch in effect until 10 o'clock Wednesday. Communities bracing for potentially landslides as well. Come on meteorologist after you Cockney reports from along the Snoqualmie River, David Hawkins said, is the owner and operator of Jubilee Farms incarnation. He's seen his share of floods over the years, and this week he's getting ready for rising water levels. I've got Pigs in my greenhouse, I'd probably have to move. So I start thinking about where everything is where the water levels will be and what needs to be brought to high ground And the next thing you know, this area's an island. Larry back, remembers major floods of previous years and hopes people never drive into flooded roads. After all, it only takes about a foot of water to float most vehicles. The main thing is just You know if you can't see the road in front of you don't drive into it. Doug Williams with the King County Flood Warning Center, advises people to sign up for King County flood alerts and to consider getting flood insurance. Very mind. It takes 30 days for the policy to take effect. What insurance If you live in a flood from area there quicker, you'll be protected from potentially large losses from a flood to say all along Washington waters. Minor flooding is possible due to a combination of low pressure and king tides. Excessive rain is also leading to a sky high threat for landslides over the mountains Wanted 2 Ft of snow could pile up over the northern Cascades expected to make travel over Steven's Pass near Impossible. At times,

Snoqualmie River Jubilee Farms David Hawkins King County Flood Warning Cent Seattle Doug Williams Larry King County Washington Northern Cascades Steven
Chino Shoho Yuko Chino

Cults

05:06 min | 6 d ago

Chino Shoho Yuko Chino

"Sixty nine year old. Yuko chino's hopes to avoid. The apocalypse were dashed when her followers were unable to rescue. The wayward bearded. Thomas chan from a tokyo river with the end of the world. Imminent chino and her followers fled to a mountainside road where their convoy stopped after several days of snarling. Traffic and headaches for locals police arrived and barricaded the group to monitor them on the day of their apocalypse. And hopefully past the authorities planned to keep chino and her followers under watch until the press and other gawkers moved on but as may fifteenth quickly approached. Everyone was on high alert. A minor earthquake struck. Tokyo potentially foreshadowing chino's cataclysm chino's followers readied their minds and bodies for a swift death. And then the morning of may fifteenth arrived. The group eagerly awoke to see if they could spot the mysterious tenth planet bureau in the sky but they were only met with some warm spring rain showers. They held their breath for the rest of the day waiting for monstrous earthquakes. But those never came and when the sky cleared up new bureau wasn't anywhere to be seen. There were no reports of disasters anywhere on earth. The world capped spinning pana wave. The science wing of chino's group immediately went into damage control mode. They announced that. Chino delayed the doomsday. For one week. Chino said the fearsome date was now may twenty second one panel wave follower rationalized. The lack of apocalypse by saying the gods and our chairman did not wish for the end of the earth. This is going to take over on the psychology here and throughout the episode. Please note the nasa is not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist but she has done a lot of research for this show. Thanks greg when chino's date for the end of the world came with no fanfare. You'd think it might be challenging for her devotees to continue putting their faith in her but continuing to hold beliefs after a failed. Prediction is actually quite common. According to psychiatrist. Neil liser if a cult member had strong beliefs and sacrificed a lot continuing to believe might be less painful than discarding everything. They've stood for. He wrote the occurrence of a prophetic disprove. Rationalization must follow in order to assuage anxiety created by this this confirmation wiser even specifically wrote the this rationalization may take the form of an admission of the miscalculation of the predicted date. He said for truly committed believers prophecies cannot and do not fail even though pana wave postponed the end of the world by a week the authorities continued to keep a close watch on them. The public still had no assurance that the group wouldn't turn out to be dangerous in the vein of a previous called called omission. Rico ocean rikio scar japanese society forever when they released talks six seren gas into the underground subways of tokyo. In march of nineteen ninety-five that attack resulted in twelve deaths and more than five thousand injuries. Ever since then japanese authorities were wary and watchful over bizarre and apocalyptic religious groups in addition to any comparisons to option. Rico the actions of other cults such as heaven's gate toward the people's temple also left them on alert in the example of heaven's gate thirty nine cult members committed group ritual suicide the deterioration of the jonestown encampment of the peoples temple resulted in the deaths of more than nine hundred individuals. So after may fifteenth came and went the police nervously watched and waited to see what chino and her followers might do. Next tensions were high at the encampment as cult members who just been granted. Another of life continued with their daily tasks. The police and press marveled as chino's flock bother to do laundry and dane duties as the apocalypse approached. But they watched closely to see if there are any signs of a sinister plan. Most of the other bystanders were there for entertainment but some wondered what if chino was right. The old reclusive woman seemed so sure and her conviction spoke volumes the days slowly past and then may twenty second finally arrived but just as before nothing extraordinary happened. Chino's followers were disappointed but most never lost faith in their leader. The authorities hung around for a few more days but when they realized the group wasn't dangerous they lost interest and broke down their barricade.

Chino Yuko Chino Thomas Chan Tokyo River Neil Liser Headaches Rikio Scar Japanese Society Earthquake Tokyo Rico Nasa Greg
Florida manatee has 'TRUMP' etched into its side; officials seek information

KNX Evening News

00:18 sec | 6 d ago

Florida manatee has 'TRUMP' etched into its side; officials seek information

"Wildlife officials are investigating reports of a manatee found with Trump scraped on its back in Florida. Harassing a manatee is a federal crime. Wildlife officials say that it was spotted recently in the home, a Social River in Citrus County. A $5000 reward is being offered for information leading to a conviction.

Donald Trump Florida Citrus County
What Was The Westward Expansion?

Can We Health You?

07:49 min | Last week

What Was The Westward Expansion?

