32 Burst results for "Ristic"

The Power of Audio with Audioburst founder and CEO Amir Hirsh

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

07:38 min | Last week

The Power of Audio with Audioburst founder and CEO Amir Hirsh

"Historically it's becoming more and more accessible but how can audio be more accessible so when we started audio your we analyzed. How come we as a personal fans of podcasts in your content and radio content as well thought that there's always all the answer that you want and all the content exists out there. How come he doesn't pick up on the internet. The hukou doesn't pick up on the new digital world and age the same as text and video n. there were several challenges that we've analyze and found them that what we've built around in order to solve his that audio in many aspects is not very easily discoverable. So you can't search audio. You can't came on your. You can't share argue a lot of the times. The audio content was one hour or forty. Five minute long of podcasts or radio show now is very accessible. You can't search for it. You can't look for specific clip or area that you'd like to listen instead of listening fully immersed into the whole show and you couldn't share any of it so what we've done in audio versus that we've built an ai engine that listens to vast amount of audio content. Have it be podcasts. Radio online videos that pretty much became slide with the audio content behind it and in an essence does three actions wanted analyzed it and cut it into short clips so we were able to take a long form show and cut it into the individual items that conversations the topics the questions that happened within it allowing users to get into specific point than sample what they're looking for the second is that we've index each clip that the we call burst we've added as much as possible transcriptions keywords entities source time a mood analytics number of speakers. There's plenty of dimensions that we've added to each clip like that so we'll be able to find it afterwards when the user can't and then we've added that delivery mechanism. Api layer and then on top of it as decay an imitable player for the web and libraries for and android to allow the different products and the different places where users are today to add an embiid audio layer to their products the main essence and misses that we wanted to do an auburn while making acceptable is making it extremely easy for products to add an audio layer and our dimension to what they're offering to their clients and to their users instead of asking the uses to come look for audio summer to come download an app or look for it online. We said no. I want the to be able to listen to their podcasts. Within the running up on the websites to be able to add the audio interview of the person mentioned within the article in the article itself and available that way. We're working on integration with podcasts. Search and audio playlist to be added to automotive to oem's and tier one. So when we drive. I want the or your car to greet you. Good morning. Allen here's the Traffic report and here's what happened in the news. And by the way. I know that you asked about tesla stock last night. Now i'm sorry a couple of days ago here is a couple of Analyst talking about it. That i've found over the night while you were sleeping. That kind of mechanism makes audio is easy and accessible to users wherever they are whenever they are just a touch away or command away or click away and that's the mission that we've done in august and it's quite the future picture. Frankly it's happening today. Alan i gotta tell you so. No no i know. I know it's it's amazing to me. I know you've you've been spending a ton of time building the tech in the meta data structures to make that possible and you talked about a few of the potential customers or ecosystem that you operate in like the news aggregate or the even the automotive industry. Can you go a little deeper for me. Like tell me a little bit more about like where audio burst operates today and like what are some additional use cases where you see your technology fitting in happy to one you remember. We started this conversation with you calling me crazy so i still need to convince you whether you know or futuristic or it's happening today. We were lucky enough happy enough to have multiple great partners invest in our company and work with us hand in hand to build this future. Earth with juristic thing. So you'll see among our investors for example samsung and hyundai and denso giants from the mobile and consumer electronics through the automotive and media world. That have joined with us in this effort to make this happen and that was an incredible. That is an incredible journey for us to do. Other birds today is live and via our player in. Api's and as decays in our have added all your to mobile apps such as flipboard the news break to websites of variety sizes of styles of and topics verticals with our impeccable player. And i think on the automotive that you said sounds of fridge ristic we have a few not live yet but few sees that we're working with leading oem's fortunately i'm not allowed to disclose on unique playlists to be added to their infotainment system to search engine behind voice activation. So you'll say hey name your Favorite car what's the latest on president by then or what's going on with the dallas cowboys or howled the markets of behaving today and you know the for time-to-time some of the existing voice activation will give you a robotic answer. A some clipper what auburn is offering them to dan. The what we're doing with them is the will provide you with the latest clip from professionally produced provider of the content from experts in the media world from the analysts from the best radio stations. Or podcast that will really give you an answer that you'll enjoy listening to that. You can stay focused on that you can listen for you know a few minutes of enrichment content while you dr. So and companies that were working with that are adding the sinking ability into smart earbuds. So you can do it in your car when you jog on when you run either from your app from earbud itself. These are exciting times. I can tell you. In the beginning. It took companies and customers of our some time to adapt and understand the message that we've done but twenty twenty really opened their eyes and saw how much the uses are dying to get talk content and podcasts and user errors. The case every brandon every company out there all of a sudden can become an audio media world and audio media provider. Because they don't need to be worrying about that layer they just add this became we handle everything for them and delight their users. It's pretty. I mean it's amazing. What the infrastructure that you've built behind the scenes if you will of these different applications at frankly proliferation i guess of where it could show up. I mean some amazing amazing platform that you're building from online news sites to encourage experiences to while on the go to your point. I mean i think that is the power of audio is that it can pretty much follow you throughout your day without interrupting. Whatever it is that you need to be doing at that moment in time or where you need to be going. that's amazing.

Auburn Denso Giants Tesla Analyst Allen Alan Hyundai Samsung Dallas Cowboys OEM DAN Brandon
"ristic" Discussed on Cyber Security Interviews

Cyber Security Interviews

02:09 min | 2 months ago

"ristic" Discussed on Cyber Security Interviews

"So so the first thing. I'd say when we think about psychopathology. Anything about to normal brain process. Either one we often try to frame it In the context of media a neuro psychosocial model which is the idea that there's absolutely brain processes that have to underlie human behavior and that are relating to how someone thinks and feels and behaves neurologically but then there's also psychological principles that that we used to understand. That would be things like you. Ristic's cognitive bias sees cognition itself and then the social piece of things of As a.

Ristic
"ristic" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

03:40 min | 2 months ago

"ristic" Discussed on Developer Tea

"So we've been talking about making resolutions making changes planning for the next year and there's a lot of ways to do this. We covered a lot of ways to do it in previous episodes previous years of this show. But i want to give you something to reflect on today on new year's eve the day before the new year begins. There are a lot of here. Ristic's that we can use as humans to understand a little bit more about ourselves about others about the world about reality. These heuristic they give some way of getting a handle on On the subject. Whatever it is that we're talking about in today's episode. I wanna talk about one of those heuristic that you can use. And it's very easy one to remember because it comes with this over used phrase that actions speak louder than words. We've all heard this a billion times in our lives actions..

Ristic
"ristic" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

04:29 min | 5 months ago

"ristic" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"Have passed Ristic loss and have attempted to also closed polling places, stuff early voting and take people's names off the voter rolls. Inspection has been removed. Judge Barren and Shelby Counting, Chief Justice Roberts wrote. Floating discrimination still exists. No one deaths that and my question to you is. Do you agree with Justice Roberts statement, Senator Harris My understanding of what remains of the Voting Rights Act. What happened in Shelby County is consistent with what you're describing the pre clearance requirement. As I understand, Shelby County remains in place and what the Supreme Court held unconstitutional is the coverage for me. So some states, which in 1965 had a history of discrimination, had to get pre clearance whenever they changed anything having to do with their voting procedures and other states didn't and I think Shelby County said that Congress can still pass a new coverage formula now articulating the criteria for jurisdictions that are discriminating and requiring pre clearance. Witness testimonies tomorrow. A committee vote will then happen eventually, a full vote of the U. S. Senate's president Trump in first Lady Melania Trump both tested positive for the Corona virus earlier this month, and the first lady says that's your son, Baroness also tested positive for covert 19. She says he has no symptoms. Instance, tested negative as has she in San Diego. The county has sent the strip club We're pottery outfielder Tommy Pham was stabbed a cease and desist order was stabbed in the parking lots in the midway District outside Pacers Showgirls International on Sunday night. He is expected to fully recovery of surgery at UCSD Medical Center strip clubs are allowed to open in California as restaurants in San Diego County. That means 25% indoor capacity on the ability to serve food and alcohol, but they cannot conduct live entertainment. The county issued order here today, saying that the strip Club does not suspend their live entertainment could receive misdemeanor citations and $1000 fines for each violations and that could be ordered to close permanently positive test rate for the Corona virus in San Diego County. Holding steady the good news is dropping for the most vulnerable of the community's positivity rate for the entire county is 3.0. And the health equity positivity rate for the lowest quartile of areas in San Diego County. The testing positivity is 5.7%, which is down from 6.2% last week, Doctor Wilmut, the public health officer for San Diego, saying four more people have died from the virus. A total of 844 for the year. The numbers were flats with point Loma University, taking no chances with their response. Students living in some residents halls at point Loma Nazarian University have been ordered to shelter in place after 12 New Corona virus cases were reported on campus. The affected dorms include classic Hall Hendrix Hall in Young Hall, the university says it also identified 50 students as being close contacts to people who have tested positive. University officials say the students in the impacted residence halls Should stay on their floors until they're cleared by the university's wellness center. The county is working with the school to test all those in impacted dorms by tomorrow and to tailor a response to the virus that fits the university's needs. Zachary Barnes Coco News parking enforcement is back underway tomorrow in the city of San Diego's is the first time during the pandemic first time since March, 16th I'll be handing out parking tickets for things like street sweeping and meters that will start tomorrow in the city of San Diego and a major meth bust has been announced in Riverside County. The DEA says the seizure of £2200 of meth in Paris, California, was the largest domestic seizure ever for their agency. CVP is recent more than £3000 Hall of Meth was the second largest of its kind. L. A is the transshipment hope for a Mexican cartel drugs coming across our Southwest border. DEA Special agent charge Bill Bannen says These busts are part of Operation Shield, which is targeting drug cartels, Their money, weapons and drugs or law enforcement efforts are not focused on drug users and drug addicts. Rather, they're focused on those who exploit, victimized and kill those suffering from addiction, he says. The cartel's behind the meth surge Arsenal. Oh and Jalisco, it's Jessica Rosenthal and finally UCSD alum Kate Rubins, Back at the International Space Station astronaut who graduated from UCSD in 1999, making her second trip to space. It'll be a six month visit actually became four years ago. The first person to sequenced DNA in space. I'm looking forward to a lot of the experiments that we have planned for this expedition..

San Diego County San Diego Loma Nazarian University Baroness Chief Justice Roberts strip Club £3000 Hall of Meth UCSD Judge Barren Riverside County California UCSD Medical Center point Loma University Tommy Pham Hall Hendrix Hall Supreme Court U. S. Senate DEA Justice Roberts
Explicit Heuristics and Cheap Tests

Developer Tea

06:10 min | 7 months ago

Explicit Heuristics and Cheap Tests

"Today's episode we're going to. Switch over and talk about explicit. Explicit ristic's and I'm GonNa give you one specifically that's been on my mind recently, I think you'll find it useful. You can imagine an explicit heuristic sounding like a proverb or platitude. And I'll give you an example of one of these that we've talked about. So many times on this show. The, heuristic of explicit. Here's stick of making things smaller. This is something that you can use as. A tool, it's not just a rule, but it's something that you can pull out of your tool chest and say, I wonder what would happen if I tried to make something in this particular situation that is currently bigger, right? It's say complex subject. What if they broke down if I broke it down into smaller component parts? What would that do? So, you can see that these explicit heuristic six differ from implicit here six in that you can kind of call them up on purpose. You can use them as a tool. Lynn's to see your problems with. So the new explicit heuristic that I would like to use today. Is Very simple and you can use this whenever you're wondering what's a good use of my time or how can I choose which direction is better and the explicit heuristic I want you to remember. is find cheap tests, find cheap tests. So let's expound on this explicit heuristic because it may not be immediately clear what exactly we mean by cheap or what exactly we mean by tests. When we are faced with difficult decision really any decision at all We have an endless number of possibilities in almost every scenario even if it seems like we only have maybe two choices we probably have. An infinite number or close to an infinite number, right? So. How do we make the right decision and how do we identify opportunities are better direction for us? Let's see you have option A. and option B. in front of you, and it's not immediately clear which of these options. Is. Going to be the most valuable they both cost the same to implement but. Option a is hard to test. It's hard to validate an early stage whether option a is a good idea option b. on the other hand. There is an easy test we can validate on in the very earliest part of the effort towards be. So. It. Makes Sense. Then if you present it this way than anyone rational would choose option B. that seems like. With the information we have that it's the most obvious choice and the reason for that. Is because even though they cost the same amount and they have the same level of confidence, we have a faster ejection from option B. if it doesn't work out if the test fails. So. This heuristic is. A way of kind of practicing in particular principle, validating your direction validating your direction. So what this means is if you're headed a direction, how do you know it's the right direction? How do you know that this implementation of these these large features may be a large set of features that is going to serve your users or it's going to kind of carry you towards the goal that you care about. Is there a way? To test that is there a way to validate that direction? Early as possible in cheaply as possible. So this is also a tool that you can use when you're trying to decide without knowing. Right, without knowing how easy it is to test, you can ask this question, which option can we validate the easiest? which direction could we can pull the ripcord on? The fastest. And here's the most important part of this heuristic, right because it allows you to make decisions more fluently a little bit faster. It gets you out of the blocks mode. When you're trying to decide between two things. That's a completely stalled scenario. But if you can make easy decisions in other words, if you can say it's cheap, it is very and of low risk to go in this direction because we know that we can test this direction very quickly and if we decide to change direction. We can do that right away. Won't the only way you can do that is if you can find a cheap test. I want to be clear about what I mean by the word cheap I don't always mean monetarily cheap. Usually what this means is that it's easy it's. uncomplicated. To check this particular direction and it can be cheap monetarily. Of course, we're not going to leave that out, but also it can be quick. Time is absolutely an obvious resource and so a test that is quickly done might be considered cheap and if you had two tests and one took twice as long as the other but they both they both cost the same amount of energy or effort or or money than you would go with the one that was faster. And again, what's critical about finding cheap tests or going directions that allow for cheap tests? Is that instead of thinking or trying to predict all the way through? Which decision is the best decision to make right option a option B. we're trying to predict the. End Outcome of a or the end outcome of. We can ask a different and easier question to ask can we check both?

