37 Burst results for "Rings"

Fresh update on "rings" discussed on 10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:42 min | 12 min ago

Fresh update on "rings" discussed on 10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

"His science and high tomorrow just in the seventies. Good morning. I'm Larry Cantor wins news time at the tone. 11 30 Good morning. I'm Susan Richard, New Jersey Federal Judge Esther Solace is giving a personal and gripping account of how her son was murdered and her husband badly wounded in their Middlesex County home last month. Judge Saleh says it was after an incredible weekend of fun celebrating her son Daniel's birthday. The two were chatting in the basement of their home in North Brunswick, when the doorbell rang, and Daniel sprinted up the stairs to see who it was from this monster who had a FedEx package in his hand open fire. Daniel being Daniel. Protected his father. Anything. First bullet directly to the test a monster then turned its attention to my husband. And began to shoot up my husband one shot after another on this nine minute videotape statement Salis speaking not as a judge, but as a wife and mom. Well, my husband is still in.

Daniel Judge Saleh Larry Cantor Esther Solace Salis North Brunswick Fedex Middlesex County Susan Richard New Jersey
Boston - Duxbury Firefighters Become First In Country To Wear Biometric Rings

WBZ Afternoon News

00:29 sec | 1 d ago

Boston - Duxbury Firefighters Become First In Country To Wear Biometric Rings

"The docks Berry Fire Department has become the first in the country to have their firefighters where biometric rings. The rings can monitor vital signs, including pulse temperature and sleep cycles. They could help detect early warning signs of covert 19 and they're also designed to withstand the rigours of a tough job, Roxbury Fire chief Kevin Nord says. The department about 38 of them and offered them two members on a voluntary basis. Each firefighter can monitor his or her information through a smartphone

Berry Fire Department Roxbury Fire Kevin Nord
Fresh update on "rings" discussed on Tony Katz Today

Tony Katz Today

00:35 min | 39 min ago

Fresh update on "rings" discussed on Tony Katz Today

"Trending at 11 02 There will be sports at North Central High School this fall. That's the plan anyway, as the Washington Township School board has voted to overturn it's suspension of the fall sports season because of the Corona virus pandemic, the board making it clear though they will change their mind. Fine if necessary. We're getting closer to the election. Andy Down's a political science professor at Purdue, Fort Wayne says Governor Holcomb has all the momentum. I think the governors approach to things have been pretty well received. Obviously being challenged a little bit right now because of what's happening with the numbers down, says Pushed back to Holcomb's mask mandate hasn't been as intense to affect anything regarding his momentum more cos maybe locating to Indiana once the pandemic is over, and the push is still hot. Ring some manufacturing jobs back to the U. S space and aeronautics and there's a big push that the state has been making and continues to make in that aerospace sector to those of manufacturing jobs at a high paying job. Gary Dick with inside Indiana business, credits the Indian Economic Development Corporation with working to try and get those jobs of to the U. S into the state. Your.

Governor Holcomb North Central High School Indiana Washington Township School Andy Down Indian Economic Development Co Gary Dick Fort Wayne Purdue Professor U. S
Consumer Spending Rose in June, but Pullback Damps Recovery

Morning Edition

00:53 sec | 3 d ago

Consumer Spending Rose in June, but Pullback Damps Recovery

"Stocks open mixed this morning as the government reported a bigger than expected jump in consumer spending. Last month. NPR's Scott Horsefly reports, the Dow Jones industrial Average was down about 10 points in early trading. The Commerce Department says consumer spending rose more than 5.5% in June following an even bigger jumpin May consumer spending has rebounded from the sharp drop in March and April. Analysts warn that recovery maybe Peter Ring out, though a surgeon new Corona virus infections has made many people wary about shopping and dining out. What's more, personal income has been slipping as federal relief payments are exhausted, and that drop is likely to accelerate the extra $600 a week and unemployment benefits that Congress authorized early in the pandemic officially expires today. So far, lawmakers have not been able to agree on any sort of extension. Scott Horsefly. NPR NEWS.

Scott Horsefly Npr News NPR Commerce Department Peter Ring Congress
Leading Ladies: Anna May Wong

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:07 min | 3 d ago

Leading Ladies: Anna May Wong

"Alot from wonder media. Network. I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manteca. Today we're talking about the first major American movie star. She openly criticized racist typecasting her accomplishments were groundbreaking and many of her critiques still. Ring true today. Let's talk about the prolific Anna. May Wong. Anna was born in Los Angeles in one, thousand, nine, hundred, five. Her birth name was Wong lead song. She initially attended a majority white school but transferred to Chinese school to. Escape racism she. From her classmates. Anna often skipped class to check out nearby film sets pushing her way to the front of the crowd to get closer to the cameras. She came up with Anna May Wong as her stage name by age eleven. And she was fourteen when she appeared in a silent picture, caught the red lantern. At Seventeen, Anna played the lead role in the toll of the sea one of the first movies and color. Anna's most notable early role was in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, she played in the hit movie the thief of Bagdad. Though. This part was a stepping stone for her career. It's also emblematic of the problems with Hollywood casting that Anna would soon after vocally advocate against and interviews. In the thief of Bagdad, Anna played a treacherously in a subservient role wearing very little clothing. Anna appeared in more than fifty films throughout her life and she often struggled with subservient. typecasting Hollywood also repeatedly granted lead Asian roles to white actors and cast actual. Asian. Actors. As villains. After working in the United, states for several years, Anna had had enough of Hollywood's biased casting. So she moved to Europe. Europe was more receptive when it came to Anna's acting ability. She started films throughout the continent with reporters praising her transcendent talent. One notable appearance was in the British movie. Piccadilly in nineteen twenty. Nine After a few years in Europe and a decided to give Los. Angeles. Another shot she appeared in the famous nineteen thirty two movie. Shanghai Express opposite. Marlene Dietrich. I must confess I. Don't quite know standard respectability that you know newborn how But Hollywood hasn't really improved. It's racist casting methods. Anna, auditioned for the lead role in the gutter. A film based on the novel about a family of Chinese farmers despite Anna's film

Anna May Wong Hollywood Europe Jenny Kaplan Bagdad Marlene Dietrich Manteca Los Angeles Chinese School Shanghai United LOS
Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