"Today we're talking about westward expansion. Yes earnings comforting. Yes in the united states yes so in eighteen zero three president. Thomas jefferson bought the territory of louisiana from the french government. For fifteen million dollars. This was known as the louisiana purchase. That was a lot of money back then. It was a ton of money. I wonder what it translates to today. Do that just curious know sure. It's like billions of dollars. Yeah so that. Land stretched from the mississippi river to the rocky mountains and from canada to new orleans so that like mid section it doubled the previous size of the then young united states and as as soon as jefferson signed the treaty. He sent the explorers lewis and clark to find a route to the pacific ocean. Many other explorers made the journey as well and so began the expansion of the country to jefferson. Westward expansion was the key to the nation's health. Jefferson believed that a republic depended on an independent virtuous citizenry for survival and that independence. Virtue went hand in hand with landownership especially up small farms. He wrote quote those who labor. The earth are the chosen people have gone. Wow yeah it doesn't correlate to me but okay yeah right so you're virtuous visuals and land or work. Yeah ok you work. Land make something from it. Honest work i suppose. Yeah if you're thinking kind of thing you take away like what we know about him. I'm think stop thinking of him as a person and the right he wanted the country to expand. And i think he planted the seed for the pioneers. Till i look you know you can go right. Make something something for yourself. Yeah so in. But in order for jefferson's dream for the country to come to fruition expansion had to happen so he maybe the country the dream of the country came first. And then thought okay. I need to have more land People to do So while the westward expansion is one of the defining themes of the nineteenth century american history. This growth was certainly fraught with struggle and won't get into that way by almost about forty years later. Nearly seven million americans forty percent of the nation's population now lived in this area. Well they know that way from eight eighteen three from eighteen hundred eight forty k. So pretty quick. Wake seven million. That's pretty big. Most people left their homes in the east and followed lewis and clark across the country as promised they were searching for economic opportunity like jefferson. Many of these painters believed that they would find land to farm trusting that ownership would lead to freedom in nineteen eighty five. Sorry wow a lot in eighteen forty five. A journalist named john o'sullivan put a name to this idea. That helped pull the pioneers to the west. He said that it was americans. Manifest destiny to carry quote the great experiment of liberty to the edge of the continent. O'sullivan wrote that. The survival of american freedom dependent on it and it was their duty to quote again Overspread and to possess the whole of the land which the providence has given us an quote the providence of meaning. I think the providence of light. What they were given like the land that was before them. It's here so is ours to take. Even though it wasn't i mean. Is that kinda what they get this kind of the way. I remember from Es three class and talking about manifest destiny asked yeah so this became a widely held cultural beliefs which carried the following themes the special virtues of the american people in their institutions the mission of the us to redeem in remake the west in the image of the east and an ear irresistible destiny to accomplish this essential duty so was disappointed was so arranged of area. Right ideas are planted in their head. Like if you go out there you will make your money. you'll survive you'll be happy. Happiness is just. Yep exactly yeah you'll have your own lambs have all the freedom that you'll have yeah So that term became controversial. You know throughout time. Meanwhile meanwhile while this kind of happening the question of whether slavery would carry onto to the west was at hand around this time. The missouri compromise was made which attempted to resolve the question of whether or not slavery would be allowed in the new western states That the louisiana purchase sort of like you know was responsible for create Them so this whether slavery would be in. These new states shadowed almost every conversation about the frontier. The compromise admitted missouri to the union as a slave state and may had to change main to a free state had they needed to have. They had to preserve the fragile balance in congress between us owning states in nonstop hunting state. Yes i say. I'm surprised that main was asleep. At i mean because she just think of the south. But i know. I'm know an i don't really know actually slave-owning or they like the changes such. Yeah just to keep that the same number okay. Half-and-half just have to say i know going. Forward as policy was made progressing through that it was always taken into account those southern states or the slave owning states. How making sure that they get what they want. It always had to be part of the conversation. Yeah it's crazy for another strong decade. A yeah i think even on that of course of an attorney but while they're formation was been the biggest conversation sure. Oh yes right. See that the okay. So the missouri compromise also stipulated that slavery would be prohibited north of the southern boundary of missouri. So the the thirty six degree latitude line okay It couldn't be north. Slavery couldn't be north of that but missouri was north of that so i think like after missouri said that they were going to be a slave. Nobody else could that was it. Yeah grandfathered in so many. Many thought of sullivan's manifest destiny was a secret term for spreading slavery. Really yes who thought that the people that wanted slavery or did not want to read. You know the people in the north okay. They thought it was. They thought it was like a secret term for light taking it over there. Really conspiracy theory Despite the many conflicts Far more complicated detailed for wondering really what. Everybody's wondering about the food. Because that's what i talk about sure. That's what we're here for

Jefferson French Government Louisiana Clark Lewis United States Thomas Jefferson Rocky Mountains Mississippi River Pacific Ocean Missouri John O'sullivan New Orleans Canada Sullivan
Will Indianapolis Colts QB Philip Rivers retire after NFL playoffs?

Glen Macnow and Ray Didinger

02:31 min | Last week

Will Indianapolis Colts QB Philip Rivers retire after NFL playoffs?

"Watching Philip Rivers yesterday, Ray Should Frank Reich be interested? I think you'd be interested anyway. You know if, um if rivers really is and it sounds like and he's sort of been giving off this, you sort of been giving off this vibe much of the year that You know, it's I'm no one coming to the end, and he thought he knew it was time to get away from the Chargers, and you wanted to take one last shot with another team to get over the hump. And he did, and he got to the playoffs and he got down to the last throw. But It's like every Philip Rivers game I've ever seen. Wasn't it? A lot of them there, Right? Maybe or s O. He's down by a couple points going for that last drive. And more often than not doesn't make it. Yeah, it seems that that does seem to be the pattern there. Um, but I kinda got the feeling Um, in fact, even kind of seeing his postgame remarks and just watching him talking about the guys on the other team at the end of the game. You can you just kind of get the feeling you're saying good bye. I mean, you just Was like I kind of gave us a try. You know, I came to a good team. We had a chance had a good season. But you know what? You know, it's timeto probably step away. I just kind of got that vibe from him. And if that's the case Then you know Frank Reich is in the market for a quarterback. And if the fact that you know Ian's reporting that that's what that would if Carson Wentz is leaving Philadelphia, that's where you wanna go. Well, sure enough. I mean, that's the logical place. Everybody's been saying that it makes perfect sense. It's a good team. I mean, they're not there right there. I mean, their defense is really good. They have a good running back. Um, I mean, that's probably a good city for him, too. Yeah, you know, it's it's not a high, intense media city, which I think would benefit him. Yeah, I think In many ways, Indianapolis would probably feel like You know, Bismarck, you know, I mean, there's there's There's there is. It's not it. Philadelphians, Indiana It's one step away from North Dakota. Yeah, I mean it Z for a guy who clearly is very Dakota Ondas in a small town guy. No, just, you know, let's face it. Philadelphia. Really? If you're an athlete in Philadelphia, especially for the quarterback in Philadelphia, you're living a fish bowl existence. 24 7, and I don't know that he was never all that comfortable with that. I think Indiana And Indianapolis would probably be more comfortable fit in to be going to the coach that he knows that has a relationship and he's enjoyed tremendous success with so I mean, in almost every way you could possibly dice this thing. I mean, it seems to make perfect sense to me. Doesn't mean it's going to happen. But if it if he's going to move I mean to me, that's 98% the move. That makes sense.

Frank Reich Philip Rivers Carson Wentz Philadelphia Chargers RAY IAN Indianapolis Bismarck Indiana North Dakota Dakota
‘Ultimate Sacrifice': Capitol Police Officer Fatally Injured as Rioters Stormed Building

RMWorld Travel Connection with Robert & Mary Carey and Rudy Maxa

00:53 sec | Last week

‘Ultimate Sacrifice': Capitol Police Officer Fatally Injured as Rioters Stormed Building

"George Manzoni reporting Brian Sick. Nick, the Capitol police officer who died of his injuries after being attacked by rioters Wednesday in the U. S. Capitol, is being remembered as a man dedicated to duty who was just doing his job that day, Brian Always wanted to help. That's what Mayor John Krenzel of South River, New Jersey, where Brian sit Nick's parents Live, says if the 42 year old sick Nick and listed in the National Guard twice deploying overseas, his family says that was a means to becoming a police officer, which he wanted to do his entire life. He joined the U. S. Capitol Police in 2008. The agency says he was injured while physically engaging with the mob that stormed inside the capital Wednesday. Too long enforcement officials tell The Associated Press Sickness was hit in the head with a fire extinguisher. It's just Mind boggling and it's it's turned My God, it's a neighbor of sick. Nick's

George Manzoni Brian Sick U. S. Capitol Nick Brian Always Mayor John Krenzel Capitol Police South River U. S. Capitol Police National Guard New Jersey Brian The Associated Press
Will Indianapolis Colts QB Philip Rivers retire after NFL playoffs?

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

01:03 min | Last week

Will Indianapolis Colts QB Philip Rivers retire after NFL playoffs?

