19 Burst results for "Rita Chatterjee"

"rita chatterjee" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"rita chatterjee" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Greeting each other with big hugs. It's It's really interesting how over the years this place this crash site that was the place where their loved ones died in a really terrible way has become to them a place of remembrance, a place of community a place of peace. NPR's Scott Detroit and Shanksville. President Biden was among those gathered for commemorations at the side of the World Trade Center in New York City. NPR's Jasmine Garst was there for the most part, it was a quiet ceremony filled with moments of silence observed At the Times of each attack. Firefighters from across the country marched carrying the New York Fire Department flag. Two. For many, it was a time of introspection. Sean Alan sat quietly on the curb throughout most of the event, he says he came up from Philadelphia came here last night just to show up and pay my respects in person. I felt like I had to do something, you know, you know the whole atmosphere nowadays, you know, it's the least I could do. Throughout the morning families read the names of their loved ones who died in the attacks. Jasmine Garza, NPR NEWS New York New research funds that survivors, rescue workers and people who witnessed the attacks on New York City's World Trade Center have been experiencing lasting mental health issues. NPR's Rita Chatterjee has details. Researchers say that the rates of depression and post traumatic stress disorder among people in New York City and nearby areas went up shortly after 9 11. While a majority recovered in six months about 10% have continued to struggle with symptoms Mark Far fell is the director of the World Trade Center Health Registry, which has tracked over 70,000 people affected by the disaster. This disaster of 9 11 in New York City. Has had long term impacts and significant impacts on both. The responders and the silver civilian survivors, he says. Often survivors are struggling with more than one mental and physical health condition, which makes it harder for them to bounce back quickly. Read the strategy. NPR NEWS. This is NPR. Israeli police say they've apprehended for Palestinians who escaped a maximum security prison this week as NPR's Daniel Estrin reports from Jerusalem. The rare jailbreak has captivated Israelis and Palestinians and is raising concerns that violence could escalate. Six Palestinians convicted or accused of committing or planning attacks on Israelis escaped through a hole in their prison cells shower room Monday. Israel says it has arrested four of them. Two were apprehended on the outskirts of the city of Nazareth after they reportedly asked locals for food to others have been caught in a village in the Galilee region, reportedly after a local saw them one is high profile militant leader Zakaria Zubeidi. Two other prisoners remain at large. The jailbreak exposed weaknesses in Israel's prison system and turned the escapees into Palestinian heroes. Following the arrests, hundreds of Palestinian civilians clashed with Israeli troops. Daniel Estrin. NPR NEWS Jerusalem The U. S. Open's men's final is now set. Novak Djokovic will play Daniel Medvedev for the title tomorrow, and at the same time he's going to try to make history. Djokovic is one win away from completing the first calendar Grand Slam in men's tennis in 52 years. The women's final is later today, the first major final between unseeded players in the professional era. 18 year old Emma Radu Cano of Britain will play 19 year old Leila Fernandez of Canada. I'm.

Daniel Medvedev Daniel Estrin Rita Chatterjee Zakaria Zubeidi Jasmine Garza Djokovic Novak Djokovic Sean Alan Emma Radu Cano Jasmine Garst Galilee Monday Nazareth World Trade Center New York City Philadelphia NPR Jerusalem 52 years New York Fire Department
"rita chatterjee" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"rita chatterjee" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Were also held in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, where flight 93 crashed after passengers on board overtook the terrorists. NPR's Scott Detroit was at today's commemoration some families Who have come to previous anniversaries just felt overwhelmed by the idea of 20 years and are not here but But by and large, A lot of people are here, and it's really a sense of peace and togetherness, and I've seen them greeting each other with big hugs. It's It's really interesting how over the years this place this crash site that was the place where their loved ones died in a really terrible way has become to them a place of remembrance, a place of community a place of peace. NPR's Scott, Detroit and Shanksville. President Biden was among those gathered for commemorations at the side of the World Trade Center in New York City. NPR's Jasmine Garza was there. For the most part, it was a quiet ceremony filled with moments of silence observed at the Times of each attack. Firefighters from across the country marched carrying the New York Fire Department flag to For many, it was a time of introspection. Sean Alan sat quietly on the curb throughout most of the event, he says he came up from Philadelphia. I just came here last night just to show up and pay my respects in person. I feel like I had to do something, you know, you know the whole atmosphere nowadays, you know, it's the least I could do. Throughout the morning families read the names of their loved ones who died in the attacks. Jasmine Garza, NPR NEWS New York New research funds that survivors rescue workers and people who witnessed the attacks on New York City's World Trade Center have been experiencing lasting mental health issues. NPR's Rita Chatterjee has details. Researchers say that the rates of depression and post traumatic stress disorder among people in New York City and nearby areas went up shortly after 9 11, while a majority recovered in six months about 10% have continued to struggle with symptoms. Mark Far fell is the director of the World Trade Center Health Registry, which has tracked over 70,000 people affected by the disaster. This disaster of 9 11 in New York City. Has had long term impacts and significant impacts on both. The responders and the silver civilian survivors, he says. Often survivors are struggling with more than one mental and physical health condition, which makes it harder for them to bounce back. Quickly Return. Chatterjee NPR news This is NPR Live from KQED News. I'm Natalia Navarro. The California Legislature wrapped up its annual session on Friday. KQED is Katie or highlights some of the action. Lawmakers sent a wide variety of bills to governor Gavin Newsom's desk, including several measures that would make it easier to build housing in the state. The Legislature also passed a number of criminal justice reform bills, including one that allows the commission on Peace officer standards and training to investigate and possibly decertified law enforcement officers. Who commit serious offenses. A bill that makes it a misdemeanor to obstruct vaccination clinics made it to the governor, but efforts to require covid vaccination in the workplace ran out of time. A bill to overhaul the state's bail system also stalled. Newsome now has a month to act on the bills. The Legislature sent him in Sacramento. I'm Katie or KQED news. Police and fire departments across the Bay Area are holding remembrances today for the anniversary of 9 11 in Oakland City officials held a memorial at the Lake Merritt Amphitheater yesterday in honor of the first responders who lost their lives 20 years ago. About 70 people came out to the event, including Mayor Libby Shaft and Fire and police personnel, Oakland police Chief Laurent Armstrong. Every day we come to work, understanding that there is a possibility That this may be our last. But truly, that is, what service and sacrifice is about. Today. We recognize those that made the ultimate sacrifice. More than 300. Firefighters and 70 officers lost their lives on 9 11 and hundreds more.