The Vergecast

48:04 min | 3 d ago

Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

"So, this hearing just going to say it, it was six hours of chaos. So. So many things like individual moments of pure chaos happened this hearing. But because every member of Congress was only given five minutes to ask the questions in and they moved on, no one could process the moments of cash. So here are some things that happened during this hearing. Jeff. bezos just started eating nuts on his call. That was just a thing that you started snacking for the first ninety minutes. It appears that basis had tech issues was operating in some kind of delay. So we didn't hear from him. They just answer any questions and they'd take a ten minute break Jeff. bezos could fix his computer. Amazing. Jim Jordan, who McKenna pointed out. On the show last week is always sort of chaos element. Try to talk over several members of Congress got yelled to put his mass back on floated. Just elaborate conspiracy theories. was when I say was chaos I. Don't know if there's any other way to describe it. I. Think that led a lot of people to think the hearing itself didn't accomplish its goals, but I think in many ways it did. But Kennedy you WanNa Kinda go through what the committee was trying to accomplish the themes they were pointed at in. How hearing played out, right. So okay. First off. Harkening back to last week I mentioned Jim. Jordan's mountain dew obsession. Definitely drink a handful those throughout the hearing I took notes in screen shots. So, I, called it. But regardless of their pores soda choices, there were a lot of lawmakers who definitely did their homework and I think that was really apparent throughout the entire hearing and when I look at. The picture that they tried to paint I think that became really clear in chairman Sicily's opening statements. So this is the guy who liked. And spearheaded the entire investigation from the beginning, and in those opening statements, he pointed out that yeah Apple Amazon Google facebook. There are different in a lot of ways and they exhibit anticompetitive behaviors potentially allegedly and a lot of different ways. But what they tried to pull together and was a story, and it's really hard to tell a story and five minute fragments. But what happened yesterday was Sicily. Ni, and a lot of the Democrats on the Committee wanted to point out that these companies they become bottlenecks for distribution whether that's information or just like APP stores marketplace's they control what gets distributed in how what was really key to the investigation was how? How they survey competitors. If you have so much control dominance over a market or a specific part of the tech industry, you have a lot of insight into your competitors and you can do a lot of dangerous things with that, and then lastly, after that dominance has gained, it's how they abuse it. Right? How they abuse it to make harder for small businesses in competitors and I think that's exactly what Cellini pointed out in the beginning and I think they did a poor job that storytelling throughout the process. But I think that's also our job. Right is to pull that evidence together and tell that story for them in a way that isn't like. Yes, no yelling at CEOS and like stopping them and I think by getting that in the evidentiary record doing all this questioning, I think they really did achieve their goal in the end. Yeah. I mean, I think the thing that happened sort of next to the hearing was that they released a bunch of documents from these one point, three, million documents of clutch. Over the past year, they released pretty targeted selection documents for every company showing some of this stuff, Casey, I wrote a story about. facebook. INSTAGRAM. My I'm going to frame this email or mark Zuckerberg. Literally one sentence, no period. The Andrew says I need to figure out. I'M GONNA buy instagram like I would love to just be in a place were sending that email like super casually like I got this thing to figure out and it's not like am I gonNa buy the model of the car. It's like instagram. I've been thinking of the text messages where so and so says that Mark Zuckerberg's didn't go destroy mode on instagram ever since they got that up. Case she this to Kevin and right that text was. Yes. Well, it was Kevin. System was talking to an investor and Kevin said to the investor. If we don't sell well, mark, go into destroy mode on us and the investor side probably. Of course, stray casual. So there's just a lot of documents and I think one of the functions of hearing was to get those documents into the official congressional record to make the CEO's account for them. That did not seem very successful to me. Is like a takeaway people should have from this hearing, right? No. I think a lot of people that go into these hearings are expecting like these big Gotcha moments and expecting like a lot of news and all this stuff. But it really, it wasn't oversight hearing. You know it wasn't. They didn't come. They came at this like in a report last earlier this week that they came out at as investigators. They didn't come at it to make a big show horse and pony show out of it, and yet I think the CEO's didn't. The record well enough to the extent that they could have. But there was definitely, I was expecting them to do a lot less evasion and I expected a lot less room probation with the documents, but it's just the process of a Congressional hearing. It's. It's hard to do that in a congressional hearing. But if you put those documents out there, you get the CEO's on the record a little bit who does excite this excites the FTC. J, and that's who can take this next and then it's also congress. You know they can't break up a tech company, but they can regulate going forward and it's those three key themes that I pointed out earlier that they could regulate. You know what I mean. They could legislate to forbid companies from surveying competitors and things like that, and that's where this goes. So the format of the hearing, every member and five minute chunks, it seemed very clear that the Democrats had some sort of coordinated evidentiary strategy, they would start and. And they would say, I, want to read this email to you. What did you mean by this email and then Jeff bezos would say something like I have. No idea is on works. I. Was real pattern that developed was basis really not doing or claiming he definitely knows claiming not really no way Wayne is under the thing they did or they would ask sooner Pichai about the very granular add deal google made by an ad product, and soon I, would say I'll get back to you, which is basically all responses. So the Democrats seemed like they were coordinated to move through their documents. The Republicans seem to be doing something else that also seem coordinated intentional, but what was their focus because that seemed clear split my takeaway from Jim Jordan who? We got into earlier, he he was interviewing. As if they were all Jack Dorsey. And as we talked about like, yeah, he invited Jack Dorsey to testify, but he doesn't sit on the antidote subcommittees. Anything. He says, it just doesn't matter. So it sounded to me as if he prepared questions Jack Dorsey and then it was like, oh, he's not coming I'll ask Tim Cook the same questions. Another completely crazy moment that happened just seen by and five minute chunks is that. Represented Sensenbrenner from Wisconsin Dear Sweet Wisconsin. Definitely. Asked Mark Zuckerberg why the Donald Junior was banned from twitter and mark. Zuckerberg was happening on twitter facebook and there was just like a moment of confused silence, and then he tried to move on and that just sort of floated by in the river of chaos to tell you how much chaos there was kneeling. When you started to tell that story, I thought you were going to tell the story about when Jim Jordan asked him cook if the famous one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, Apple Super Bowl, AD was actually about twenty twenty cancel culture, which is another thing that really happened. I think that's out of context. He didn't ask him. He said clearly, this is. That's definitely what Steve Jobs was thinking IBM is canceled culture and Apple's going to break it with hammer and Jeff. Bezos said that social media is a nuance destruction machine and all this crazy stuff from that. It was a wild will that that particular question when Jim Jordan asked, do you support the cancel culture mov, you could see the CEOS like. 'cause they went in order. He asks them all in order. So First Tim Cook just like basically muttered nothing. Here's like I don't. I support speech whatever. The iphone a keyboard like that was his answer. Sooner per child also, just like muttered, right? He's like Google has always supported free expression Zuckerberg like saw the opportunity and took it and the forces of liberalism I rising I, and then basis was like I cannot. I cannot do in like went for it, and that was just totally insane moment. But it also seems like the Republicans were intentional to try to create their own moments where they were yelling at CEOS about bias on platforms is obviously something cover a. At. You were paying a lot of attention that case you're paying a lot of attention to it. Do you think that was effective in creating because you know there's like a parallel conservative Universe Jim? Jordan was on Tucker. Carlson. Last night like was that effective or d think that the CEO's were able to sort of tamp down on interesting the Tucker Carlson pointed out that Google and other companies are all big donors to Jim Jordan another folks. So that is a weird side, but I think it was actually besides the moment where they mixed up twitter with facebook I. Think this was much more effective off. Off Topic yelling about technology than we usually see like are genuinely issues that like they are upset about that, they could point to largely around like cove nineteen misinformation and they could at least like pick those topics and stick to them rather than kind of asking vague questions about like, why is my phone listening to me? Well, they're definitely asked questions about why are my campaign emails getting filtered by G mail? Yes. I should. I should mention that they have really and they have all of these cases where they ask about extremely specific one off incidents that anyone who has used social media knows happens constantly. And, then turn them into a sinister pattern. But I think they managed to come off as sounding more like they understood what they were talking about the unusual. I think that was a real theme of the hearing, Casey. What did you think of this sort of bias side show that occurred? Well, I mean the the idea that conservative voices are being suppressed is foundational to the conservative movement and is behind the rise of conservative talk radio. It was behind the rise of Fox News. Now that social media exists, we have seen it in this new form, but it is sort of being presented as extra, sinister and worthy of. Some sort of legislative intervention what frustrates me about it is that much more than newspapers or or cable news like Mark Zuckerberg Dorsey. These people benefit hugely from having all possible voices on their platform. None of them is incentivized to drive conservatives off their platform. What they are incentivized to do is have rules that make the place safe and welcoming. So that people want to hang out there and so to the extent that there are issues on the platform, they've largely come because these platforms have rules. And you know you would think that a bunch of free marketeers would realize that the alternative to the system that they're so mad about would be creating a new system, but they don't seem at all interested in doing that. So I just sort of dismissed all of them as charlatans I actually thought it was interesting that the opposite track came up, which was the Stop Hey for profit campaign I kind of wasn't expecting that. The representative Raskin I believe asked facebook. Basically, why aren't you kicking more hate speech off. I forget who else asked like look is the point that you're so big. You don't care about advertiser boycotts I. Mean, you know it will here. Here is a fact that the number one complaint that facebook gets from its users, the thing that users. About. FACEBOOK is that it removes too much content and so if you're running the place, you do have to take these complaints seriously in a way. Right? It might not be you know that you shadow band conservative whatever that even means on social network in twenty twenty. But the fact that you're removing content is really upsetting people. So you can't dismiss that idea entirely, but I still don't feel like we're having that intellectually honest conversation about it. So this was definitely I feel like you can connect the you control distribution. We're GONNA show the abuses of power narrative. We got other. Democrats. With the you control distribution. You're banning conservatives right like I. Think what's Sensenbrenner Again, cups and conservatives are consumers to is that people don't realize that like fifty percent of the population in many ways. But facebook has like famous conservatives working its highest levels Kevin. We last week, we're talking about Kevin Roose keeps sharing the list. List of the most engaged content from crowd tangle. It's all conservative content, and that's so problematic for facebook that they're. They're pushing back with other metrics and graphs of their own, making the facts just aren't there, but it doesn't seem to be convincing. Brett Kevin is being asked to recuse himself from facebook case because he's like best friends with facebook I, AP I wrote a column almost two years ago. Now, arguing that conservatives were trying to redefine. Any conservative identified person having any unwanted outcome on a social network, right? So bias is your name was higher than mine in search results. Bias is used suggested that I follow a Democrat and not a Republican right, and if you take action on your policies that apply to everyone against me a conservative that is biased against conservatives, right. So and by the way I have to say this has been hugely successful because we've talked about it. How many minutes now and the longer that these discussions. Discussions. Go on. They just sort of refi people's minds. The idea that there really is a vast conspiracy to silence conservative speech because he's networks are so big millions of conservatives are having experiences like this every day, and now there is an ideology that is basically a religion for them to attach to, which is although Silicon Valley liberals are out to get. Reason I wanted to talk about the conservative side show, which in many ways was a circus is it feels like the notion that we should be punitive to the companies or mad at the company's. Bipartisan, right we were. We were not looking at a hearing where the Democrats were on the attack. Republicans are saying we love. Apple. We're looking at hearing where they were. Everyone was mad. There are a couple of exceptions to that. There were a couple of I think sensenbrenner and a few other folks were like look we want to be clear. Big is not bad. We just WANNA make sure we're not punishing you for your success, but you were like almost entirely, right? Yeah. I. Mean I. think that's it's important to. To capture that mood like Jeff Bezos Mark Zuckerberg, Tim, Cook soon. Darpa, try they usually get to finish whatever sentence they start saying. Right. They're not used to being interrupted. Their thoughts are usually like you know they get to live in complete sentences and people take them seriously here in five in intervals, they were interrupted almost every time they started speaking to be told that they were wrong that they were filibuster at one point Sicily said stop thinking is for the questions. We can just assume they're all good questions. They. Were getting yelled at and they're going yell that about a variety of things that were pretty specific. So you kind of in your kind of structure here. The first one was controlling distribution. What did you hear as a hearing went on the indicated to that? The committee had a case here? I think the apple's APP store is one thing you know charging thirty percent cuts on certain things is just controlling an APP store. It's the same thing with Amazon's marketplace. They can inherently in control what gets placed and what gets sold and you know if they want to play with search results on Amazon, they can do that, and then on facebook and Google, it's not just like products and software that's information. And it could be information when it's like Google. Google. Stealing yelps, texture views right in putting those in its little info boxes in search queries in facebook if facebook is just like an. Mation, distribution platform and. It can decide Algorithm Mickley. Knowingly. What people get to see this bution was very keen to the committee's hearing yesterday and they pointed out different aspects in which you know each company exhibited that kind of behavior. So the one that will you bring up apple? We wrote about this, say there's much emails. Apples document production is just one hundred and thirty pages of unrelated emails and whatever order see it's like scan through it. So there's a lot of little stories in there. There's one about right to repair and apple realizing it needed to repair. By watching PR people operate by reading their emails journalists. Very entertaining. They're like we had a break like here's our strategy. Here's we're GONNA. That's all in there. You can look at it, but there's a lot about the APP store itself and how they're going to use the mechanics of the APP store to control their platform, and it started at the beginning like the first emails in this production from twenty, ten there. From Phil, Schiller Steve Jobs saying, are we GONNA? Let Amazon Sell Books in the kindle store. Store, it felt like I saw an Amazon ad was hard to watch this hard to watch this ad where a person's reading a book on an iphone in the kindle APP in the pick up an android phone keep reading. He's like literally like it was hard to watch like Schiller's at home like pain what a customer is having an experience that good it really just. Heart and so he's like it was hard to watch. You fours Steve Jobs. They're like we gotta shut it down jobs is the bookstore will be the only bookstore on the APP. Store. That's the way it's going to be everyone's gotta used to it. We know that restricting payments will hurt other things, but that's what we're doing and they started there in two thousand ten and they pulled it out, and then that ladders up into everything that we've seen with, hey, ladders up into the analysis group showing up to. Apple, can pay them to say that there's independent study has revealed. Everybody has a thirty percent cut. It has landed up into Tim Cook, forwarding. He gets a letters from developers that are in this direction. It's like apples breaking my heart and he just like Ford's it. Tim, Cook forwards that email to filter credit eighty, just as thoughts like amazing like they are constantly thinking about the APP store as a mechanism of control for the platform in the leverage and other deals. So the other one was apple is this Amazon one which I have very mixed feelings on saying that this is bad or legal I'm curious for all of your thoughts famously. Did, not have the prime video APP on the Apple TV and all these other places apple, Amazon came to a deal. There's an entire presentation in this production like the slide deck of how the deal is going to work. Apple got to be the preferred seller of its own product. So third parties cancel. Apple. Products, Amazon pages, they got. They have a custom by flow. They've custom product pages, all the stuff in return. Amazon got a lower commission on the APP store and gets to Selatan products which no. No like you can rent a movie from the Amazon APP on the Apple TV, no one else gets to it in one world. This is just pure platform collision, right? Apple cut VIP deal for big companies because it wanted something and you could say this is legal in another world. It's like this is how deals work apple something valuable. Amazon s something valuable and they came to a conclusion wherever made more money and quite frankly the consumer experience platform has got better. How do you read that? Casey? That is good and fair analysis of it. I. Think I did read slightly more scandalous. Tones into it in part because apple would never acknowledge that some developers are more important to it than others even though if you assume that that's true, I think maybe one of the things that's frustrating about it is there is no transparency accountability around which developers get sweetheart deals is that once you hit a certain threshold of revenue will cut your price. Why couldn't they extend that deal to everyone right? Or is it just if we withhold something that seems particularly valuable, we can eventually drag you to the table. Table, which is sort of what seems like happened here. I think in all cases, what I'm always looking for is the accountability, right like and some sense of of equitable treatment of developers and I understand the guys are always going to get the best treatment, but it can that be publicly visible. Can it be acknowledged and there'd be routes for others to achieve that same level of success and treatment, and that I'll just seems missing here. Did you buy Tim Co? He said it twice. It was obviously A. Glimmer, of sympathy for all four CEOS. There is a lot of reporting that they had spent months preparing for this hearing like being grilled there, they'd hire outside law firms. They. Practiced they all clearly had soundbites memorized in none of them. Got To say him because it kept getting interrupted. Tim Cook had this one where he is like if we're the gatekeepers, the gates are open wider than ever. We've gone from five hundred. APPS to one point seven, he said like. A whole speech. and. The thing is there's fierce competition for developers. They don't like our store can do for android the windows. For xbox and PS. Four. Which I was like the idea that adobe is going to be like we don't want to be on the IPAD. Here's PS. Four Photoshop is insanity to me. I'm going to build a spreadsheet. APP. For the five. That's how frustrated with Tim Cook. To that ring. True to you I. Mean, there's no, it does not ring true. There is a, there is a duopoly. In the United States when it comes to smartphones, iphones have majority share in the United States and you can't say, well, you know there's there's a rogue fork of android in Malaysia that you could go develop for if you really wanted to and have that come across as a credible argument to Americans. Right it is. Natural for any monopolist to spend most of its time, arguing that it is much smaller and much less consequential as as you think it is and they're essentially always asking you to ignore what is in front of your face, which is that they are the giant. They are in control. What they say goes, and it doesn't matter which small businesses get hurt along the. The. Way I would point out that the contact and we're gonNA talk about earnings eventually. But the context for that is apple had its biggest third quarter ever this month, their revenues went up eleven percent year over year, they're making obviously making billions of dollars in their services revenue, which is a lot of the narrative around the APP stores increasing that services line. Also went up. I think it was thirteen billion. So you're right. They're very big in their earnings the day after the hearing did nothing. To reduce that impression. I want to switch to Amazon a little bit McKenna. You really focused Amazon was basis first time up there. They came at him a lot about marketplace. How did you think that went I think it went pretty good. I. Think. John Paul specifically was just like killer her questions with breakout star. Yeah. She was just like killer and she's the representative for. SEATTLE. So this is where Amazon is right. So she just like killed it and. And I think there were a couple of instances in the documents and in questioning yesterday that really pulled important things out there was like testimony from one bookseller who was like, yeah. We just can't sell a category of books and we don't know why Amazon doesn't let us do that just like testimony like that or even when it comes to like acquisitions, the ring acquisition especially, I wrote about that today through the documents and how. They said, this is for market position. This is a for technology, your talent or anything. We just bought this and that's something that base said again, yesterday he was just very clear. It's like, yeah, we do buy things market position, which is like so insane just here like the richest person in the world. But like, yeah, we're buying market position. It's just what happens. That's another one I have mixed feelings right, and by the way, people should read McKenna story because those documents have just a very funny breakdown like the pros and cons of buying. Buying ring in many of the cons like what if this turns into nest, which if you're just the verge cast listeners like it's just like the Keyword Bingo, but it's fine to say, we're buying market position like this isn't the best product out there, but it's the category of video. doorbells is not huge, right? So to by the the market leader in video doorbells is maybe the most rational use of the money. What is the problem that you think the committee was trying to show an address sense of we're just going to market position. Pointing out, they can just do whatever they want and how casual it is, and there really isn't. It's really funny to read an email like that, and we could buy it or we could just copy it or are. We could just watch. You know that was one of the emails that base from someone. Those are just three options you know and it's like just pick and choose you know. Pointed out like a lot. Just that email itself really pointed out just how easy it is for them. They used a lot of that time history to talk about copycat behaviors and to talk about just like you know buying up competitors and it just seeing that all in one little e mail having to do with the ring was like really i. think it was really kind of I opening and especially like useful for the committee. So Amazon got hit a lot for the data collection side of it of copying competitors. bezos did not seem to have great answers there. Right. So that's the. The thing they got in trouble with this. There is that Wall Street. Journal article from like April where employees were literally like, yeah. We dip into data and we use that to guide our own private label products and everybody was like Whoa and Amazon basins. Yesterday said, well, we do have a policy that bans that but giant pointed out yesterday. It's like, okay. So what's your enforcement look like you can have the policy, but like if you don't enforce it, then it's like meaningless. And then yesterday I. Think Paul was like, can you give me a yes or no answer? Do you dip into data and he's like I can't I can't give you. Yes or no, and we're just like we're looking into it. The story had anonymous sources. So that isn't very helpful to us. You know what I mean. So that was one of the main things and that Wall Street Journal article and I think it's the same kind of examples in the committee's documents. They point out specific examples like car trunk, organizers of all things. It's like weird little products like Amazon's like this is a little hot. Maybe we should do that. So I, I think. I, think they made a good case yesterday. Yesterday on that. Yeah. I mean bezos brought up that Wall Street Journal, Article himself twice, and he was like, well, your policy against it. But I can't guarantee never happened. Then there is a strange just didn't come across clear I. Think I know what the committee was trying to get at their like US aggregate seller data when there's only three sellers and then only to sellers? Yes, I. Think what they're getting at is when you're down to the aggregate data of two companies, you heard effectively looking at individual data. What is the problem? They're like the I get what you're doing. You're just reducing the denominator to get to one, but like it, why is that particular problem? Right? Well, none of these. Dipping into individual seller data and looking at aggregate data. That's not a legal. There is no law. This is all voluntary of Amazon. So they have a voluntary policy where like we can't do individual seller data, but they say nothing against aggregate and aggregate what you're getting at eight. Here you is. Does the same thing if it's just like some goofy little product they. They bring up pop stock. It's all the time before pop tops in a moment. Right? There's only like one pop. So company like you know pop soggy, it was kind of an innovative product. It's like well, if there's only two of them and use the aggregate data, you you you have everything you need to know you know about that product line looking aggregate. If that's what you decide to qualify as do you as you're looking through the other Amazon documents and other stuff. So anything jump out at you is something the committee was trying to prove or get at. The questioning seemed very focused on. Like are you using the state at a copy products? Are you buying things? You shouldn't buy. There's one question which I did not understand why came up about DMC. Take downs on twitch and Jeff as just had this look of panic in his eyes. He's like I don't know man I bought Wedge because my kids want to. Do something like that was like the side show stuff, but the real focus here, it just seemed like it was definitely in the marketplace, right? Amazon, everyone came at Amazon for the marketplace. That's what everybody knows him as like they have all these little sides. They got rain. They got Alexa Alexa was one thing too. That was kind of interesting. It's like. Are you buying things like ring to put Alexa into and dislike expand your like Titan Ism as like an Internet Internet connected home. Thing and make that more closed off and walled gardening. That was one thing. But no, it was just focusing on how much power they have to kind of change. What happens in the marketplace to kind of decide what companies in what products are able to come up on the first page of results. You know that's also something that they dug into Google and in something that one of those like themes that kind of ties everything together. We should say they all spend a lot of time talking about counterfeit goods, and why is it Amazon removed? Fake stuff from the platform and how much is it profiting off of you know selling pick rolexes? Is it surprising? The whole foods didn't show up at all they're. Like that is a really massive thing. Amazon owns that. Is it moving into a huge new product category? I think whole foods is not an online marketplace, which was the title of the hearing, not that that restricted anybody from doing anything except that, one of the things Amazon says is we have lots of competition from offline marketplaces, right? Brought up kroger a lot I mean, this is the case he's point. They all made. It seem like they were beset at any moment. They could be crushed by the likes of stop and Shop Right? Like I think the point though was really on the. Digital. Experience Consumers have and like I, don't know Ho-. Foods fits. Into that narrative, especially, because it is itself not dominant like they bought it because you needed to grow in their. Good at that at my question for you on the Amazon stuff was when you think about, we talk about two thirty a lot right like you and I in particular spent a lot time to thirty, which regulates with the platform can do with content. There's not really an equivalent of two thirty for goods on store. Right like there's some case is out there saying like you're liable for what what happens on your online store page, but Amazon doesn't have that like second order of like Messi nece around it that twitter and facebook to with two thirty, I. Mean, it gets invoked a lot for marketplace's, but it's way messier. Well, I just wanted to like this question at counterfeits question about ranking the store like they are even more free than any twitter is to to sort tweets algorithm. Algorithm clear to modern like it just their store. Do you think that they're like that Algorithm transparency? Your wire things ranked. Did you catch a sense that that's where the regulation is GonNa go. So much of the conversation around Amazon really felt like it was individuals sellers being wronged for reasons of Amazon being unresponsive or stealing. It's data. So I don't know it didn't. It didn't seem like a really big focus of the hearing, but it is a huge deal. Yeah. The, digital marketplace frame of this, which is where we have talked to. Cellini. That's where he's going right like facebook and Google very digital. They have like they don't do physical goods. Really. Apple is the APP store. It's all digital goods. Amazon is the one where it's. Front to a lot of physical things, and that is the only place where I can see this regulation needing to make some sort of like major meaningful distinction in I. Didn't see it in the hearing, but I was curious of you caught a glimmer of it. I'm not positive that they have to make a huge distinction there like depending on what they come up with because. So much of this is about their companies and whatever product they produced. The issue is more or less whether or not they're being surveilled and unfairly by targeted and crushed by that data surveillance. All right. We have gone for forty minutes. We should take a quick break. I said I wasn't going to go by company and it happens. So we should come back and talk with facebook Ango. We'll be right back. This is advertiser content. When I say utopia what comes to mind. Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the perfect social body. Every Body Matt Place. Everybody happy now while the peacock original series, brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. A concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago. But we keep looking for that community identity stability of aldous Huxley's Utopia and not finding it Americans are the unhappiest they've been in decades, and we're increasingly lonely whereas in a utopia. Everyone belongs to everyone else. In nineteen forty-three, the psychologist Abraham. maslow's developed a theory of Utopia. One that allows total self determination in basic terms. maslow's theory says that in Utopia, we decide for ourselves, what we need and how we're GONNA get it in Huxley's Utopia citizens always get what they want and don't want what they can't get. Sounds. Pretty good. Right. Then why can't we make it happen? For a Utopian Society the work we might need to disband some of the things we hold dearest marriage government privacy individualism even family. See for yourself. If a Utopian world is as perfect as it seems watch brave new world now streaming only on peacock. These are really difficult crazy stressful times, and if you're trying to sort of cope, it could be helpful to find something that gets beyond like doom scrolling and like obsessive worried. But digs into what is really going on underneath the surface, and that's what the weeds is all about I. Matthew Yglesias. Weeds podcast here on the box meeting podcast network. This is podcast for people who really want to understand the policy debates and policy issues that shaping our world. We've seen now more than ever like how relevant policy is to our actual lives, but so much in the news isn't focused on really understanding and explaining detail way if that sounds good to you, join us for the weeds, every Tuesday and Friday to find out what's going on why matters and what we can do about it. You could download the weeds on apple spotify or wherever else you get your podcasts. Tracy. When it comes to facebook I turn to you. FACEBOOK is patience consumer of startups as what we've learned. Yeah. But you said something to me yesterday was interesting, which is everyone else's problems are forward looking and it feels like facebook's problems are actually in the past break for people explain what you mean. Yeah. So when Congress is looking at any trust with respect to these four companies for three of them, it's It's sort of about the marketplaces that their operating right now with facebook, the question is much more about should we have allowed it to buy serum? Should we have allowed it to buy WHATSAPP and most of the antitrust conversation that was around facebook yesterday was all about that. What did Mark Zuckerberg know about Instagram, and when did he know it? We wrote a story based on some documents that the house released yesterday. In which facebook has clearly identified instagram as a competitor. In at least some ways and wants to go after it and knock it off the table, and so that's kind of where the focuses their facebook and Burke did get a lot of other questions yesterday, but it tended to be much more about content moderation and things that don't have a lot to do with antitrust. So there was weird section where they asked the face. Face Research APP in the novel, Vpn? Any kind of got lost well, explain what happened and I'm curious reactions. Yeah. So facebook has a bunch of nifty tech tools to figure out what's trending which APPs or the kids using, and so that can essentially have an early warning system if it needs to consider acquiring something or more likely in these days, go out clone it. and. So Zuckerberg was asked about the way that the company uses these systems and if they are anti competitive I, think you know traditional antitrust law probably would not say copying an APP feature is anti competitive, but could lobby written in the future about it shirt I. Think the one that caught me was I mean, this is what I'm. McKenna's points from earlier is like one of the themes here is, are you so dominant that you can collect data that's unfair and then use that to crush or killer competitors, and definitely bought the Inaba VPN to do it. That's true. Now, when I've asked executives at facebook about this, what they'll say is they don't get surprised anymore. When you have three point, one billion people using your apps around the world. You know what links they're sharing, you know what they're talking about. And so you're not going to need some kind of specialized tool to know that WHATSAPP is really taking off. Right. So they would argue that, yes, these tools were useful to them, but you know at their scale, they know what's popular now, which doesn't really seem like addresses, the problem is reached. The fact that we're so big that we're all knowing is maybe not the defense that they sometimes presented as so here's what I didn't get. I thought, Zuckerberg I want to the instagram. What's about who's issues, but on the facebook research front, the data front, they him about this APP facebook research, which you were giving to teens. They were deploying with an enterprise certificate that story broke apple revoke the certificate, and all of facebook's internal APPs went dark, and this is a scandal story after story about it, they went on for two days. So I can I, don't recall that APP? Just how he you know, he remembers the day that all facebook's internal APPS went down and people couldn't go to the cafeteria. I would agree I found that answer. Extremely, ed? Persuasive. that. Do you think that was like actually strategic for him to be like, I, don't know and then come back later and correct the record I do remember when that happened I. Mean. I really don't know I mean also you know during a six hour hearing, it's also possible that you just you get flustered or you miss here something or or something because. Yeah. As as you say, I'm sure he remembers the day that apple turned off their internal APPS I mean. Honestly. Seems like an opportunity to talk about apple's market power, and the fact that you know a day of work canceled at facebook because apple got mad. But I think most of the CEO's didn't go into yesterday a wanted to pick fights with each other. It was kind of sad that they didn't. I was Kinda hoping that Tim Cook take a shot at soccer burger. Point that the other two APP platforms I was expecting it. It was there. It was. There was all there. So cellini ended and he ended the whole meeting with closing statement. He said, some of these companies didn't get broken out. They all need to get regulated in the off too much power that some of them I. don't these breaking up apple. What sort of break. Right like. The division get sent into the corner thing about what it's done. Right. Does should spin out the finder team I've always wanted to. A clean is always that they want to. They want the APP store to be separate from the IPHONE. Basically, that's the thing I always hear. Can't break I. Think you can write some strong regulations but not playing you're on store, right. But like Elizabeth Warren's point was it's cleaner if it's two companies, but it's still a gigantic remedy that I don't think there's a lot of like like consumer or public opinion is going to walk into an Apple Cup I think you'll radio at marketplace. It seems very clear that we says some of them she broken up he is talking about facebook. I have a twenty percent conference level. He might be talking with Google and Youtube as well. But if he's going to say some of the need to get broken up like it's facebook, did you hear anything yesterday that supported that conclusion or Saudi stocks I? MEAN HE I don't remember which Republican it was, but he was like the Obama FTC looked at this and they said it was minding love. Obama. Right. Like. Why would we go back in time to relook at I? Mean, there is a belief and I mean. Somebody who thinks there could be a lot of benefit in instagram and WHATSAPP being different companies from facebook. And the reason you ask. So many questions about that acquisition as you're making the case that it never should have been approved in the first place, and so now you need to remedy it. So that was actually like the entire thrust of the argument against facebook yesterday. I think, you could probably make just as good a case that Amazon after spin out aws, but lawmakers chose not to make that case. Yeah. I think that also gets into. Politics of the acquisition of the time. To his credit is like nobody knew instagram would actually be a success like we made it a success. It didn't happen by itself. I, don't know if the lawmakers. By award, these guys said, but I don't know that he actually made that case very persuasively. and. Who knows I mean? That's like anything could have happened. Right? Cram could've stayed independent and rapidly grown and overtaken facebook like that's something that could have happened. It could have kind settled into a middle zone like snapchat or twitter seems more likely to me although I think probably would have been bigger than those two but. You're never going to know I mean it is true that facebook gave Mike and Kevin it instagram enormous resources. A lot of the reasons why Mike and Kevin sold was because running tiny startup that's blowing up is absolutely exhausting Mike. Krieger. was dragging his laptop all around San. Francisco. Because the servers were melting at all times of the day whenever Justin Bieber. Posted like the site stopped working and they really we need help. Finding a person who can quickly fix this? So we don't have to like that is the reason that they were entertaining these offers and wanted to sell it. So that is also thing that happened. Do you think that that same kind of argument or approach can apply to what's up? What's up basically did not come up yesterday and all the focus on Instagram, but that's the other one, right? Yeah, and we know weirdly a lot less about that acquisition I. Think it's because people in America just have so much less love for what's APP generally. That, it's never seemed as important. What happened to WHATSAPP as what happens to instagram even though WHATSAPP, is used, you know way more, it probably has way more engagement even than instagram does so I don't know why that didn't come up as often. We know there was a competitive bidding war for that as well. Goule. Wanted it as well. You know Mark Zuckerberg made them an offer, they can't refuse. Do you think everyday Google's we should've spent more money on what's whatsapp like this could have been solved. Should have, but Google has been placed under an ancient curse that prevents them from ever making the right decision about any social product. So it was doomed never to happen. It's fun looking through the documents and watching them casually say they should buy facebook dot com. Yeah, that. Point. That is how they talk like the window into these executives just casually being like we should just this thing or maybe not, or we should just copied ourselves and kill it before it gets any traction like it's repeated over and over again last facebook question. This one is like harder to parse because I. There's a chance, it's October is just joking around but. But. He's in many of these emails. He's like the thing about startups, as you can always buy them, which I think the committee thinks is a smoking gun, right? Like facebook's entire plan is to buy the competition to get the data from wherever they get it to say, oh, man, this apps popping, we just buy it and kill it before it competes with us. I. Think he actually said at one point. That's a joke. Yes, he did and I believe that you know it was two thousand, twelve, right? He was probably still in his mid twenties. At that point, the company was a lot smaller like people were joking around like there's more loose talk when companies are younger and I do think. It was it was part of that. I think the more interesting question becomes. Let's say facebook is telling the truth about everything. Let's say they thought it was going to be a successful acquisition, but they never knew it was gonna big as it became today and they invested in it and it got super big. Okay. Well, now, it's as big as it is. Should they be allowed to keep? Keep it or should they be forced to spend it out and if you're GONNA force them to spin it out. What's the argument that you'RE GONNA. Make about why one question that I have a lot is clearly the referral they're gonNa make, and it seems like if you don't have some other reason, we've heard hints that there's some other reason, the FTC scrutinize this that will eventually be revealed. But what you're saying is the antitrust standard at the time, the Consumer Hartman stand, which is still our standard. Says, you have to prove prices will go up both products for free. You're screwed. Right? There's nothing to review because you're not gonNA prove prove that free products are gonNA get more expensive. I think it's pretty unfair if you change the standard and you go back in time and say you missed that standard. So I think there has to be something else there. Well, what was the standard by which at and T. was broken up? Right? Like presumably at and T. didn't used to be that big, and then it just got really big and then they broke it up at least. That's the thumbnail understanding I have of that break-up. Well, yeah. But then reformed itself. Right. But because of lax antitrust regulation, right? Like it wasn't a naturally occurring phenomenon that all those APPS got back to the other or was that just sort of like inattention to capitalism It's like in the seventies and eighties. This is Tim moves book the cursive bigness in the seventies and eighties Robert Bork I can't talk about Robert on this podcast. Are we doing this right now. Robert was very influential judge Appellate Judge Federal Appellate? Judge. And basically moved the antitrust law to the consumer harm standard as part of a movement called and economics. A whole thing Robert. Bork. Mostly famous because he was not appointed. He was nominated Supreme Court by Reagan but they leaked video tape rental history, and then he didn't get nominated and that is where the expression getting bork's comes from. This is all true Netflix's still has to abide by videotape data privacy act is a whole. This is all true when facebook and Netflix had some partners, Nansen? Partnership. To. Automatically share your net flicks, watch history to facebook. They're like pending the change of this law which we are working on Robert Bork. He haunts us all. I'm sorry, I can't believe this much. Yeah I. think that's just like the law changed in the in the seventies and eighties, the standard change. The conversation right now is a very much about changing it back months and months ago, pre pandemic, we had an economist from I. Think it was Nyu Thomas Philippon came on the show, and he was like look you have this natural ab test going on in the world where the European Union when it formed was like, how do we get an economy like America's? So, we'll just take their competition policies pretty good, and at the same time we changed consumer harm standard. So everything you're seeing the EU is basically our old competition antitrust standard in. You can see how active they are in everything. Here's a new consumer welfare standard. Whether you believe, this is actually a functional Ab test given. The state of both governments is up for debate, but that was his point I thought. It was spare can say.