"Eliminated from the playoffs today. With their 27 24 loss. The Buffalo Bills. I think this is it. Think Philip Rivers is retiring. I don't think we'll see him next year as the quarterback of the Indianapolis Colts. I think we'll see a press conference here in the next month or so, where Rivers announces it. He signs a one day contract to go back to Los Angeles and retire a charger. All of his family's there. He speaks about what happened. And then at some point He gets his flowers. From the home team. But if I had a vote, I'd vote for rivers into the Hall of Fame. There's only four quarterbacks in the history of the league, who have more touchdown passes the rivers there only four quarterbacks in the history of the league who have more passing yards than Philip Rivers. If they came to me and asked for my opinion, I would vote rivers until the Hall of Fame. I want to know what you

Philip Rivers Buffalo Bills Indianapolis Colts Rivers Los Angeles Hall Of Fame
Traveling To Snowdonia

Travel with Rick Steves

04:13 min | Last week

Traveling To Snowdonia

"Let's start with a peak at the natural appeal of the largest national park. In wales snowdonia the highest peak and wales in fact the highest peak in england and wales is called snowden sits in the heart of the snowdonia region and in one of britain's first national parks these welsh islands offer outdoor adventures gorgeous backdrop and draw countless tourists each year. Well skied martin. The land of its is here to help us make the most of our time in snowdonia martin. Thanks for being here. Thank you for having me there. So i've been to your home. Snowden is right in the backyard you grew up there in northern wales snowden in snowdonia national park mean to you. It's a place. I tend to walk quite a lot. It's just a huge and beautiful area. When i say huge. It's massive eight hundred and twenty seven square miles but you don't see that many people in it feels massive because it's it's windy it stark. It's pristine yeah. Small road not allowed to crowds. How tall is mount snowden. It's the massive height of three thousand six hundred fifty feet above sea level at its peak but because it rises more or less out of the sea. Yeah it has the aspect of bigness about it. It's so interesting because here on the west coast of the united states. Three thousand five hundred feet. It's like this is sort of a medium mountain pass for britain. That's a big peak. That's you know. Ben davis is the highest one in britain and there are few mountains over four thousand of the snowdonia national park. You have all of wales peaks over three thousand feet high and on. I think there's only one pecan english over three thousand okay. And this is the north of wales in. I've traveled on wheels. A fair bid. I just if you got limited time. I would recommend north. The peaks only Less than four thousand feet but didn't The british Climbers have mount everest. Actually practice in the snowden area. They practiced in that. Nobody had ever used oxygen on a mountain before. And so they had a stroll round be had Two systems an open and closed. And they thought oh. The closed system is much better. But what they didn't realize goes onto everest the vows and clo- system froze so the luckily they had a couple of open systems with them but they had some rugged enough areas in north wales where thought they could have some practice there. And you do get to some mountain. they're not resorts alert. Sort of hiking centers or something there. There's some beautiful towns. There's town called. Beth goulart galaxy. Guess who described beth killer it's a mountainous area and therefore towns villages. They nestle in the valleys. They don't sit on tops of hills and bathe galax which means ballots grave is useful in a little bowl with rivers running through it stone building. Oh everything is built on. Everything is built stone bridges over the babbling drone bridges and of course slate roofs because wales used to be the slate production center of the world at one time that right so when we think about going to north wales as a visitor and we want to do some hikes. What advice would you give for enjoying the nature of snowden national park and bringing up some calories at the same time you can hike all levels. Mt snowden itself with acid in welsh is an attraction. And there's a railway that runs up if you don't wanna walk for three hours just take the train and this is kind of a cute little tourist steam train. Yeah it goes from some berries up to the top and that's a family out it is. It gets crowded. Some of what i was going to say is that snowden is like a magnet people have heard people know that so that eight hundred and twenty seven square. Miles will get away from snowden. You'll see fewer and fewer and people which is a lovely thing. It is very empty area. It is and if you wanted to have some rugged memory you could hike it without the steam train. Take what five hours or so three hundred. Well five hours up and down if you if you know. It's a nice day. It's a lovely day. Beware say this flat up. Beware of times of year like easter when it's considerably cooler the top dress. Well okay

Wales Snowdonia Snowdonia National Park Snowdonia Martin Northern Wales Britain Mount Snowden Snowden North Of Wales Ben Davis Beth Goulart National Park North Wales Martin
"river" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

09:42 min | 10 months ago

"river" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"Welcome back everybody. Sam Buck total series in the lead with two points with her devastating stone quarry Deception I have one point Sam has one point and Stephan has nothing and now it's time for Stephan to try and claw his way back with me in the back off. We've got to panelists who are going to present facts to the attempt to blow their minds and the present easy Sambuc to award at the fact that they liked the most who's GonNa go I will. It is the person who can tell me how long the third longest river in the world is the Yangtze River. How long Since this is devastating because being very wrong. We'll just like Abu like well. I didn't know how big earth was. I guess I'm GonNa say eight Hundred Miles Ken. I was GONNA say more than that. I'll say twelve hundred. Okay Anka's closer you both bigger this. Oh three thousand nine hundred seventy way. Nihil it's four thousand one hundred thirty two miles long online. Gosh all right so Stephan. I guess I'll go first so rivers great and sometimes they kind of get in our way or we're gonNA capture him in some way like for example. Maybe they're created ice jams and we got blow 'em up or we just want to harness the energy of that river and build dams and stuff. This is great if you want to store up a bunch of water and maybe get some electric city. It's bad if you want fish to survive so we do want fish to survive and in doing that. Would you believe me if I told you that? We created a delicious death trap for Salmon to be consumed in a kind of sushi. Conveyor belt for sealines so fish ladders are thing and the idea of official ladder is like you have the dam and like that's like the water comes up to dam and like obviously a fish can't get up but then you can build sort of a thing that a fish can kind of swim up a little external thing so the fish can continue on its path to it spawning ground in the things can get down and you sort of connect the two ecosystems that you've built a big wall between but at the Bonneville Dam and Oregon sea-lions started showing up in the nineteen nineties. It started out with just like one or two and then a handful but then the apparently started telling other buddies about this amazing sushi conveyor belt and by the early two thousands there were like hundreds of sea lions showing up to just like grab the little fish out of the or just like wait at the top when they came out of the fish ladder and be like go. Thank you very much so The number of salmon actually decreased significantly as a result of this and no other National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration estimates that the sea lions eat around ten thousand adults. Spring Chinook Salmon a at Willamette falls where the sealines found another fish ladder to hunt dot. There are an additional twenty five thousand steelheads migrating through that in the nineteen seventies and in two thousand eighteen. The numbered in the hundreds so in response to this wildlife. Managers have tried to scare the sea. Lions off so sometimes they run at them and they're like that doesn't seem to work very well they also have tried to blow them up. Not Actually they did however set firecrackers off to try and scare them away. That also did not work because the lines are like. Have you seen all of these fish? They also tried trapping the sea. Lions releasing them five hundred miles away. And would you believe that the sea lions travelled five hundred miles back so that they could eat at this fish buffet? They have had to start shooting the sea. Lions you guys. We were like. We built a dam. That was really bad for the Salmon. And then we'll build a fish ladder and then it's like well the really enjoying this fish ladder. So let's start to shoot the sea-lions unintended consequences man. It's hard so sorry for the to end on a low note but we are doing our best to protect salmon populations and hopefully we're doing something useful with the sea lions after we shoe so they're still shooting them to this day. They are shooting them to this day. Here I Imagine Sea Lion Yelp was very wild when they discovered the salmon ladder was like guys. I found the secret Sushi spot. Can you imagine yelp when they started to get shot? This sucks the service gone really downhill here. This might be foolish question. But how did they tell each other? That all the salmon were there. Did they decide? I know your own or a- witter I do not know an I mean like I was wondering two things I did not find good information for either of these like how did they find it in the first place 'cause sometimes Osaman will jump out and it will not back into the ladder and so you have the smell of dead and dying salmon and that is a smell that might attract an animal from a long way away. Yeah or maybe it was just accident. Then you have like okay like clearly. It wasn't like one showed up and then to showed up and then three showed up. It was like wanted to shoot up. And then four eight sixteen like it was clearly exponential like they grew very fast so like it it does seem like in some way there was like family communication going on like maybe the maybe the sea lions were extremely in. There are like well. I'll just bring all of my offspring. I am having no trouble creating because I get to eat ten thousand salmon. Rc lions fairly social creatures. I feel like you always see the clustered in bigger aisles and pictures That probably has something to do with it to where whether or not we've studied it. They might have some sort of communication of like. Hey there's food this way. If as long as in direct competition with each other they have some sort of sociality they have some communication seven so in Africa. There's the Mara River which I don't know what it ranks as far as lengths of river but around that river there is. I think it's one point two or one point. Three million Seren Giddy wildebeest that make their migration through that area and this is the largest remaining overland migration in the world and so during that they crossed this river multiple times and at four of those crossing sites. I guess the conditions of the river end up being pretty bad at certain points but they they're wildebeest and they're KINDA DUMB. They don't really realize that so they just keep trying to cross there and that leads to a bunch of mass drownings happening and so they're often migrating in like they're not like one big heard of million they're like packs of one hundred or several thousand and like the entire pack will get consumed and an end drowned in this river at these points and so on average this amounts to over sixty two hundred wildebeest deaths annually which is very small compared to the overall size of the herd so it doesn't actually affect them that much but unless you're one of the sixty yes it sixty two hundred sixty two hundred but still. That's that's a lot of wildebeest and so after this happens like obviously you have a bunch of like vultures and crocodiles coming into like chow down by a team of researchers wanted to see how these kinds of events were affecting the aquatic ecosystem because it's kind of similar to like a whale fall in the ocean so like when. Wales die they end up falling to the ocean floor and then there's this ecosystem that develops around its corpse for several decades as the corpses consumed. This is the same sort of thing happening in our a a river. And it's not a particularly large river and in the paper they. They did the math to compare it to how many like Wales worth of biomass. It is and it's about ten blue whales a year that is getting deposited in this river. The thing that I thought was the coolest was in the weeks after the events happen. Thirty four percent to fifty percent of the diets of fish in the river were wildebeest flesh. Even the fish are getting in there and chowing down and even four months later will be. Were still seven to twenty four percent of the fish's diet so this is after the flesh disappeared but the fish were still eating the biofilms that were being supported by the bones and they point out that like these were probably way more common back in the day when there were many more large herds of animals Romay the right road bison in North America and these are probably important or were important influxes of nutrients for the the river ecosystems. And it's not a thing that I think we factor in when we're looking at like how were modeling freshwater. Ecosystems or thinking about restoring ecosystems to how they used to be in nature we must let the wildebeest die yeah and and also. I'm really happy. That yours was kind of a Downer too because I was worried that just by the fact being about death I was going to have less less good chance but oh hey rijsel circle of why yes. Are you guys time to pick your fact? Are you ready three two one? Oh let it. We split the different stuff. And I'm just happy I got one. Point is a good fast any nothing about it. I've heard about Hippo Coop in those rivers and the River Mara not. There's.