Lynn
Small Problems and Principled Engineering

Developer Tea

03:28 min | 8 months ago

Small Problems and Principled Engineering

"What is it about small problems? That make them good as a default measure. Why should we always be thinking about our problems? In their smallest most atomic form. I want you to think back to a project with software projects if you have one in mind. Or really any kind of project at all. That had a lot of moving pieces. A lot of complexity. Maybe a lot of people dynamics involved with project. Maybe it's a school project where you had a lot of participants, a group project and Let's say that there was some conflict on that team or if it was a professional project a software project. There's a lot going on. Maybe there's multiple stakeholders. Maybe there's some weird API's is that you have to. Kind of integrate with. Maybe you're on a constraint time, line or certain parts of the project have better funding than other parts and all of this `asymmetry all of this. Heterogeneity in the project. This, is the hallmark of a complex system complex project, and the truth is most projects that we engage in. Particularly if they grow to a sufficient size, they will eventually become complex. And if you were to zoom out and look at them at some level. The complexity. Is Overwhelming. We can't really calculate the complexity with our own brains. In other words. We can't imagine what is the next most perfect decision to make and this is kind of a good. Here ristic for deciding whether a project at a particular. at a particular vantage point is too complex to think about as a whole. But. There's an interesting thing that happens when you zoom in. Once you zoom in a little bit. Things get a little less complex and that zooming can happen on multiple different. Types of axes for example you might zoom in on the time aspect. Maybe you don't know what the most important thing is to do. If you would look at in the next year, but perhaps you do know the most important thing to do in the next hour. Or vice versa, maybe the zooming in actually looks a little bit more like zooming out. Maybe you do know what the best thing is to do over the next year, but it's hard to determine what the best thing is to do in the next hour. If you zoom in to a particular part of the projects that has a homogeneous structure. Maybe it has homogeneous funding for example. Or that? Particular part of the project only works with one. You know fairly straightforward or even if that one piece of the project works with that old word, API. It's some vantage point at some zoom level. Once you go in deep enough. Things become simpler. And if you continue to zoom in. Things become nearly elementary. And it's at this zoom level. That I want you to focus your energy and your efforts. And not because it's easy either.

"ristic" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:35 min | 11 months ago

"ristic" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Call the moral here Ristic in the moral here Ristic is revenge and at one point the a New York times actually wrote an editorial about that event and the editorial writer I think got it right and and the editorial writer wrote killing cookie made no sense at all actually but it felt right emotionally and the reason it didn't make sense intellectually of course is the idea that a crocodile would do what a crocodile does is hardly surprising that's what crocodiles do the brain is smaller than a wall not he is a creature largely of instincts particularly when it comes to food and he was doing what crocodiles do he was not a moral agent you know which I would argue is one of the biggest differences between humans and other species we are moral agents so the interesting thing is that Haas the owner in some ways related to cookie as of cookie was a person that cookie was a moral agent and in some ways that's a variation of what Jim Thompson was doing with the book wasn't it which is your assuming that the animal has agency and behavior things are has human like qualities and that you're there for a Blige or required to treat this other creature as if in some ways it had human like qualities I'm sure that if you interviewed Haas he he you know clearly would know the difference at an intellectual level between a crocodile in a person but you're quite right he's basically treated them the same way that we would a person this similarly played out in a bizarre incident that happened in Tennessee where an elephant named merry killed into Grunwald in a circus parade in nineteen sixty they hung the elephant to death and you know to me that was it you know the ultimate example of where we have to pour more flies animals that we give it capital punishment in a sense for something that was clearly not morally culpable so people listening to the stories would say well those are really you know crazy stories but as you point out in the book this this tendency we have to answer for more flies animals is actually really ubiquitous you draw a contrast between the way we relate to the giant panda and the giant salamander tell me what the giants on the matter is what it looks like and how our attitudes to what these different animals are shaped by the ways in some ways that we have to put my face down yeah the so the animals in some way or similar the giant panda and the giant Chinese salamander in that they're both in danger they both live in China and they're both really special although in quite different ways the a giant Chinese salamander is basically a six foot long bag of brown slime with BT are to me they're like they're striking I wouldn't say that they're beautiful but they're stunning Justin their size and their I don't know do you have to be there with her charismatic but I think most people would agree with that but you're not going to see the world wildlife fund putting a picture of the agenda Cheney salamander on their logo instead they use the panda and the panda you know in some ways looks a little bit like a human but it's basically a faker in the sense that it has these giant circles around its eyes which is valid is called baby release so we look at that panda and it basically logs onto that jams into that that maternal instinct that we have when we see creatures with big eyes and impose on them that in some ways it reminds us of a human infant to for example researchers have shown that one of the biggest predictors of whether or not people will give money to save animals is the size of the animal's eyes this certainly have it twenty times the size when we come back I like cats actually improve our lives we're better off in terms of their psychological and physical health than non pet owners but so are people with Mercedes Benz X. your brain I'm Shankar Vedantam this is NPR this week on says you spoiled food I don't know that salted fish goes bad you never have locks of my hands over his house the only log again as fast as it's fun and everyone's a winner says you play the game.

Ristic New York
Automating Electronic Circuit Design with Deep RL w/ Karim Beguir

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

08:31 min | 11 months ago

Automating Electronic Circuit Design with Deep RL w/ Karim Beguir

"Kareem is CO founder and CEO at Institute Kareem. Welcome back to the Tacoma area. Podcast pleasure to speak again. Absolutely so if Kareem's name sounds familiar. That's because we spoke We're trying to figure this out. It was between a year and a half a year ago The show actually was published in September. Was Number three hundred two and you should definitely check it out for Kareem's full background But croom wanted to give us a brief overview of what you're up to as well as an update from when we last spoke absolutely so I it's a pleasure to be back in. Continue our conversation on aside. He's been pretty invent follow. The Lot has happened as you know instead. Deep is a decision making a startup. So we focus on Problems related to making complex decisions We also do our own innovation and the tried to be helpful to the community and we've made progress basically on this three areas. We've been able to release innovative products. In decision making we've also been able to publish innovate in research Publishing original you know like pieces. That were actually. What come that nervous where we got the spotlight presentation for example with Google declined? And we've also been very active on the community side organizing major events in Africa and basically lots of young talents. Find say super -tunities in there and the we most recently saw one another at Nuremberg and had a chance to catch up briefly at the black dinner where you really piqued my interest around one of the company's new initiatives or products which is called DP. Cb tell us about what is absolutely so this'll be actually started with with conversation Two years ago I I had a dinner with a good friend of mine. Who is actually an expert in hardware design worked on like no chips for a well known phones etc and we were speaking about like. What is he doing this particular sector? And he was like not that much like particular like busy stunt for printed circuit boards so basically those ships that you will find with all sorts of Consumer Electronics Products Iphones Speakers Bluetooth etc and You know the situation in that market was that auto routers basically automated systems to connect the different components like built. Basically the electrical secretary have been going on for many years but they were not that make and we were like. Hey that sounds like an interesting problem to to look at. We started looking into it eventually. This good front now. Be True was now meeting or hardware team joint steady and we've worked very hard on this project and we're very proud to have been able to achieve goals and in November last year we've released it in. Beta form and it is a world first for the first time we have a system that is end to end fully deployable and scalable on the cloud capable of understanding how to route chips essential and now last time we spoke we. Our conversation was focused on the work. Your company was doing applying reinforcement learning to logistics is deep be also based on reinforcement learning absolutely and this is a very strong commonality and like design philosophy between or or products. So in a sense. Let me give you an example. We've we've continued to do great work in logistics and the recently last September. We've won a major contract for example with that. Chaban the German railway company and to give idea this is about routing trains on a large scale talking about ten thousand trains a day and some think on some thirty three thousand kilometers of railway but downs out their communities between routing trains and routing chips on a board and so we realized that the projects and the type of research that study is doing is actually applicable to multiple fields. And when it comes to imbed Ziegler printed circuit boards. They're putting compelling so. We went full speed ahead and this turned out to be office product. Alrighty so when you initially met with your friend your mention that they're you know while this these auto routers have been in place or have been in use for many years. They were not without their challenges and problems. What were some of those challenges and problems? And what was the opportunity to introduce? A I think Reuters have been the they've been. There's been a lot of great work. Donald Reuters but in terms of like design philosophy. The design philosophy is all about essentially using ristic's to solve problems and we spoke a little bit about this in Bester conversation so it's very similar to let's say what was the status of software for chess before out. Fazio came out the systems which were very well actually but still are built on your way. Sticks fought for the hardest problems. Ristic's have limits and a system that can essentially mobilize learning can. Learning get scale can get better results when it comes in particular for in the status of printed circuit. Boards it is actually incredible and we are in twenty twenty that actually complex sucrets still designed manually and the reason why people design those Mandy is because auto routers essentially a failed to deliver the goods to the degree of quality which is expected by high quality customers so we see a really compelling opportunity with modern built on the latest innovation. Some of it actually developed in house we actually have patents on the work done for the. There is an opportunity to accelerate the design cycle of products. Because it's not just about quality you mean. Engineers do absolutely amazing work and have amazing intuition. It's about the speed. Human engineer could take in certain cases multiple weeks if not months to completely root complex with more than we do believe instead that this timing can be proud to twenty four hours this if done at scale it would be tremendous for the industry and it would accelerate the product cycle. We are using consumer electronics to have a cycle every six months of the year. There's a new version coming. We believe that any I could actually accelerate A. That's that's a that psycho and as a consequence also make it easier to design new products and experiment and ultimately unleash more human creativity and mobilizing gay. You mentioned complexity of the boards as being one of the challenges. What are we talking about when we talk about complexity? We I'm assuming we're measuring that in for example number of components but having worked with circuit boards before there are also issues like the number of layers and things like that when you talk about a complex board. What exactly are you talking about? So about really consists in basically an. Kyi's that we need to connect and as a consequence like those guys they can be what needs to be connected so you have fairs of components essential get need to be connected and they could be thousands of those and as you mentioned rightly there could be multiple layers simple designs start with two or four layers that you could have a lot more and the more you have layers the more components you have to connect the heart of the problem. It is an empty heart problem and so this is where I can help. But you can you when you're looking at the most difficult designs that we take human engineers significant amount of time to solve

Kareem Institute Kareem Tacoma Engineer Africa Nuremberg Croom Reuters Google Research Publishing Ristic Donald Reuters KYI Co Founder Secretary Ziegler CEO Fazio
Forearm Strength

20 Minute Fitness

04:09 min | 1 year ago

Forearm Strength

"So you're forums as you probably know from feelings in the gym are used in many exercises things like you'll pull ups you'll rose your dad less and even your bicycles all involve a certain amount of forum strength and if you lock forum strengthen your ability to build shrimp and other pulse your body or also compromised on this is essentially due to the strong forearms are the strong your grit. You have more squeezing force when you have undeveloped a week forearms. These muscles might be the first to tire out when you're doing something like a row and you'll never actually really tax the most of your trying to work. Let you push your train chain on a dead left because you'll forearms give out too quickly so get fit guy. Brock Armstrong caused this. The Weakest Link in the kinetic chain if your forums. And letting you down. And this basically means that when we're doing something like a pull up we're not only engaging the major muscles that we're targeting. Shia back for example put up but you're also including all the muscles involved in the kinetic chain that performs the movement including so in this case your wrist you'll hand your forums you biceps on Soham. See your bike. Mont not only lots my knowledge to be challenged. If you're doing a pull up because your hands your grip fails before the muscles even start to get now reforms on tortuously stubborn and difficult to grow some lucky enough to have been gifted genes that allow for four hundred element some of the not so lucky and we have to use specialized training to build up these areas. As 'cause it's really a case of trading them hard and often some people definitely find that their forums can develop if you're just handling heavy weight and regular basis during exercise in saved not using wrist wraps for example because they getting is sufficient stimulation whilst doing that but with most muscles they can also be trained independent. May if you want to get optimal results. According to David Robson a body building dot com editor given their composition. Ristic Stanzas and risk. Flexes IS W- as well as the longer bracket radiologists the forums. All a pretty complex grouping on each be targeted with that allow for full contraction so in David's experience he's found beneficial to train forearms at the end of biceps training and on their own two days per week before seeing a proper no small results and he found it valuable to talk at the forearms variety of exercises on rep ranges to keep them stimulated and growing and training them frequently and hard. He's actually found the as LEDA upper. Body strength increases as well as the lifting Nashi making a safe transition to a heavier overall weight without the fair the forums. Going TO GIVE OUT MID set. So you're getting ineffective for Training session as leading to a safer more efficient training session for other components as well. So what exercises are recommended while I up training the wrist. Extensive extended enable the Hon to extend backwards they comprised of eight different heads on these muscles. Run the outside line for four such development affectively a number of reverse grit movements needs to be done sir. Thoughts things like Bob L. Reverse risk coils cable reverse curls and Soham now the great Texas is the Pharma's walks to build solid forearms to find anything like a weighted objects will not be kettlebells dumbbells. Even Bob Bell said the blocks tires or about anything else you can get your hand on plates and simply pick up the object assault walking for as long as you can obviously as well ups and Chin ups great exercises. You can even try hiding from a ball. For THIRTY SECONDS. Alm straights. You could do. Dumbbell wrist extensions says Bench holding dumbbell on them without lifting your own of your thoughts co the number as far as you can toward your bicep. I maintain a tight grip throughout this movement. Obviously slowly lowered the dumbbell back to neutral. So there's lots of next is you can't do train your forearms independently into really actually give them the the focus. They might deserve if you are trying to improve your your grip strength so that might sound unnecessary or you feel. You don't need to do them. You'll forums can be trained like any other exercise and they can benefit. You'll pull up shell rose. And you're dead lifts by by improving your your squeezing power and if like my friend do grip is less than you down than definitely. Give it a try