Facebook Apple Amazon Mark Zuckerberg Google Tim Cook Instagram Jeff. Bezos Tim Co Twitter CEO Casey Brett Kevin Cellini Jeff Bezos Jim Jordan Sicily Mckenna
Volcanoes of Life

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:56 min | 4 d ago

Volcanoes of Life

"Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb, and I'm Joe McCormack in today, we're going to be talking about something that I've been thinking about doing an episode on for a while ever since I read an article while back that really interested me, and that is the surprising and kind of counterintuitive link that has been proposed by many geologists now between life as we know it. It on earth and the fires of Mount Doom, specifically, the the most violent and scary of geologic processes like volcanic eruptions on the movement of tectonic plates. Yeah. This is a great topic to get into. We kind of had a I guess a preamble to this a couple of episodes ago when we were talking about eggs and we talked about the volcano birds and the idea of a volcano being seeming. Almost. Paradoxically to be something that can nourish. As opposed to something. That's just a purely destructive force. Oh, I. didn't think about that comparison at all. But yeah, the the way that the volcanic sand babysits the egg for for the megapode so that it can just run off and do its own thing. Yeah. Raised by a volcano. But so I thought a great place to start here might be with a brief reading from volusia. It is a famous old norse epic poem from the collection that is known as the Poetic Edda. Now, this is a synonymous work. The author is unknown, but the volusia tells the story of the norse Gods culminating in their destruction in the fiery doom of Ragnarok can I'm just GonNa read a couple of Quad trains here. In Anger Smites, the water of the earth forth from their homes must all men flee nine paces fares the son of Jurgen and slain by the serpent fearless. He sinks the Sun. Turns Black Earth sinks in the see the hot stores down from heaven or world fierce gross. The steam and the life feeding flame till fire leaps high about heaven, itself Nice and one fun thing about this poem. It's bit of Tolkien Trivia Robert Tell me if you've heard this before, but the name of the wizard Gandalf that first appeared in Tolkien's. Tolkien's the Hobbit and then of course, the best character in Lord of the Rings, the name of Gandalf comes from the Veloce token, actually borrowed the name from a section known as the tally of the dwarves from this epic poem. Originally, he was going to apply it to the character in the Hobbit, who became thorn oaken shield the leader of the Dwarf Party. But then he decided later on that, it made more sense to apply the name of Gandalf. The wizard. I think because again, Dal means something like magic staff l.. and. I think he made the right choice like, Gandalf. That makes more sense for the wizard than for Thorin. Think. So but cool thing that happens in this poem sort of part of the RAGNAROK. Myth is that there is a rebirth that follows this fiery doom know after the fire leaps high heaven and the Kingdom of the Gods is destroyed. Earth is not just left in cinders instead, there is a renewal from the fire and the author writes now do I see the earth new Rizal Green from the waves again, the cataracts fall and the Eagle flies and And Fish, he catches beneath the cliffs. So there's this great link between Fiery Cataclysm and rebirth and renewal of life in norse mythology, and and of course, you know these are symbolic elements. I'm not suggesting that they had some kind of scientific insight with this is something that I think is taken as a metaphor largely about human life itself, but coincidentally, it ends up kind of ringing true with things. We're finding out about geology and nature. Well, it's something you see in a lot of different mythological cycles, right I. mean you see it in Hindu mythology? In. Various. American mythologies. Thinking about. Meslin. South America in particular society that things will rise things will fall that there will be cataclysm that whole world will be destroyed, but new worlds will rise out of them and have risen out of them before. Yeah. I was thinking about themes of fiery eruption in the greening of the earth together or sort of a creator destroyer duality. One that came to my mind that that I thought, you might know something about because I know I've heard you talk about Hawaiian mythology before was the Palay myth. Yeah. Yeah. The Hawaiian got his Palay is an interesting example, a deity of fire and Volkan Ism I was reading a book titled Pay Volcano Goddess. Goddess of Hawaii by H are low nemo, and he points out that when Polynesian voyagers I arrived in Hawaii, they brought their gods with

Volusia Robert Lamb Tolkien Mount Doom Joe Mccormack Hawaii Hobbit Thorin Jurgen South America Rizal Green DAL Dwarf Party
John Lewis Funeral to Be Held at Atlanta's Ebenezer Baptist

KNX Evening News

00:32 sec | 4 d ago

John Lewis Funeral to Be Held at Atlanta's Ebenezer Baptist

"Farewell for a civil rights giant. On Thursday. Here's CBS's Alison Keys. The funeral for Congressman and civil rights icon John Lewis is being held at the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church. The voice of Dr Martin Luther King Jr once rang out during the fight for justice. Voting rights in equality Jennifer Holiday will sing Take my hand Precious Lord, a favorite of kings and a staple of black funerals. Former President Obama will give the eulogy for John Lewis before private burial. Also attending will be former Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush.