Stephan Yangtze River Salmon Mara River Wales Sam Buck Hundred Miles Ken River Mara Sambuc Willamette falls Bonneville Dam Yelp yelp Anka Oregon Oceanic Atmospheric Administra Africa official Hippo Coop North America
"river" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

11:42 min | 10 months ago

"river" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"Of our panelists is prepared. Three science facts for our education and enjoyment. But only one of those facts is real and the rest of us have to figure out either way deduction or wild. Guess which is the true fact. Seri is going to present these These facts to us. And if you fool us you will get a Sam Bucks for each one you fool and if we get it right we will get the sandbox Sarry. What are your facts? Niagara River was hard to cross by ferry since the currents were so rocky and it would have made things a lot easier to build a bridge between the US and Canada to help with tourism and other kinds of traveling and in eighteen forty seven. An engineer named Charles Eliot Junior was awarded the contract to construct a bridge across the Niagara Gorge above a spot called the whirlpool rapids. Because it's too dangerous for boat travel in that spot but it was the narrowest part of the river and because it was such a challenge. Charles rallied the local communities to help so which of these three things is. True Number One. He created a kite flying contests and offered a prize to the first kid who could fly their kites from one bank to another then. He used that kite string to pull across increasingly bigger ropes and start constructing a suspension bridge. Oh GonNa be mad. If that's not real numbers today. He created an artist's festival in a quarry near the river inviting sculptors to create large specifically carved stones which they could add personal touches to that locked together like puzzle pieces to make a stonebridge strong enough to resist the currents or number three. He invited chemists and engineers to test out explosives because the rocks that fell into the river altered the currents enough to break up the rapid so that it was possible to navigate ships and build a timber Ridge. One of these explosive experiments resulted in a mixture of black powder and liquid chemical fuel. That was the best explosive on the market until dynamite happened in eighteen sixty seven so we've got three facts here one of them's true. Two of them are fake the first one he did a kite flying contests and then used the strike string to draw cross subsequently larger ropes until they could build a suspension bridge number two he created a temporary quarry and an artist festival to have artists come and carve really good large bricks or a number three invited chemists and engineers to test out explosives so he could give big hunks of rock into the river to slow down the current enough to build a timber. Rich I WANNA go to straight to the artists quarry. Did they so they got to do? They get till like carve things that they wanted and they get a prize if they did something prettier than other people. He did have cash prizes to award. Which at the time. We're like five or ten. Us dollars. But I think the the main marketing behind this sort of thing was come to the Corey. I have designs for rocks and I need them carved in a particular shape but within that you can add your own signature to it or you can carbon designs and make a mark on this project on this bridge. That's uniting our two countries this like working for exposure totally is well. It's like working for impact like I'm going to have a legacy. Yes people find value different ways Sam. Walking across this bridge might see my special rock if I get a handrail piece. Yeah some of those rocks are going to be under the water. Yeah that one. I like these all so much the first one I loved the most the yeah. That's the kind of thing that sends just crazy enough to work that somebody back. Then when I thought of it I am like you couldn't get it across some other way because the rapids were so bad right. But couldn't you like go up with your big rope and like cross it up? I mean maybe not but a trees and stuff in the way is a very very big river at was that said how big it is. I think the gorge is eight hundred feet wide and two hundred feet deep okay. So let's totally totally doable to get a kite. Across that. Depending on which way the wind is what and like was that the American kids. Who did it were were? Did the Canadian kids do it? I think it was again like anyone who wants to can trying. But which kid did it. I want to know it was an American. I don't picture Canadian. Kids big type. Flyers is either not another wind or way too much wind. The Kite thing reminds me of spiders. Because I know there's some spiders that throw their web. They live on one side of a river and they like poop their web out into the air and it like the wind carries it across and then it gets stuck on the other side and then they can build a web off of that Sarah Space Looks. Very disgusted right now my thoughts and then the last one just seems too smart for his own good. I don't even understand what you're talking about. Arrowhead come tryout your blowups yeah Blow up the cliffs. Make the rocks fall into the river to disrupt the whirlpools logically sound as the eighteen. Hundreds you know Oh yeah. They didn't have ecology back then. That word literally didn't exist as so what year was this. He got the grant in eighteen forty seven and he built the bridge in eighteen forty eight or starting eighteen forty eight. I think wow so in any one of these cases you. He was extremely ingenious and his ideas for how to get this project started and I like to think that he was like. Here's what I'm GonNa do and the people are like. Oh yeah that's great. Here's the money you can do. My sense is that he was one of the only people who wanted to do this. A lot of engineers where like now. This is impossible here. Asks have and then Charles Eliot junior was like give me the contract. I have ideas. I'M GONNA go with kite flying you guys. Even if it's not real it is so good I wanna hear about the ways in which it Israel which I'm sure is something. I feel like the kite. Flying must be the spider thing and I just don't think the artists thing would work that does it. Sounds like you would take. I don't know it just doesn't sound right to me like they wouldn't work car. How many stone carvers are there out there? Yeah Nazis in that specific area of the world back then. Maybe they were a lot. I guess that's what you're building houses out of. Yeah back then masons were like everybody was a mason. That was one of the only job. Well then never mind. I'm going to go down as an IRO solitaire of now. Okay with other people working for artists shoot. I was GONNA go with number two two but do do WANNA double up okay. I'm doing it number two. I like I like the idea of this one. Oh okay okay. The real one is Kate's disgusted face on us. I don't know what my face looks like. I didn't given time so that's good to know I love it. Tell me more. It seems like you knew a lot about this. Why you gave you had too many fax. I was trying to not know what you kept asking questions and I was like. Oh I'm excited about this. I love it so the competition was held in January eighteen. Forty eight and the child who I succeeded to spend the gorge with kite which he named the union was an American named home in Walsh. He sent his kite from the US side to the Canadian side. I think that first time at crossed his kite string broke. His there was a son in like pull of the line and it got caught on the rocks and at broken and so he was stuck on the Canadian side for eight days while this happened this child. I don't know if you went there this family. Or how did he gets? He flies because they were all right. I don't know the the story does not have very many details. It's like on a website but also a children's book an economic us the full children's book to verify but he like sent his kite to the opposite bank and like ran up. Stream took a ferry across to go collect his kite and make sure the string was taught and then he found that it snapped instead so they were stuck in Canada for eight days and then was like okay. I'm going to try it again. And then repaired his kite. The Union did not go with a new one. He like had his trusty kite and then flew the kite across again. And then one was there a lot of other people trying to do this. I think so. I think it was promoted in local papers or whatever new system they had at the time on both sides of just like. Hey kids win five bucks flyer kite across this river in the middle of winter. He really wanted the five bucks. He's still alive. I think many says it's like a very good memory of his the one time that he flew a kite across there and that's basically what they did is they took his string and then they did a bigger rope. A bigger rope eventually steel rope way and that was how was how engine bridge. He's not still is still alive. Eighteen four heaven. Never mind ask discovered some Elixir. Was he was still alive at some point thanks. For fact checking man to be attornal. He died in eighteen ninety nine. That was a while ago when back all right well. I'm glad it was a big deal for them. And if you didn't get to live forever Do you have any real to the concrete? Corey Arts Festival. Not just that stone. Bridges existed time. I was looking at other bridges that were built in the eighteen hundreds and it seems like there are mostly stone. Stone was the next. Big Technology is putting pieces together without anything sticky Stinky Raka but together and some of those bridges are still standing today. But they're mostly over small rivers but they could whether the currents a lot more than mood and then there's a tiny bit of truth in the explosion story kind of cobbled together between two separate things the Leshan I think giant Buddha and China is a two hundred thirty foot high statue and when it was constructed the currents below it were really really rough and I think they partially created this Buddha statue to like hope that ships would be able to take safe passage but the so much rock fell off that actually made the current safer. It's also from Ottawa. Canada and other countries in wintertime have so much ice flow in their rivers that if it was allowed to continue building up it would become dangerous for the people who live nearby the riverbanks and so every winter they just bombed their rivers trenches and put dynamite in them and blow it up to break up the ice because it won't melt fast enough naturally we've just done a bad job with infrastructure and just been like. I WanNa live close to the river and then the river is like no no no. That's not how nature can say. We've we've done a bad job but like they solve the problem because they were like no we've got bombs. You're not a problem. I can blow you up usually. You can't blow up a weather but in this case you can all right next. We're going to take a short break and then it'll be time for the fact off. Welcome back everybody. Sam Buck total series in the lead with two points with her devastating stone quarry Deception I have one.