Rita Chatterjee Jasmine Garza Sean Alan Mark Far Natalia Today Newsome Philadelphia Friday Sacramento yesterday Katie Gavin Newsom Oakland City New York Fire Department Bay Area Chatterjee Detroit 70 officers Shanksville
"rita chatterjee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"rita chatterjee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Six unit Crest View Towers condo were given just a couple hours to evacuate their North Miami Beach home on Friday afternoon, officials received an engineering inspection report dated January of this year that deemed the building structurally and electrically unsafe. With the Surfside tragedy, fresh on everyone's minds and a tropical storm on the way. City Manager Arthur Story the third called the Evacuation the right thing to do out of an abundance of caution. The report spoke of falling concrete. And we know that's a buzzword these days. So when we saw that in the report, we had an impact immediately. Residents will not be able to return to the building until the condo association can prove the building is structurally sound. Liz Baker. NPR NEWS Miami BEACH A ransomware attack paralyzed the networks of at least 200. U. S companies yesterday, the criminals targeting a Miami based software supplier called Messiah. Tim Starks is a senior editor with Cyber Scoop News. He told the BBC that the hackers are using messiahs software to spread the ransomware through corporate networks and cloud service providers. Casillas says they only have 40 direct customers that they know of. But those 40 direct customers. If all of the people who are working with them are being hijacked as well, you can see the sort of exponential effect that's gathering. It's often called the supply chain attack because what's happening is you're interjecting an attack into companies that are distributing a lot of things and you're getting into their supply chain, which means you can get into those companies as well. Results of the solar wind attack and in virtual in December that was a big deal. Tim's start. Speaking on the BBC, A new report from the CDC finds that over the course of the pandemic, more than half of public health workers face mental health challenges. NPR's Rita Chatterjee reports of the 26,000 state, tribal, local and territorial public health workers surveyed over 50% said they had experienced symptoms of anxiety depression. Post traumatic stress disorder, all suicidal thinking in the two weeks before the survey. Symptoms of PTSD were more common among individuals who experienced work related trauma and stress, like those who felt inadequately compensated and those who felt disconnected from family and friends because of workload. According to the report, pandemic related work experiences and stress We have increased PTSD risk for public health workers re through strategy. NPR NEWS The average number of covid 19 cases in the U. S is up about 10% over the past week, according to the C. D. C about 12,600 cases are being reported daily. This is NPR news in Washington. This is W. N. Y. C in New York, and I'm David first as the city begins to move around 9000 New Yorkers who had been staying in hotels back into group shelters. At least one resident says he's not going Anthony Campbell had been staying at the Sheraton in Midtown for more than a year during the pandemic, as many of his neighbors packed their things and were bussed to different locations. Campbell said. He wasn't going anywhere. He spoke to WN my C over speakerphone from his hotel room. This is not a plan. If you want to plan this should be affordable housing hot. Every American. No one should be homeless shelter workers could be heard in the background, threatening to have him arrested for trespassing. The city says Having shelter residents in hotels was always temporary. In order to reduce covid infection rates. It plans to have all single adults back in group settings by the end of the month. New Jersey Supreme Court has ordered mandatory settlement hearings in all pending eviction cases. W N. Y C is Karen he reports. Most landlord tenant trials remains suspended, and until now, settlement conferences held remotely between parties were voluntary. But facing an enormous backlog of cases, Chief Justice Stuart Rabner has ordered settlement hearings mandatory. Older cases with the most old rent and newer cases with more than a year's worth of back. Grant will be up first, and if a tenant fails to show up, the court will enter a default judgment to evict them. Tenant advocates called the consequences cruel and said it would cause confusion. There's still a state ban on residents being physically locked out of their homes through the end of the year, and the law could change soon. Bill before Governor Phil Murphy would protect tenants from eviction. If they certified they were financially harmed by the pandemic. Many New Yorkers are looking forward to celebrating the Fourth of July this weekend. 23 year old Enrique Rodriguez in Washington Heights is one of them. Gonna be fun. We're gonna be trying fireworks, and we're gonna be drinking, getting left and barbecue at the family. That's all we do. Following last year's pared down affair. Macy's fourth of July fireworks will make it come back tomorrow evening, and, according to Macy's, it is scheduled to be the biggest fireworks show ever. 61 degrees right now. Light rain falling. We are expecting a showers, possibly a thunderstorm. Today, a high in the mid sixties. Support for NPR comes from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people and Jahrling, Pamela Mon, thanking the people who make public radio great every day and also those who listen. This is weekend edition From NPR News. Scott Simon is off this Saturday. I'm Leila Fadel..

Tim Starks Liz Baker BBC Rita Chatterjee Leila Fadel Enrique Rodriguez Anthony Campbell Friday afternoon Washington Heights Scott Simon Campbell Washington December tomorrow evening North Miami Beach David 61 degrees Pamela Mon Today Karen
"rita chatterjee" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"rita chatterjee" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"We had an impact immediately. Residents will not be able to return to the building until the kind of association can prove the building is structurally sound. Liz Baker NPR NEWS Miami BEACH A ransomware attack paralyzed the networks of at least 200 U. S companies yesterday. The criminals targeting a Miami based software supplier called Messiah. Tim Starks is a senior editor with Cyber Scoop News. He told the BBC that the hackers are using messiahs software to spread the ransomware through corporate networks and cloud service providers. Cassius says they only have 40 direct customers that they know of. But those 40 direct customers if all of the people who are working With them are being hijacked as well. You can see the sort of exponential effect that's gathering. It's often called the supply chain attack because what's happening is you're interjecting an attack into companies that are distributing a lot of things and you're getting into their supply chain, which means you can get into those companies as well. Results with the solar wind attack and emergent in December. That was a big deal. Tim's start. Speaking on the BBC, A new report from the CDC finds that over the course of the pandemic, more than half of public health workers face mental health challenges. NPR's Rita Chatterjee reports of the 26,000 Steve Tribal, local and territorial public health workers surveyed over 50% said they had experienced symptoms of anxiety, depression, post traumatic stress disorder, all suicidal thinking in the two weeks before the survey. Symptoms of PTSD were more common among individuals who experienced work related trauma and stress, like those who felt inadequately compensated in those who felt disconnected from family and friends because of workload. According to the report, pandemic related work experiences and stress We have increased PTSD risk for public health workers retail strategy. NPR news. The average number of covid 19 cases in the U. S is up about 10% over the past week, according to the CDC, about 12,600 cases are being reported daily. This is NPR news in Washington. Right now it's 63 degrees in Chicago at 704. Good morning. I'm Marie Lane with WBZ News. Thousands of residents were allowed to return to their homes in Morris, Illinois, yesterday afternoon. But the lithium battery fire that caused their evacuation could smolder on for weeks before it burns itself out. Morris Fire chief Stacy Stephens. Tracey Stephens Rather said local fire departments are unprepared for such fires, even as lithium battery use expands with cell phones and electric cars. So I'm asking our federal authorities are state authorities. We need to make some task force of how we're going to respond to these so that we do not have this happening in another community. The fire was brought under control, using 28 tons of dry cement mix. Since water and foam caused the batteries to explode. The EPA is monitoring air quality in Morris and trying to protect the nearby Illinois River. Returning residents were told to wipe down their cars and their homes. Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced yesterday. There will be fireworks, said the lakefront tonight to celebrate both the holiday and the city's reopening from the pandemic. The show is scheduled for 9 30. The mayor's office says it will be visible along the lakefront from Grand Avenue to at least 55th Street. There is no Fourth of July fireworks show at Navy Pier this year. The Cincinnati Reds handed the Chicago Cubs their seventh straight loss with the 21 victory yesterday in Ohio. Cincinnati saw strong performances from Sonny Gray, who struck out eight in five innings. In his first big league start since June 8th and from Joey Votto, who hit a two run double in the sixth inning to give the Reds a boost. Grey allowed one run and five hits before five relievers combined for four scoreless innings. The two teams face off again this afternoon. First.

Joey Votto Sonny Gray Rita Chatterjee Tim Starks Chicago Cubs BBC Illinois River Chicago Tracey Stephens Marie Lane Liz Baker 28 tons yesterday afternoon Stacy Stephens 63 degrees Ohio Grand Avenue Washington five relievers December
"rita chatterjee" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"rita chatterjee" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To evacuate their North Miami beach home on Friday afternoon, officials received an engineering inspection report dated January of this year that deemed the building structurally and electrically unsafe. With the Surfside tragedy, fresh on everyone's minds and a tropical storm on the way. City manager Arthur Story the third called the Evacuation the right thing to do out of an abundance of caution. The reports focus falling concrete, and we know that's a buzzword these days. So when we saw that in the report, we had an impact immediately. Residents will not be able to return to the building until the kind of association can prove the building is structurally sound. Liz Baker. NPR NEWS Miami BEACH A ransomware attack paralyzed the networks of at least 200. U. S companies yesterday, the criminals targeting a Miami based software supplier called Messiah. Tim Starks is a senior editor with Cyber Scoop News. He told the BBC that the hackers are using messiahs software to spread the ransomware through corporate networks and cloud service providers. Cassius says they only have 40 direct customers that they know of. But those 40 direct customers. If all of the people who are working with them are behind act as well, you can see the sort of exponential effect that's gathering. It's often called the supply chain attack because what's happening is you're interjecting an attack into companies that are distributing a lot of things and you're getting into their supply chain, which means you can get into those companies as well. We saw through the solar wind attack and emotional in December. That was a big deal. Tim start. Speaking on the BBC. A new report from the CDC finds that over the course of the pandemic, more than half of public health workers face mental health challenges. NPR's Rita Chatterjee reports of the 26,000 Steve Tribal, local and territorial public health workers surveyed over 50% said they had experienced symptoms of anxiety, depression, post traumatic stress disorder, all suicidal thinking in the two weeks before the survey. Symptoms of PTSD were more common among individuals who experienced work related to trauma and stress, like those who felt inadequately compensated and those who felt disconnected from family and friends because of workload. According to the report, pandemic related work experiences and stress We have increased PTSD risk for public health workers read through strategy. NPR News. The average number of covid 19 cases in the U. S is up about 10% over the past week, according to the CDC, about 12,600 cases are being reported daily. This is NPR news in Washington. The World Meteorological Organization has.