John Lewis Dr Martin Luther King Jr Ebenezer Baptist Church Bill Clinton Alison Keys Jennifer Holiday Congressman George W. Bush CBS Barack Obama President Trump
John Lewis' funeral set for Atlanta church that MLK once led

The Lake Show with Henry Lake

00:32 sec | 4 d ago

John Lewis' funeral set for Atlanta church that MLK once led

"Ofthe final farewell for a civil rights giant. On Thursday. Here's CBS's Alison Keys. The funeral for Congressman and civil rights icon John Lewis is being held at the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church, where the voice of Dr Martin Luther King Jr once rang out during the fight for justice, voting rights in equality. Jennifer Holiday will sing, Take my hand Precious Lord, a favorite of kings and a staple of black funerals. Former President Obama will give the eulogy for John Lewis before private burial. Also attending will be former Presidents Bill Clinton and George W.

John Lewis Dr Martin Luther King Jr Ebenezer Baptist Church Bill Clinton Alison Keys Jennifer Holiday Congressman Barack Obama CBS George W President Trump
Amazon & Walmart changing checkout experience

Clark Howard Show

03:11 min | 4 d ago

Amazon & Walmart changing checkout experience

"Amazon. Has Developed a shopping cart. Is Most. People aren't aware Amazon very quietly. Is Opening, Amazon branded supermarkets. And they're doing just a few around the country is they've really failed with whole foods they're trying to come up with an Amazon branded supermarket and the shopping carts. Automatically. Know, what you have in your cart. And when you're done shopping. You just walk right out of the Amazon Grocery. So you don't even stop at a cashier. And the one thing you have to be as you have to be registered with Amazon. With the APP on your phone. And then it knows who you are when you come in knows how you're going to pay. And then the heart I know this is freaky and weird but the cart. Automatically Is. To Register each item. That has gone in there. It's called the the Dash Cart. And when you're done. You're done just go straight to your vehicle. Walmart. Amazon's rival. Is rumored to be coming out with an? Addition, to. Their APP. Where registered shoppers and it's not clear what category that's going to be will be able to. Check out of the store on their own right on their phone. It's not as easy. As what Amazon's offering very similar if you are a Sam's club shopper and have used their self-checkout. On your phone and it's great. Because allows people who know how much money they can spend to not get to the register and say, Oh, I don't have enough money for that. Were you take that off you take that off, take that off you. As you go along, you're able to ring things up. You know what they're going to cost what your total bill is and the rest, and this puts cashier jobs at risk obviously. But, the. Retailer. Is Looking to create a more efficient environment, and then the other aspect that's been rumored is that they're trying to deal with people's fears of human contact right now with corona and that's why. They're going to offer people the ability to ring up their own purchases completely different than self-checkout. This is just reading the Barcodes as you go on your phone with a running total. And then you end up checking yourself out. It creates a bar code that the greeter at the door scans with a little electronic gun. And they're able to verify the. You're a okay and you leave the store not ever having gone to a register line four one.

Amazon Amazon Grocery Walmart Amazon. Corona
Man Arrested After 2 Deadly Shootings in Brooklyn

Bernie and Sid in the Morning

00:31 sec | 5 d ago

Man Arrested After 2 Deadly Shootings in Brooklyn

"Is in custody in connection with two deadly shootings in Brooklyn. Police say the suspect, identified as a 41 year old Hassan rank allegedly shot and killed 39 year old Ansel Blackman this out from Friday night the victim found right in the middle of the street after being shot in his face following a dispute rank also suspected in the fatal shooting of a 20 year old DeAndre more earlier this month in the injury of a 36 year old woman. Ring facing charges of murder, attempted murder and criminal possession of a weapon.

Ansel Blackman Murder Hassan Brooklyn Deandre
Mark Tucker - Top Takeaway from Alexa Live 2020

Future Ear Radio

06:18 min | 6 d ago

Mark Tucker - Top Takeaway from Alexa Live 2020

"One German please I. Think I know what it's going to be but go ahead? Alexa conversations now I've just okay. I, wish so desert some data. So Alexa conversations a whole other thing. Yeah, we'll have. Six on my list, sorry. Number one is quick links and asked him task. Links so like we said before. You can start a skill by just saying the invocation name, or now an I. And launch it or you can go right into a specific intent by giving it more detail. That's exactly what quick links are quick links launches the APP. You can use that today. No additional work needed for anything. You just construct a url that you include what your skill ideas and it's got slashed launch on the end, and you can post that wherever you can have it in your. Social media you can have an L.. Yup your help documentation on your website wherever you want somebody to launch your skill from then just include that link and what happens is when you click on the link than it redirects you to a an intermediate page now if you if you're not logged onto your Amazon account, that's that's associated with. Alexa and you're GONNA get a log on Amazon. dialogue, so you can enter your user ID and Password, but then on this page it gives you a little header at the top that shows you. The name of the skill is skill icon. It's rating a little information about it, and then it finds the. Device devices that are connected that you own associated with that account and you've got a button for each one of those or Or Button to send a notification to all of your Alexa, devices and so you just have one of those buttons and next thing you know that devices talking to you saying. Do you WANNA start? This experience the specific skill on on this device, and it starts to run in your off just as if you were to have said Alexa open whatever your skill rotation name is. Yeah. I actually think this is a humongous deal for at the whole Alexa ecosystem. This would have been my number one to if I was power ranking him because I think that we've heard so much discussion around discover ability end. Just this dilemma that you know. How do you ever remember the invocation for ten twenty thirty? This idea where you're going to have this ever increasing amount, you don't have the skew more fic- interface like you have with you know the mobile web and you have your APPs and all that. So you don't have these reminders of what APP means what all this? You gotta just remember it and I think this is massive for two reasons. The first is the ability for marketers to. Effectively cross-channel market their skill I think is just a total game changer from a marketing standpoint. Because now you can think of Ho campaigns that the whole purpose is to grow the. Skill user base insight. You have a social media campaign. You have digital marketing. Google's Google ads banner images are websites I can just see this becoming something where you know this is something we'll see a lot of where you get people to enable the skill I. think that's the big thing. Because again it goes back to what you were just saying about number two being the referrals if it is something where it is kind of like it's a system. That's really largely dependent on what you've already enabled, but you can't necessarily remember it, but you know you have that movie skill that you enabled. Enabled through the you know you have the fandango skill or whatever that might be but you know it's slipping your mind of how you invoke that, so then you can use this generic term and say hey launched my movie skill in. It's like okay. I know that that's Fandango in the reason that you were even enabling that in the first place was because of this really effective marketing campaign so I think that this is a massive development for the third party ecosystem because I think now. It solves a major problem where it's like. How do you get people to a get signed up so that you can open the skill without having to enable it and then be i. think it gives them the opportunity. If this whole referral network kind of becomes something where it's dependent on these suggested kind of. You know affiliated searches. At No, I. I think you say there's a lot. In there that just rings true. Because how do you get somebody in the skill? For the very first time, right, you might run an ad campaign. That's got a great graphic. You know. Maybe it's Kung, Fu, panda, and you've got the new country panda skill, and you just say Alexa Open comes panda. seems simple enough but sometimes people just want tap it's there's that extra security of just tap this thing and I follow through the steps, and Oh, now I'm here. You know it's. There are multiple steps. Could you do your one to happen and you might have to log in, and you have the tap which device you want to go to, and then you start getting the the voice interaction. But, for for new users especially that are new to this idea of skills and want to be out there. Hand held a little bit more. It's kind of scary just to say something and. See if it works or not but to build a third USTA. Tapping people are used to touching a button I can't even see. This is something that occurred to me is now. What if I were to take? One of the quick links and Dan saved at as an idea on my mobile phone so I'm I'm already in there and I got some sort of an APP and I just wanted to tap that. And then also it's It's going to allow me to open that up on another device so. It's There's lots of different things that you can do with that so I just love the idea of quick links and lots of different things going on

Alexa Google Amazon Usta DAN Amazon. Kung Hand
Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and the Hunt for the Kremlin's Most Dangerous Hackers

The Vergecast

46:42 min | 6 d ago

Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and the Hunt for the Kremlin's Most Dangerous Hackers