US Canada engineer Niagara River Union Stone Sam Bucks Seri Charles Niagara Gorge Charles Eliot Junior Charles Eliot Big Technology China Corey Bridges Sam Buck Corey Arts Festival Sarah Space
"river" Discussed on Think: Sustainability

Think: Sustainability

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"river" Discussed on Think: Sustainability

"So what was the river lack for locals locals after all of this despite having a long history of use studying back thousands of years the river was no longer a meeting place. The smell was this gruesome and a common joke was that even the fish didn't WanNa Bay that as they would regularly jump above the water as mud crab paid. The Monroe told me little was also a common site. What would happen? The Todd would come in and pick up all the floating letter and push it up river. The flooding needed coming down. River would make that and you'd have a blanket of across the river that you could almost won't trust just be covered in inflicting later so lots of little Orrick art estimate that we've pulled out over the years that we've been growing it'd be thousands and thousands of bags bags Asahi there each bags cubic meter and and when we pull out hundred to two hundred. Every every event with the river native massive amount of remediation residents accidents like paid and the mudcrabs stepped in the mud crabs are Nam of advocacy group. The Cooks River Valley Association. WHO Under a range of different names? An interrelations have been cleaning up the river for nearly a century in recent years. The group has been advocating for sustainability initiatives including a container deposit. posits came up river and the removal of steel piling on the banks both of which they achieved through lobbying efforts including taking bags of litter out of the river and dumping it on the steps of the state parliament. The mud crabs are the volunteer wing of this association created as you heard when local residents became fed up up with the amenity of the river and had to do something about it and lay is a mud crab and also the president of the Cooks River Valley Association CEO it's combined combined it's a combined effort So and people who live here want to get involved and he's ago the river was collude drain and it was little more than that and people built the house spicing streets. But now they're turning the morale facing reveal So it's instead instead of just being a horrible Nasty Stein It's becoming a lovely haven of a place where you okay. Relax as they grew in number and realize success in that litter cleanups the mud crabs moved onto another of the rivers many challenges with most most of the native vegetation on the riverbanks destroyed over time. Peter tells me they decided to turn their efforts to restoring the bottle riparian zones all the first votaw landscapes found on the banks of rivers effort has gone from liter to revisitation now. We've got non revenge a tightening and that's exciting. Sorry because we just started another live we just added another two and a nice dot brought individuals who live nate saying. I WanNa start doing this. So so we support them. Give them by connecting with the council and that takes off and get since supported people in in the local area in the mud crabs have multiple sites up and down the river and bus hundreds of volunteer members wanting to do their bit so walking around the Mug trap side. I get a sense that what the group office to them is a way that they can actively contribute to bettering the natural environment and in a time when many people feel helpless to change the reality of our environmental future the sense of action. The Madcap show is inspiring.

Cooks River Valley Association WanNa Bay Monroe Orrick Peter Todd nate president CEO
"river" Discussed on Think: Sustainability

Think: Sustainability

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"river" Discussed on Think: Sustainability

"For the majority of my life I've lived about a two minute walk from the Cooks River in Sydney's in a West it's always been common knowledge that the river is sick. Thank the smell of it would turn me and my friends away a lot of the time and if we did head down there it was more common than not to see a floating car or Red Willie been among the mudflats bought. The river hasn't always been like this when Captain Cook said is on it in seventeen seventy he said it looks o'clock a very fine stream and one fit to support the culloty's that would come as we know. The fortunes of the cooks river have changed dramatically since then What was once? A vibrant area of wetlands swamps and estuaries has been diverted polluted and abused to the point that I founded at when I moved there in two thousand and five. So what is being done about. This can the Kooks one-stop Australia's most polluted river ever recover recover plot. It's Sunday morning and I'm in wholesome Park Doc. A quiet suburb in Sydney's west which is bordered on one side by the river. I've come to meet a group of committed locals down on the river. Banks who are passionate about the Kooks well I moved T- a- I live on the other side of the breach just here and I moved here in twenty twelve and I saw people down he working on the river and I said I want to get involved and thought that looks like a good thing to do. I moved onto Cantabrian brain two thousand eleven and I ride my bike. Go for running every day and was he a flash and then you go for a run you you get that unless you come back in good mood but when I go running the thrilla get that. Besides the Louis Angry on official I turn my best both Ranjit and and who you just heard from a part of a group called the mudcrabs. They made in multiple locations up and down the river doing all they can to improve the environment here. I'm at Ford Avenue side where they've been working once a month for ten years to try and return natural vegetation nation to the riverbanks among the twenty also mudcrabs. who around me are pulling out? Wade's planting native trees and picking up litter. I Find Peter Monroe one of the founding members. He tells me there was one person who is instrumental in getting the group together. Nearly fifteen years ago Beckmann Chris Bartlett in particular who was very holly Very skilled very dedicated verging on but he he just drew people to him In terms of him working that's awesome meeting soaring pulling from the river and stopped in spite doing and then said join you said and he started ringing. Everyone up Every every Tommy had cleanup bring twenty thirty forty fifty sixty so he then started a name out system where we got five hundred sixty people on the email system.