David Robson Brock Armstrong Leda Shia Mont Soham Nashi Bob Bell Editor Bob L. Bench Assault Texas Chin
Where is AI Heading? Interview with Nick Thompson, Editor-in-Chief, Wired

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

07:54 min | 1 year ago

Where is AI Heading? Interview with Nick Thompson, Editor-in-Chief, Wired

"Hello and welcome to the AI today. Podcast I'm your host Kathleen Walsh and I'm your host Ronald Schmeltzer. Our guest today is Nick Thompson. Who is the editor in chief at? I nick thanks so much for joining us on AI. Today Oh thank you so much delighted to be here. Yeah welcome neck and thank you so much for joining us today. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners and tell them a little bit about your background and your current role at wired I Journalists and journalists since I stopped street musician. I'm in my early twenties and prior to wired I worked at the New Yorker around the digital side and then I came over and became the editor in chief of wired. I started the same week. Is DONALD TRUMP? So it's relatively easy to track them. How Long. I've had this job in about three years now. Two years in a month and my role is to assign stories at stories figure out the direction of wired on the HR office figure out our business model view with ethical questions involving sponsored content. And every now and then go on. Cool podcast talk about things. We care a lot about like artificial intelligence. Well great well thanks. We drill to heavier. Because I think you know part of the reason why we have you on our podcast. Is You have an interesting perspective. You obviously hearing from the industry and hearing from pundits and you're hearing of course from what end users are talking about but also a governments are doing have interesting perspective. That may be many others. Don't have on what's happening for artificial intelligence and so as you may see is impacting every industry. It's impacting all sorts of corners of our ecosystem. So how have you seen a evolving over the past few years and for your audience? How have you seen your audience of all in its understanding and interaction with artificial intelligence? It's interesting you know. The debate over a I has conversation. Area has changed and all kinds of wonderful ways since I started this job and started really digging into it. You know three years ago. Four years ago the public conversation over a I was much more about super intelligence and much. More bowed concerns about runaway TAC. Much more caught up in the hype over the last couple of years. We've narrowed and deepened understanding back to now. It's much more about okay. What former they I is going to be. The MOST IS GONNA BE MACHINE. Learning as far as we can see are going to go beyond machine. Learning let's talk about the ethical debates but let's not talk about them in the superficial ways. We really talked about them a year or two ago. Just talk about him and more complex nuanced ways much talk about where is actually being used successfully where it's not. I've talked about it's real limitations. Too I feel like part of my own. Understanding of the issue has deepened in profound ways. Over the last three years editing stories about hey right but I also think that the reader wired have become much more educated on the topic much more interested in it and much more involved than ever increasingly interesting debates about all things related to I. It's interesting that you say that because we've seen a lot of the use cases that we talk about and with our clients as well. We say you know this would be a great application. They're very mundane back office processes things like that and people are like. Oh yeah well. That's kind of a boring use case and we're like yes but it's an incredibly useful one and you should probably start with it and it's going to save a lot of money and time so it's interesting you know you've been seeing that as well where we've gone from this talk about artificial general intelligence is very you know super ristic science fiction view in some sense of Ai. To how can we use it now in every day? So we've talked about how. Ai Is impacting just about every industry including journalism as well. So how do you see? Changing journalism in the coming years and what ethical considerations should be discussed and put in place around this? Yeah I mean I I just want to completely agree with your statement or one of the companies. I read about a lot of facebook. And you know when I started people like Oh my God. Facebook IS USING AI. To create language that will displace humanity. And now hey is basically like a really useful tool for getting porn off facebook right. It's much simpler row tasks that are much better accomplished with assistance. Humans journalism question every profession is going to be changed in interesting ways. Biracial right because professional events systems using. I will be able to do things that we used to have. Humans do so when I think about journalism. What are the things that we do now? That machines can do better from a reporting process. I think that machines and it'll be very help and identifying patterns potentially defined stories so there will be a group of reporters class reporters a type of reporter in the future who will harness AI to analyze databases identify patterns find investigative stories. There will also be kinds of stories that we no longer need to write to the Washington. Post is already experimenting with having a systems writing basic pieces so Toronto Blue Jays beat the Baltimore. Orioles for to to happen. Because someone's home run and Joe got so they're kind of wrote stories that people like to read that you don't really need a human writing you can probably right about stock market and as time passes and as machines get better like those stories will increasing complexity. You won't be able to write three thousand word narratives profiles using an AI system. But you'll be able to write a certain kind class of story within the tasks that we have you right. It'll be changed a little bit. Copy editing an interesting profession. Where High End. Copy editing like trying to identify voice style that will stay with humans right to kind of copy. Editing Donna wired but there's a different level of copy editing that I think probably will be automated replaced by. There's fact checking that you smart a system could do so. There's certain tasks within the stack of tasks that make up the creation of an article. That will be done with I in a certain set of them. That won't be a lot of journalism in ball. Human to human contact human human reporting becoming friends with somebody eventually developing a relationship where they trust you to give you the information that makes an important story like a machine is not gonna be able to develop a trusted relationship with the source story but a machine will be able to do copy editing. The fact check legal review parts of that more efficiently than a human can so few ways. It's GonNa Change. They're probably about twenty five thousand others but that start that's interesting. You know one of the things we've noticed it. I don't think related specifically artificial intelligence but the whole idea of the long form article has really sort of. It's become a lot I mean. Maybe I'm just noticing it more become a lot. More prevalent icon. There's like bringing you into the emotion of the story and sort of like you know carrying rather than just talking about the facts of some story just today. I was reading this book about somebody who was lost in the Costa Rican rainforest and somebody wrote a book about it and and instead of just talking about that sort of brings you into the story and I found that to be really engaged. Something of course that you can't really do what they item wondering if one is sort of like a reaction to the other which is that. These sort of automated pieces are taking the place of sort of this more sorta wrote journalism and in the place now. Journalists are more storyteller switch bringing people into the narrative. I mean does something. I don't know if that's something that's intentional or I'm just noticing it more. I think that I think it is true that there are more of those stories and it probably you are seen more of them in your newsletters in the publications you read. I don't think it's a reaction to a I yet or it. Is You know. Five percent due to ask generated through. I think that is much more. A reaction to the decline of advertising supported journalism so one of the big wrecks or phenomenon dinner industries that the price of ads on websites and permissions like both prices. Going down in the Seltzer rate is going down. So it's much harder to generate revenue off of content. Right if you get if you publish a ton of stories and get a ton of readers. It's hard to

AI Facebook Donald Trump Editor In Chief Wired Nick Thompson Kathleen Walsh Ronald Schmeltzer Washington High End Toronto Blue Jays Orioles Donna Reporter JOE
Coronavirus: China accuses US of causing panic and 'spreading fear'

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Coronavirus: China accuses US of causing panic and 'spreading fear'

"The Chinese government is accusing the United States of reading fear by Ristic restricting travel and pulling its citizens out of that country even as the death toll has climbed past the three hundred sixty mark with corona virus all it has done could only create and spread fear which is a bad example the reason they're upset is because they have essentially isolated China with that decision the U. S. that is and other countries have followed suit more more issuing these travel bans against Chinese nationals are folks coming from China correspondent

Chinese Government United States China
Management Anti-Patterns - False Homogeneity

Developer Tea

08:22 min | 1 year ago

Management Anti-Patterns - False Homogeneity

"So this this week we are focusing on management anti patterns. And I'm going to take a step back before you as a non manager developer before you turn this episode off once you understand something that management is not about a title management is not about a role on a team although there certainly are distinctly important roles for managers on healthy teams depending on and of high. Your team is structured management. Is something that we all have to do. And the basic thesis here that no one else is going to care about your time or or have as much insight into the time that you spend and to your values your priorities as you are even if you were to share everything thing that you're feeling and thinking with another person they won't experience it to the same visceral degree that you will and so as the person and who is most bought in the person who cares the most about how your time and how your efforts are managed higher life and work irk are managed. Only you have the opportunity to take the responsibility to become a good manager for yourself. So we're talking about management anti patterns and that applies to managers that are Kinda formerly titled Managers but it also so applies to everyone else. WHO's listening to this episode right now and you can choose what you do with this information but you can kind of implement these ideas both at a team level and at a personal management level? So what is the Management Anti Pattern that kills focus that destroys focus and actually actually this turns out to be very common pattern that managers tin to follow and as it turns out this same pattern the same mindset. It doesn't just kill focus. It also creates an inaccurate picture of the world around you. This this anti pattern that we're talking about is the pattern of false equivalence. Another way to describe it is false homogeneous entity and you'll recognize this pattern immediately really when you hear about it this is different From a the kind of fallacy of false equivalence instead. What we're talking about this anti pattern is perceiving or communicating two things to be similar or the same on some dimension whether or not actually the same moreover doing this by default? So think about it like this. Imagine so you have a backlog of tasks and you and your team are supposed to start working on these tasks and building product right so this anti pattern which show up immediately if I as a manager said will all of these tasks are equally important all of them have the same level of criticality to this project. So what do you do with this information as developer. We'll becomes very difficult all to make decisions about what to work on. And so you have to choose as a developer. What you're you're going to work on first and then second and third and so on? So how do you choose the unstated reality when we communicate kate that things are for example of equal importance. Is that the order in which we do. Things therefore does not matter because is implicitly. If something is more important than another thing on a timeline it makes sense it kind of makes logical sense offense to do the most important things I and indeed. This is a good here ristic that we have kind of built into our brains when we're trying to organize what at work we wanted to do. And here's the problem. Then we see all work as equally important are heuristic for what we should do. I now fall back to something that is difficult to agree on. For example one person might want to work on the easiest thing I because they're drained the tired another person might want to work on the hardest thing. I additionally this kind of false equivalence or false congeniality of these tasks doesn't take into account the possibility of dependencies. A given task may not be very very important on its own but if it is a kind of parent dependency to multiple other tasks will then it kind of inherits the priority of the tasks that what are dependent on it now. I do want to take a step back and recognize that we are simplifying an issue. That is much more complex that planning planning your tasks and figuring out what is the highest priority is not as simple as you know ordering things based on priority and then inheriting thing Inheriting that priority up the chain of dependencies and then calling it done. That's not the message of this episode instead. Message of this episode. Is that win. We communicate as if some pool of objects whether that's tasks or people or even days on the calendar when we communicate or Think or build systems around the false idea that those days or tasks or people are somehow equivalent into each other. We build on a false reality this same issue crops up when you try to replace one developer over with another you take an existing developer off of her project you hire a new developer and you assume incorrectly as a manager that those two developers will have equivalent performance. What you're forgetting to take into account when you make these assumptions is the time that it takes for example apple for that developer to simply onboard into the project itself even if those two developers had exactly the same skill sets which is very unlikely to begin with the on boarding time has some switchover? There's some overhead there additionally. It's possible that this new developer doesn't have the same kind of chemistry St on the team and so even at the very highest level. Even if you had exactly the same skill set there are two major areas that makes these developers outputs very likely to be different from each other and additionally don't know the developer that you've moved onto another other project what their output will be on that project either. So what do we do to combat this idea of false homogeneous entity. How can we get to a place where we recognize that every single task that we have to do has a different level of priority? One solution starts with your disposition. It starts with your assumptions about the world around you and these are difficult to change but when you're evaluating in a pool when we're talking about a pool we mean two or more subjects that have kind of the base unit is the same both are tasks or both are people were both. Are you know some base unit start with the assumption of of implicit diversity. What do we mean by implicit diversity? We mean that the output of two people is going to be different the preferences of those two people is going to be different the priority of two tasks the difficulty of those tasks. All of these kind kind of attributes characteristics start with the assumption that these characteristics are diverse. They're different from each other. They diverge from each other.