Rita Chatterjee Tim Starks Liz Baker BBC Friday afternoon World Meteorological Organizat December Miami Cassius Washington 26,000 NPR NEWS 19 cases 40 direct customers yesterday North Miami beach NPR News Cyber Scoop News NPR third
"rita chatterjee" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"rita chatterjee" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Reports focus. Falling concrete. And we know that's a buzzword these days. So when we saw that in the report, we had an act immediately. Residents will not be able to return to the building until the condo association can prove the building is structurally sound. Liz Baker NPR NEWS Miami BEACH A ransomware attack paralyzed the networks of at least 200 U. S companies yesterday. The criminals targeting a Miami based software supplier called Messiah. Tim starts as a senior editor with Cyberscope News. He told the BBC that the hackers are using Casillas software to spread the ransomware through corporate networks and cloud service providers. Cassius says they only have 40 direct customers that they know of. But those 40 direct customers if all of the people who are working With them are being hijacked as well. You can see the sort of exponential effect that's gathering. It's often called the supply chain attack because what's happening is you're interjecting an attack into companies that are distributing a lot of things and you're getting into their supply chain, which means you can get into those companies as well results with the solar wind attack and emerged in December that was a big deal. Tim starts. Speaking on the BBC. A new report from the CDC finds that over the course of the pandemic, more than half of public health workers face mental health challenges. NPR's Rita Chatterjee reports after 26,000 State, tribal, local and territorial public health workers surveyed over 50% said they had experienced symptoms of anxiety, depression, post traumatic stress disorder, all suicidal thinking. In the two weeks before the survey. Symptoms of PTSD were more common among individuals who experienced work related trauma and stress, like those who felt inadequately compensated and those who felt disconnected from family and friends because of workload. According to the report, pandemic related work experiences and stress We have increased PTSD risk for public health workers read through strategy. NPR News. The average number of covid 19 cases in the U. S is up about 10% over the past week, according to the CDC, about 12,600 cases are being reported daily. This is NPR news in Washington. The World Meteorological Organization has.

Rita Chatterjee BBC Liz Baker U. S Washington December Tim 19 cases yesterday World Meteorological Organizat Cyberscope News NPR Miami NPR NEWS 40 direct customers CDC NPR News about 12,600 cases over 50% Cassius
"rita chatterjee" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"rita chatterjee" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"To the sixth floor into the fourth floor in the fifth floor, and I'll show you were not out of this yet. Just over the last week we've had 13 patients die in this hospital from Covid. We're not post pandemic. California Drought means some people have been without water for weeks. Complications from that N C. Double a decision to allow college athletes to cash in on their names and images. And a year after Beijing passed new laws that may dissent in Hong Kong virtually impossible. We bring you one protester story. First news It's Saturday July 3rd 2021. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Louise, Given a condominium building in North Miami Beach has been evacuated over safety concerns. Miami Dade County is auditing all high rise buildings over 40 years old after building in Surfside, Florida collapsed. 22 people There are confirmed dead 126 missing. NPR's lose Bigger has more Residents of the 156 unit Crest View Towers condo were given just a couple hours to evacuate their north Miami Beach home. On Friday afternoon. Officials received an engineering inspection report dated January of this year that deemed the building structurally and electrically unsafe with the Surfside tragedy. Fresh on everyone's minds and a tropical storm on the way, city manager Arthur sorry the third called the Evacuation the right thing to do out of an abundance of caution. The reports focus. Falling concrete. And we know that's a buzzword these days. So when we saw that in the report, we knew we had an impact immediately. Residents will not be able to return to the building until the kind of association can prove the building is structurally sound. Liz Baker. NPR NEWS Miami BEACH A ransomware attack paralyzed the networks of at least 200. U. S companies yesterday, the criminals targeting a Miami based software supplier called Messiah. Tim Starks is a senior editor with Cyber Scoop News. He told the BBC that the hackers are using Casillas software to spread the ransomware through corporate networks and cloud service providers. Cassius says they only have 40 direct customers that they know of. But those 40 direct customers if all of the people who are working with them are being hijacked as well. You can see this sort of exponential effect that's gathering. It's often called the supply chain attack because what's happening is you're interjecting an attack into companies that are Distributing a lot of things and you're getting into their supply chain, which means you can get into those companies as well. We start with the solar wind attack and emotional in December. That was a big deal. Tim's start. Speaking on the BBC, A new report from the CDC finds that over the course of the pandemic, more than half of public health workers face mental health challenges. NPR's Rita Chatterjee reports of the 26,000 state, tribal, local and territorial public health workers surveyed over 50% said they had experienced symptoms of anxiety, depression, post traumatic stress disorder, all suicidal thinking in the two weeks before the survey. Symptoms of PTSD were more common among individuals who experienced work related trauma and stress, like those who felt inadequately compensated and those who felt disconnected from family and friends because of workload. According to the report, pandemic related work experiences and stress We have increased PTSD risk for public health workers read through strategy. NPR News. The average number of covid 19 cases in the U. S is up about 10% over the past week, according to the CDC, about 12,600 cases are being reported daily. This is NPR news in Washington. The World Meteorological Organization has.

Tim Starks Rita Chatterjee Liz Baker BBC Friday afternoon Washington Hong Kong fifth floor North Miami Beach 126 NPR sixth floor fourth floor December Cassius World Meteorological Organizat Miami Saturday July 3rd 2021 13 patients Arthur
"rita chatterjee" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"rita chatterjee" Discussed on KCRW

"Thanks to a collaboration with the local Children's Hospital, MPR's Rita Chatterjee and Kristine Herman of Wi L. L have the story. In 2019, the Rockville Center school district in Long Island, was shaken by tragedy. It started with a very recent graduate and a current student dying by suicide nor Greenlee. He is an assistant superintendent for the school district. And when you get these bosses one after the other, you almost can't get traction on Normalcy. You can't get traction on kids just functioning in a day to day basis in a school setting. The incidents pushed Leahy to try to find a way to connect students to mental health care. She raised the issue with her colleagues and some parents and I was talking out loud G. I wish we could figure out a way to get access to a psychiatrist. Mental health professionals to make sure that we help our school team get kids handed off to care to psychiatric care. Psychological care. One of those parents was Gina Marie Bounds. I can actually remember the exact moment exactly where was sitting And she said to me, I just wish there was a place to send their kids. I wish we could just hang up like a shingle on a storefront and send these kids. They're no bounds happened to work at the nearby Cohen Children's Medical Center, and I thought back to myself, and I said I think I can do that. And she was shocked and like, just give me a few weeks. I think I could do that. She took the idea to the head of emergency child psychiatry at the hospital, and they got to work. And in January 2000 and 20, they opened a behavioral health center within miles of the five school district's it now serves. It has a child psychiatrist, Medical office assistant and a mental health counselor. My name is Arianna Medaglia. I am a licensed mental health counselor. School staff for first students, too. Her or parents reach out directly and met. Talia works with the center's child psychiatrist to evaluate the kids and drop a treatment plan. We are able to prescribe medication and maintain a child in our clinic for us long as they need while they're waiting for an outpatient level of care, she says. It's old, so hood job to connect kids to provide us in the community. That's easier to do, she says, when a child has already been evaluated by a child psychiatrist, so that's kind of our golden ticket, Medaglia says. The Behavioral Health Center, working closely with school staff has been able to weave together a safety net for Children and families that didn't exist before, and parents like Jennifer Joe Baldy are grateful. Daughter, Elissa is 17 and attends Oceanside High School on the south shore of Long Island. She is extremely social, like she's like the mayor of the school. Everybody knows her. No matter where we go in town, there's somebody who knows our Elissa has down syndrome, and the pandemic upped her anxiety. Last ball, she became catatonic and was hospitalized. Several times. She went into like a zombie like state, she couldn't talk. She couldn't move. She would go into tremors. She couldn't feed herself after her neurologist ruled out other conditions, they suggested Elissa see a psychiatrist. Her mother, Jennifer says she was turned down repeatedly by providers, saying they didn't take her insurance or that they didn't work with kids with disabilities. That's when Alice, a school nurse, referred her to the new Behavioral Health Center. The psychiatrist reviewed Eliza's medical records and prescribed medications for depression and anxiety. Jennifer says the God demands on a Saturday morning By Saturday night, she was out of the catatonic state and ever since then, she's been coming back to us. Like her personality came back. Elissa continued to go to the Behavioral Health Center for several months until they were able to transition to a psychiatrist who works with kids with disabilities. They were such a lifesaver for us. We can never thank them enough. Most kids like Elissa around the country might never even see a psychiatrist says, which will Graham Ticker He's a child psychiatrist at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. Due to lack of care, they end apportioning and the access the emergency rooms to avoid a crisis or as the only way to get a mental health evaluation. Even if that happens with emergency room care. There's no place for them to go and connect. Because this is shortage of providers. All of this has played out around the country as the pandemic worsen Kid's mental health. Last year, the hospital emergency departments so a surge in the proportion of kids in mental health crises. But in Long Island, Cohen Children's Behavioral Health Center was able to reduce the number of kids from those five school district's ending up in the ER by at least 60%. Rent a car says this model is a great way to meet more kids in need, And it makes sense for Children's hospitals to partner with schools. It's the place where kids mostly are and as the famous tale goes about the famous bank robber. Why do you rob banks? And he said, Well, that's because that's where money is, and that's exactly the thought in the field. Now school self often know their students better than anyone else and can spot early signs. It's why schooled in many parts of the country are trying to partner with mental health care. Providers for Assistant Superintendent Noreen Leahy. The price her district pays for the new behavioral health services is less than the cost of one full time staff member and the state chips in to cover part of that. Leahy says the help couldn't have come at a better time. It's just a real relief and many levels and most importantly, it's helping kids this.