"Everybody from the British. Ask this week's interview. Episode has any Greenberg senior writer at wired. He just SORTA book called Sand Worm New Era of cyber war in the hunt for the Kremlin's Miss, dangerous hackers, it is all about hacking group inside of the Russian government called San Worm. They were responsible for the most damaging cyber warfare attacks over the past year there behind not PECI. The hackers took out in the mayor shipping line hospitals across the U. K San has totally escalated. What we think of Cyber War, and he's book gets all into how they were discovered how they were flushed out the. The intricacies of these various hacks. It's super interesting. The book is a thrill ride. If you're looking for something that isn't the virus. This is like a thriller, a highly recommended. It was really fun to talk to her about the stuff. one thing I. WanNa know we're all at home so during this in every might hear some kids in the background. I asked you just be a little forgiving that we're all. We're all dealing with it and he was a great interview. Check Out Sandy Greenberg of sand worm, a new era of cyber war and the hunt for the Kremlin's most dangerous hack. Any Greenberg your senior writer at wired you're also the author of Sand Worm, new era of cyber war in the hunt for the Kremlin's most dangerous. Welcome glad to be here so even writing about cybersecurity frontier I think you just said two thousand six and writing about Cybersecurity, but this book sand worm as I was reading it. It seems like it's called the new era of cyber war. It seems like there's been a huge turn in sort of state-sponsored. Particularly Russians sponsored cyber attacks. How did you come onto that notion? How did you begin reading this book I'm I'm very curious how you see. See that turn happening well. In late twenty sixteen, my former colleague Kim Zetter she had been the one who really covered state sponsored hacking in cyber war stuff, but she left wired, and this was also at the time. When you know Russian hackers were meddling in the US election, they'd hacked the democratic. National Committee and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and the Clinton Campaign, so my editors were really primes on face, mantra hacking all of a sudden, but what they? They really what they told me they wanted was a actually like a big takeover of the whole magazine. All about cyber war, but cyber war to me is different than those kinds of espionage election, meddling tactics so I went looking for no real cyber war story, which means to me like a actual disruptive cyber attacks, and as I looked around. It seemed like the place where that was really happening was in Ukraine not really in the US in fact maybe. Maybe what was happening in? Ukraine seemed to me like it was in some ways, the only real full blown cyber war that was actually occurring where Russian hackers were not just attacking the election which they had done, they tried this spoof the results of a presidential election, but they had also attacks media and destroyed their computers. They had attacked government agencies and tried to like destroy entire networks, and then they had turned off the power for the first time. In December of two thousand, fifteen, the the first actual blackout triggered by hackers, and just as I was look into this happened again the the effect, the seem hacker group caused a blackout this time in the capital of Kiev so I wince looking in Ukraine for this cyber war story that. Turned into a cover story for wired that kind of gave editors what they wanted, but then also kept unfolding This cyber war kept growing in scope and scale and. The original story written for wired was kind of about the fact that you could look to Ukraine to see the future of cyber war that will what was happening. There might soon spread to the rest of the world. And that is actually what happens to like just after we publish that cover story to same hackers released this climactic terrible cyber attack in Ukraine. Called Not Petiot that spread beyond Ukrainians became the worst cyberattack history cost ten billion dollars, so when that happened, that was when I saw that there was potential to do a book about this that it was not just a kind of case study about Ukraine or even kind of predictive story, but a an actual full story arc about this one group that had carried out the what I would say was not only the first. First Real Cyber War, but the worst cyberattack in history and the you know I wanted to capture the the Ark of that story in the effects, the real experience of cyber war. Yeah, so the group is called sand worm in this is just one of the the sort of opening arcs of the book is how they've come. They come to be named this because references and code walk people through just like it's so. relatable that like even these hackers are using using this language that leads them recalled Sandwich Tell people about it. So when I started to look into the origins of this group after that second blackout attack I I found that this this company called eyesight partners which have been acquired by fire I I, said partners was the first to find these hackers in twenty, fourteen, basically using fishing in kind of typical espionage tactics, plant malware in the networks of typical Russian hacking targets like groups across Eastern, Europe and NATO in a look like what they were doing was just kind of typical espionage. They were planning. This by wear calls lack energy buds will first of all they could see that they were rushing, because they had this server that they were using to administer some of these attacks and they. They left the server, so anybody could look at it in. There was a kind of Russian language to file for how to use black energy on the service, so these guys seem like they were rushing, but even more interesting in some ways. was that they to track each victim each instance of black energy? This malware has little campaign code in each campaign was a reference to the science fiction novel Dune and you know so like one of them was something about Iraq is, and then one of them is about the sutter cars, these like imperial soldiers in in that SCI FI universe so I said partners named this group sand worm, because well just because it's a cool. Name associated with doing, but it turned out to me. It became this very powerful because a sandwich miss this monster that lies beneath the surface, and occasionally arises from underground to do terribly destructive things. partners didn't know that at the time, they they soon afterward realized what sand. was doing was not just espionage, but they were actually doing reconnaissance for disruptive cyberattacks. They were also hacking power grids. They were planning black energy, not only in the European Eastern European targets in the US power grid networks as well. The Ultimately Syndrome was the first twenty fifteen to cross that line in use black energy as the first step in a multi step attack that led to a blackout. So this was not just espionage really was kind of like you know this monster that rises from under the ground to do terrible acts of mass destruction that came to pass so one of the things that comes up over in the book. Is this growing sense of dread from security researchers and analysts? Oh this is an imminent threat to the united. States just Ukraine, but like this is happening here and then there's a sense that the United States actually open the door to this kind of warfare with stuxnet. which was an attack on Iran? How how did those connect for you that it seemed like there's a new rule of engagement new set of rules of engagement for cyber warfare that actually the United States implicitly created with with stuxnet by attacking Iran. Yeah, I mean I tried to highlight. Clearly sand worm are the real bad guys in the story, they are the actual hacker group that did these terribly reckless destructive attacks that actually in some cases put people's lives at risk, the kind of in some parts of the story they actually shutdown medical record systems and I. Think may have cost people's lives with cyber attacks today they are the actual antagonist here, but I also want to highlight the ways that the US government is is partially responsible for the state of Cyber War, and there are a few ways that that's true. I The US! Open the Pandora's box of cyber war with stuxnet. This piece of now where that. That was used to destroy Iranian nuclear enrichment centrifuges that was the first piece of our that actually have caused that physical disruption destruction, and we now see Sandra doing the same thing in Ukraine. In in fact, in some ways around the world, also the the US hordes, these kind of zero day, secret hacking techniques, some of which were stolen and leaked and used by sand worm, but then I think the in fact, the biggest way that I tried to highlight that the US is responsible or complicit or negligent. Here is that we did not call allows what Santorum was doing in Ukraine and say to Russia. We know what you're doing. This is unacceptable. Nobody should be turning out the lights. Two civilians with cyber attacks. There wasn't a message like that I. mean the Obama White House sent a message to Russia over this kind of cyber hotline to say your election hacking is not okay. We see what you're doing and we want you to stop, but they said nothing about a tube blackout attacks in Ukraine, and that was kind of implicit signal to Russia. They could keep. Keep escalating, and even as all the cyber security, researchers and Ukrainians were warning that what was happening to Ukraine, would soon spread to the rest of the world, the US government ignore this both Obama, and then the trump administration until that prediction came to pass and a sand worm cyberattack did spread to the rest of the world, and it was too late, and we all suffered globally as a result, so let's talk about patch it. WAS CATASTROPHIC IN SCOPE, right? It took out the mayor shipping line, which is a massive business. It took out some hospitals in UK like it was huge in scope. I don't think people really put it all together. Talk about how it started and how big it grew. Yeah, so not too was kind of like big apotheosis sandwich, where all of these predictions of the terribly destructive things they were doing to the rest of the world came to pass but it did it started in Ukraine. They hijacked this. The the software updates of this accounting software called me doc that is basically used by everybody in Ukraine. The quicken turbo tax of Ukraine. If you do business in Ukraine, you have to have this installed, so sanborn hijack the updates of that news to push out this worm to thousands of victims mostly in Ukraine, but it was a worm, so it's spread the mmediately end quickly kind of carpet bombs. The entire Ukrainian Internet's every computer at spread to would encrypt permanently. You could not recover the computer, so it very quickly took down pretty much every. Every Ukrainian government agency twenty two banks multiple airports for hospitals in Ukraine that I. could count and in each of these cases. What is eight took them down. I mean it destroyed essentially all of their computers, which requires sometimes weeks or months to recover from, but then as you know, this is a worm that does not respect national borders. So even though it was, it seemed to be an attack intended to disrupt Ukraine. It immediately spread beyond Ukraine's borders. Borders to everybody who had this accounting software installed? That was doing business in Ukraine and some people who didn't so that includes Maersk. The world's largest shipping firm and Fedex and Mondelez, which owns cadbury, NABISCO and ranking manufacturing firm that makes tylenol in Merck. The Pharmaceutical Company in New Jersey on each of these companies lost hundreds of millions of dollars. The scale of this is kind of difficult to capture but I in the book I tried to. To I focused in part Maersk because it is just a good company to look at because you can. They had this gigantic global physical machine that is they have seventy six ports around the world that they own as well as these massive ships that have tens of thousands of shipping containers on them. And I told the story of how on this day seventeen of their terminals of were entirely paralyzed by this attack with ships arriving with just. Piles of containers on them. Nobody could unload. Nobody knew what was inside of nobody knew how to load or unload them with around the world of seventeen terminals, thousands of trucks, Semitrailers, carrying containers were lining up in Lyons miles long because the gates that were kind of checkpoints to check in the these trucks to drop something off or pick it up. They were paralyzed as well. This was a fiasco on a global scale is responsible for a fifth of the world's lable shipping capacity. They were truly just a rendered brain dead by this attack, but yeah displayed out at all of these different victims MERC had to borrow their own each vaccine from the Center for Disease Control because they're manufacturing. Manufacturing was disrupted by this, and it ultimately spread to a company called nuance, nate speech to text software. They have a service that does this for hospitals across the US to dozens of our possibly hundreds of American hospitals at this backlog of transcriptions to medical records that were lost because of this, and that resulted in patients, being do for surgeries or transfers, other hospitals in nobody knew their medical records were updated. I mean this was scale where hundreds of hospitals each of which has thousands of patients missing changes the medical records. We don't know what the effects of that work, but very well could've actually harmed people's health. Our lives I mean the scale of not petty is very difficult to. Get your mind around, but we do know that you know monetarily cost ten billion dollars, which is by far the biggest number we've ever seen, but it also had this this kind of harder to quantify toll on people's lives, so it it you know you read about it at length and wired. Obviously these companies go down of ripples in mainstream sort of general press, but I don't feel like people really not like Oh. This Russian group called San Worms sponsored by the Russian government. Unleash this attack in it caused this cascading effect of failure and disaster cost in that because we know what we can attribute it to the government, our government. I don't feel like that connection got made for people. What is the gap between other as a hack and Oh, this is actually a type of warfare engagement, because that that connection seems very tenuous. I think for a lot of people. Even as sort of the more general mainstream press covers this stuff. Yeah, you know. I don't think that that's is just like the nature of. Of Cyber War I think that was a failing that that lack of connection is a failing on our government's parts, and on you could say even on the part of some of these victims like these large companies I mean I at the time did not pitch it happened. I was fully on the trail of standard within days. I was talking to cyber security researchers who? Who had piece together? Some of the forensics to show the not petiot was Sandra that it was a Russian state-sponsored attack in yet none of those companies that I mentioned mercker Mondelez or Maersk or Fedex, or any of them wanted to say the Russia had done this to them and know governments were talking about either like the Ukrainian government was. They're always willing to point. Point the finger at Russia, but the US government was not, and you know that to me seemed to be just kind of I mean I felt like I was being gas. Let's at that point. I had watched Russia due to Ukraine for a long time at that point tonight. I sort of understood that NATO in the West. We had this kind of cruel logic that. Ukraine is not us. Russia can do what it likes to Ukraine because they're not NATO not e you. They are Russia's sphere of influence or something I think that that's very wrongheaded, but at least it made sense. You know to have that that viewpoints, but now this attack had spread from Ukraine to hit American soil American companies in many cases and yet still the US government was saying nothing I just thought this was bizarre and you know so i. For months I was like. Trying to get any of these companies to tell the story of of their experiences, not Peta I was trying to figure out why the US government wasn't talking about the fact that this was a Russian cyberattack and ultimately I. Think it was I. think it was kind of I know partly disorganization negligence. I think it may have something to do with the fact that the. The? Trump administration doesn't like talking about Russian hackers for obvious reasons, but eight months after it took eight months ultimately for the US government to finally say not that it was a was Russia it was the worst cyberattack in history, and then a month later. The White House impose consequences in put new sanctions on Russia and response, but it took nine months and more importantly it took. Multiple years this without was the first time this was twenty eighteen, and the Russian cyber war in Ukraine had started around the fall of Twenty fifteen, so that's just incredible span of negligence when the US government said nothing about these escalating unfolding. Acts, of Cyber Award that there should have been unacceptable from the very beginning I mean these are the kind of quintessential acts of state sponsored cyber attacks on civilians, trying out the lights. You know that's the kind of thing that I believe that the US government should have called out and drawn a red line across at the very beginning took ears, so I do think it was a big failing. Of of diplomacy, it just seemed like that part of the problem, and this is kind of an expression is it's so hard to describe like if the Russian government sent fighter jets to America and live their support. Okay, like everyone understood, you can see it. You can understand what happened there. In the you know, there's like a however many decades of movies about how to fight that war. This is a bunch of people in a room typing. Like it there's just an element of this where the dangerous Oh federal where the attack is invisible, and while the effects might be very very tangible, the causes are still sort of mysterious people so. My question is who is sandwich. What what do we know about them? Where do they work? What are they like? Do we have a sense of how this operation actually operates? In some ways the the biggest challenge of reporting this book, and I spent essentially the third act of the book, the last third of the reporting of the book, trying to answer the question of who is in worm, who are these people? Where are they located? What motivates them and I guess to partially spoil the ending here. They are a unit of the year you. They are a part of Russia's military intelligence agency, which is responsible for you know, this is not a coincidence. They are responsible for election meddling responsible for the attempted assassination of You. chemical weapons in the United Kingdom they're responsible for the downing of a seventeen as commercial passenger jet over Ukraine were three hundred innocent people died on the G. R.. You are this incredibly reckless callous out military intelligence agency, but they act like kind of almost just cut through mercenaries around the world. Doing Russia's bidding in ways that are very scary, so I threw essentially like a combination of excellent work of a bunch of security researchers who I was speaking to combined with some confirmation from US intelligence agencies, and then ultimately some other clues from the investigation of Robert Muller into meddling all these things combined created the trail that led to one group within the JERE. You that were you know I? Eventually had some names and faces even address of this this group, and all that was actually only finally fully confirms After the book came out Justin in recent months when the White House finally actually was the State Department's. End as well as the UK on Australian and other governments together finally said yes, sand worm is in fact that this unit of the year you so this theory that I developed in positive near the end of the book was finally basically confirmed by governments just in recent months. So one thing that strikes me at that is I, think of the Russian military things. Gru is being foreboding being obviously, they're very very good at this other a buttoned up in then they have like a incredible social media presence that kind of POPs up throughout the book that distracts from what doing. They set up Gucci for two point Oh when they were doing the DNC hacks that fed to wikileaks in the. That account insisted it was just guy. They set up the shadow brokers which was. I read. It is just like your some goof-balls like they wanted to seem a lot dumber and a lot smaller than they were. They were very effective at it to people I. Talk About those that strategy, and then I guess my question have is like a re better at seeing that strategy for what it is well. You make a really interesting point. The uses these false flags like throughout their recent history that we I should say we don't know that they were responsible for shadow brokers. In fact, nobody knows who shot a brokers. The shadow brokers truly are, and they are in some ways the biggest mystery in this whole story, this one group that hacked the NSA apparently and leaked a bunch of their zero day hacking techniques, or maybe they were even say insiders. We still don't know the answer to that question, but the other other incidents you mentioned. That are you are responsible for this Guja for two point zero fake hacktivists leaked a bunch of the Clinton documents. They're responsible for other false flags like they at one point to call themselves the Cyber Caliphate pretended to be Isis. They've a pretended to be like patriotic pro. Russian Ukrainians at some point they they're always like wearing different masks ends. They're very deceptive. in the a later chapter of the book, some of the biggest one of the biggest attacks they. They did was this attack on the twenty thousand Olympics where they not only wore a false mask, but they actually had layers of false flags where as cyber security researchers W. This melwert was used to destroy the entire back end of the two thousand eighteen winter Olympics. Just as the opening ceremony began, this was a catastrophic events. The aware had all of these fake clues made look like it was Chinese or North Korean or maybe Russian. Nobody could tell it was like. It was this kind of confusion bomb almost designed to to just make researchers throw up their hands. Give up on attributing mallards. Any particular actor was only through some amazing detective work by some of the analysts that I spoke to the able to cut through those false flags identify that sand was behind this essentially, but yeah, it's it is a one very real characteristic of the jury you that they are almost they seem to almost take pleasure or like be showing off their deception capabilities to and their evolving those capabilities they are getting more deceptive over time as fake gets more, destructive aggressive. Advertising content when I say Utopia what comes to mind? Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the Pathak social body. Everybody in that place. Everybody happy now. While the peacock original series brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. The concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. 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Not Connected Right, but the way they throughout the book the way they execute East campaigns they're deeply connected, and that seems like not only just a new kind of warfare, and you kind of craft, but some just consistently seems to work in surprising ways like the tech press is GonNa. Be Like Gucci. I says this and we're. There's never that next step of also we think it's Russian government, and that seems like first of all I'm dying. I imagine the meeting right. I would love to be a fly on the wall of the meeting where they decide what their twitter name is going to be today. I'm very curious how they evolve those attacks in such a way that it just seems to be more and more effective time. Yeah, I mean. I also love to have been those meetings in. It's my one kind of regret in this book that I never actually got. Interviews, it's almost an impossible thing to do. They liked find defectors from the R., you or something. He will tell those stories at a knock it murdered I mean. It's kind of a possible, but but. In some cases? I think your earlier points. They almost seem kind of bumbling in these things they do them in a very improvisational way. for two point Oh seemed almost like it was a justice thing they invented on the spot, tried to cover up some of the the accidental ups like they had left russian-language formatting errors in the documents that they had leaked from the DNC, so they admitted this guy who appeared the next day and started. Talking about being a Romanian. Friends as motherboard Lorenza, Franceschi decry he started this conversation. Align with with Guja for two point, oh basically proved at the guy could not actually properly speak Romanian. BE Russian speaker. In fact, it was. It was almost comical at the same time. They're using very sophisticated hacking techniques doing destructive attacks on a massive scale, but they're also. They seem like they're kind of making it up as they go along. They do things that don't actually seem very kind of strategically smart. They kind of seem like they're trying to impress their boss for the day. Sometimes with just like some sometimes, it's just seems like the Jere. You wakes up in asks themselves. Like what can we blow up today? Rather than thinking like? How can we accomplish the greater strategic objectives of the Russian Federation? So they are fascinating in that way and very stringent colorful group. That's I think one of the biggest questions I have here is. We spend a lot of time trying to imagine what flat and Mirror Putin wants. You know when he grows up, but it. None of this seems targeted like what is the goal for Russia to disrupt the Winter Olympics right like. Is there a purpose to that? Is that just a strike fear? Is it just to? EXPAND THAT SUV influenced. Is it just to say we have the capability furious is there? has there ever really been the stated goal for this kind of cyber warfare? That one is particularly mystifying. I mean you can imagine why Russia would want to attack the Olympics. They were banned from the two thousand Eighteen Olympics doping, but then you would think that they might want to attack the Olympics and send a message maybe like eight deniable message a message that you know if you continue to ban us. We're GONNA. Continue to attack you like like any terrorists would do, but instead they attacked the winter. Olympics in this way, that really seemed like they were trying not to get caught, and instead like make it look like the was Russia North Korea? And then you have to like what is the point of that was? The could kind of. Sit there in Moscow and kind of like rub their hands together in gleefully. Watch this chaos unfolds. It almost really does seem like it was petty vindictive thing that they just for their own emotional needs wanted to make sure that nobody could enjoy the Olympics if they were not going to enjoy them I that was, but that one is i. think outlier in some ways for the most part you can kind of see. The Russia is advancing. The G. R. You that sand worm is advancing something that does generally make sense which is that. In Ukraine for instance, they're trying to make Ukraine look like a failed state. They're trying to make Ukrainians. Lose faith in their security. Services are trying to prevent investors globally from funneling money into Ukraine trying to create a kind of frozen conflict, as we say in Ukraine where there's this constant perpetual state of degradation. They're not trying to conquer the country, but they're trying to create a kind of permanent war in Ukraine and would cyber war. You can do that beyond the traditional front end. It is in some ways the same kind of tactic that they used in other places like the US which. which here we saw more than influence operation that they were hacking leaking organizations like democratic campaign organizations and anti doping organizations to kind of so confusion to embarrass on their targets. They're trying to influence like the international audiences opinion these people, but in Ukraine, it is in some ways, just a different kind of influence operation where they're trying to influence the world's view of Ukraine. Influence Ukrainians view of their themselves under government to make them feel like they are in a war zone even when their kid hundreds of miles from the actual fighting. That's happening on the eastern fronts in the eastern region of. Of Ukraine so in a book you you you go to Kiev. You spent time in Ukraine. Is there a sense in that country that while sometimes light goes out sometimes our TV stations. Their computers don't boot anymore. Because they got rewritten, the Hydros got Zeros like. Is there a sense that this is happening? Is there a sense the defy back is there does Microsoft deploy you know dozens of engineers to to help fight back. How does that play out on the ground there? Yeah, I mean to be fair. Ukrainians are very stoic about these things and regular. Ukrainian citizens were not bothered by you know. Know a short blackout. They didn't particularly care you know. This blackout was the first ever. Hacker induced blackout in history but Ukrainian cyber security. People were very unnerved by this end, people in these actual utilities were traumatized I mean these attacks were truly like relentless sins very kind of scary for the actual operators at the controls I mean in the first blackout attack. These poor operators Ukrainian control room in western Ukraine they were locked out of their computers, and they had to watch their own mouse cursor. Click through circuit breakers, turning off the power in front of them I. Mean They watched it happen? At these kind of Phantom hands to control of their mouse movements, so they took this very very seriously, but yet Ukrainians as a whole I mean they have seen a lot. They are going through an actual physical war. They've seen the seizure of Crimea and the invasion of the east of the country. You know the the date hits. A Ukrainian general was assassinated with a car bomb in the middle of Kiev, so they have a lot of problems, and I'm not sure that cyber war is one of the top of their minds, but not patio I. Did, actually reach Ukrainians normal. Ukrainian civilians to it. It shook them as well. I talked to two regular Ukrainians. who found that they couldn't swipe into the Kiev Metro. They couldn't use their credit card at the grocery store. All the ATM's were down The Postal Service was taken out for every computer that the postal service had was taken out for more than a month. I mean these things really did affect people's lives, but it kind of. A until that kind of climactic worm. Not Patio for I think for this to really reach home for Ukrainians. who have kind of seen so much. How do you fight back? I, mean I one of things that struck me as I was reading. The book is so many of the people you talked to people who are identifying the threat. They're actually private companies. Eyesight was the first even detect it. they are contractors to intelligence agencies the military in some cases, but they're not necessarily the government right like it's not necessarily Microsoft. Who has to issue the patches from the software not necessarily GE which makes simplicity, which is the big industrial controls talk about a lot. How does all that come together into a defense because that seems like harder problem of coordination? Yeah, I mean defense in Cyber. Security is in an eternal problem. It's incredibly complicated, and when you have a really sophisticated determined adversary, it know they will win eventually ends I. think that they're absolutely lessons for defense in this book about you know. Maybe you need to really really think about software updates for instance like the kind that were hijacked to a with this medoc accounting software. As a vector for terrible cyber-attacks. Imagine that like. Any of your insecure apps that have kind of updates can be become a a piece of Malware, really unique to signature networks need to think about patching on. There are just an endless kind of checklist of things to every organization needs to do to protect themselves so. In some ways that just like a Sisyphean task and I don't. I don't try to answer that question in the book because it's too big, and it's kind of boring as well, but what I do really hammer on is the thing that the government's really could've done here. which is to try to establish norms tried to control attackers through diplomacy through kind of disciplinary action through things like kind of Geneva Convention for Cyber War if. If you think about a kind of analogy to say like chemical weapons, we could just try to give everyone in the world a gas mask that they have to carry around with them at all times, or we could create a Geneva. Convention norm that chemical weapons should not be used in if they are than crime, and you get pulled in front of the Hague. Hague and we've done the ladder and I think that in some ways should be part of the the answer to cyber war as well we need to establish norms and make countries like Russia or like organizations like the G. Are you understand that there will be consequences for these kinds of attacks, even when the victim is not the US or NATO or the? The EU and I think we're only just starting to think about that. One of the questions I had as reading is it seems like a very clear red line for almost everyone you talk to is attacks on the power grid right? That is just unacceptable. You should not do it if you do it. You've crossed a line and there should be some consequence. Is, that clear to governments. Is that something that our government says? It's something that the says it has been established. It seems like it's it's the conventional wisdom wants to salvage, but I'm not unclear whether that is actually the line that exists. It definitely has not been established, and when I kind of did these I managed to get sort of interviews with the top cyber security officials in the Obama ends trump administration Jay Michael Daniel was the cyber. Cyber Coordinator for the administration was the kind of cyber coordinator boss in the The Homeland Security Adviser for trump and both of them when I asked him about like wiped. Why didn't you know to put it bluntly like? Why didn't you respond? When Russia caused blackouts in Ukraine? Both of them essentially said well. You know that's not actually the rule that we want to set. We want to be able to cause blackouts in our adversaries networks. In their power grids when we are in a war situation or when we believe it's in our national interest, so you know that's the thing about these cyber war capabilities. This is part of the problem that every country. Absolutely the US among them isn't really interested in controlling these weapons, because we in this kind of Lord of the rings fashion, we are drawn to them to like we want to maintain the ability to use those weapons ourselves and nobody wants to throw this ring in the fires, of Mount Doom. We all wanted maintain the ring and imagine that we can use it for good in out. So that's why neither administration called that Russia for doing this because they want that power to. Make the comparison to to nuclear weapons but Negotiated drawdown and treaties with Russia in the past we count warheads where aware that the United States stockpiles can destroy the world. Fifty Times over today maybe tomorrow one hundred hundred like what we have a sense of the the measure of force that we can. Put on the world when it comes to nuclear weapons, there's a sense that Oh, we should never use these right like we have them as a deterrent, but we've gained out that actually leads to his mutually assured destruction like there's an entire body of academics. There's entire body of researchers. Entire body is got scenario planning with that kind of weapon. Does that same thing exist for for cyber weapons. There are absolutely. Know community is of academics. Policymakers who are thinking about this stuff now, but I don't think it's kind of gotten through to actual government decision. that. There needs to be kind of cyber deterrence in how that would work. In in the comparison to nuclear weapons is like instructive, but not exactly helpful. In fact, it's kind of counter-productive because we cannot deter cyber-attacks with other cyber-attacks i. don't think that's GonNa work in part because we haven't even tried to establish it yet. There are no kind of rules or read lines, but then I think more importantly. Everybody thinks that they can get away with cyberattacks that they can. They're going to create a false flag. That's clever enough that that when they blow up a power grid, they can blame their neighbor instead, so they think they're. They're gonNA. Get Away with it, and that causes them to do it anyway. A not fear the kind of assured destruction so I think that the the right response, the way to to deter cyber attacks is not with the promise of a cyber attack in return. It's with all the other kind of tools we have, and they've been used sometimes, but but they were not in the case of Sand Werman. Those tools include like sanctions which came far too late in the story indictments of hackers. In some cases, we still haven't really seen syndrome. Hackers indicted for the things that they did in Ukraine or or even not petty. And then ultimately just kind of messaging like calling out naming and shaming bad actors, and that has happened to some degree with Sandra, but in some cases there have still been massive failures there there has still been no public attribution of the Sandwich attack on the twenty eighteen Olympics I mean. My Book has been out for months. I think show pretty clear evidence that syndrome is responsible for this attack. The very least it was Russia and yet the US and Korean War, These Olympics took place at UK, none of these governments have named Russia as having done that. That attack which almost just invites them to do it again whenever our next Olympics are going to be, I guess maybe not this year, but if you don't send that message than you're just essentially inviting Russia to try again so I think might my big question is what happens now? I mean right we you write about. The NSA has tailored access operations, which is their elite hacking group. We are obviously interested in maintaining some of these capabilities. We've come to a place where people are writing books about how it works. What is the next step? What is the next? does it just keep getting worse or does this kind of diplomacy you're talking about? Is that beginning to happen I? Think there is some little glimmers of hope about the diplomacy beginning to happen I mean this year in February I think it was the State Department's called out a sand worm attack on Georgia, where a worms hackers basically took down a ton of Georgian websites by attacking the hosting providers as well as a couple of TV's broadcasters in the US. State Department with a few other governments not. said this was sand. Worm named the unit of the GRU. That's is that was confirmation that I've been looking for for a long time, but they also made a point of saying that we're calling this out is unacceptable, even though Georgia. Georgia is not part of NATO or the U. so that's that's progress. That's essentially creating a new kind of rule. That's state-sponsored. Hackers can't do certain things, no matter who the victims and that's really important. Also, it was kind of interesting because federal officials like gave me a heads up about that announcement before happened, which they have very very rarely do and I think they were trying. To say was in we. We read your book and we. Got The message okay like Stop attacking us about this like we're trying. We're doing something different here I. Don't want flatter myself that I actually changed their policy, but it did seem interesting that they wanted to tell me personally about this so i. I think that like maybe our stance on this kind of diplomacy is evolving, and we're learning lessons, but at the same time we also see the attacks evolving to. To and their new innovations in these kinds of disruption happening, we've seen since some of these terrible Sandra attacks. You know other very scary things like this piece of our called Triton or crisis that was used to disabled safety systems in a oil refinery in Saudi Arabia on that was you know that could have caused an actual physical explosion of petrochemical facility? The the attacks are evolving to okay final last real question. Tell people where they can get your book. You can find all kinds of places by on indie Greenberg Dot net. Written another book as well previously, yes. That's right. I wrote a book about wikileaks. Cypher punks and things like that. That's right well. I'm a huge fan. It was an honor to talk to you. Thank you so much for coming on I know it's. It's a weird time to be talking about anything, but the coronavirus I was very happy to talk about something else, which is that it seems a little bit more in control Even if it is quite dangerous, a thank you for the time. I appreciate it. Yeah, I'm glad to provide people with a different kind of apocalypse as a distraction.