Developer Kate Apple
Automated Machine Learning with Erez Barak

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

08:22 min | 1 year ago

Automated Machine Learning with Erez Barak

"All right everyone I am here in Orlando at Microsoft ignite. And I've got the pleasure of sitting with Ariza Barack Ariza's group manager for as you're as welcome to the uh-huh podcast. Thank you thank you great to be here. Great to be with you. Sound super excited about this conversation. We will be diving into a topic that is generating raining a lot of excitement in the industry. And that is Auto Amal and the automation of the data science process But before we dig into to that. I'd love to hear how you got started working in Melanie. I it's a great question because I've been working with data for quite a while and I think roughly about five to ten years ago. It became apparent that the next chapter for anyone working with data has to we've itself so the AI world and the world of opportunity with AI is really really only limited by the amount of data. You have the the uniqueness of the day you have and access you have data And once you're able to connect those two worlds and a lot of things like predictions new insights new directions sort of come out of the woodwork. So seeing that opportunity imagining that potential has naturally led me to work with the. I was lucky. Enough to join the AZURE. Ai Group and does really three focus areas within that group. One of them is machine learning. How do we enable data scientists of those skills to operate through the machine learning life cycle starting from the data to the training registering the mouse to put them in productions in managing them a process? We call Emma Lops so just looking at that end to end and understanding understanding how we enable others to really go through that process in a responsible trusted in known way. There's been a super exciting journey so far and so did you. Do you come at this primarily from a data science perspective or research perspective engineering perspective. I I think one of the above or all of the above. You know I'm actually going to go with all of the above. I think it'd be remiss to think that if you're gonna hit it from a data science perspective live and you're trying to build a product. Yeah really looking to build the right set of products for people to use as they go through their journey. You'd you'd probably miss out on an aspect of it if you think about. The engineering perspective will probably end up with great. Infrared doesn't align with any of the data science. So you really you gotta think between the two worlds and how one empowers the other. You really gotta figure out where most data scientists ovo skills need to help. WanNa help are looking for tools and products and services on Azure to help them out. And I think that's the part I find and most compelling sort of figuring that out and then really going deep where you land right because if we end up a billing sticky. We're going to spend a whole lot of time with our the data signs customers data science internal teams and figure out. Well how should I look like but if you're building something like ultra mel that that's targeted not only at the deeper data scientists but also the deeper rooted data professionals. You WanNA spend some time with them and understand not only what they need but Kahad that applies to the world of data science. And what were you working on before Azzura. So before as R- a Microsoft I worked for a team in culture data retreated created the set of data platforms for our internal teams and prior to joining Microsoft. I worked in the marketing automation. Space Company called op Fai and again the unique assets. We were able to bring to the table as part of op. Find the world of marketing automation were always data-based. We're always sort of looking at the data assets marketers had instead. What else can we get out of it? Machine learning wasn't as prevalent at the time. But you could track back to a lot of what we did at that time. And how machine learning would have helped if it was used on such a general basis. Yeah one of the first Machine learning being use cases that I worked with were With folks that were doing trying to do like lead scoring and likelihood likelihood to buy propensity to buy types of use cases. I mean that's been going on for a really long time. So we're on a podcast so you can see me smiling but we did a lot out of a worker on building glow lead scoring okay and you ristic's and manual realistic sense of general us. Ticks and you're is that the customer could customize and today today you've seen that to really evolved to a place where there's a lot of machine learning behind I mean it's perfect for machine learning right you've got all data it's fresh it's coming. You know does insights sites. That are really hard to find out once you start slicing and dicing it by regions or by size of customers. It gets even more interesting. So the whole the makings for you're adding machine learning really make. You are getting pretty excited about various Nice Nice. You want to dive into talking about auto. I Mel this is probably for the level of excitement that and demand for Ah Auto Amal and enthusiasm That folks have for the topic not to mention the amount of confusion that there is for the topic. I probably not covered it nearly enough on the podcast. You know certainly when I think of when I think of Auto Amal there's a long kind of academic history behind the technical approaches that That drive it it. But it was really popularized For many You know with Google's cloud autumn L. Twenty eighteen and like before that they had this New York Times. Sometimes you know they had this PR win. That was like a New York Times article talking about how you know I was GonNa create itself and I think that contributed a lot to for lack of a better term in the space but then we see it. You know all over the place. There are other approaches. More focused on kind of citizen data data science. I love to just start with how you define Auto Amal and you know is is is your take on it as a space and you know it's role and importance that kind of thing I think I can. I really relate to many of the things things you touched on. So maybe I'll start and this is true for many things. We do Adra but definitely for Auto Mail on your point around academic roots Microsoft Microsoft. Has this division gold. Sr Microsoft Research. And it's really a set of researchers who look into leading edge topics and drive the world of research in different areas and that is when we first got in our team introduced to Oto Mel. So so they've been doing. Research of a subset of that team has been doing research around the ultimate meal area for quite a few years. They've been looking looking at it. There have been thinking. Well you know it started yes. I've heard centers AI. Making A. I don't know when he started getting into it. Like what does it me. And then it means to be honest. It means a lot of things to many people. It's quite normal. Used will be quite frank. There is no one standard industry the standard definition. That says. Here's what I can tell you what it is for us to continue what it is for our customers. I can tell you where we're seeing. It make a ton of impact and it comes to using machine learning capabilities in order to help you being the data scientists create machine capabilities in a more efficient in a more accurate in a more structured fashion.

Auto Amal Microsoft AI Barack Ariza New York Times Microsoft Research Ai Group Melanie Orlando Group Manager Oto Mel Emma Lops MEL Space Company Google Azzura Ten Years
Leverage as a Career Heuristic

Developer Tea

07:54 min | 1 year ago

Leverage as a Career Heuristic

"Many past episodes we talk about some of the pitfalls of our biases as of our cognitive distortions and often this discussion turns to the concept of heuristic here risks being he kind of rules of thumb that we use when making snap judgments and here is six are incredibly important unfortunately often they get a negative rap been on this show so in today's episode I WanNa talk about a specific heuristic the you can use to kind of drive your career growth James Jonathan Cottrell and you're listening to Develope my going the show is self driven developers find clarity perspective and purpose in their careers before we talk about the ristic I want to discuss today I want to take a step back and think about how we as developers as engineers designers donors how do we set our goals of course in the context of a company you may have revenue goals you may have you know official okay ours everyone agrees on but there's a distinct line in the sand between the common goals making more money and the more specific goals like having a positive impact on a particular group of people no matter how you create your goals almost everyone falls back to some kind of basic rules of thumb for example almost every once whatever they do to be sustainable and I don't necessarily mean environmentally sustainable of course that could be a part of your values the people don't tend to set out with the expectation and the desire to fail or to stop doing something that they're doing quickly the Hicks of earning resources or social recognition social appreciation these are the heuristic we tend to share and these serious six can kind of be automatic they're built in we don't have to sit down and write down that we want Social Nisshin we know how to sit down and write down that we want more resources so that we can survive and thrive so we have a bunch of these automatic curious expert what if we wanted to kind of create or build another set of heuristic on top of this most of the time when we think about our values news it is not necessarily at the heuristic level in other words there aren't really rules of thumb we have to think very hard about how we measure certain decisions against the the values today I wanna talk about a heuristic that will help you grow your career that may not necessarily be obvious it may not necessarily pop out to you from your nature or your subconscious but before we get into talking about this particular heuristic I want to introduce it with it a caveat and that is that no one is going to care about your career more than you do think about that for Ramona no one will have the capability of carrying about your career more than you do now many of you have probably heard this in some form or another that nobody's going to care about your life or your job or your income more than you do and it's true but some of the connotation nations need to be cleared up here this doesn't mean that no one else cares about your career at all and also doesn't mean that everyone else is out to get you or that they will put their careers above yours very often decisions are mutually benefit missile they benefit both your career and the other person's so have to be careful when we are thinking about making moves for our own careers we have to be careful in assuming that no one else cares at all about our careers when the truth is probably somewhere in between I've heard some pushback on this idea also from the angle that other people can't care as much about my career as as I do and I think the the better ways think about this as no one else will invest as much in your career as you will no one else will invest as much in your careers you will and when we think about it this way they he clears up any kind of confusion so let's talk about this heuristic I will talk about what the heuristic is them we're GonNa do a quick sponsor break in come back and talk about how it applies in particular scenarios in your career you're going to have moments where you have to you negotiate and negotiation isn't always about getting a better salary it's also not about getting a promotion of course those are moments of negotiation but you're negotiating all the time negotiation is out of our lives pretty much every day now we often think about negotiation as getting the Best Bang for our buck getting a better price on something but negotiations much more than that at a fundamental level negotiation is the process of resolution the process of finding common ground with another person in order to take the next step essentially anytime you are making decisions a specially when you're making collaborative decisions you probably have some dynamic of negotiation happening additionally you can imagine that negotiation happens within ourselves as well we seem to have two sides in an even decision the one side that wants to do the thing that it is immediately gratifying or maybe the thing that is safe and the other side that wants to do the thing that's long-term better for us or maybe a bit more risky often the decision making process for an individual is kind of a mock trial between these two sides thing to arguments of each one and then deciding which one is the most persuasive and so it benefits us to understand and to be good good and negotiating pretty much all negotiation relies on leverage and this is the heuristic the you can use used to grow your career now I want to be clear that I think there are a lot of ethical implications in this discussion because leverage can be anes Bhai totally innocent and even beneficial processes where you can gain leverage through very unethical processes even illegal processes like tale in the same way that earning resources as a heuristic you can come by those resources in both illegal in legal ways to remember that with every heuristic that you use I e need to bring with you the tools of inspection in the filtering that you have through your values and through your ethics and of course using the filters of societal norms and even what's legal but once we get on the other side of that once we get to the place where we can gain leverage we can build leverage for ourselves in ways that are totally above board we provide ourselves a much better position in any negotiation

"ristic" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"ristic" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"The fact that Chris once admitted to it and is serving time for those murders CBS fours Dylan Thomas reports from outside the Frederick police department bring greasing tells me that the cyber bullying around this case has been relentless sense the murders about eleven months ago so bad that he's even gone to law enforcement and law makers seeking help has had no assistance from now he's here in Colorado asking CBS for viewers to help him stop patrols I can't possibly describe how painful the last eleven months have been how does one cope with the murders of their child in grand children just dealing with this type of tragedy is more than a family should bear almost one year has passed since Chris what's murdered his pregnant wife in their Frederick home later killing his own daughters bell in C. C. as well since the murder Shanahan's family led by father Frank Ristic has been under attack in the most vicious ways you can imagine intense cyber bullying by fans of the murder and trolls around the world England Philippines Australia it's not fair to those victims we don't deserve it Frank groups that wanted to speak with CBS for to pressure lawmakers to step up and find a way to limit the attacks trolls make online his lawyers say calling major social media companies has been useless we called Facebook we called you to recall Twitter I shouldn't have to be out here doing this the route six say cyber bullies are making them relive their nightmare daily we just try to ignore it but sometimes you just can't ignore it place to stop how much life leave ours alone while many choose to bully Frank said he tries to cherish those who choose love who have supported us and pray for us in our family we can't thank you enough god bless you all free cokes the focus in this case will move towards remembering shin man and her kids as the loving and intelligent people they were to do so he continues to wear a wristband to this day I read the names of those he lost CBS fours Dylan Thomas reporting money news now as we check in with pan.

Chris CBS Dylan Thomas Frederick police department Colorado C. C. Shanahan Frank Ristic murder Facebook Frederick England Philippines Australia eleven months one year
Firefly Wants to Send Your Stuff into Orbit

Business Wars Daily

04:41 min | 1 year ago

Firefly Wants to Send Your Stuff into Orbit

"The business wars daily is brought to you by Staples work is changing, but Staples is changing right along with it. The new Staples delivers solutions to help your team be more connected productive, and inspired. Learn more at Staples dot com slash change. From one I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily on this Thursday, June twenty seven do you have a research project piece of artwork or an invention that you'd like to send up into space? Sounds crazy, right? Wrong firefly aerospace is offering just that an opportunity to put your project into orbit around the end of this year. The Texas based company develops rockets intended to launch small satellites into space and help publicize its mission to make space accessible to everyone firefly will accept payloads ranging from children's art work to university experiments to inventions by space entrepreneurs for free the cargo will go into orbit on alpha the company's first small satellite launch vehicle think of alpha like a taxi into space, but a taxi that carries cargo not people firefly has reserved some of alpha unused space for your payload. Owed the companies taking applications on its website through the end of June, the free payloads are part of the company's dream program that's an acronym for dedicated research and education, accelerator mission company, founder Tom are Kucic is a former NASA and SpaceX engineer, he says he's always wanted to boost interest in the stem fields that science technology engineering and math. The dream program is his manifestation of that desire, the quest for space travel inspire stem interests, like no other endeavor. The company says, alpha has been a long time in the making unlike other startup space companies like SpaceX and Jeff Bezos blue origin, firefly CEO didn't make a fortune elsewhere before starting his company in two thousand fourteen he kept it funded with small amounts from venture capitalists until twenty sixteen when a combination of financial and legal problems Sankt, the company it filed for bankruptcy and competitors. Left it for dead in two thousand seventeen it's assets were. Sold, but six months later, a new investor came along and Markku sick was able to restructure and start inventing again, last November, NASA awarded contracts in nine companies that allow them to bid on delivering payloads to the moon over the next decade. And even though firefly has yet to launch its first rocket it received one of those lunar landing contracts. But the part of the space industry that firefly occupies, crowded, the company faces several rivals, including SpaceX, virgin rocket and rocket lab. Remember your first day of college when you were told to look left and right at your fellow freshman and warned that in a year or two. One of you would be gone. Well, same here experts, including the vendors themselves believe the industry is right for a shakeout firefly's dream payload program is out Ristic and good publicity, along with affordability the ultimate test for firefly. We'll be how it performs when it zooms off its pad this. Winter and how well it's many rivals do as they race into space. Brown won re this business wars daily, if you like dreaming of the near impossible with us. Let us know small step for you giant leap for business workday gives a five star rating on apple podcast, Google podcast, Itcher, or your favorite listing, thanks so much. I'm David Brown Ables tomorrow. Business wars. Daily is brought to you by Staples. The world of work is changing faster than ever before a week ago open floor plans were in. Now, they're out the pace of our evolving work lives can feel overwhelming. But Staples can help not the old stables, but a new Staples that delivers solutions to help your team be more connected productive, and inspired work may be constantly changing. But Staples is changing right along with it to support you. Learn more at Staples dot com slash change.