Jennifer Joe Baldy Rita Chatterjee Arianna Medaglia Jennifer Medaglia Talia 2019 Kristine Herman Graham Ticker Elissa January 2000 Long Island Alice Eliza 17 Oceanside High School Cohen Children's Medical Cente 20 Last year Nationwide Children's Hospital
"rita chatterjee" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"rita chatterjee" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And by the listeners and members of KQED public radio 88.5 of them in San Francisco and 89.3 FM in Sacramento. Coming up on 7 46. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. With almost 40% of the U. S fully vaccinated. Many parts of this country are opening up, but not everybody is quite ready. NPR's re to. Chatterjee has been talking with psychologists about why they'll write has been fully vaccinated since last week. But I still feel little trepidation about going out right, is a psychologist and senior director of healthcare innovation of the American Psychological Association, she says. In fact, most people are feeling a whole range of emotions right now. Things like nervousness, anxiety, trepidation, discomfort, and I think that's hard for people to understand because we have been waiting for this moment for so long that it feels like we should just be excited. And she says it's normal to feel this way because despite the light at the end of the tunnel, there's still a lot of uncertainty were unclear about what role the variants and vaccine hesitancy is going to play. If you're a parent with Children under the age of 12 you're thinking about how can you keep them safe until they're vaccinated and a lot of things are going to change the workplace education, health care? We just don't exactly know what they're going to look like uncertainty, she says. Drives up our anxiety. Especially since most people have already spent the past year feeling anxious, says psychologist Dina Garff in off the University of California of mine, the pandemic really shattered people's assumptions of their safety, their security what their lives were going to be like then, Garvin says. A return to normalcy also means a big change and research shows that any change good or bad is stressful. Even more so when it means going back to a more hectic pace of life. So after 14 or 15 months of sitting at home and not having to deal with traffic and having a slower pace of life, people are now having to get in their cars and raised to work and sit in a traffic jam and race home to change toe run out to a social event. So how can one make this transition less stressful, less anxiety ridden, Garvin says, Firstly, be patient and kind with yourself. And then, she says, if people were able to find things during the pandemic that gave them comfort that help them. I would say to take some of those things with them into the new normal. So if you found solace and gardening or more time with family during the pandemic, Garff in says, Hold on to those things. Psychologist Elissa Apple is at the University of California in San Francisco, she says, decide what kinds of other activities and social interactions you're comfortable with. And start with. Those things were not yet used to going back to normal social interactions. And we need to set our own boundaries and return at our own pace. Also, she says, in order to move forward, it helps to acknowledge the grief and loss is off. The past year. We have all had losses. Felt the losses and so to have some type of events where we can actually come together and acknowledge what we've been through what we would love to leave behind. What we would love to take with us. And Apple says no matter how you feel, try to make room for some joy. I think it's wonderful to feel joy and we shouldn't feel guilty about Having a great day or expressing when we feel Happy. Things are going well, she says. Joy is contagious and can help counter the other negative emotions you may be feeling right now. Rita Chatterjee NPR news It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Rachel Martin. And now Joe McConnell with a Bay Area traffic.

Joe McConnell Dina Garff Rita Chatterjee Rachel Martin Steve Inskeep Garvin Elissa Apple Sacramento San Francisco American Psychological Associa Bay Area 14 Chatterjee last week 15 months NPR 88.5 Apple University of California U. S
"rita chatterjee" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"rita chatterjee" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Are we gonna say? How is your pan damage, right? We don't want to say that right? Small answer to that question, right? It's not like Oh, it was fine advice for returning to normal life after these news headlines Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear as lawmakers prepare to vote this hour on forming a mission to investigate the January six attack at the Capitol. Senate Minority leader Mitch McConnell says he will oppose the plan. NPR's Claudio Chrysalis reports. McConnell made the remarks just hours before the legislation was set to pass the House with Democratic and some GOP votes leader. McConnell joins House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and rejecting the legislation despite Republican support that helped reach an agreement with Democrats. McConnell said the commission would duplicate efforts by law enforcement and congressional committees. Mr President. It's not at all clear what new facts are additional investigation yet another commission But actually lay on top of existing efforts by law enforcement. In Congress. McConnell's objection deals a setback to the legislation's chances in an evenly divided Senate, where Democrats need 10 GOP votes to approve the plan. Both GOP leaders had come under direct pressure from former President Donald Trump. Cloudy status. NPR NEWS Washington Facebook is running a 24 hours Special Operations center to monitor its platforms for violent threats connected to the conflict in Gaza and Israel. That's amid fears social media is inflaming hostilities on the ground. NPR's Shannon Bond reports, the company set up similar centers around elections as well as other safety threats. Facebook launched the Operation Center last week, staffed by native Hebrew and Arabic speakers. Their goal is to identify and remove posts that break the social networks rules against hate speech and calls for violence. Monica bickered is Facebook's vice president of content policy. Of course, safety and freedom of expression have always been important on our services, and when we look at a situation like this, we want to make sure that we are able to monitor real time. What's going on. Researchers have found false information and violent threats spreading across Facebook's platforms, including Instagram and WhatsApp, where encrypted messages cannot be read by the company. Facebook is among NPR's financial supporters. Shannon Bond, NPR News Survived administration is reinstating a climate scientist who was removed by the Trump administration last year. Michael Koperberg will be helping to conduct a major federal study about the impacts of climate change more from NPR's Lauren Sommer under both the Obama and Trump Administration's Michael Kuperberg coordinated climate change research across federal agencies as leader of the U. S Global Change Research program. Key task was producing the nation's core climate science report the national climate assessment, But last November, the Trump administration removed him. His replacement, David Lee Gates, questioned the basic tenants of climate science. By an administration is returning Kuperberg to his previous job, where he'll help lead the next national climate Report due in 2023. Lauren Sommer. NPR news The Dow was down 164 points. You're listening to NPR. Nearly three and four LGBT Q. You say their mental health this suffered during the cove in 19 pandemic. That's according to a national survey by the suicide Prevention and Crisis Intervention Organization, The Trevor project. As NPR's redo Chatterjee reports, A significant proportion of respondents said they had seriously considered suicide in the past year. More than 70% of LGBTQ Youth say that the experience symptoms of anxiety in the two weeks prior and more than 60% experience symptoms of depression. LGBT Q. Young people were already at a higher risk for poor mental health because of discrimination and isolation, says a Meet Bailey, the CEO of the travel project. The pandemic, he says, only added more stress to their lives. So many LGBTQ young people were trapped in homes with families that were unsupportive or even abusive. And that takes a toll on their mental health. The Seville to found that LGBT Q young people of color were at high risk for suicide, nearly half off youth survey. Said they were unable to access mental health services. Rita Chatterjee, NPR news authorities say New YORK State man has been charged for taking part of the January six insurrection at the capital after a tipster reported overhearing the man boasting about it during a visit to the dentist, Daniel Warmest, of Alden, New York, was released from custody today after appearing in federal court in Buffalo to answer to for misdemeanor charges. One of the criminal complaint, the FBI began investigating warmest after receiving a tip He talked about smoking marijuana inside the Capitol oil fell $2.13 a barrel today I'm Jack Spear, NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, supporting those working towards a day when no one has to choose between paying rents, putting food on the table and protecting their health and the health of others are wjbf data, Warg. Good afternoon and.