Cooks River Sydney Peter Monroe Captain Cook Red Willie Beckmann Chris Bartlett Wade mudflats Australia Tommy Louis Angry Cantabrian Ranjit official
"river" Discussed on PODSHIP EARTH

PODSHIP EARTH

09:33 min | 1 year ago

"river" Discussed on PODSHIP EARTH

"People in the river playing by the river so we try to you know try to educate folks to try to stay away from it so we don't put our first responders and in harm's way as the financial like you were saying that you can tell the height of the river by weather plastic bags are in the trees like there's not that many plastic bags though. I thought it'd be a lot more. Yes that's correct. There's not many plastic bags. Since this program began the pilot program our first year we saw an enormous amount of plastic bags but since the inception of the plastic ban plastic bag ban we have seen a significant reduction of plastic bags in the river and I think there has been a positive impact of many times you say oh what what's the actually outcome of this. Where do you actually see this and I personally can attest that I have seen the reduction in here and we don't. We don't see as many bags in here anymore so I think that's helping out and it's been a key thing to what the impact of those plastic this is flying or being dumped how it affects our waterways and we're seeing this because that means also predestined reduces. Everything is into the ocean swab. It's amazing hummingbird right yeah eh right above so again. The elevator like said you're you're working. People can see us right now surrounded by Willow Sycamore. We've got all this natural vegetation here. You forget where you're at again. The water being deep is about until ten fifteen feet here and again. You're still within the city needed. Los Angeles and you and you forget about this. I I would never I grew up in in England and this little village and the river was cold. Cam like the camera. Everyone looks exactly like where we are today. You never think that was in. La I do nice well they have. They have guns. Let's you like a longboat with a poll where they had. This is very much like that. Yeah love it financially. Well said so. There's there's not many homeless people. Have we just passed a homeless encampment like what's the story we the actually the one we just passed right now. no. I've actually personally been working with him and while skilled gentlemen but he's one of those outdoor enthusiasts he doesn't WanNa be living indoors doesn't want to be doesn't want anything to do that. He really wants to living outdoors. we've attempted to get him help with the homeless advocates he groups and just refusing abusing to you. Don't blame the person in front of this river and you know the beauty that it actually has however it's unsafe because you know we we do have the you know we have federally protected endangered species birds out here so that affects that so we definitely have to be kind of find a balance and manage the the usage of the facility the so it can you know both folks can actually enjoy it but at the same time our wildlife can also use as a refuge to be able to you know to survive their species being in an endangered species. You definitely want to be protected as well and at this time was to protect. We know we were right now. We're surrounded by a rundle. What is Iran does like a massive a green bamboo kind of caney thing it very very difficult to get rid of whether they come from I believe it's Asia than it actually comes from and this this highly invasive minimum. Rondo those things where Army Corps of Engineers Sube. La La County flood-control spent a lot of money to try to get rid of it. I've personally seen it burn with diesel because it was after a traffic collision and three weeks later your sprouts were coming up on the same spot and the Legion valley so that-that's tell you how resilient this vegetation is but then along wells out castor bean. That's a invasive in here as well again things that are that are really you know out of their out of their element but but they thrive here because they've got water. They've got the right eight elements for them to be able to start. Try to take over. We're just saw light little fish swimming by that was the fast fish. It's amazing like the the rivers alive yes you've got eight different types of fish here while one of the bigger ones that you've got carpenter and you've got river channel catfish and here's well the one. I've actually saw when one guy was actually fishing here. He caught it was an eight pounder a ponder he he was just catching releasing however there are folks out here for the consumption of the Fisher catching here and just recently alley times relievers Allie Times did a special on it fish cotton here the river and took it up to the Mount Washington area for like a cook there and and they put out a feast they're and enjoyed it in a sonic really good actually saw pictures like let's say a place where the Sushi that might just the night before so I'm super the cool thing about where we are right. Now is how accessible is to so many people in the city. Many folks may not have the means to get to a Colorado Colorado River occuren- river and having this resource in your backyard's is something that is attainable something that they can take public early transportation to it bike their way here so there is there is something to be said about this little sound. Jealous River no I when I was growing up we would buy from city alimony down to the real Honda River in the spillway as well again. It was probably not the right thing to do but somebody placed a rope there and guess what that was watering watering hole growing up so we would use a rope woman right into the water until one day though and my mom did the same thing that the dive she drank some water and the her expression her her wanting to gag and everything was a still laugh about it and and I'm still now because she reminded him on. Remember remember when you did this. I can't believe I'm like hey you guys but then we've come a long way though because right now I mean if people eating the fish in it. That's a good sign. Yes a fish do get tested for mercury and also their studies that come on and people can follow that to see what what we you know what kind of fish you can have consume and in the end. I'll tell you that it's people consuming it and people have been doing this for decades and so if there is something it'd be set of Los Angeles River Amazing where we what are we going to see next Fernando right now. We're actually going to when we come cut this corner here. We're going to be entering an area that we call the Grand Canyon and why it's called the Grand Canyon. I will come to your imagining. He Start Thinking Okay the Grand Canyon this massive. You know you know just crater whole river at the very bottom and you'll see what we're about to the walls. Are you know not. It's you'll see what die but you also see in. See why we call all at the Grand Canyon. I'm excited with paddling. Thanks so so ed used to be in charge of getting rid of these invasive yeah so when I worked kind of upstream before now working in the mainstream up here in the Sangare your mountains there's substantial amount of Rondo that comes from here all the way to the foothills and higher elevations the mountains in this watershed and when you can take out one Nacre of a Rondo you can actually put back into the system twenty. Acre feet of water craft and it's a tremendous amount of water to twenty doesn't sound like anything right but one acre foot of water there is enough for four households for a whole year so these small putting we're seeing here some pretty big bunches of Rondo and if we're actually removed that it would ensure that all of this vegetation really thrived for longtime but then we'd have more water downstream. We'd have more to consume. We working upstream where that was kind of these source of water water for L. A. so when we talk about local water supply we can take that plant out we can return tremendous amount of water back to the local system but it's a how do you remove. It looks like incredibly I believe resistant to removal it is it's a really resilient plant as most invasive are so it has a a root structure it's kind of like ginger but ginger on steroids and it will regrow anytime you cut it down from that route ball and so you really have to either somehow will remove it mechanically and really ensure you get that root out which is can be a really big challenge or a lot of people do use other types of Chemical Michael Methods after you've cut it down so so you only have to apply a minimal amount do not apply the whole thing and that's successful just because you can ensure ensure that the chemicals actually going down at the roots and kills the whole plant but you know there's there's challenges in the controversy and their issues with using those kind of pesticides herbicides. That's if they can use manual treatments. That's out there. It's just it's really labor intensive. It's labor intensive even if you no matter what even if you're using to have a a chemical approach you still have to cut it down and treat it because if you leave it just as giant F- potential fire source on so it's a threat no matter what okay now we're at the attending around. This is the part of the the end of the river while we got waterfall in front of us heading back home. She's always fun to see the river from a different perspective.