Staples Staples Dot Firefly David Brown Nasa Jeff Bezos David Brown Ables Texas Kucic TOM Apple Founder CEO Engineer Google Six Months
What the G-20 summit means for currencies

Bloomberg Surveillance

06:39 min | 1 year ago

What the G-20 summit means for currencies

"Joining us as mark mccormack head global head of f._x. strategy at t._d. securities mark thanks so much for joining us i wanted to start with the g. twenty and kind of how you think the various scenarios coming out of the g twenty could impact currencies kinda how are you positioning yourself there yeah thanks for having me to start but for the twenty i think it's it's interesting to think about that this is a part of an event ristic goes into a longer process of of the trade wars but to kind of think around some of the scenarios there's obviously the worst case which is escalating which is you know talks breakdown u._s. lapsed the additional three hundred billion worth of tariffs on china that seems seemingly unlikely at this point but the other scenarios are generally are base cases which is we agree to a framework to restart talks although we do not reach new deal so i think i think those are the two kind of most focused on outcomes and i would say ours is definitely the latter where it's agree to i guess to disagree but we're not reaching a deal anytime soon do you still or do you view the deputies yen as a safe haven in and around these talks that's historically been one of its attributes is that still the case in your mind i think it's it's a bit of a misnomer but i think what's really important about the japanese yen is if you have to think about the capital flows and if you think about avonex and quantitative easing and all the things that's happened in japan japan has the world's largest excess savings which for many years now has been deployed in the rest of the world equity market and also fixed income so what what really drives the yen on risk off is it's really the japanese bringing their money home so the fact that when when markets turn a bit sour and global equities have a lot of all tila ty- the japanese on strengthening because the yen flows are coming back into japan mccormick my wager is they say in england on the red sox let's painful right now i need to make some money back quick mark can you trade off asaka can you try Trade-off g twenty. i don't think so i think the problem is especially speaking with a lot of clients last especially the last couple of months is everyone kinda looks at a lot of these events is binary and even if we think about brexit and some of the other things that are kind of overhanging it's no one that we really kind of speak with that has investment thesis is really kind of comfortable deploying risk into vents you know they're tradeable we have trades of the week and and other ways we like to think about tactical trades but i think for some of the broader money managers these aren't becoming risks that there's just too much uncertainty and binary risks are just too hard to trade becomes a bit more of a gamble can we see big figure moves or is it more of a grind pair to pair i think we're getting to a point where we're going to start seeing big figure moves i think the last time i was on we talked about the outlook for the broad dollar and i think what we've seen the past couple of weeks is really reinforces that there's a top in the broad dollar and things that we had focused on earlier in the year was kind of return to the carry trade dollar that was weaker against emerging markets on reach for yield and i think what we're seeing now over the past couple of weeks is a major pivot not just for merging markets for the broad dollar but for the euro to start to strengthen for the yen to strengthen and for the the broad feds trade dollar to finally turn and start to re rekindle that bears trying to was on before it was disrupted last year so it's interesting mark so about the euro in particular to seems that the economic uncertainty in and around europe particularly southern europe persists what can euro do right here so i think you want to say about the euro kinda like this it's it's kind of an asset that's got a tremendous amount of bad news parts priced in it's especially on the u._s. dollar side of it it's the dollar seems to no longer responding well to i guess you would call it good news and i think the thing with the euro that's really important is that there's really not much more easy can do to try to weaken the euro they could try to cut rates that they have to have a tearing system but we're also dealing with the central banker who's a bit of a lame duck and i think in the in the second half of the year we'll know who the who's going to replace druggy but i think the important thing for the euro is the economy is is stabilizing it's no longer decelerating there's tremendous amount of bad news priced in our positioning evaluation models show that the market is extremely short euro and we showed that the euro's relatively cheap on a medium-term basis and i think what you're seeing if there's a broad base broad based anti u._s. dollar trade which i didn't this is why people are focusing on gold the euro along with the end become two very strong forms of reserve currencies that are that are also dollar traits well then let's pull that in your advantage at t._d. securities by your work with preah misery and if you fulled in her fixed income call with your foreign-exchange mix what does this signal for yield and particularly full faith and credit yield yeah it's a great question so what it is is it's the start of a fed easing cycle that extends into into next year and i think what you get is the fed essentially cutting rates if you think about where the u._s. ten year real rate is about thirty three basis points right now where's it going to be in a year it could be it could be back to close to zero but then why do we need that if we have cleared a solid economy well i think if you kind of look at the path of the yield curve what you're getting is is central banks are seems to be their cushioning for the potential downside that would manifest if the trade wars were to escalate and so i think what the yield curve in in the fixed income markets telling us that the central banks are taking out insurance but then what is good enough to to stabilize the economy where where central banks start to normalize and the next eighteen months or so so i think what what's really important is that we're kind of on the precipice right now especially with trade wars that the global economy could could get shifted into a negative feedback loop i would central banks are trying to do is stave off that worst case scenario and if they can do that then they can get that relation and so you know i think that's the impact where it's you know we think about the lags in acts of monetary policy this could kind of help cushion a slowdown as we move into twenty twenty record things t._d.

Global Head Mark Mccormack Eighteen Months Ten Year
"ristic" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"ristic" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"This is not an easy time because, like, if you're not the woke woke that ever walked in you miss you miss say something, or you say something that's out of bounds of like what the political world is is talking about the net shucks. You write down doesn't allow you to actually grow in learn. So this is where the communication in the feedback those feedback loops are super important. And I think that social media in a way that the media self portrays itself is, is, it's shutting down the true conversation that needs to happen, so that we can solve for some of these bigger bigger problems. It's really cool because you've got a lot of space in there. You've got a strong point of view, and you've got a lot of space about the messy part of change. And you're saying, listen, okay, people are gonna screw up, there are by sees that we all have in where you're challenging people to take a look at where those biases came from and, you know, in, in the field of psychology. Were even taught that are Bisi show up in the room like one on one with a person in we call it transference and counter transference, but they are bias in that transference is the client reminds me of somebody, and then I've got a whole history with that because we're trying to do this thing, culture, Ristic's, which are shortcuts to survival. So we make snap decisions for survival. It doesn't mean they're accurate because like the person sitting across the chairs completely new, but the frame that I've had from that person from my whatever number of years is something that is in place, and it's established based on the perfume that they wore the Cologne that they wore what they said they liked me. Did they not like me, you know, maybe it looks like my uncle that was great to me or my uncle that was a jerk to me all of those buys these are taking place and they've been informed by the institutions. They've been informed by experiences and they're real. And so. I love that. You brought up something that I've witnessed that's taking place is. And I, I don't know if it's wrong, but it is taking place that white men are going to say. So I'm going to avoid it. I'm sure do I open the door. Not open the door literally sometimes because why would you open the door for me? I can get my own door buddy. Right. Or like literally opened the door like the conversation. It super tricky and don't want to screw up and be a jerk, you know, and so- sensitivity is I think where you're agitating for. And here's the here's the easy question, whether it's feminism or something else. Do you believe that men and women deserve equal rights? Yeah. We'll opportunities. Right. Yeah. So if the answer's yes, then you're on the same page, like four humanity to win. You know, you believe do you does somebody really opposed the idea that every. In being on the planet deserves equal rights. Well, I shouldn't there a lot of people on the planet, you know, there's these things called, genocide that have happened throughout the human history of humanity's. They're bad people in this world. Yeah. And listen, I think that we have to actually figure out what the next step is for men out there who. Are, are experiencing some fear right now around interacting in any way with women will. What once was okay is no longer. Okay. And how do I know what is right? And what is wrong? I think that one really good thing to kind of hang your hat on is to just mind your own body. For so many centuries. Women's bodies have been sexualize end subjected to ownership of men. Right. I mean, think about marriage from, like a very level like marriage in it was a financial gain it was like a way to, to, to, to, to get land in to own a person into to, to have a person who could create other human beings..

Bisi Ristic
"ristic" Discussed on Founders Talk

Founders Talk

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"ristic" Discussed on Founders Talk

"But I mean, it's really fascinating the way that the air. You know, I look back over a pitch to eggs from their seed round in there. Just like some of them were like well. Yeah. That is still a good idea. We're still planning on doing. When yet in other ones are just so laughably bad. I'm like, why did why did anybody think that was a good idea? But the thing about raising seed money is like you're really trying to convince investors of a couple of things like you're not trying to convince them that you are a profitable company, right or that they need to like that's kind of more the growth phase. It's much later. Face kind of approach what you're trying to convince him of is that this is a real problem. This is a a legitimate approach to that problem. And I am a person who can figure out what the solution to that problem is going to look like, regardless of of, you know, you're almost like trying to just sort of sell the positioning of the founders rather than the particular solution because any seed venture firm is going to know that whatever thing you're pitching right now, you're going to change it four or five times before you achieve product market fit. So from their point of view, it's like do I think this is a legit thing. And do I is this a space. We want to be in. Right. So what that also means is like, what's. In your and this is I don't know people. This is a controversial opinion a lot of people probably disagree. But I sort of think like what's in your pitch deck almost just doesn't matter. Right. It's like the main thing you're pitching is just here's a big thing. I know about it. You should give me a lot of money. That's that's basically it you need to have the pitch deck because it's it's part of the whole ceremony of it. But like the products that are included in there, or the approaches that include are like everybody knows that you've actually thought that the problem, and you have some indications of how you might go about generating revenue, basically, right, right? But I mean, it's kind of like, I don't know like any any VC who really nitpicks your model? That's in your pitch deck. Proceed funded company is like they're just being an they've already they've already decided. No, right. They're just kind of trying to justify that. So there were a handful of people who handful of people we talked to who just completely laughed us out of out of the room or were just jerks, like really, I don't know the some some some some people in the VC community are not nice. Most of them are very very friendly though. I think most of the people we talked to where we're at least extremely professional. The biggest thing I got was you know, there were some like there's some folks just kind of don't. Get how to make open source of business. And they think like how do you build a business around open source is a single problem? And in reality, that's like saying, how do you build a business around software like, well, there's, you know, eight thousand different ways and any of them can feel can fail or succeed in a million possible outcome, so like there is really no one way to make a business in open source. And so occasionally there'd be investors who we talked to because they'd invested in a handful of other like, quote, unquote, open source companies. But when we talked to them they'd be like, well, you don't have the node contributors on your team. So how can this ever succeed? It's like, well, I have the entire PM contributor based on my team because that's me pretty much, and this isn't just for node. And why would I need that? You know? But it's sort of a people get people get assumptions in their head. And then they, and you know, probably that Ristic served that investor pretty well. You know, if you try to go and create a start up around node, and you didn't have the backing of the node core Dev team like you'd have a really hard time. Right. You're you're coming in sort of as an outsider to this open source community in the case of mpm. That's just not the shape of the situation..