Ukraine United States Russian Government Nato Olympics Kiev United Kingdom Sandra Cyber Award State Department Kim Zetter Barack Obama Clinton Russia San Worm Sandy Greenberg NSA DNC
Police investigate shooting at Austin Black Lives Matter protest

NPR News Now

00:52 sec | Last week

Police investigate shooting at Austin Black Lives Matter protest

"Police in Austin Texas have released two individuals suspected of firing handguns, and a black lives matter protest in a facebook live video a car is. Is Heard Honking and a group of protesters when shots rang out for member station K. UT Danny Martinez reports, police say twenty eight year old Garrett foster was carrying an AK47 type assault rifle when he approached the driver's side window of a vehicle last night during a protest and was shot. Austin police chief Brian Manley others in the crowd began striking vehicle. Gun were fired inside the vehicle at Mr Foster. Chief Manley says it appears that foster may have pointed his weapon at the driver of the vehicle before being shot himself a second individual in the crowd than fired shots at the vehicle as it drove away, foster died from multiple gunshot wounds at a local hospital. Police are still investigating the incident

Garrett Foster Austin Texas Chief Manley Brian Manley Danny Martinez Facebook Assault
Garrett Foster: Police investigate shooting at Austin Black Lives Matter protest

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | Last week

Garrett Foster: Police investigate shooting at Austin Black Lives Matter protest

"In Austin, Texas have launched a probe now into the shooting death of one man at a black lives matter protest yesterday. Sheila Foster is the mother of Garrett Foster shot while officers rather seen monitoring protesters in downtown Austin. That's when shots rang. It was pushing Whitney through an intersection. And this gentleman had got out of his car and started firing shots and my son was shot three times. Initial reports indicate the victim may have been carrying a rifle and approach of suspect's vehicle

Sheila Foster Austin Garrett Foster Whitney Texas
Why Are the Leaves on the Tips of My Transplanted Japanese Red Maple Turning Brown?

Your Gardening Questions

02:21 min | Last week

Why Are the Leaves on the Tips of My Transplanted Japanese Red Maple Turning Brown?

"Planted a Japanese red maple tree two months ago. He put it in in early May and he says some of the leaves now on the ends of the stems are starting to either turn, Brown or look wilted. Is this normal? Yes and that's the best way to answer I have a plan to spend established for many many many years, and with the the drying of the season, even though we've had sufficient rain to keep the roots going. The tips of the leaves on my jammies. Red Maple and a couple of others I've seen are indeed starting to dry up apparently has to do with the vascular nature. Little tiny find tips guy, get brown when their stress for water and I would say that that sounds quite natural. It's most unfortunate because it kind of ruins. The look things a bit but I. I don't think that it indicates a problem beyond the fact that it's a new plant It's it's typical for all of them to do that to a certain degree right now. The finer the foliage tips well yeah, the finer relieves cuts, and so on are the more apt. This is to happen, but I've seen all all kinds of Japanese maples. With this same problem about the same time of year now. He does need to continue to water, because the friend is plant, but again so daylights out of it when you do and then in the case of a of a plant in the ground, it could be two in three weeks before you need to water again. Even on a new plan you. You need to add sufficient to get the soil moisture down least foot. If the top inshore to is out, it can still be wet down below and that's where I'm going to mention not so much for him, because it sounds like it's normal thing, but I still have. Rod Hanging in my do and the garage that has a keen to on one end and his point of on the other, and I have cut rings into the darn thing, and used those sharpie to create black areas every four inches from the tip on up so I can tell when I show that in the ground around a new plant. How how much moisture is at what bet?