Grand Canyon Colorado Colorado River occure Los Angeles River Honda River Rondo Los Angeles La County Army Corps of Engineers Sube Willow Sycamore Asia rundle England Legion valley L. A. Iran Fisher Allie Times Mount Washington Fernando
"river" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"river" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Frequent and is is expected to get worse with climate change i asked homes is it fair for her fellow taxpayers to pay to fix riverfront roads and services to accommodate a handful of residents residents who want to live right on the river. I pay taxes also so i look at it as though my taxes just cleaned my road but i do believe that if you come and you live on the river that you do it with open eyes and know that it's going to flood and you can't constantly be saying help me help me while the mississippi river has always flooded davenport and nearby cities. We're at flood stage this year for ninety ninety eight days for our south of devonport. I met with colin welland camp. Were in the city of arnold missouri. Just north along the mississippi river ver- stand next to a flooded city park next to the merrimack river it flows into the mississippi but because mississippi has been running so high the water in the merrimack is backing up and it's spilling over its banks. The floodwaters come within a few feet of the road. We're at where just a few homes are left standing since since nineteen ninety-three they have been buying this property out. The city wants people out of harm's way and land to absorb floodwaters. It's an idea woolen camp supports up and down the river countless acres of urban pavement have replaced spongy soil well in camp is the executive director of the mississippi river and towns initiative association of mayors across the ten states that border the mississippi. He says levy serve a purpose but his organization is looking for ways to return the river shed to a more natural state in order to protect these communities but these cities need help and woollen camp says washington needs to wake up an address what's going on. If you wanna call it climate change..

mississippi river mississippi colin welland camp merrimack river devonport davenport missouri levy executive director washington ninety ninety eight days
"river" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"river" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"I'm so off we went so how has the mississippi river changed would you say then since you know i'm in such a famous river such a famous mark in our country in 1883 mark twain called it the crooked as river in the world has changed over time and evolved it has so in a lot of ways i mean number one we control the hydrology to to a spectacular degree for one of the for one of the planet's largest waterways rivers were able to the core of engineers obure reclamation and all the other agencies evolved or able to control the hydrology to it agrees that we don't get floods that devastate the the entire deepsouth through the midwest like we used to and they're still the possibility of these but they've done a marvellous job on that in addition to the river for better or worse it's it's a lot straighter than it used to be it's a lot easier to get these quarter mile long barged goes up and down the river and it just makes moving things around that that much easier and then from down on the on the boat itself if you imagine a can of darth vader's layer with all of his technology that we might see in movies that's what the river looks like from the from the viewpoint of these these bo captains is all the technology makes a lot of things possible that were not otherwise so instead of having people dropping lead weights on strings to try to figure out how deep the river is we've got this threedimensional picture of the river is these as these boat captains go up and down there is such interesting history in this book from the mighty mississipi to add the area canal you write about that as at how it helps facilitate trade and commerce between the north atlantic coast and the burgeoning out west you know you talk in your book about the things that are kids learn in school from federalism to sovereign teed property rights and you say that all of those things can be looked at through the lens of our rivers and what we've done to our rivers.

mississippi river mark twain darth vader north atlantic
"river" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"river" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"I'm so off we went so how has the mississippi river changed would you say then since you know i'm in such a famous river such a famous mark in our country in 1883 mark twain called it the crooked as river in the world has changed over time and evolved it has so in a lot of ways i mean number one we control the hydrology to to a spectacular degree for one of the for one of the planet's largest waterways rivers were able to the core of engineers obure reclamation and all the other agencies evolved or able to control the hydrology to it agrees that we don't get floods that devastate the the entire deepsouth through the midwest like we used to and they're still the possibility of these but they've done a marvellous job on that in addition to the river for better or worse it's it's a lot straighter than it used to be it's a lot easier to get these quarter mile long barged goes up and down the river and it just makes moving things around that that much easier and then from down on the on the boat itself if you imagine a can of darth vader's layer with all of his technology that we might see in movies that's what the river looks like from the from the viewpoint of these these bo captains is all the technology makes a lot of things possible that were not otherwise so instead of having people dropping lead weights on strings to try to figure out how deep the river is we've got this threedimensional picture of the river is these as these boat captains go up and down there is such interesting history in this book from the mighty mississipi to add the area canal you write about that as at how it helps facilitate trade and commerce between the north atlantic coast and the burgeoning out west you know you talk in your book about the things that are kids learn in school from federalism to sovereign teed property rights and you say that all of those things can be looked at through the lens of our rivers and what we've done to our rivers.

mississippi river mark twain darth vader north atlantic
"river" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"river" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"I'm so off we went so how has the mississippi river changed would you say then since you know i'm in such a famous river such a famous mark in our country in 1883 mark twain called it the crooked as river in the world has changed over time and evolved it has so in a lot of ways i mean number one we control the hydrology to to a spectacular degree for one of the for one of the planet's largest waterways rivers were able to the core of engineers obure reclamation and all the other agencies evolved or able to control the hydrology to it agrees that we don't get floods that devastate the the entire deepsouth through the midwest like we used to and they're still the possibility of these but they've done a marvellous job on that in addition to the river for better or worse it's it's a lot straighter than it used to be it's a lot easier to get these quarter mile long barged goes up and down the river and it just makes moving things around that that much easier and then from down on the on the boat itself if you imagine a can of darth vader's layer with all of his technology that we might see in movies that's what the river looks like from the from the viewpoint of these these bo captains is all the technology makes a lot of things possible that were not otherwise so instead of having people dropping lead weights on strings to try to figure out how deep the river is we've got this threedimensional picture of the river is these as these boat captains go up and down there is such interesting history in this book from the mighty mississipi to add the area canal you write about that as at how it helps facilitate trade and commerce between the north atlantic coast and the burgeoning out west you know you talk in your book about the things that are kids learn in school from federalism to sovereign teed property rights and you say that all of those things can be looked at through the lens of our rivers and what we've done to our rivers.

mississippi river mark twain darth vader north atlantic
"river" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"river" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"I'm so off we went so how has the mississippi river changed would you say then since you know i'm in such a famous river such a famous mark in our country in 1883 mark twain called it the crooked as river in the world has changed over time and evolved it has so in a lot of ways i mean number one we control the hydrology to to a spectacular degree for one of the for one of the planet's largest waterways rivers were able to the core of engineers obure reclamation and all the other agencies evolved or able to control the hydrology to it agrees that we don't get floods that devastate the the entire deepsouth through the midwest like we used to and they're still the possibility of these but they've done a marvellous job on that in addition to the river for better or worse it's it's a lot straighter than it used to be it's a lot easier to get these quarter mile long barged goes up and down the river and it just makes moving things around that that much easier and then from down on the on the boat itself if you imagine a can of darth vader's layer with all of his technology that we might see in movies that's what the river looks like from the from the viewpoint of these these bo captains is all the technology makes a lot of things possible that were not otherwise so instead of having people dropping lead weights on strings to try to figure out how deep the river is we've got this threedimensional picture of the river is these as these boat captains go up and down there is such interesting history in this book from the mighty mississipi to add the area canal you write about that as at how it helps facilitate trade and commerce between the north atlantic coast and the burgeoning out west you know you talk in your book about the things that are kids learn in school from federalism to sovereign teed property rights and you say that all of those things can be looked at through the lens of our rivers and what we've done to our rivers.

mississippi river mark twain darth vader north atlantic
"river" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"river" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"We don't we are unaware of them nearly as much as we probably used to be i mean i think uh in a lot of ways were uh we drive over them we might notice a little sign that says something about george washington or or fdr something like that on the side of the road but we we tend to be very separated from from rivers so just general awareness i think a big thing is we're not aware of the central role that rivers play in our modern economy whether it's through hydropower in stabilising the grid whether it's through irrigation out west or probably more than anything else that overlooked is the the central role that barge traffic plays in moving heavy commodities around our nation and around our world and so that those herb it's just do it we tend to forget the fact that our cod that our economy is based on these currently we also tend to forget the fact that a lot of our regional economies were started by doing something with rivers you write about those big barges to which you just referred when you took a your trip along the mighty mississipi river with all of its levy systems and fled controls tell us about that trip about that tow boat trip on the on the mississippi it was definitely probably the highlight of my career it's one of those random things would one of the things that i did discover writing this book is that people who work on and around rivers are in inordinately fascinated with them and they're also very quick to to help other people understand them and so this was one of those moments righteous randomly said i wonder what it'd be liked to write on a barge into c of the river from uh from the river out rather than looking down at it called a barge company and floated the idea by him and to my schalken possibly horror they said i could tackle of tag along.