Ristic
"ristic" Discussed on Data Skeptic

Data Skeptic

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"ristic" Discussed on Data Skeptic

"Can you share your thoughts on a help people incorporate new information from a business perspective? Rubasinghe perspective shore. And when thing to say about that is the base basis theorem. Beijing process. It's more of Ristic. I mean, I'm sure you know that social scientists, psychologists in particular, have documented myriad ways in which people's information processing diverts from Beijing. But if you start with Beijing model, then you can pretty much understand just about any one of the defects in people's ordinary reasoning. If you compare how it doesn't fit with Beijing. I'm so forbe's here. I would just use the most basic understanding that when people get new information, they update their existing beliefs in proportion to how much more consistent. The new information is with one potential belief versus another right? How much more consistent it is. That's the likelihood ratio amazes right one one rendering basis is that prior odds times the like ratio equals the posterior odds in our where we focus on how people's group commitments generate conflicts among them over. The likelihood ratio or how much weight to give to the evidence. So people might see one in the Saint piece of evidence on, but give it different weight depending on what they think the outcome is that evidence supports, but this doesn't just affect science. We've done studies where people sense impressions will participate in this kind of pattern by to tell people that have the subjects that protests is at an abortion clinic in that the protesters are disagreeing with Roe v Wade and the other half of the protesters at a military recruitment center by people who don't approve of the former policy that excluded openly gay and lesbian people from the military and people with different values will disagree about whether some of the protesters are blocking into a building or hitting people with their signs and so forth. It all depends on what we tell them. The protest is about in how that corresponds with their values. You really see this line of motivated drive in how people process information when it comes to science, it's the same thing. People are. Looking at the cues that normally tell them what science knows and they're construing it knits by fashion. Make sense. It makes sense also helps us to see that. Although this dynamic affect science in a really profound way and threatens to prevent enlightened self government, it's not just a, it's not a process that rises in our assessment of science per se on this kind of dynamic happen in any kind of setting where people relying on actual information. Tell me more about that to me. I mean, facts and science. They might be technically different, but I think of them as both sources of truth. In what way do they differ? Well, that the example of the study I just gave you call. They saw protests the people weren't disagreeing about facts, but science will have much to say about whether a protest your block, somebody going into a building, people just form different impressions of what they were interpreting seeing on film. Those same groups are the ones that are disagreeing about climate change. I'm a what science says about the safety of nuclear power of west science. About the episode of HP vaccine. If you see that in fact, this process isn't unique to science. You're in a better position. I think to remedy if people even outside of the mains of science or disagreeing about facts, including the Wednesday taken with their own sense, impression, that's unlikely that the solution to the problem is to change, how do science or how it communicates Heinz. Listeners, are there any of you who haven't yet checked out brilliant dot org, if so, you gotta get over there, brilliant dot org, math and science done, right. You can use that site to help you master key ideas in math science, computer science, and a lot of other professional topics. So what is brilliant was not boring lectures..

Beijing Wade Ristic forbe Heinz HP Roe
"ristic" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

03:33 min | 2 years ago

"ristic" Discussed on Venture Stories

"So even if you thought that even if you found out that there was not predictive nece on these things, I think it's it's just super useful habit in practice to that. You know, I wish was way less friction in general because you know, I've injured, you always kind of lie to yourself afterwards of what you actually think anything of how you actually talked about beforehand. And so in general, I think that there is a lot of value to be had in kind of having the accountability of of actually making predictions in being able to to go back and see. And I've always thought that like that in general is a thing that would be great, just general cultural norm among. Of people they all just actually made projections. Right. And then in back in actually looked at what those were in kind of repack of their decision making off of that, that of course, doesn't actually require prediction markets. Prediction markets are more about how do you scale that up and absent make it possible for for that to the way more kind of verifiable massively distributed. But I think that that, you know, perdition markets are super interesting because markets in everything is probably trends that for for a bunch of areas we actually probably crudity constrained, we don't realize. And so I think that, you know, I don't expect them to immediately take off because I think that it's actually very difficult to identify areas and industries that specifically have captured Ristic's where having prediction markets would would unblock them. I actually don't think that is necessarily every market. That that that launch a take work of t of very focused civic teams to figure out what are the areas where having something that allows you to bring increase liquidity are have kind of third parties is kind of ascertain what is actually the or it's important that you have third parties, ascertain what is what is actually the Christ. Our state of it is, is that is something that is absent pretty difficult to to find a for the same reason that you know, you know everyone trying to start Uber for x. companies kind of miss that e dynamics of those industries weren't the same as Uber, right, or ridesharing where you kind of had this dynamic where it was liquidity constraints because there was actually a specialized knowledge required to be driver and and it was really in Google maps in in ways that that unlocked unlawful the quantity on that. And the question is, what are those areas of all level where prediction markets. Unlock the liquidity on it. I think it's a challenge, but I think that you know the idea that we have hit the limits of all things that should have markets on them is probably crazy. Reich has be some few today in a world, talk markets and everything. Where would you worry in terms of market failures or something? I think that we need solve market failures which is more market in others thing. No, actually in something inherently. Yep, yeah. And, yeah, I mean, I think that you know the more you quit buckets or more specifically, I guess, or more generally, I guess I'd saved the more you centralize things. It introduces a different class of respect. There's and I think you know, we are currently seeing this, you know, not just in our financial markets. We're also seeing this in in our SAFA pathogens. Right..

Ristic Reich
Swiss Students Design 250-Mile Range E-Bike

Your Weekly Tech Update

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Swiss Students Design 250-Mile Range E-Bike

"Zayed's could become a thing of the past. Thanks to ethic a bike with the face. We of mother could love electric motorcycles are becoming a bigger and bigger part of the global motorcycle market. The silent revolution of the battery powered motor with all the models becoming available. We can choose between a standard looking e bike that hides its true nature or a future Ristic design that screams high ride on zero emissions. The common challenge all these models still face though is the lack of range that could be about to

Phillip Island Victoria Australia
Swiss Students Design 250-Mile Range E-Bike

Your Weekly Tech Update

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Swiss Students Design 250-Mile Range E-Bike