Rita Chatterjee Jack Spear Claudio Chrysalis Lauren Sommer Daniel Warmest Michael Kuperberg FBI Mitch McConnell David Lee Gates Michael Koperberg Gaza Buffalo Shannon Bond Kuperberg 2023 McConnell Democrats Johnson Foundation 164 points Israel
"rita chatterjee" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:57 min | 2 years ago

"rita chatterjee" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Time is 5 20. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ailsa Chang and I'm Ari Shapiro. A year into this pandemic. It's clear that the disease has led to more than a physical health crisis and an economic crisis. It's also led to a mental health crisis, especially for young people. Recent CDC report shows that hospital emergency departments are seeing a greater proportion of Children and adolescents with mental health problems, and educators and child psychiatrists are concerned that Mork kids in emotional crises are considering suicide. NPR's re to Chatterjee reports to understand why educators are concerned. Consider Nevada's Clark County School district. It's had 19 students die from suicide since last March. One of those students was a senior, a chatter Each high school on the outskirts of Las Vegas. Colleen Neely was this counselor. He had a huge smile that would just light up his whole face, And he flushed that almost daily, and it just made my day. She says he was shy but smart and polite, and he'd stop by her office every day to check in. He says he'd gone through a period of homelessness. But he'd been doing really well icky. He was passing all of his classes going to earn the highest level diploma that we offer at our school, So he was in a really good place, you know, and this was leading right up. Todos being shut down. Then, a couple of months after they switched online classes, her boss called her to give her the news. Really was devastated. I just sent him an email. I'm telling him out proud. I wasn't him. And that he was almost there. And the next phase of his life was going to start. It's hard to know what drove him and the other students to end their lives. But the debts have school officials wondering if the pandemic played a role. Now there's no nationwide data yet for suicide deaths or attempts, but across the country, we're hearing that there are increased numbers. Of serious suicide attempt and suicidal deaths. Dr. Susan Duffy is a professor of pediatrics and emergency medicine at Brown University, she says in recent months, many of the seriously suicidal Children and teens are showing up in emergency departments in her own hospital. We are seeing an increased number with Plans and thoughts. I spoke with providers and hospitals in seven states, and they all reported a similar trend. Doctor Vera FOIA directs pediatric emergency psychiatry at the Children's Medical Center off north well held in New York. The kids that we are seeing now in the emergency department are really at the stage of maybe even having tried or attempted or have a detailed plan looked up online. How one hurts themselves, she says. Well, there's been a slight increase in town. And an 11 year olds attempting the majority of kids. She sees our teenagers for your and her colleagues around the country are collecting data to get a better picture of this disturbing trend. In the meantime, they're patients are providing a window into how the pandemic created a perfect storm, increasing their risk for suicide for years, those Children who are most at risk of those with physical or mental health problems. We've been cut off from crucial in person services at school and in their communities and are really struggling to cope because they have difficulties that their mood or learning or socialization or medical issues, and now you have other layers of difficulties. On top of that. Those are the kids that that we see in in Ville hopeless moments like the 14 year old she stole last fall, who has health problem that hasn't been properly diagnosed because of pandemic related delays and his care. Then the pandemic also took away his access to sports, which was his world in life, and you can do that school's not going very well because can focus and then he looks at you and says, Like, what's the point? What do I have to look forward to like you tell me. What do I have to be hopeful about one trancelike? I tress told me about a teenage girl with an anxiety disorder feeling overwhelmed with worries about a close family member who's a health care worker. Another psychiatrist told me about a nine year old boy who wanted to die after his father passed away from covered 19. Many kids feeling suicidal right now are from families and communities hit hardest by the pandemic. Dr Richard Martini is a child and adolescent psychiatrist at the University of Utah Families who have lost family members parents who have lost jobs kids who have lost contact with people who are close to them Children who have experienced in significant challenges at school. All of these experiences are fairly traumatic, and it's harder to cope with all of this when kids are cut off from the supports at school. Mental health services, social workers, teachers, counselors, friends, the vast majority of my patients want to go back to school, miss the social contacts. Miss the life that they have, And then these kids really do have a separate life in school. That's important to them valuable to them. It's among the reasons why the American Academy of Pediatrics is encouraging school district's to aim to bring students back into classrooms when it's safe to do so. There's a level of social isolation for these kids, particularly for adolescents, but I think for all Children that they I'm not experienced before. Social isolation is a major risk factor of a suicide, especially for young people. Already struggling with difficult life circumstances, They may begin to feel like they're in a situation that they can't Sort out. They may also be in a position where they feel they can't talk to anybody, even their parents because their parents are gonna be quite upset and as the number of solutions for that situation dwindle. They can begin to think about. You know, I'd rather be dead. It's worth through this, especially with all the uncertainty about when the pandemic will end. Dr Naso Malice, is a psychiatrist and pediatrician of the University of Michigan. I think it's a couple ng of those things is is pretty daunting. For a lot of our youth. We're still trying to figure out who they are right. I mean, these are kids who are developing and growing and still in need of guidance from adults, especially to cope during difficult times. Kali, nearly the school counselor in Las Vegas, doesn't know the exact circumstances that led her student to suicide. But she wonders if someone could have prevented it. If the pandemic hadn't upended everything. It's very hard because part of me will always question Huh? You know if we had been in the building, and if he had been able to just see another adults he has friends possibly talk to me. Um, if things would've been different Rita Chatterjee NPR news..

Rita Chatterjee social isolation Las Vegas NPR Clark County School district CDC Ailsa Chang school counselor Nevada Ari Shapiro American Academy of Pediatrics Dr Richard Martini Colleen Neely Mork Children's Medical Center Doctor Vera FOIA Dr Naso Malice
"rita chatterjee" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