george washington mississipi river mississippi
"river" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"river" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"We don't we are unaware of them nearly as much as we probably used to be i mean i think uh in a lot of ways were uh we drive over them we might notice a little sign that says something about george washington or or fdr something like that on the side of the road but we we tend to be very separated from from rivers so just general awareness i think a big thing is we're not aware of the central role that rivers play in our modern economy whether it's through hydropower in stabilising the grid whether it's through irrigation out west or probably more than anything else that overlooked is the the central role that barge traffic plays in moving heavy commodities around our nation and around our world and so that those herb it's just do it we tend to forget the fact that our cod that our economy is based on these currently we also tend to forget the fact that a lot of our regional economies were started by doing something with rivers you write about those big barges to which you just referred when you took a your trip along the mighty mississipi river with all of its levy systems and fled controls tell us about that trip about that tow boat trip on the on the mississippi it was definitely probably the highlight of my career it's one of those random things would one of the things that i did discover writing this book is that people who work on and around rivers are in inordinately fascinated with them and they're also very quick to to help other people understand them and so this was one of those moments righteous randomly said i wonder what it'd be liked to write on a barge into c of the river from uh from the river out rather than looking down at it called a barge company and floated the idea by him and to my schalken possibly horror they said i could tackle of tag along.

george washington mississipi river mississippi
"river" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"river" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"We don't we are unaware of them nearly as much as we probably used to be i mean i think uh in a lot of ways were uh we drive over them we might notice a little sign that says something about george washington or or fdr something like that on the side of the road but we we tend to be very separated from from rivers so just general awareness i think a big thing is were not aware of the central role that rivers play in our modern economy whether it's through hydropower in stabilising the grid whether it's through irrigation out west or probably more than anything else that's overlooked is the the central role that barge traffic plays in moving heavy commodities around our nation and around our world and so that those herb it's just do it we tend to forget the fact that our cod that our economy is based on these currently we also tend to forget the fact that a lot of our regional economies were started by doing something with rivers you write about those big barges to which you just referred when you took a your trip along the mighty mississipi river with all of its levy systems and flood controls tell us about that trip about that tow boat trip on the on the mississippi it was definitely probably the highlight of my career it's one of those random things one of the things that i did discover writing this book is that people who work on and around rivers are in inordinately fascinated with them and they're also very quick to to help other people understand them and so this was one of those moments where i just randomly said i wonder what it be like to ride on a barge into c of the river from uh from the river out rather than looking down at at called a barge company and floated the idea by him and to my schalken possibly horror they said i could tackle of tag along.

george washington mississipi river mississippi
"river" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"river" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"We don't we are unaware of them nearly as much as we probably used to be i mean i think uh in a lot of ways were uh we drive over them we might notice a little sign that says something about george washington or or fdr something like that on the side of the road but we we tend to be very separated from from rivers so just general awareness i think a big thing is were not aware of the central role that rivers play in our modern economy whether it's through hydropower in stabilising the grid whether it's through irrigation out west or probably more than anything else that's overlooked is the the central role that barge traffic plays in moving heavy commodities around our nation and around our world and so that those herb it's just do it we tend to forget the fact that our cod that our economy is based on these currently we also tend to forget the fact that a lot of our regional economies were started by doing something with rivers you write about those big barges to which you just referred when you took a your trip along the mighty mississipi river with all of its levy systems and flood controls tell us about that trip about that tow boat trip on the on the mississippi it was definitely probably the highlight of my career it's one of those random things one of the things that i did discover writing this book is that people who work on and around rivers are in inordinately fascinated with them and they're also very quick to to help other people understand them and so this was one of those moments where i just randomly said i wonder what it be like to ride on a barge into c of the river from uh from the river out rather than looking down at at called a barge company and floated the idea by him and to my schalken possibly horror they said i could tackle of tag along.

george washington mississipi river mississippi
"river" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"river" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"We don't we are unaware of them nearly as much as we probably used to be i mean i think uh in a lot of ways were uh we drive over them we might notice a little sign that says something about george washington or or fdr something like that on the side of the road but we we tend to be very separated from from rivers so just general awareness i think a big thing is were not aware of the central role that rivers play in our modern economy whether it's through hydropower in stabilising the grid whether it's through irrigation out west or probably more than anything else that's overlooked is the the central role that barge traffic plays in moving heavy commodities around our nation and around our world and so that those herb it's just do it we tend to forget the fact that our cod that our economy is based on these currently we also tend to forget the fact that a lot of our regional economies were started by doing something with rivers you write about those big barges to which you just referred when you took a your trip along the mighty mississipi river with all of its levy systems and flood controls tell us about that trip about that tow boat trip on the on the mississippi it was definitely probably the highlight of my career it's one of those random things one of the things that i did discover writing this book is that people who work on and around rivers are in inordinately fascinated with them and they're also very quick to to help other people understand them and so this was one of those moments where i just randomly said i wonder what it be like to ride on a barge into c of the river from uh from the river out rather than looking down at at called a barge company and floated the idea by him and to my schalken possibly horror they said i could tackle of tag along.

george washington mississipi river mississippi
"river" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"river" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"We don't we are unaware of them nearly as much as we probably used to be i mean i think uh in a lot of ways were uh we drive over them we might notice a little sign that says something about george washington or or fdr something like that on the side of the road but we we tend to be very separated from from rivers so just general awareness i think a big thing is were not aware of the central role that rivers play in our modern economy whether it's through hydropower in stabilising the grid whether it's through irrigation out west or probably more than anything else that's overlooked is the the central role that barge traffic plays in moving heavy commodities around our nation and around our world and so that those herb it's just do it we tend to forget the fact that our cod that our economy is based on these currently we also tend to forget the fact that a lot of our regional economies were started by doing something with rivers you write about those big barges to which you just referred when you took a your trip along the mighty mississipi river with all of its levy systems and flood controls tell us about that trip about that tow boat trip on the on the mississippi it was definitely probably the highlight of my career it's one of those random things one of the things that i did discover writing this book is that people who work on and around rivers are in inordinately fascinated with them and they're also very quick to to help other people understand them and so this was one of those moments where i just randomly said i wonder what it be like to ride on a barge into c of the river from uh from the river out rather than looking down at at called a barge company and floated the idea by him and to my schalken possibly horror they said i could tackle of tag along.

george washington mississipi river mississippi
"river" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"river" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"We don't we are unaware of them nearly as much as we probably used to be i mean i think uh in a lot of ways were uh we drive over them we might notice a little sign that says something about george washington or or fdr something like that on the side of the road but we we tend to be very separated from from rivers so just general awareness i think a big thing is were not aware of the central role that rivers play in our modern economy whether it's through hydropower in stabilising the grid whether it's through irrigation out west or probably more than anything else that's overlooked is the the central role that barge traffic plays in moving heavy commodities around our nation and around our world and so that those herb it's just do it we tend to forget the fact that our cod that our economy is based on these currently we also tend to forget the fact that a lot of our regional economies were started by doing something with rivers you write about those big barges to which you just referred when you took a your trip along the mighty mississipi river with all of its levy systems and flood controls tell us about that trip about that tow boat trip on the on the mississippi it was definitely probably the highlight of my career it's one of those random things one of the things that i did discover writing this book is that people who work on and around rivers are in inordinately fascinated with them and they're also very quick to to help other people understand them and so this was one of those moments where i just randomly said i wonder what it be like to ride on a barge into c of the river from uh from the river out rather than looking down at at called a barge company and floated the idea by him and to my schalken possibly horror they said i could tackle of tag along.

george washington mississipi river mississippi