"Zayed's Zayed's could could become become a a thing thing of of the the past. past. Thanks Thanks to to ethic ethic a a bike bike with with the the face. face. We We of of mother mother could could love love electric electric motorcycles motorcycles are are becoming becoming a a bigger bigger and and bigger bigger part part of of the the global global motorcycle motorcycle market. market. The The silent silent revolution revolution of of the the battery battery powered powered motor motor with with all all the the models models becoming becoming available. available. We We can can choose choose between between a a standard standard looking looking e e bike bike that that hides hides its its true true nature nature or or a a future future Ristic Ristic design design that that screams screams high high ride ride on on zero zero emissions. emissions. The The common common challenge challenge all all these these models models still still face face though though is is the the lack lack of of range range that that could could be be about about to to to source source change. However, it's difficult to increase the range on an electric motorcycle to achieve that you need a bigger battery capable of storing, more energy, bigger battery means bigger frame and easy equation that results in a bulky, electric power train. At this point you might as well throw in a few. Hugh more wheels for balance, steering wheel for good measure and call it now. I don't know a car, a group of engineering students from the university of Zurich in Switzerland has actually managed to produce a one off. Motorcycle with a staggering electric range of two hundred and fifty miles. In addition to the range, the bike has a built in quick charge system that can top off its battery in about an hour. The prototype was designed for a school project that challenged the fourteen students to experience all the steps of product development. The result is the all electric ethic. The design is pretty brutal, but it serves its purpose. The mono body unit is a quipped with a massive, lithium ion fifteen kilowatt hour battery. The group explains that the front wheel, braking, dissipate seventy five percent of the energy. So it addressed this reality by adding a front wheel hub motor that will recall. Operate the energy that's dissipated despite its minimalistic look and it's a labyrinth technology. The ethic does retain more classical motorcycle elements, including a lightweight to frame a proper swing arm and a trapezoidal fork out the front of it. Obviously, at this point, there is no talk of production, but the students in Genuity could definitely find some real world applications after all would be easy to market at electric. Motorcycle with the two hundred and fifty mile range, which is more than most gasoline models can travel right now. Hopefully we'll get to see this idea make its way to production. Just please let a design student have a go at it as well. Hyperloop transport faces, many, many hurdles, but until now, how cows can cross the track hasn't really been one of them, but that's going to change as Canadian company. Trans pod sets up its testing facility in a village deep in the French countryside. The current record for high-speed t GV trains could be shattered in the tiny commune of drove in central France. Last week. The company applied for planning permission, which it expects to be granted sometime this year. Hyperloop technology much publicized by Ilan. Musk's enthusiasm involves putting passengers or goods in capsules, which are then projected through depressurized tubes at up to twelve hundred kilometers an hour in their search for the perfect test zone. Transplants researchers hit on the Perez to Lou corridor, which. Has no high speed rail line, but they identified eight, three kilometers stretch of an old now, disused railway passing through farmland transplants, founder and chief executive told, euro news that the project has the backing of both residents and local authorities, but admits they've had to build some quirky demands into their planning application. For example, a farmer who has land on either side of the line wanted them to develop a pathway for animals as little. As you're ago Gendron the founder said that he doubted that anyone in Europe would want to invest in hyperloop technology. Now, investors have committed sixty five million euros transport. Also plans to build a research and development center in southern Italy got some spare time this weekend. Why not build yourself a working Rover from plants provided by NASA, the space Knicks at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory have all the plans. Code and materials for you to pursue and use. Just make sure you've got an extra twenty five hundred bucks and a bit of engineering know how this thing isn't made out of Lincoln logs. The story is this after curiosity landed on Mars, GPO wanted to create something a little smaller and less complex that it could use for educational purposes. So they created rove e. That's what they're calling it anyway. Traveled with GPL staff throughout the country and showed off what it was capable of unsurprisingly. Among the many questions asked was often whether a class group could actually built one of their very own. The answer unfortunately was no though far less expensive and complex than a real Mars Rover. Roe v was still too expensive and complex to be a class project. So GPL engineers decided to go back to the drawing board and build one that was less. Expensive. The result is the JPL open source Rover may set of plans that mimic the key components of curiosity, but are simpler and use off the shelf components. The OS are uses curiosity like suspension corner, steering and pivot differential, allowing movement over rough terrain and the brain is a raspberry pi. You can find all the parts in the usual supply catalogs in hardware stores, but you'll also need a set of basic tools of bandsaw to to cut change. metal. However, Drill press it's difficult is probably to increase a good idea the to range on soldering an electric iron motorcycle snips wrenches. to achieve And so that on you need researchers a bigger said battery in capable our experience, of storing, more this energy, project takes bigger no battery less than means two bigger hundred frame person and hours to build easy equation depending that results on in the skill a bulky, of electric those involved power train. could be At significantly this point you might more. as well throw So in basically, a few. Hugh unless more wheels you're literally for balance, a rocket steering scientist wheel for good measure expected and double call it that now. time, I don't know although a car, GPO notes a that group they did of engineering work students with schools from to the adjust university the. Building of Zurich process in Switzerland and instructions. has actually There was managed flexibility to produce a built one into off. the plains Motorcycle too, with so a you staggering can load customer ops, electric connect range payloads of and two sensors hundred and fifty all to miles. the brain In and addition modified to the range, the mechanics. the bike However you'd has like a built it's in open quick source source charge after system all. So that can top make off it your its own battery for more in information about an hour. head on over The to prototype open was source designed for Rover, a school project dot that GPL, challenged the fourteen dot NASA, students to experience dot gov. all the Amazon steps of recently product announced development. in a blog post that Alexa The result enabled security is the cameras all electric for ring ethic. are low and The August design along with Amazon's is pretty own brutal, cloud, but Cam it serves indoor its security purpose. camera. The mono Now body work unit is a with quipped with a massive, the Amazon lithium camera. ion fifteen Recap kilowatt API. hour battery. This new The API group explains should make that it the possible front for wheel, you to braking, view a dissipate recorded seventy clip five with percent the phrase, of the energy. Alexa So it addressed show the this event that reality just happened by adding at the a front front door wheel hub or motor the back that door will or recall. whatever Operate you named the these energy specific camera that's that dissipated you want to check out. despite The Alexis its minimalistic go works on the look Amazon and it's echo, a labyrinth show technology. the echo spot, The ethic the fire does TV, retain more and. classical Fire tablets. motorcycle You elements, can't currently including ask a Alexa lightweight to to show frame an event from a proper specific swing time, arm and a but trapezoidal you know, it's fork just a matter of out time the front of previously. it. Obviously, You could only at this say point, things there is like no Alexa, talk of pull production, up the front but door the students life feed in Genuity to see what could was happening definitely in real find time, some real but world you couldn't applications actually view saved after clips. all would This be feature easy to market is currently at electric. only available Motorcycle in the US, with the two but hundred it will and fifty be expanding mile range, to other which countries is more very than most soon gasoline tricking models through a crowded can travel right cavernous. now. Hopefully WalMart we'll get supercenter to see this idea really make its isn't way to much production. fun, Just please but what if you could let do it a design from the comfort student of your own have home a go at through it as virtual well. reality, the world's biggest retailer wants to find out Hyperloop according transport to filings faces, with the US many, patent many and trademark hurdles, but office. until now, The company how has applied cows for two can patents cross that the detail track a virtual hasn't really showroom been one of and them, fulfillment but that's going center to change that as Canadian would company. connect Trans shoppers pod clad sets in VR up headsets its testing and facility censor packed in a village gloves deep to in a three the French dimensional countryside. representation The current record of a for WalMart. high-speed Store t GV customers could trains wander could digital be shattered aisles in from the home tiny and commune grab items, of which drove would be immediately in picked central up and France. shipped from Last a fully week. automated The company distribution applied for center. planning permission, The filing which is it part expects of WalMart's to recent be granted push into sometime virtual reality this year. and Hyperloop area that holds technology promise for brick much and mortar publicized retailers by Ilan. struggling Musk's enthusiasm with the massive involves costs putting associated passengers or with goods store in upkeep capsules, and labor. which are then projected This could be through a godsend depressurized in tubes February at the retailer up to twelve acquired hundred spatial kilometers an land hour a startup in their search that for makes the perfect software test tools zone. to create Transplants virtual reality researchers experiences. hit on the Spatial Perez land is housed to Lou inside walmarts corridor, in house which. tech Has no incubator high speed rail store line, number but eight, they which identified last year eight, hosted three kilometers a v. stretch commerce of an old gala now, in disused Los Angeles, railway Agadi passing affair by through WalMart farmland standards that transplants, celebrated founder the five and Witters chief executive of told, WalMart euro news competitions that the project to find has the the best backing ideas of both residents in the space. and local WalMart authorities, but is admits moving aggressively they've had to build into the some digital quirky realm demands at the same into time that their Amazon planning application. and other technology. For example, He companies a farmer are who has looking land to establish on either a side brick of the line and mortar wanted presence. them to develop Amazon a pathway acquired whole for foods animals market last year as and is little. also As you're opening ago Gendron cashier the 'less founder stores. said that he While doubted Google that is anyone planning a in retail Europe flagship would store want to invest in Chicago. in hyperloop technology. WalMart has filed Now, more than investors a dozen have committed virtual sixty reality five patents. million But euros it's focus has shifted transport. from Also using plans VR to build for a internal research and business, development say center virtual in southern conference Italy calls got to some more spare time external this weekend. shopper Why not focused build applications. yourself a working Rover from plants provided by NASA, You used the any of space the portable Knicks at bluetooth the Jet Propulsion speakers Laboratory on the market? have all A have gone the plans. through several Code over and the years materials myself, for but you they all left to me pursue fairly unimpressed and use. with both be sound Just make sure and you've their got battery an extra life. twenty I've five hundred had all bucks portable bluetooth and a speakers bit of in engineering the same category. know how It's a great this way thing to share isn't your made music out of on Lincoln the go, logs. but The they're story only slightly is this better than after the mono curiosity speaker phone landed on on most Mars, smartphones. GPO wanted Now to create something I'm revising a that little thought smaller in recommending and less the complex j. b. l. that it could flip use for Ford. educational Not purposes. only does this compact So they created portable rove bluetooth speakers e. sound That's also, what they're calling it anyway. but it has Traveled a rock with in battery GPL life staff that throughout seems the to country keep getting better and showed with off testing what it was capable on top of of that. unsurprisingly. It's completely Among waterproof the many questions and I asked don't mean was often water resistant. whether a class No, group I'm talking could actually dunk. Your built head underwater, one of their sit very there own. with a snorkel The and answer submerge unfortunately your speaker to was enjoy no all your favorite though music far is less heard expensive by and dolphins complex waterproof. than a real Mars This Rover. thing is Roe absolutely v was still too expensive incr-. Credible. and complex I to was be a a class radio project. engineer for several So years GPL and win. engineers I decided needed speakers. to go back I to always the drawing turn board to JBL. and build one Their that sound was is always less. Expensive. exceptional with The base. result You is can the JPL feel open even source in their smallest Rover monitor may speakers set of plans for studios. that mimic the The key components flip four of curiosity, holds true but to are simpler the JBL sound and use off even the with shelf its microscopic components. size. The OS It's are uses smaller curiosity than your insulated like suspension coffee corner, mug, steering but weighs and in pivot at one point, differential, one pounds. allowing movement It has over a rough three terrain thousand middle amp and hour battery the brain that JBL is a raspberry says, can last pi. for twelve You hours. can find all the parts Now in intesting the usual supply I catalogs was able to use in hardware it for thirteen stores, but to fifteen you'll also need hours a depending set of basic on how tools loud of it was. bandsaw to And cut the metal. performance Drill seemed press to get a is little probably better. a good Each idea time to I recharge the soldering device with iron the snips first wrenches. test going And so just twelve on and a researchers half hours said thirteen in our experience, on the second this project and takes fifteen no less on than the two third. hundred person Now, it's very hours hard to to test build a speaker at full depending volume on the skill with of those involved for twelve hours, could especially be significantly when you're married more. and have the So kid. basically, But unless I would. -magine you're literally if you did a rocket play the scientist flip four at expected full volume double that time, that it would actually although last, GPO it's notes twelve that hours they specified. did work with schools The flip to four adjust can connect the. Building to process two devices and instructions. at once allowing you There to take was flexibility turns playing music built into from the plains each other's too, phones, so you can or load customer ops, you could even connect fight payloads over the speaker and sensors for supremacy. all to the brain and modified the mechanics. However you'd like world. world. it's open after all. So make it your I'm own for more information head on over to open source Rover, dot GPL, dot NASA, dot gov. Amazon recently announced in a blog post that Alexa enabled security cameras for ring are low and August along with Amazon's own cloud, Cam indoor security camera. Now work with the Amazon camera. Recap API. This new API should make it possible for you to view a recorded clip with the phrase, Alexa show the event that just happened at the front door or the back door or whatever you named these specific camera that you want to check out. The Alexis go works on the Amazon echo, show the echo spot, the fire TV, and. Fire tablets. You can't currently ask Alexa to show an event from specific time, but you know, it's just a matter of time previously. You could only say things like Alexa, pull up the front door life feed to see what was happening in real time, but you couldn't actually view saved clips. This feature is currently only available in the US, but it will be expanding to other countries very soon tricking through a crowded cavernous. WalMart supercenter really isn't much fun, but what if you could do it from the comfort of your own home through virtual reality, the world's biggest retailer wants to find out according to filings with the US patent and trademark office. The company has applied for two patents that detail a virtual showroom and fulfillment center that would connect shoppers clad in VR headsets and censor packed gloves to a three dimensional representation of a WalMart. Store customers could wander digital aisles from home and grab items, which would be immediately picked up and shipped from a fully automated distribution center. The filing is part of WalMart's recent push into virtual reality and area that holds promise for brick and mortar retailers struggling with the massive costs associated with store upkeep and labor. This could be a godsend in February the retailer acquired spatial land a startup that makes software tools to create virtual reality experiences. Spatial land is housed inside walmarts in house tech incubator store number eight, which last year hosted a v. commerce gala in Los Angeles, Agadi affair by WalMart standards that celebrated the five Witters of WalMart competitions to find the best ideas in the space. WalMart is moving aggressively into the digital realm at the same time that Amazon and other technology. He companies are looking to establish a brick and mortar presence. Amazon acquired whole foods market last year and is also opening cashier 'less stores. While Google is planning a retail flagship store in Chicago. WalMart has filed more than a dozen virtual reality patents. But it's focus has shifted from using VR for internal business, say virtual conference calls to more external shopper focused applications. You used any of the portable bluetooth speakers on the market? A have gone through several over the years myself, but they all left me fairly unimpressed with both be sound and their battery life. I've had all portable bluetooth speakers in the same category. It's a great way to share your music on the go, but they're only slightly better than the mono speaker phone on most smartphones. Now I'm revising that thought in recommending the j. b. l. flip Ford. Not only does this compact portable bluetooth speakers sound also, but it has a rock in battery life that seems to keep getting better with testing on top of that. It's completely waterproof and I don't mean water resistant. No, I'm talking dunk. Your head underwater, sit there with a snorkel and submerge your speaker to enjoy all your favorite music is heard by dolphins waterproof. This thing is absolutely incr-. Credible. I was a radio engineer for several years and win. I needed speakers. I always turn to JBL. Their sound is always exceptional with base. You can feel even in their smallest monitor speakers for studios. The flip four holds true to the JBL sound even with its microscopic size. It's smaller than your insulated coffee mug, but weighs in at one point, one pounds. It has a three thousand middle amp hour battery that JBL says, can last for twelve hours. Now intesting I was able to use it for thirteen to fifteen hours depending on how loud it was. And the performance seemed to get a little better. Each time I recharge the device with the first test going just twelve and a half hours thirteen on the second and fifteen on the third. Now, it's very hard to test a speaker at full volume with for twelve hours, especially when you're married and have the kid. But I would. -magine if you did play the flip four at full volume that it would actually last, it's twelve hours specified. world. world. The the Hi recent flip everyone. four Farnborough can connect There's airshow an to old two saying 2018, devices that aerospace luck at happens once engineers allowing when from Your Your preparation you to Britain's weekly weekly take turns university tech tech update playing update meets of music central brought brought from to to opportunity you you by each by land other's holiday holiday phones, casher homes homes here, here, and or there's no Phillip Phillip presented better island, island, example you could what even Victoria, Victoria, of they fight that than over stayed twenty the Australia. Australia. speaker sixteen is for discovery the supremacy. world's It's It's first at your your the turn turn university graphene to to relax relax of California skinned before before aircraft Irvine you you get get on on by holiday holiday doctoral on on known student. the the island island as the Maya contact contact Juneau the Li holiday holiday three point home home fi five I'm care. care. meter wide We We after can can unmanned set set I'm playing up up around your your residents residents plane in the lab, or or could she made holiday holiday be a a sign discovery rental rental of things that do do could to the the come shopping shopping lead for for to developed you you a provide provide rechargeable in partnership linen linen battery and and towels towels with the and and Sheffield, that mature. mature. could It's It's last already already advanced up manufacturing by by to the the four time time hundred we we get get research years here here giving giving centre, that you you more more means time time longer-lasting the university to to enjoy enjoy of Manchester's laptops what what Phillip Phillip national and island island smartphones, has has graphing and to to fewer offer offer institute. lithium for for more more information, information, ion And batteries hi, visit visit Dale piling graphing the the holiday holiday up industries, care care in landfills. PI PI judo dot dot additionally, A team com com of researchers features or or at Email Email UCI graphing holiday holiday based had batteries home home been here here experimenting p. p. I I and three with d. Nanno printed g. g. components. wires Banff Banff for dot dot potential com. com. It's

Phillip Island Victoria Australia
Baby survives birth in Burger King restroom as mom OD'd on heroin, police say

Morning Show with Sean and Frank

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

Baby survives birth in Burger King restroom as mom OD'd on heroin, police say

"Their, customers wedding and engagement rings. For weddings engagement parties, and bachelorette parties as well. So the engagement cookie Mike become, a new thing unlike. When, Chuck was getting engaged The bride, usually we're left with crumbs. Not cookies nice that's, a whole nother references in. The first hour and a half These stories pop up. I. Can't control that yeah I know what's going to pop up right This is the news cycle This. Is a fake news cycle We have again

Mcdonald Chuck Heroin United States Ohio Ristic Mcdonald Mcdonalds Mike Chicago Chillicothe
"ristic" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"ristic" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"You know to people who come from different backgrounds who are different generations one's older one's younger they're different races the different genders just living your life being who you are will lead you to develop different perspectives the other half of cognitive diversity is it's called here sticks which is basically a fancy way of saying how you approach problem solving so the way that you've grown up and all of these things i just talked about can lead you to having different strategies for protein problems or just how you're trained where you go to school if we went to school for the same subject but in different places we might have developed different sets of sticks or skills to press problems snow says a perfect example of here ristic's put into action can be seen on our police forces specifically he says shows itself in police partnerships between a man and a woman studied cops when you have a male cop and a female cop and you give them both the same problem of getting through a locked door it's more likely that a male cop not always but it's more likely that a male couple try and force the door open kick it down but it's more likely that a female cop will try and figure out who has the key compromise that person and the reason this is more likely because if you grow up with less upper body strength than your peers you know in school and in college and the police academy then you realize that your strategy for getting through a locked door or getting through anything that requires strength that might actually be to go around and find a different way to do it which is why police partnerships that have men and women in the partnership tend to do better at problem solving because they bring different sets of strategies just naturally from how they grew up.