06:55 min | 2 years ago

"rita chatterjee" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"This is all things considered. I'm Ailsa Chang and I'm Ari Shapiro. A year into this pandemic. It's clear that the disease has led to more than a physical health crisis and an economic crisis. It's also led to a mental health crisis, especially for young people. Recent CDC report shows that hospital emergency departments are seeing a greater proportion of Children and adolescents with mental health problems, and educators and child psychiatrists are concerned that Mork kids in emotional crises are considering suicide. NPR's re to Chatterjee reports to understand why educators are concerned. Consider Nevada's Clark County School district. It's had 19 students die from suicide since last March. One of those students was a senior, A chatter Ridge High School on the outskirts of Las Vegas. Colleen Neely was his counselor. He had a huge smile that would just light up his whole face. And he flushed that almost daily, and it just made my day. She says He was shy but smart and polite, and he'd stop by her office every day to check in. Nearly says he'd gone through a period of homelessness. But he'd been doing really well. It d he was Passing all of his classes going to earn the highest level diploma that we offer at our school, So he was in a really good place, you know, and this was leading right up. Todos being shut down. Then, a couple of months after they switched online classes, her boss called her to give her the news. Nearly was devastated. I just sent him an email. I'm telling him how proud I was of him. And that he was almost there. And the next phase of his life was going to start. It's hard to know what drove him and the other students to end their lives. But the debts have school officials wondering if the pandemic played a role. Now there's no nationwide data yet for suicide deaths or attempts, but across the country, we're hearing that there are increased numbers. Of serious suicidal attempts and suicidal deaths. Dr. Susan Duffy is a professor of pediatrics and emergency medicine at Brown University, she says in recent months, many of the seriously suicidal Children and teens are showing up in emergency departments in her own hospital. We are seeing an increased number with Plans and thoughts. I spoke with providers and hospitals in seven states, and they all reported a similar trend. Doctor Vera FOIA directs pediatric emergency psychiatry at the Children's Medical Center off north well held in New York. The kids that we are seeing now in the emergency department are really at the stage of maybe even having tried or attempted or have a detailed plan looked up online. How one hurts themselves, she says. While there's been a slight increase in And an 11 year olds attempting the majority of kids. She sees our teenagers. For your and her colleagues around the country are collecting data to get a better picture of this disturbing trend. In the meantime, they're patients are providing a window into how the pandemic created a perfect storm, increasing their risk for suicide. For years. This Children who are most at risk are those with physical or mental health problems. They've been cut off from crucial in person services at school and in their communities and are really struggling to cope because they have Difficulties with their mood or learning or socialization or medical issues, and now you have other layers of difficulties. On top of that. Those are the kids that that we see in in real, hopeless moments like the 14 year old she stole last fall, who has health problem that hasn't been properly diagnosed because of pandemic related delays and his care. Then the pandemic also took away his access to sports, which was his world in life, and you can do that school's not going very well because can focus and then he looks at you and says, Like, what's the point? What do I have to look forward to like you tell me. What do I have to be hopeful about? One child psychiatrist told me about a teenage girl with an anxiety disorder feeling overwhelmed with worries about a close family member who's a health care worker. Another psychiatrist told me about a nine year old boy who wanted to die after his father passed away from covered 19. Many kids feeling suicidal right now are from families and communities hit hardest by the pandemic. Dr Richard Martini is a child and adolescent psychiatrist at the University of Utah Families who have lost family members parents who have lost jobs kids who have lost contact with people who are close to them Children who have experienced in significant challenges at school. All of these experiences are fairly traumatic, and it's harder to cope with all of this when kids are cut off from the supports at school. Mental health services, social workers, teachers, counselors, friends, the vast majority of my patients want to go back to school, miss the social contacts. Miss the life that they have. I mean, these kids really do have a separate life in school. That's important to them valuable to them. It's among the reasons why the American Academy of Pediatrics is encouraging school district's to aim to bring students back into classrooms when it's safe to do so. There's a level of social isolation for these kids, particularly for adolescents, but I think for all Children that they I'm not experienced before. Social isolation is a major risk factor of a suicide, especially for young people. Already struggling with difficult life circumstances, They may begin to feel like they're in a situation that they can't Sort out. They may also be in a position where they feel they can't talk to anybody, even their parents because their parents are gonna be quite upset and as a number of solutions for that situation, the window They can begin to think about, you know, I'd rather be dead. That's work through this, especially with all the uncertainty about when the pandemic will end. Doctor Naso Malice, is a psychiatrist and pediatrician at the University of Michigan. I think it's a coupling of those things is is pretty daunting for a lot of our youth. We're still trying to figure out who they are right? I mean, these are kids who are developing and growing and still in need of guidance from adults, especially to cope during difficult times. Kali, Nearly the school counselor in Las Vegas doesn't know the exact circumstances that led her student to suicide. But she wonders if someone could have prevented it if the pandemic hadn't upended everything. It's very hard because part of me will always question um, you know if we had been in the building, and if he had been able to just see another adults, he has friends possibly talk to me. Um, if things would've been different. Rita Chatterjee NPR news..

Rita Chatterjee Las Vegas social isolation Ridge High School Clark County School district NPR CDC Ailsa Chang school counselor Nevada Ari Shapiro American Academy of Pediatrics Colleen Neely Mork Doctor Vera FOIA Dr Richard Martini Children's Medical Center
"rita chatterjee" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:52 min | 2 years ago

"rita chatterjee" Discussed on KCRW

"A year into this pandemic. It's clear that the disease has led to more than a physical health crisis and an economic crisis. It's also led to a mental health crisis, especially for young people. A recent CDC report shows that hospital emergency departments are seeing a greater proportion of Children and adolescents with mental health problems. And educators and child psychiatrists are concerned that Mork kids in emotional crises are considering suicide. NPR's re to Chatterjee reports to understand why educators are concerned. Consider Nevada's Clark County School district. It's had 19 students die from suicide since last March. One of those students was a senior, A Chatter Ridge High School on the outskirts of Las Vegas. Colleen Neely was his counselor. He had a huge smile that would just light up his whole face, and he flushed that almost daily, and it just made my day. She says. He was shy but smart and polite, and he'd stop by her office every day to check in. He says he'd gone through a period of homelessness. But he'd been doing really well, itty. He was passing all of his classes going to earn the highest level diploma that we offer at our school. So he was in a really good place, you know, and this was leading right up. Todos being shut down. Then, a couple of months after they switched online classes, her boss called her to give her the news. Nearly was devastated. I just sent him an email. I'm telling him out. How'd I wasn't him? And that he was almost there. And the next phase of his life was going to start. It's hard to know what drove him and the other students to end their lives. But the debts have school officials wondering if the pandemic played a role. Now there's no nationwide data yet for suicide deaths or attempts, but across the country, we're hearing that there are increased numbers. Of serious suicidal attempt and suicidal deaths. Dr. Susan Duffy is a professor of pediatrics and emergency medicine at Brown University, she says in recent months, many of the seriously suicidal Children and teens are showing up in emergency departments in her own hospital. We are seeing an increased number with Plans and thoughts. I spoke with providers and hospitals in seven states, and they all reported a similar trend. Doctor Vera FOIA directs pediatric emergency psychiatry at the Children's Medical Center off north well held in New York. The kids that we are seeing now in the emergency department are really at the stage of maybe even having tried or attempted or have a detailed plan looked up online. How one hurts themselves, she says. Well, there's been a slight increase in And an 11 year olds attempting the majority of kids. She sees our teenagers. For your and her colleagues around the country are collecting data to get a better picture of this disturbing trend. In the meantime, they're patients are providing a window into how the pandemic created a perfect storm, increasing their risk for suicide. For years. This Children who are most at risk are those with physical or mental health problems. They've been cut off from crucial in person services at school and in their communities and are really struggling to cope because they have difficulties with their mood or learning or socialization or medical issues, And now you have other layers of difficulties. On top of that. Those are the kids that that we see in in Vail whole blessed moments like the 14 year old she stole last fall, who has health problem that hasn't been properly diagnosed because of pandemic related delays and his care. Then the pandemic also took away his access to sports, which was his world in life, and you can do that school's not going very well because can focus and then he looks at you and says, Like, what's the point? What do I have to look forward to like you tell me. What do I have to be hopeful about? One child psychiatrist told me about a teenage girl with an anxiety disorder feeling overwhelmed with worries about a close family member who's a health care worker. Another psychiatrist told me about a nine year old boy who wanted to die after his father passed away from covered 19. Many kids feeling suicidal right now are from families and communities hit hardest by the pandemic. Dr Richard Martini is a child and adolescent psychiatrist at the University of Utah Families who have lost family members parents who have lost jobs kids who have lost contact with people who are close to them Children who have experienced in significant challenges at school. All of these experiences are fairly traumatic, and it's harder to cope with all of this when kids are cut off from the supports at school. Mental health services, social workers, teachers, counselors, friends, the vast majority of my patients want to go back to school, miss the social contacts, miss the life that they have. I mean, these kids really do have a separate life in school. That's important to them valuable to them. It's among the reasons why the American Academy of Pediatrics is encouraging school district's to aim to bring students back into classrooms when it's safe to do so. The level of social isolation for these Kids, particularly for adolescents. But I think for all Children that they have not experienced before social isolation is a major risk factor of a suicide, especially for young people. Already struggling with difficult life circumstances, they may begin to feel like they're in a situation that they can't sort out. They may also be in a position where they feel they can't talk to anybody, even their parents because their parents are gonna be quite upset. And as a number of solutions for that situation, the window they can begin to think about. You know, I'd rather be dead that sort through this, especially with all the uncertainty about when the pandemic will end. Dr Naso Malice, is a psychiatrist and pediatrician of the University of Michigan. I think it's a coupling of those things is is pretty daunting. For a lot of our youth. We're still trying to figure out who they are right. I mean, these are kids who are developing and growing and still in need of guidance from adults, especially to cope during difficult times. Kali, Nearly the school counselor in Las Vegas doesn't know the exact circumstances that led her student to suicide. But she wonders if someone could have prevented it if the pandemic haven't upended everything. It's very hard because part of me will always question um, you know if we had been in the building, and if he had been able to just see another adults, he has friends possibly talk to me. Um, if things would've been different. Rita Chatterjee NPR news. And if you're.