Rod Hanging Brown
Creating TV shows on an iPhone

Talking Tech

05:36 min | Last week

Creating TV shows on an iPhone

"This pandemic, we're seeing so many TV people recording from home and you're probably wondering how doing this. How are they recording on an iphone in reaching the broadcasting? Facility, we've got rich to mirrow here. He is tech reporter for Channel Five. Ktla in Los Angeles and he remotes first TV stations all over the country and he's. GonNa fill us in rich. How you doing I'm doing fantastic. Let me just first say a I think it was like my little personal dream to go live from my home for all of my stand in one place, and do five hours of live shots every morning for all these TV stations, and I thought. Wow, wouldn't it be more efficient for me to just have a home studio and do it from there? Well now I've been forced to do that, so my little dream has become. Become a reality, but I'll tell you it's been kind of a nightmare because it's not very easy, and if you've been watching me on TV folks that have been seeing, it have seen kind of an evolution of me going live from home. Because KTLA's been fantastic, they said hey do what you need to go live from home. Whatever and get the equipment you need thankfully as tech person. I have a lot of the equipment that I need to do this, but the bottom line is at this point. You only need a smartphone, which is the IPHONE and some software and a microphone, and so we've used to piece of software at KTLA. One is called. And the other is call TV. You and both of these things work in the same way. They take a signal from your phone, and they broadcast it back to home base, so it's kind of like using skype, but it's managed by the TV station, so they can manage in the quality way better than what you would get on an off the shelf product. Does that make sense does? The, let's let's go through. Let's go through the process, so you're doing the morning show it's seven. Oh five and they cut to. They say okay. We got rich with his tech segment. Now now you're sitting in Los Angeles at home and you've got the IPHONE. It's ready to go. Take me through the process. Yes, so when I get up in the morning, it's. It's Kinda like it's. It's like lighting up a little studio so in my spare bedroom which I've used to be the kids playroom I cleared it all out, which actually has been very bad, because the echo has been the biggest issue with the studio, and the problem is normally, and this is the other issue that I've run into normally when you're setting up a home. Home Studio. What do you do you figure out what you need what you have and what you have and you order the rest on Amazon. It's there the next day. Well. Guess what during Kovic Times? You can't just get next day delivery from Amazon so it has been a challenge to set up a home studio because I can't order the products that I need so. So, what I have here is a ring. Light that I used to use for live shots when I used to do like a podcast from home like facebook. Live so I i. Put that up and the ring. Light is kind of a big circular light that goes around my phone. My iphone sits in there and then underneath the iphone i. have another Tripod with A. An ipad on it and actually went to best buy and bought the Tripod Mount for that jobe amount, and then for that I've been using that as kind of a to watch KTLA and to also use as a teleprompter and so I. Did experiment with the Tele prompting APP as well? I didn't think it looked good on TV. I thought my eyes were a little shifty. So for me. It's easier to actually just kind of memorize some of my lines and read them off the script when we go to video which you called voiceover. But the microphone has been tricky. I've tried a lot of different microphones. A lot of the reporters at home are using. either. The apple included ear buds, and those work, really well Otherwise you have to kind of put a microphone into your phone, which is not very easy because professional microphones don't connect to the iphone unless you have a conduit, so I've been using a board I used for my podcast to connect the microphone into the phone, so it's gone very complicated Jefferson. A? What microphone you connecting theoretically into the phone? While so right now I'm using Oh my gosh. I have to look at my my headphones. Hang on. Audio Technica, and so this is an audio technica. It looks like one of the microphones that sports caster would use. It has the microphone that sticks out, but also the nice big headphones so with that I can hear what's called IFP so the other tricky part of this whole situation is that it's not like a video call where you can not worried you have. What's the return from? TV In my ear, so I have to be able to hear what the anchors are saying to me in my ear and. It gets really complicated. That's usually what we call be. We have this little cable that runs to a box that we listen to the programming of the station on, and when you're there live. Obviously you can hear the anchor talking to you, but when you're out in the field, you have to connect to an I've be box, and that's also another challenge, but these programs like I mentioned the. And the TV you, they allow you to pipe in the programming. Cheer IFP. I'm getting a little in the weeds year for the consumer audience. It's okay, do you? Do you pick up those programs in the APP store or are they Do you get up some other way we'll see? These programs are something that the TV stations pay a lot of money for it because they come associated with receiver so when I actually am broadcasting I'm broadcasting. Allied receiver we have at Ktla

Ktla Home Studio Los Angeles IFP Tech Reporter Audio Technica Amazon Facebook Kovic Times Jobe Apple Jefferson
Bruce Rasa - AgVoice: Voice Tech for the Farm

Future Ear Radio

06:04 min | Last week

Bruce Rasa - AgVoice: Voice Tech for the Farm

"Fascinating space because it seems, everyone is interested in voice. Everyone's willing to try and trial. It but we. We really here's got sparked. So about five years ago many people might remember that. Google did a public competition. For. Smart Glasses and they primarily aimed at you. Know vast majority that at the consumer market. But when I saw the device first floor in about it as a possible successor, initially compliment, but possible successor to the smartphone itself. I was really intrigued. At could be A. Very useful very practical everyday hands on tool to help people collect a saying for example in any industrial use case. And I just knew that intuitively because of Mine Akron grown up on the farm, families still farms in total like my a father brother GonNA cousins farm about ten thousand acres in western Missouri. uncles Nance also have an portrait of a forty thousand apple trees. Really Groping really neat, fascinating, rich diverse environment for for agricultural. work in the short versions observe was her hands on intense job, so when hands free tool came along I was interested tried out, so the specific origin story was. Through my name in the ring. In a you know Google did a public competition said. What would you do if you had this device? And I said well, if I had glass I would help. Farmers Growers Connect with consumers and show how their food is grown in a safe and environmentally responsible way so effectively the type of communications platform. To allow the world of agriculture to connect with the world of consumers, which usually has a lot of. Differences are GonNa Misunderstandings and the simple version is I was I was fortunate I was selected. and went through the list of the eight thousand people selected, and only five even mentioned the word agriculture. Got, this, device that has intriguing possibility, it's tested and so I actually I got the device in Los, Angeles I fully can say Missouri, and I went and test it with farmers the next day, so the first place in the world, smart glasses retested in the in the food production sector, anyway at least to general purpose, you know mass device. On Google's device was in western cooler bar. That's so cool, yeah! I think that's super interesting and you mentioned something there. You know hands busy labor intensive like that's where I think that. This is where it really caught. My attention is this. Is this notion that you know you think about that type of job? If you're a grower, you're a farmer more times than not I would imagine that you are doing things that are really. Really preoccupying yourself, but I think that as I've learned a little bit about your product, it really allows for them to continue to do the job that they're doing, but also sort of take care of a lot of different like almost like clerical work right like this is what I did today. These were the amount of bushels of apples that I picked. The right s you know kind of going like one by one and you can do this all on the go and and I. Just think that's so interesting, because clearly as you know, I would imagine that would the type of feedback that you've gotten is like this is a really positive thing because it allows me to do my job just way more efficiently than I had been doing it can. Can you speak a little bit to that idea of like how this tool serves that type of professional? Assure so a couple of examples quicken in that you know toying with the device on my whole goal was to put that. SMART glasses in a lot of people's hands, which I I got to meet with about eight hundred people over the course of a year people were from. Slightly more than twenty different countries got very diverse input and Dave. Two things came out loud and clear was. Screaming need for hands free device. NC exactly what you said was people already with a hands on job, sometimes a full professional job, not just if you will caller, but all of them have an escalating need to capture information as they're doing their job and they don't WanNa stop work doesn't sound like a big deal. Many people saying office, but this this stops ten twenty or thirty percent of their day by today's recordkeeping, which is really not frankly they're usually. They're talented their passion. But the the second thing that came out in their search was the voice recognition absolutely sucked. So these people have specialized dedicated jobs there. People could veterinarians a plant scientists agronomist. Machinery inspectors repair support in a very specific jobs. Basically, they have a very specific vocabulary or dictionary or lexicon. If you will a things they need to do the reports and pretty simple. If you if anyone listening this is tried anything with a general purpose, surface optimize for consumers be Siri. It could be google. Times Alexa Cortana. Usually those things really. Are Not optimized all for specific industrial use case yen. Okay, the second thing is. I'd observe what has happened. Ed Buried very successfully in the healthcare sector. So the quick kind of analogy there is whistling somewhat. Similar idea, but again the healthcare sector just one company alone called nuance. Brilliant job kind of from a distance think last I understood they've about five hundred thousand. Users that are doctors, nurses, health practitioners doing this thing you're talking about to invoice capture against healthcare records, so the big benefit to them is a reduction in this this overwhelming painful. recordkeeping piece so critical mandatory yet 'cause it's a major. Of Major source of overwhelming and burn out for physicians and other people in health care. And the second thing is frankly they're taking their eyes off the patient.

Google Farmers Growers Connect Mine Akron Ed Buried Missouri LOS Alexa Cortana Nance Dave Siri Missouri.
In Heat and Humidity, Watch for Lawn Diseases.

Your Gardening Questions

04:56 min | Last week

In Heat and Humidity, Watch for Lawn Diseases.

"Tell us a little bit about all this hot and humid weather. I know that now's the time you have to watch for lawn. Diseases. Well mark that is indeed true, and that's that's. It's kind of an annual thing. However We've had let us where I live now that that it varies considerably, but we've had. been rains some deluge, and then submitted ranged kept lawns moist to the points at the do point Do Point on. The grass can last until nine ten, nor even eleven o'clock in the morning to the point that that. Okay that much moisture. High humidity which is I'M GONNA. Say just simply yesterday. I tried to watch some windows. And I. Put it try because it was done at eight thirty in the morning. Before the Sun hit! It was so humid that the windows wouldn't dry when glass won't dry. It's H-. Hot, humid so anyhow. Fungi exist in the air at all times. They're blowing around there. Probably in the first thousand feet above the ground, and they settle and a Cetera when they settle on a susceptible plant and each kind of like the human cold, each each person gets a cold for a different reason, but it's still basically the same. Win Those spores are on the grass blades, and then we get a cold shower at six thirty in the evening and or high humidity or both the whole night long. Is a wonderful time for those fungi to Germany when they germinate, they send what is indeed kind of a tiny little room into the plant where it's been can grow if he is a fungi. That's going to cause disease He does that ring now. I don't know that these things are running rampant, but I have been told about red. Dollar spot. Guy. Guy Boaters Lawn I. Don't know week or so ago that he his tennis shoes turned orange. Well that indicates to me. That is lawn has arrested disease. What to do about it well. I. See about getting into a high rise you to mess with it, but more importantly. Some of these things are when I'm GONNA call natural. That doesn't mean they're good, but blue glasses which are prevalent in our area along with them, some of the new tall will turf type all fescue. Each one is a living in a d much baloney on it. There's hundreds of millions of them in a given long. When there is a spore when there is high humidity darkness. And, then temperatures are up. These guys are guys. Tales Germinate. Take a hold on the lawn and cause a problem now. sometimes you can't present them by putting on. They fun just side before the fact, but then how do you know that's going to happen? Well, that's where you have a lawn care company. That's that's where they try to stay did. I'M GONNA. Life in this now to Arborist who told me in a in a dry year when he sprays for fun decides and and protection of plants. He becomes a miracle worker. In a wet year, which we've had three of a row, he can spray with the same stuff same same everything. Mean to do just as good a job, and at the same time the fungi will germinate, and the way they go and prevention will have helped, but he won't stop the diseases so right now I would say along with other lawn care factors set that blade high, and and as a matter of fact high as you can is a good thing, which and then does trap some more water, but it also allows the plans to have enough leaf hype to gain enough sun to make enough food to sustain, or let's just say direct toward a well grown plant, even though there's millions of and that's that's the overall and it so Try It will if it comes down to your needs to water your lawn. Do not water in the evening. I'm going to say after dinner time at all I want that long going into nighttime dries and be on the surface at least so the next morning you can sit up the sprinkler and run it for three hours a spot deliver that one inch of water you'll have benefited the lawn, but drive by Neuner soon thereafter, and it'll start holding the disease at bay, just in a more or less normal way, or let's say by virtue of the way you care for the lawn.

Germany Neuner Tennis
Learning to program: The journey of Graham Cluley

The CyberWire

05:26 min | 2 weeks ago

Learning to program: The journey of Graham Cluley

"States you learned how to program by buying a magazine of local news and spending hours. Over the weekend, the bore ously type in the basic commands, and this is how I learned how to to program computers, and I loved it, and I started writing computer games for my friends. I actually began to write games which were in a way, a mixture of both. Programming and literature I got into. What's good interactive fiction will will come into the text adventure games, and after awhile I began celebrates text adventure games in those adventure games ended up on the front discs of. Magazines and I would say at the end of them. Look if you really liked the game. Why not send me five or ten quid, and all I'll help you get further in the game or something you map. And then one day. A package arrived on my doorstep from a Guy Code Allen Solomon. Played my games. And my life changed forever. I was misled. And inside the parcel, it had to check the twenty pounds, which is more than I have asked for and a copy of duct. Psalms antivirus talk it and a letter saying if you want a job, let me know. And, so I rang him up. and. I went for an interview and he gave me a job and I was his best effort. Windows program at. So few years I was writing songs, antivirus windows, but what they noticed was that I think actually I was at a particular show where we were launching the product, and I would see the sales people demonstrating my software my creation. I think they're not showing the good bits, and so I said No. You mind if I have a gun. And say they let me have a go on stage. And soon there was a bit of a crowd around as I explained and talk through my magnificent bit maps which are designed. So I think I sort of bullied my way. In time out of the programming department, so I made this great big jump. Over time I became more and more the public face of Dr. Solomon's talking to the press describing what was going on in the world of CYBERCRIME. Writing articles and generally just. do it doing tap dances effectively. And, then one sad day. The company got bought. and. Frankly I think I lost it about six weeks. After period of gardening leaf. I decided to go and join sauce vocal about half the salary, but three times the fun I wasn't involved in any of the programming US office, but I was involved in. The social media activity, and probably the primary thing of all was something which myself and criterion now co hosts a podcast with me smashing security We set up a block code naked security. At the time it was something a bit different to be honest when we launched it, there weren't many technology companies who writing every single day. About what was going on what was going on in terms of threats and trying to explain them in simple language, we were trying to explain these things in a in a way which. An intelligent child would understand because I always felt as being a problem. Where buy nerds speaking to other nerds and I. Don't think that's the solution to the cybersecurity problem I think we have to be able to communicate to everybody. Effectively I. My career now involves Brighton articles. Make Him podcasts and giving public presentations. that that's that's what I do. and. People. Thank! Goodness, interesting. I have to say Oh, how I say it and so they're asking me to keep doing that. I, wish I had gone independent sooner. Has Been An interesting new challenge and I? I wish I'd had the confidence to do that sooner. And to carve my own career is all kinds of changes because I'm basically a one man company Naum. Things like. Network. So much more important. That used to be I'm naturally quite introverted. If you've. If, I. Don't know you I'm quite quiet and shy in off high all hanging out in the kitchen or something I definitely let parties and things that he likes to be around. I'm good with the people I. Know, but I'm not good with he I time. And so I find myself events now and I push myself and say. Okay I. Don't know anybody here. Maybe, I should just go and chat to someone. Is Still. Twelve year old computer programmer inside me. It feels a little bit scared about doing that sometimes, but you know. Sometimes.