ristic
"ristic" Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

Therapy for Black Girls

12:07 min | 3 years ago

"ristic" Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

"The care to Ristic's related to super woman complex, you mentioned the idea that it causes us to have issues with help seeking behavior and I own about, you know, like my experience has been that black women tend to want other black women therapist. You know, most of the time it feels like at least it might experience. But my new feel like there is some difficulty when you are working with another black woman therapist who you presume has to gather that it feels like it. It makes it more difficult maybe for you to step into a more emotional space to admit that you're struggling because of his knees kind of have this presentation. You know what? I think that that's highly possible Dr. joy. And to that, what I would say is then that would be a challenge, not for that woman who comes in and sits in that chair, but more so a challenge or the black female thera. Pitch to have the awareness because I think that that's part of the cultural competency piece that we're all challenged in charge the half, the be to have the feel. I think we need to understand that about the client that is sitting in front of us, and then we have to be the one to take charge and know how can I make that okay for her. And so I can tell you that for me in my therapy or my therapeutic orientation, it's very important that my clients understand straight away. That one, I'm not your girlfriend even though we may have that connection, and we may be able to speak a certain way and we may be able to use references that each of us get just from a cultural place because we are culturally similar, but I also want them to know that I am not the expert in their lives that they are, and I'm just here to reflect back to them their journey as they understand it or even to help them under stand it in a different way. And most importantly, I want them to understand at all the time that I. I am human just like them. And to that, I walked until my clients and they will tell you back as they are out in the streets and other people, or they refer people to me and they'll say, you know, one of the things that someone told me she said that you do not play about putting you up on the pedestal, and I would tell them immediately. No, no, no. Because let me tell you do not look at me and think that you know what my life is about. I have no problem sharing my struggle with you over the years. If I think that that would be therapeutically appropriate, and there would be some value to that. But if for even a single second, I think that you were using me as you're measuring sick, then I will not only point out the pedestal that I'm concerned that you're placing meal and, but I will jump off head I and I will not only I will not only do that to break the idea of perfection for you, but also to show you that I can take that leap and still survive, and the world has. Hasn't fallen off of its access. So I will do it to be a model to you to be a mirror to you to show you what is possible when you shake off that cake yen. It feels like that's where some really good work can happen, right? Like through that bow, your earning, that they can see this risk and it's still very is yes. I'd be like, oh, it's getting good now getting into your growth, we on the net. Now we're in the journey now that you put your shoes back on because they the real deal is I can never tell you what your journey is like. And it's not for me to judge your journey because I will never ever be able to walk a single mile in your shoes. And so it is not for me to judge your journey. It is not for me to assess where you should be in your journey. How can I do that with something that I can't experience in the same way that you will never be able to do the same in my life? And so a plus B always equals C in your own life. If. If you look at your a and you look at your be, it is no wonder that you are at sea, right? Where you are sitting now and it's all about helping you to unpack the journey. So once you understand are able to make those connections, you then become empowered and in control of where C D. And E take you. And that's really what it's all about. Yeah, like this, fear it so would would you suggest to people who may be listening to this episode in there? Like, oh, my goodness, I do recognize this MSF I feel like this may be struggle with what kinds of tips are strategies might you have for people who think that this may be an issue for them? Well, you know, I always say, and this is just my biases therapist, their appeals, they are and more therapy. I believe that it is imperative that at some point in your journey and really to be quite Frank with you, multiple joints coins in your journey that you would give yourself a gift of therapy. And getting on somebody's couch because we all deserve, and we all can benefit from the idea of sitting with somebody who is trained to help guide us any place and in a way where they are as objective, a person as I am ever going to be, they are not invested in my situation at all. So they have no stake in this. You know, I love. So my clients, I have no horse in your race. I'm not betting one way or the other. I know nothing about anybody else. This is just about your individual performance for where you are now where you're trying to go and how do you connect those dots. And so I would say that there appear gives you one of the best ways to absolutely be able to do that. But then you have to look at the other parts of that because they repeat for most people is just once twice, or you know, three or four times a month depending on how you set your therapeutic journey. But that is just a few minutes once a week, if you're lucky. Right? That means that you have six other days and twenty three other hours in the to have to engage in this journey with you as the leader without your therapists there to guide you or to support your walk us through. So you have to know how do I take time for myself? How do I, what do I mean to do to get this journey? Right. And so in addition to that, there are few -tic processing. You also have to think about eating right sleeping right moving, right. And you know, in the moving, right? I said, that's getting the exercise that you need, and that's also getting the rest that you need and we don't do the rest part well, and a lot of us aren't doing the exercise for well either. Let's just be real. And then even more importantly, sometimes than all of those things combine, we have to learn as black women, how to set limit how. To set limits, understanding that no is a complete sentence understanding that I do not have to be all things to everybody. And there will come times where I have to say no to my friends, no, to my family, no, to my job, no, to my church, even know to myself, I have to set boundaries so that I can be okay because the real deal is that everybody even pseudo superheroes need time to rest, rejuvenate recharge and replenish. And we have to find a way to strike that balance in our lives. Those a great tubes. So in addition to that, do you have any favorite resources related to this topic for people who may be wanna read more or feel like, okay, I want to do more work in this area, like any books or things that you enjoy. You know what? It. I don't really think that it's about books nowadays, unfortunately, because I think that everybody is reading something. It's so interesting. I come into a session and I have clients, especially since we're talking about this archetype and I, I want to be very clear because I want people to be like spirit. They don't read. What I am saying. Okay. But what I am saying is when you were dealing with a woman who thinks that she is a superwoman nine times out of ten Dr. joy, she has already gone above and beyond to research the mess out of what she thinks her situation is because remember, she doesn't need help. He's trying to figure it out on her own and she has the answer. So I'm more likely to see that woman come into the office and go, okay, I already know what's wrong with me. I think I know what my diagnosis is and you go, how is that possible that you could actually know that? And she goes, oh, well, you know, I looked on the websites and she'll name fifty million websites and I figured that out. I figured out that you know, with my parents on, sorry, that's my little bits waking up now that the of being the superhero. She says, listen, I think I already have figured out. And so what I say is don't try to put the pieces together simply show up with your pieces in hand and allow somebody else to help walk you through the journey in the same way as when you go to the salon and you're going to get a any petty, you don't sit there and you tell the woman. Okay, I, you're gonna put my feet in the water. Okay. Now you're gonna make the water this. Okay. Now it's time for you to take it out, right. We don't do that. You don't go to your favorite restaurant and say, okay, can you tell them that when they make my steak? I, I want them to set the temperature at three fifty. Then I want them to make sure that there's enough oil on on the on the grill. We don't do those kinds of things. We simply show up and say, I'm here to be a part of the experience. And so that's what I encourage all of the super women who are out there listening to this show right now. No. Knowing that they are cracking under the weight or knowing that their muscles are ready to give out or that they are simply exhausted. Stop trying to read about it, stop trying to study about it stopped trying to think that you have to have the answer, simply show up show up and allow somebody to help you even if nobody else ever gets to see. 'cause that's the beauty of therapy. It's the confidentiality just show up just show up. Nice, nice. So any news or events that you have going on coming up that you wanna share about the easiest way for people to stay abreast of what it is that I'm doing, and if they want more information about how to do those things in term contacted me or watching or listening simply come to my social media, I'm talking to spirit and that's talk the number two spirit. You can find me at talk to spirit on all of my social media, and I will always keep you. Rest about what's going on, not just in the month, not just in the week, but sometimes on the day. And more importantly, more importantly, if they think or they know that they need help or they just want to expand this conversation. One thing that I do know that I do each and every week without fail is free advice. Friday, they can come to my Facebook page every Friday at noon eastern standard time, and we do a live Facebook chat featuring beautiful, wonderful, gifted, talented, knowledgeable therapists from all over the country. The matter of fact, I think we've already seen you on the couch at least one stuff to about time to get you back. Okay, so they can definitely catch you for that. And I definitely would incur put tune in for that because those are great conversation. Yes, we always have a ball and more importantly, we have the opportunity to talk to people directly face to face, whether they'd like to remain anonymous or whether they could care less and they are there to get the information tools

Dr. joy Facebook Ristic Frank
"ristic" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"ristic" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Are pretty much identical as far as certain certain things about them certain care for ristic's uh all of us are constantly dating narcissist in that was based on a cycle in a pattern that was created by a family member for example may be your dad is a fool on narcissist in the way or your mother is a fullon narcissism the way that you had you get love in get attention even though it was unhealthy you got used to it in so when you meet uh you know somebody to date you end up falling into that category of finding another narcissists because you're used to having a jump through hoops to get love having you do various things that aren't normal for some people about for you are normal and nazi me is a negative pattern in our life okay it's a negative pattern and those are the things we have to break but in order to break those patters and those cycles we have to be aware of them we have to be aware of them and we have to be able to be selfaware enough to be able to look around us to say how did this begin how did i fall into this pattern of going after this particular type of person every time every time the relationship ends like x y z every time i'm hurts and i go back out i find another one of these and is based on the way we were raises based on our environment that we are accustomed to because no matter how unhealthy a situation is when we get used to it we begin to see that as normal and we begin to replicate that.

ristic
"ristic" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"ristic" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Are pretty much identical as far as certain certain things about them certain care for ristic's uh some of us are constantly dating narcissist in that was based on a cycle in a pattern that was created by a family member for example may be your dad is a fool on narcissist in the way or your mother is a full on narcissists in the way that you had you get love and get attention even though it was unhealthy you got used to it in so when you meet uh you know somebody to date you end up falling into that category of finding another narcissists because you're used to having a jump through hoops to get love having to do various things that aren't normal for some people about for you are normal and nazi me is a negative pattern in our life okay it's a negative pattern and those are the things we have to break but in order to break those patters and those cycles we have to be aware of them we have to be aware of them and we have to be able to be selfaware enough to be able to look around us to say how did this begin how did i fall into this pattern of going after this particular type of person every time every time the relationship ends like x y z every time i'm hurts i did i go back out i find another one of these and is based on the way we were raises based on armed virement that we are accustomed to because no matter how on a situation is when we get used to it we begin to see that as normal and we begin to.

ristic
"ristic" Discussed on About to Review

About to Review

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"ristic" Discussed on About to Review

"And as opposed the docked doc approach when he was like let me not take the regular humanoid at gary ristic's let me manufacturer something in a different way but we as humans even when we see something deeply alien legs than a morph in ailing right we still try to um you know make it okay well what would that we still use terms like circulatory system still use terms like oh it must have some whereas its heart we carbonbased life jahor which of course you know i so that's the kind of thing is weird china understands though santa isn't people go real radical with their design uhhuh it's like canadaled added we do with this this is like does it look like at the end of course that we if we if it won't work for human level go to the decks nearest animal ray and say oh well this is like a octopus um but with a skeletal system slow i thought they do it you know betsy then will try to kind of do that kind of stuff which is kind of i mean it's but that's all all of us go okay i don't know this thing is um but what's the next series thing yeah and can i hodge podge something together am i and my view at some point in that situation you would just be like how could if you just run you're the is already option to figure out with this thing growth right and then you just satellite well okay nope don't recognize it i'm out and i that's the guy i for for meet the as the funniest by he is weighed live there is many wrong when this thing you see something you literally ever seen before and yet your idea is let me stick my face really close to a hate it gray this and so but you know with what she has this kind of.

china santa gary ristic betsy
"ristic" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"ristic" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"When you see a logo or your exposed to a brand i mean that's the purpose of having a logo is to conjure up all the different things that are associated with that brand so that can be very intentional um and i think that sort of your classic marketing and grave you're like onomic says more focused on understanding things that people aren't immediately aware of what's interesting though is some of these biases are so strong the called here ristic's our rules of thumb ways that we process an incredible amount of information in the environment and is still a down into something begin manage on a moment to moment basis some of these things are so strong that even if you tell someone the effect that's happening they still can't get away from the founding they've abaya threat is a darrell maury shares a pretty interesting story about beat during the lockout he took class at harvard and the experiment was the rockets shia that's exactly right um the experiment was right down the last two numbers of your phone uh or social security number and sort of the principle is anchoring when you see something that becomes immediately your reference point and whatever you estimate afterwards wherever you project is based on what you just saw and so the question is how many countries are there in africa and have an it's almost perfectly correlated the guest that people make with what they wrote down on their paper relay yeah and the funny thing about that is even if you tell them exactly what i just told you they will still be biased in the guests that the make because it's so strong like they don't know one of vacuum what to gas right um but once they right on a number that becomes the reference point you wait until you ask someone who's like a geography professor and then they completely blow the study for you that number is nothing like the actual number of countries in africa on you mentioned that you already had the job set up at the polls was this the first integration of this particular job for the team.

harvard professor onomic ristic darrell maury rockets social security africa
"ristic" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"ristic" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Slash eleven thirty that ship recruiter dot com slash eleven thirty looking ahead with industry insight from colin ristic accounting tax and advisory today anton partner national director renewable energy industry practice shares his insight federal in state policies continue to reduce the carson wind and so development making renewable energy more price competitive without the forms of energy production he's attractive conditions i driving investor appetite encouraged by last year's federal extension of investment in production tax credits the next several years may offer significant opportunities for tax equity investor is interested there were no when it you projects although the number of context equity investor is in their noble market is at an all time high at cullen rest make we're seeing many investment opportunities for distributed generation solar and small a when projects these projects offering attractive yields in the potential of favorable pricing for those investors willing to take on a little more rest look ahead and gain insight imagine more physical cone resident dot com slash breakthrough come ristic county tax advisory who's going to do what flashlights nowhere to be found emergencies of like it's not packed what about blankets we haven't oh towel cellphone may not where emergency water not a drop perfect we all know we're meeting if were separated the stop and i'll be waiting here wondering where you all are great sounds like we don't have a plan winging it is not an emergency plan make sure your kids know what to do during an emergency who to call where to meet what to pack is it ready dot gov slash kids for tips and information brought to you by fema and the.

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"ristic" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"ristic" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Know how we hired before that whether you're looking to fill one position are twenty find the best candidates with recruiter or your job is just one kick away from one hundred plus job site fast dissuade high and right now you can try zip recruiter free just go to chip recruiter dot com slash eleven thirty that shipped recruiter dot com slash eleven thirty looking ahead with industry insight from colin ristic at counting tax advisory today jeremy swan printable a national director private equity inventor capital industry practice shares his unsigned privately firms are sitting on your record levels of drive powder with an additional one trillion dollars being raised despite substantial capital availability remains a lack of quality companies on the market middle marker key firms are seeing increased competition and quality deals which is maintaining valuations at inflated levels utilizing originated in resources to pursue deals with businesses owned by baby plumber's to be successful strategy former seek a bye riveting so it growth demonstrate limited him play based and keep operations in the community to succeed in today's tight market key firm should look to the school run businesses as a source of quality deal flow look ahead canaan tonight imagine more is it cool dot com slash breakthrough cone ristic county tax three it's time to get grow with commercial lending releasing in treasury management services from ct we work with companies across a wide variety of industries including transportation technology energy manufacturing healthcare and retail antsy ita we have the expertise and the experience to help grow your business for more information on how you were business can grow would see i td visit cia t dot com.

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