Rita Chatterjee Las Vegas Clark County School district social isolation Chatter Ridge High School Nevada CDC NPR school counselor Mork American Academy of Pediatrics Colleen Neely Dr Richard Martini Vail Children's Medical Center Doctor Vera FOIA Dr Naso Malice
"rita chatterjee" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"rita chatterjee" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Sandy Althouse. Happy New Year. First of January. 2021 the time now is 5 45. This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm Layla. If Alden and I'm Steve Inskeep 2020 is behind this. The pandemic is not, But even without seeing each other in person, we can stay connected. NPR's Rita Chatterjee reports that one family found a way Back in June of last year. Vladimir Celestine 95 year old grandmother had some mild seizures. The family was worried she might have covered 19 the idea of anything happening to Grandma and So we were very scared. Thankfully, she tested negative and got better. Celestine is Haitian American and lives in Baltimore. He says his grandmother who lives with his parents in Long Island, New York, is at the core off not just his immediate family, his parents, his two sisters, but also has extended family his arms on golden cousins. They heavily weigh in on the ability of my grandmother to be that spirituals rock for us when times are difficult, and so after her health scare, they decided they would check in on her and each other more often. They realized they couldn't visit her for Christmas because of the pandemic. They decided to make a virtual present for her together old family photos off all of her descendants, all of her Children and all of her grandchildren. Great grandchildren. Also, the photos also told a story of the family's journey from Haiti to New York. And then two different cities in eastern United States and Canada, one of his cousins in Canada, But the photos together in the sight show on Christmas Day, they got together in a zoom call and presented it to Grandma. I mean, I have to get you, Uh think and act is that Celestine is Grandmother. France Soir a file Speaking in Creole. Her daughter, Josie. Celestine translates it, she says, Sure. Oh, happy. You still a choice and a heart that never felt before? He almost had a sign, she said. Josie says of Mother spent hours laughing and talking to everyone as first son, Vladimir Celestine, he says, the whole experience made him feel closer to his family. It was almost like we were learning each other all over again because the old photos brought up family stories and some that he'd never heard before. Like the time when his moment onto a teenager's back in Haiti and their pet parrot got them into trouble at the time, my Gladys she liked going out. Often, you know, going out Toe party's going out to hang out with friends. One day when it's great owned, was watching over his mom and her two sisters is on. Gladys decided she'd sneak out in the evening. Sisters didn't like the idea and kept warning her not to go out because armed he would catch her. But Gladys was determined. She gets dressed. She starts making her way. Out the door, but they completely forget that the bird Was obviously hearing this throughout the day. So decides at this point to start shouting. Don't go out! Don't go out your aunt's gonna catch of your aunt's gonna catch you, which of course work there on top, and Gladys was in trouble. Celestine says the virtual family gathering felt more meaningful than many past in person get togethers. I think it was understanding that this could have all been Loss and really being grateful for the moment that you can recognize this is not just another zoom call. This is deeper. This is spiritually and away, he says. It's ironic that it took a global pandemic to make this possible. Rita Chatterjee NPR news It's morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Leyla. Father. We've got the California report coming up in just a minute. First we're going to check the roadways..

Vladimir Celestine Gladys NPR News Steve Inskeep NPR Josie Haiti Rita Chatterjee New York Sandy Althouse France Soir Long Island Baltimore Alden California United States Canada
"rita chatterjee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"rita chatterjee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Possible. Rita Chatterjee. NPR news, among other things. January 1st is public domain Day. That means copyrights expire on works from 95 years ago. So everybody is free to rewrite or remix or just play around with classic books and songs and more. NPR's Petra Mayer reports on what people have been doing with it all. So here's the thing with public Domain Day for 20 years. It didn't happen in 1998. Congress passed a law extending current copyrights from 75 to 95 years. And that meant that until two years ago, nothing new was coming into the public domain. That all changed on January 1st 2019. Since then, A flood of popular culture from the 19 twenties has become available early, silent movies, pop songs, books like the Prophet Mrs Dalloway and The Great Gatsby. So what are people doing with all this good stuff? You know, Like Gatsby, I was captivated by Nick That's author Michael Ferris Smith. His new novel, Nick comes out this month, and it imagines a life and a backstory for Gatsby's Nick Carraway. Smith says he was snagged by that moment at the end of the book, where Nick suddenly realizes it's his 30th birthday. And then right after that, he describes it as anticipating a decade of loneliness. And that is what really stuck me like When I read the decade of loneliness line I remember actually stopped there, and I said the book aside, Smith says he saw so many parallels between Nick's life and his own at that age that he decided to write next story, although he says he just assumed Gatsby was in the public domain. When he started writing five years ago. He was a little taken aback when his publishers told him the book couldn't come out until 2021. But Nick is one of the few really high profile works to surface from that flood of new public domain material. Jennifer Jenkins is the director of the Center for the Study of the Public domain at Duke Law School. She says. A lot of what's happening is on a smaller scale. I've had e mails from parents who say Hey, why high school kids, an amazing musician, and guess what. Another Rhapsody in blue is free. He's going to play it. He's going to re imagine it and maybe we'll put it on YouTube. Some publishers have put out new editions of books like Khalil Gibran's The Prophet, Jenkins says the works become more available and in more editions, and that is self feeds creativity, So we do absolutely no, that happens. So why aren't there more Nick's out there? Glenn Fleishman is a journalist who's covered copyright issues. There's some very popular weird copyright cases that involve lots of lawsuits and I think it makes people worry. Flashman has experienced some of that worry himself. He loves the classic song. Yes, we have no bananas, which entered the public domain on January 1st 2019. So he organized some friends at a New year's party to sing it, And they put the song up on YouTube. Moments after midnight on January 1st wait..

Nick Michael Ferris Smith Gatsby Jennifer Jenkins Nick That NPR Nick Carraway Rita Chatterjee YouTube Flashman Petra Mayer Glenn Fleishman Mrs Dalloway Duke Law School Congress Khalil Gibran director
"rita chatterjee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"rita chatterjee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NPR's Rita Chatterjee reports that one family found a way Back in June of last year. Vladimir Celestine 95 year old grandmother had some mild seizures. The family was worried she might have covered 19 the idea of anything happening to Grandma and So we were very scared. Thankfully, she tested negative and got better. Celestine is Haitian American and lives in Baltimore. He says his grandmother who lives with his parents in Long Island, New York, is at the core. Off not just his immediate family, his parents, his two sisters, but also his extended family, his arms on gold and cousins. They heavily weigh in on the ability of of my grandmother to be that spirituals rock for us when times are difficult, and so after her health scare, they decided they would check in on her and each other more often. They realized they couldn't visit her for Christmas because of the pandemic. They decided to make a virtual present for her together old family photos of all of her descendants, all of her Children. And all of her grandchildren. Her great grandchildren. Also, the photos also told the story of the family's journey from Haiti to New York and then two different cities in eastern United States and Canada, one of his cousins in Canada, But the photos together in the sight show on Christmas Day that got together in a zoom call and presented it to Grandma. It means I get you, Uh think and act is that Celestine is Grandmother. France Soir a file Speaking in Creole, Her daughter, Josie, Celestine translates, sure, happy You still a choice and a heart that never felt before? He almost crying, she said. Juicy, says her mother spent hours laughing and talking to everyone as first son, Vladimir Celestine, he says, the whole experience made him feel closer to his family. It was almost like we were learning each other all over again because the old photos, product family stories and some that he'd never heard before. Like the time when his mom and onto a teenager's back in Haiti and their pet parrot got them into trouble at the time, my Gladys she liked going out. Often, you know, going out Toe party's going out to hang out with friends. One day when his great aunt was watching over his mom and her two sisters is on. Gladys decided she'd sneak out in the evening. Sisters didn't like the idea and kept warning her not to go out because Auntie would catch her. But Gladys was determined she gets dressed. She starts making her way out the door, but they completely forget that the bird Was obviously hearing this throughout the day. So decides at this point to start shouting. Don't go out! Don't go out. Your aunt's gonna catch you. Your aunt's gonna catch you, which, of course work there on top, and Gladys was in trouble. Celestine says the virtual family gathering felt more meaningful than many past in person get togethers. I think it was understanding that this could have all been Loss and really being grateful for the moment that you can recognize this is not just another zoom call. This is deeper. This is spiritually and away, he says. It's ironic that it took a global pandemic to make this.

Vladimir Celestine Gladys Haiti Rita Chatterjee New York France Soir NPR Josie Long Island Baltimore United States Canada
"rita chatterjee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"rita chatterjee" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This'd afternoon on all things considered a court in Saudi Arabia sentence to women's rights activist to nearly six years in prison we hear from her sister, Listen by telling your smart speaker to play NPR or your member station by name. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Layla falled in and I'm Steve Inskeep. 2020 is behind us. The pandemic is not, But even without seeing each other in person, we can stay connected. NPR's Rita Chatterjee reports that one family found a way Back in June of last year. Vladimir Celestine 95 year old grandmother had some mild seizures. The family was worried she might have covered 19 the idea of anything happening to Grandma and So we were very scared. Thankfully, she tested negative and got better. Celestine is Haitian American and lives in Baltimore. He says his grandmother who lives with his parents in Long Island, New York, is at the core off not just his immediate family, his parents, his two sisters, but also his extended family, his arms on golden cousins. They heavily weigh in on the ability of of my grandmother to be that spirituals rock for us when times are difficult, and so after her health scare, they decided they would check in on her and each other more often. They realized they couldn't visit her for Christmas because of the pandemic. They decided to make a virtual present for her together old family photos off all of her descendants, all of her Children. And all of her grandchildren. Great grandchildren. Also, the photos also told the story of the family's journey from Haiti to New York and then two different cities in eastern United States and Canada. One of his cousins in Canada, But the photos together in the sight show on Christmas Day, they got together in a zoom call and presented it to Grandma Jackie working. That's lessons. Grandmother Francoise Raphael speaking in Creole. Her daughter, Josie. Celestine translates, sure. Oh, happy You still a choice and a heart that never felt before? He almost crying, she said. Juicy, says her mother spent hours laughing and talking to everyone as first son, Vladimir Celestine, he says, the whole experience made him feel closer to his family. It was almost like we were learning each other all over again because the old photos, product family stories and some that he'd never heard before. Like the time when his mom and aunt were teenagers back in Haiti and their pet parrot got them into trouble at the time. My Gladys she liked going out. Often, you know, going out Toe party's going out to hang out with friends. One day when his great aunt was watching over his mom and her two sisters is on. Gladys decided she'd sneak out in the evening. Sisters didn't like the idea and kept warning her not to go out because Auntie would catch her. But Gladys was determined she gets dressed. She starts making her way out the door, but they completely forget that the bird Was obviously hearing this throughout the day. So decides at this point to start shouting. Don't go out! Don't go out. Your aunt's gonna catch you. Your aunt's gonna catch you, which, of course work there on top, and Gladys was in trouble. Celestine says the virtual family gathering felt more meaningful than many past in person get togethers. I think it was understanding that this could have all been Loss and really being grateful for the moment that you can recognize this is not just another zoom call. This is deeper. This is spiritually and away, he says. It's ironic that it took a global pandemic to make this possible. Rita Chatterjee. NPR NEWS It's Morning edition from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm Leyla Father. And you're listening to morning edition on W. N. Y. C in New York, where it's 10 minutes before seven o'clock. The marketplace Morning report is next and later on morning edition. Ah Cambodian American lawyer who returned to her homeland to join the resistance to strongman Prime Minister Hun Sen has now been accused of treason. She says the U. S needs to pay attention to what's happening in Cambodia. And especially with China is doing. They're more on that coming up next hour. Stay with.

Vladimir Celestine Gladys Rita Chatterjee NPR News NPR New York Haiti Layla falled Prime Minister Hun Sen Saudi Arabia Steve Inskeep Josie Steve Inskeep. Long Island Francoise Raphael Grandma Jackie Baltimore Canada
Researchers Who Study Mass Shootings Say Perpetrators Often Idolize And Copy Others

All Things Considered

03:26 min | 4 years ago

Researchers Who Study Mass Shootings Say Perpetrators Often Idolize And Copy Others

"The man who claimed responsibility for the mass shooting in New Zealand posted a lengthy statement online before the attack it has a hate-filled mix of white nationalism, white supremacy and anti Muslim ramblings he claims to have identified with and taking inspiration from white supremacist. Attackers before him like the shooter at the manual African Methodist episcopal church in Charleston, South Carolina in two thousand sixteen and the attacker at the summer camp in Norway back in two thousand eleven researchers who study such attacks say it's not uncommon for perpetrators to identify with previous attackers NPR's mental health. Correspondent Rita Chatterjee. Is here to explain more Harry to we've heard before about copycat incidents is that basically what we're talking about here. Yeah. So some researchers do use the town copycat phenomenon. Now, we know from this man statement that he was a nominated with previous white supremacist muscular. But this kind of idolizing of previous shooters is not unique to white supremacists. It's actually true for most mass shooter as someone contemplate. Mass violence often will spend days or even weeks studying the lives in acts of previous mass shooters. And it's been shown really well that potential squeeze shoot us, for example will often right in their journals or in school papers how they identify with previous school shooter say the Columbine shooters. And if there's a political ideology involve these individuals than frame their ideology and actions based on the words and actions of those who carried out these acts before them, do we know what drives these shooters to copy their predecessors. It's a very human act. Now, we humans sort of instinctively emulate those around us, especially people we identify with. And we do this in ways be even often don't understand or know. That's how culture spread now. If you take the case of these mass shooters, these individuals tend to be unhappy people, they're dissatisfied, and they tend to have this us against them outlook about the world their social lives, aren't that? Great. They feel like they don't really belong anywhere. Now, you take somebody like this. They can go online and read up about the lives and actions of those who felt like them and who acted on their violent dissatisfied thinking and now they have somebody to identify with. And there's a sense of belonging and purpose that comes with that identification, and they feel justified in how they think and what they want to act on another thing to keep in mind is that a significant number of mass shooters are also suicidal, and this sort of copycat phenomenon has been very well, documented and suicidal behavior as well. Yeah. We've heard about the contagion of suicide where like a celebrity will die by suicide. And then there's an increase in other suicides. Exactly, it's been well documented, for example, after Robin Williams death in even take small communities if someone's death by suicide gets a lot of coverage than spark other suicide. So would you then presume that this attack in New Zealand would spur other similar attacks in the future? Well, according to one study the risk. Of a mass shooting. Inspiring other attacks is the highest in the two weeks following an incident. It's not quite like the contagious -ness of the flu. Where one sick person leads to many people falling sick. But you do sometimes find that mass shootings occur in clusters were one shooting. Sparks a few more. And the one thing to keep in mind. Is that these mass shootings even though are more common today than a couple of decades ago, statistically speaking, they're still

Harry New Zealand African Methodist Episcopal Ch Rita Chatterjee NPR Charleston South Carolina Norway Sparks Robin Williams Two Weeks
Protest of Macedonia name deal gets unruly in Greece

Glenn Beck

02:52 min | 5 years ago

Protest of Macedonia name deal gets unruly in Greece

"Deserve a hearing when a woman comes here with her four year old son and says i am asking for amnesty i have been threatened by gangs in my home country we should at least give her a hearing the house is expected to vote on one of two immigration reform proposals this week psychologists say children already separated from their parents as part of the trump administration's former policy of separating families at the southern us border may face lasting damage npr's redo chatterjee reports developmental psychologists say the children who are already in government facilities are facing one of the biggest traumas affair lives that trauma can have a lasting impact even if their health for short period of time luis zayas is the dean of the school of social work at the university of texas at austin even a few days or a couple of weeks of detention particularly separated from a parent in the way that it was done in this case can cause longterm damage ziya says children are likely to suffer from mental health problems even after they reunited with their families but it's not clear when the children will see their parents again rita chatterjee npr news turkish president registered to one has won reelection npr's peter kenyon reports it solidifies and expands his executive powers opposition candidates had hoped to keep air to wants total below fifty percent which would have triggered a runoff next month with the second place candidate muharram injia from turkey's main secular party aired on cleared the threshold and we'll be sworn in for another fiveyear term air one will also gain new executive powers approved in a referendum vote last year and the position of prime minister will be eliminated erdo wants ak party is on track to win the most seats in parliament but not an outright majority the ap ran in an alliance with turkey's main nationalist party analysts say some kind of coalition may be forthcoming peter kenyon npr news bull foulland's of people demonstrated sunday in greece's second largest city against a do of macedonia that seeks to end nearly twenty seven years of disagreement between the two countries over macedonia's name protesters threw bottles and chairs and police responded with tear gas and stunned grenades nationalists in both countries oppose the deal that would rename greece's neighbor north macedonia and allow the greek province of macedonia to still use that name you're listening to npr news in washington the barbershop harmony society is inviting women to be full members of the organization for the first time as blake farmer of member station w p l n reports the nashville basing association says it's part of a more inclusive vision throughout its eighty years the barbershop harmony society has been unapologetically male shoes.

Nashville Basing Association NPR Executive President Trump Rita Chatterjee University Of Texas Blake Farmer Washington North Macedonia Macedonia Greece Bull Foulland Erdo Prime Minister Turkey Peter Kenyon Austin