Allen Solomon United States
"rings" Discussed on Giles Coren Has No Idea

Giles Coren Has No Idea

05:45 min | Last month

"rings" Discussed on Giles Coren Has No Idea

"He thinks that he's just too important to do. All of that stuff and someone's asked him. Who did you think was doing the housework and he said? Sherry deny the kids dot dot dot, not sure which I think is probably not I mean they probably go some kind of cleaning help. I, met you and black. He's a very very nice boy, a very nice boy, and he looks to me like the kind of kid who knows how to Tina bathroom, but I don't. Cleaning all of their houses, and all their properties holding down a job, probably know maybe Blair didn't do the. He couldn't find the pledge just like you couldn't find the weapons of mass destruction. Yes, maybe. The pledge is there somewhere we don't know? Where and the is. He GonNa. Take me forty five minutes to find it, so he didn't bother. Maybe he sent in Wim Wenders. Somebody was cold that blatantly. Film director but was. When somebody that he was a weapons block. He was the benching because I was one thousand, nine, hundred ninety. One doesn't know there was some local. WHO's I remember so like I remember. Today there has been a lot of kind of froth. Spun off the story about tiny. Cleaning all I mean just reams and reams of Coffee Coffee Cup Coke God, reams of copy about. Many do the house. What many don't do the housework wide that men think they do the house what they don't actually that. What can you possibly add for Saturday's paper? You'd I was thinking about this. Because obviously I worked myself up into self righteous rage every now and again by how you do nothing and I do everything actually. Lord like you. Take complete care of the cats. I literally I mean. If I was after Gulf of the cats, they would be debt. You complete look after the cats. You sweep up little kittens, poos that they've started. Doing swept the shooting three times a day. The kitchen floor you are! Yes, you are. The kids feds house quite often do I notice. You've done a very nice job of today. I did it site. Yeah, complimented, yes. I not because I often do it. Yes, you do. Yes, you do it and I kid your breakfast today, but then you do other things so I think it is dismantled and replaced. A CHORE IS NOT, just cleaning, it. You. Did you took you took that book? Stand up to lovely thing the road. He wanted it with a look through. This is one. Person because I clean and could do Dario maintaining and how much like eating or is that not? Has that been done I wonder? When was that story? Is quite a while ago. I mean the blecher product project that Blah. Chore Project Humidity Blair which. He does remember that. SORT ON BLU ray. I wonder. Naballah okay that. Made A. Really good subjects of reading a story it is. If, it had happened today or tomorrow. It would be perfect, but because. I think people are a bit boardman cleaning now. So, let's move on. Is that. Can that be on the newspaper? I'm just thinking again. I'm. Not The satisfaction of sleeping floor hoovering which I used to love as a kid because of the. Could make the NAP and how we have this post. Sisal carpets which doesn't make. This is not as much fun as it used to be. The difficult dusting. What kind of? You got quite irate with me about using the scouring. The Hell is wrong with the because there wasn't there wasn't. There was not adequate. A cloth actions me and then when? You turn is e. you're willing to do cleaning. Don't know where anything's kept. Though the are all not willing. To there should be in one place now. When I was a kid to clean, had one of those. Carrying trucks. I think if I was a cleaner I would have a belt the bat belt. And or possibly, or maybe like you know how. Dumper projects have these belts with. Acts in a knife and night have one just with pledge. Yeah, a window, lean spray, thing and then dust various different dusters of different coarseness fries you. Guam for the windows that keep separate. That's an idea. Isn't it? Meant if they're gonNA get men to do more chores. Yes, yes, paint my patriot equipment housekeeping belt. Yes, there with the kind of thing so that you can twelve the window lean around your finger, a gun and then reupholstering and say. This House is too small. For both of us, this house ain't big enough for the. I took. Quite looking yes, cobweb! This house ain't big enough that there must be not sexy. No. look I, tell you what is not sexy is is is feeling like you are a mother to your husband that is what is the most like horrific passion killer so if you are. Make doing all this stuff. Your kids finding oldest after that that is what is a passion. Kill men during the cleaning up is not remotely a passioncom killer. It's men's sort of going has may sing. No it's this. Generic. Manchester you actually don't you change the narrative around that as well. You crash around the House Guy just looking back to goals. Don't mind me. Official site, maybe just yet. I'm just looking through my phone. Asking where it is! Asking anybody where my phone is an all, either say yes, it's in the fridge where you put absent, minded credit and Anyway so so. So. Men, thinking that housework is a manly or unsexy is is not true. The only unsexy thing in a marriage is when your husband Pavelec. Child. And you have to sort of parent them it's. The. Of those bits where they get the washing machines..

Sherry Wim Wenders Gulf Blair Manchester director Dario Guam Official
"rings" Discussed on The Discographers

The Discographers

02:40 min | Last month

"rings" Discussed on The Discographers

"Bones. To this? E- songs go step further than the score to establish an intense sense of realism within the story, working hand in hand with the score to provide a lush musical landscape both inside and outside the universe the story. The author of the Lord of the rings was Jr Tolkien's. He was not an author by trade, but rather a philology one who studies language in historic contexts. This vocation lead Tolkien to create a great many languages on his own, sometimes referred to as art languages are constructed languages Lord of the Rings, more or less became a sandbox for him to create the Histories and cultures behind these languages linguist, David Zatezalo along with the dialect coaches on the film's Andrew Jack and Rushing Cardi helped to the actors implement. Implement Tolkien's languages in the film, but that contribution didn't stop with the dialogue. They also help shore, incorporate elements or stands of these languages into choral and solo vocal arrangements for the soundtrack. It's worth noting that Andrew Jack passed away due to Cova, one thousand nine at the end of March so his memory. Let's take a look at some of his linguistic contributions to the score. Just about three hours after I finished recording this I saw the news that Ian home. The actor who played Bilbo had died. So! Guess, this wants for him to. Lyrics were furnished in the language of Ebonic and ancient tongue of men for scenes where the ringwraiths were present in the first film. This is a nod to the origins of the ringwraiths, nine former kings of men from ancient times corrupted by the power of the ring. The melody is in the sounds of the words used here seemed to convey that strain in that corruption. The language of the people of Rohani's is known as row here Eric and for the purposes of the soundtrack, old English was used as a in based on the similarities in culture between Han aged England..

Jr Tolkien Andrew Jack Bilbo Rohani Cova England David Zatezalo Ian Ebonic Eric
"rings" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

04:30 min | 7 months ago

"rings" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"Today's episode involves something. We've probably all done at some point our lives. We're talking about counting tree rings but I think you'RE GONNA be amazed at the value of the data hidden within tree rings. Things themselves joining us to talk about. This is associate professor doctor Valerie. True she works in the laboratory of Tree Ring Research at the University Arizona in her research focuses On using tree rings study climate and its interaction with forest ecosystems over the last two thousand years. It's really interesting research but today we're talking about Out a very special project. She's been working on a book. Her book is called Tree Story. The history of the world written in rings. And it's a look at all of the amazing data we can pull from Tree Ring Analysis. And how can be used to understand not only earth's history not only trees history but the history of human civilization. This is remarkable research. And and it's a really compelling read the book will be out in April but you can pre-order it over at Johns Hopkins University Press. You can check the show notes put linked to do just that but this talk is is all about the amazing world of tree rings. What she's learned in the process of writing this book so let's jump right into it without further ado? Here's my conversation with Dr Trae. I hope you enjoy joy all right Dr Valerie true way. Thank you so much for coming on the PODCAST. How about we start off by telling everyone a little bit about who you are are and what it is you do will? Thanks for having Me Matt so when Valerie True A and I'm a professor at the University of Arizona in the laboratory Tori of tree-ring research which year is a department on its own and so Emma dendrochronology used a rings in trees to study the climate of the past and to look at how it has influenced forest ecosystems as well as human systems very exciting and super cool to have you on this podcast right now because this is a topic that I definitely feel like does not get enough attention in mainstream media and who doesn't remember counting tree rings as the child at some point in their life at least but I'm wondering what brought you to tree rings in the first place. Were you kind of a plant person. I or just kind of liked climate How did it all kind of come together that you find yourself working in the tree ring business? That's a good question. So my background is in environmental engineering and had a a strong interest in plants in forests always have add And then when I when it came time to do my master's degree my master's thesis this I was an idealist at times are really wanted to win. Were again in Africa. Actually and there was one topic that came up that was available which was doing during analysis in Tanzania Nice and so we're interested in Tanzania injury. They never heard of it so I chose that topic another student and I we went to Tanzania went to collect their samples came back and the the and when I started looking at those woods samples under the microscope. That's when I really got hooked Lincoln under a microscope. It's so beautiful. It's so exciting and beautiful to look at that honestly ever since asters degree. I've never done anything else I went on to do a PhD and then put stocking Now a professor in during science. Wow what a remarkable story and very serendipitous. I love those because it's it just goes to show you that you can can have all the plans in the world and all the ideas in the world but you never know what's GonNa come exactly very much so yeah so dendrochronology that's that's a that's a big field Aw again like I said a lot of people. Listening will probably know that counting rings on a tree can tell you some information but you mirrored it with this idea that you know just seeing would under a microscope and seeing these details it truly is stunning to look at nature in that that view because until we had microscopes we couldn't really understand what was truly going on at that level and for those that Notre rings exist but have no idea why they exist. Let's Kinda get at the basics here. Why do trees? Everything's yeah good question so the reason why I should say not. All trees have rings. Threes in seasonal.

Tree Ring Research Dr Valerie Tanzania University Arizona professor Johns Hopkins University Press associate professor Dr Trae Africa Emma dendrochronology Lincoln Tori
"rings" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

06:38 min | 9 months ago

"rings" Discussed on Backlisted

"The afternoon. I had the surge of the sea and off oft dreaming understood every word of Dutch for the first time in my life and believed I had arrived and was home. It's Brennan what about. Ah Philip idea of dreaming and O'Brien leaving home these are these are really wistful melancholy concepts on the the ad through so bouts work repented survey Sable Jen period here. Because can you guess what I was going to raise You're reading but the reading afterwards and I just lead up to that for me too because what you say is true and I think the whole notion of the bookish this inexorable movement towards meaning to some kind of context for what we are being told this cabinet of curiosities as vindication of off things that he brings together gathered from his memory. His invention from our collective history from the past from the future from the present doesn't and to me it's the inexorable movement towards the shore as you intimate in that region and the sense of this place this land which she's tipping into the ocean. I mean actually written is physically tipping into the North Sea Coast is the most rapidly eroding. And it's almost as though the Z.. Is going to be on the short GONNA disappear for heaving gets there in a way. And it's back to Europe over dog land of this flooded land over Thomas. Thomas Brown has buried over Edward Fitzgerald and his tinted glasses and his black labrador. There's always a dog somewhere in symbols wound very very interesting. That's we can talk about. That is really interesting with that comes from but he ends up and if you don't mind me launching into reading after that just because Faisal Ball and coincidence I'm picking up where Jesse left off that the evening in Amsterdam. I sat in the piece of the lounge of a private hotel by the von Park. Which I knew from earlier visits us and made notes on the stations of my journey now almost at an end the days I had spent on various inquiries? Is it bad kissing gooden. The panic attack in Bardem boat excursion on Lake Zurich. I run of Good Luck at the Casino. Zeno in Lindau. My visits to the ought Pinakothek in Munich and to the grave of my patron saint in Nuremberg Doc. Of whom legend has it that he was the son of a king from Dacia or Denmark. Who married a French princess in Paris Bruce during the wedding night the story goes? He was afflicted with a sense of profound unworthiness today his supposed to have said to his bride bodies are adorned but tomorrow they will be food for worms before the break of day he fled making making pilgrimage to Italy where he lived in solitude till he felt the power to work. Miracles rising within him off to saving giving the Anglo Saxon. Princes Wimbledon WanNa bold from certain starvation with a loaf of bread baked from ashes and brought to them by Celestial Messenger. An after preaching a celebrated sermon and Vincenza. He went over the Alps to Germany Regensburg. He crossed the Danube on his cloak. And they're made broken glass whole again and in the house of a wheel right to you mean to spare the kindling. He lit a fire with ICICLES. The story of the burning of the frozen substance of life has as of late meant much to me and I wonder now whether in a coldness and desolation may not be the condition for making the world believe leave by a kind of fraudulent showmanship. That one's own wretched heart is still aglow. Be that as it may. My namesake is said to have performed many miracles in his hermit. Harsh in the forest between the rivers Rechnitz and pigments. It's and to have healed the sick before his corpse as he held ordained was born on a cart drawn by two oxen to the place where his grave is to to this day. Now what follows in the book is amazing description. This soft Congress in saying say bombs judge in Urine back doc so I went my pilgrimage that and found this. which is the leaflets that you get to this extraordinary and this is the same image of this extraordinary thing which looks like a sort of Gothic Lori and actually the Saint Saint Saint Cbo disease is in the silver casket on snails sitting on snails the Balsam but with dolphins and Triton's an and Hercules with an enormous erection saint seaboard is on wheels so he could be wheeled around? The town is moving for for display. And you're holding the leaflet which says at the top in nineteen eighty. uh-huh scrap this highly about your noon. Book means the grave of the Saint Saybolt of Nuremberg as mine. And I'm going to take a picture of sipping put up on the website extraordinary that you should both choose the same kind of from the same extort extort mutual now of course this book is like a brain isn't a it's the connections. I mean we can talk about the infants of so-called there has been a huge influence. That couple of things is watching. Garages Amazing Film. Patience after about recently Adam Phillips said something that I love which he said he said the book is irradiated with the melancholy which is beautiful phrase for how it feels Joni talking about grunge is filmed patients which I strongly recommend to be listeners..

"rings" Discussed on KNSS

KNSS

01:47 min | 9 months ago

"rings" Discussed on KNSS

"Rings set to start this Wednesday California congressman Devin Nunez ranking Republican on the house intelligence committee submitted a witness list of eight names and the whistle blower and Biden are on it but Democrats say other witnesses corroborated with first hand testimony what was in that initial whistle blower complaint and so the whistle blowers testimony at least is not needed say the Democrats Republicans were hoping to shift the focus of these public hearing from president trump's interactions with Ukraine to that of the bidens in the DNC during the twenty sixteen election that is why the GOP requested witnesses such as hunter Biden and his business partner as well as Nellie or who worked at the opposition research firm fusion GPS which paid for the now infamous trump dossier intelligence chairman Adam Schiff is suggesting that is not going to happen though in this morning the chairman of the democratic caucus a king Jeffries dismissed the GOP's witness list tweeting house Republican hash tag cover up **** is once she on witnesses to testify my two cents get lost stocks is Gerrit Tenney president trump again tweeting that his phone call with Ukraine's president was perfect also saying he will release the transcript of a second phone call he had with a lot of years a landscape on Tuesday the fate of the dock a program and tens of thousands of young people brought here illegally as children before the Supreme Court this week president tweeted about the case last month writing quote if the Supreme Court upholds docket it gives the president extraordinary powers are greater than ever thought fox's mark Meredith in Hong Kong Reuters reporting police have opened fire on pro democracy demonstrators with live ammunition.

Jeffries Hong Kong Reuters Gerrit Tenney congressman California mark Meredith fox Supreme Court president Devin Nunez chairman Adam Schiff Nellie partner hunter Biden GOP DNC Ukraine trump
"rings" Discussed on Love Letters

Love Letters

03:32 min | 11 months ago

"rings" Discussed on Love Letters

"Here's why think of the story when people ask how do you know most of the time they're asking me how they know they can be sure they wanna be with someone forever or asking how they can get a hesitant partner to commit and Elizabeth was someone who did always WanNa get married. Dave was a touring drummer who liked his life. I wondered what was the thing that made him. Suddenly no he found the person he'd want to settle down with actually asked this question of Elisabeth at a party the night before her wedding. This is what she said. Dave told her that he felt about her the same way he felt about his house and his dog and at the time I was like that was not the the romantic response I was hoping for. He just compared her to the dog but now I think it was actually really honest stooge because Dave was saying something else which was Komo deeper. How can I say my relationship with my dog was very close. It was like we were knee. Were team you know and my house is like my best thing that I had sort of achievement that I had done those. Two things were like like the greatest things in my life and if I met a woman who is like fits in with that idea I lucked out I've lucked out 'cause I found someone who fits me then. It seems like it's a good thing it's not the least romantic I know you made. It sound pretty romantic when you put it like that. It sounds terribly romantic if you think about it. Dave was on the road a a lot when he saw his doghouse it meant he was home. That's how he felt around Elizabeth. That's how he knew and that's why I tell a lot of people about David Elizabeth Story. What's funny. Is that fifteen years later. David Elizabeth have no memory of him saying this Elizabeth doesn't even remember the conversation we had had before the wedding but they do remember how honor those early phone calls about the Hobbit when they got married. We were had to decide on what kind of rings so she got her engagement ring which there's a legit bring and we said well. Let's let's get at these are the days of of Sky Mall which is the magazine and the Airlines and we flew flew quite a bit and so we're familiar with the offerings and Sky Mall which they had the all the Lord of the rings stuff it could get like a sword could get like a law or mask thing and you could also get the rings of power of the Ring's things power the one ring to rule them all had Elvin Elvis Elvis sh we decided that rather than get the expensive gold rings where like three hundred Bucks Lake which seemed like kind of a lot of money for joke for joke that we thought it would be better to get the silver rings because he's like who cares also silvers funny gold is not worth spending three hundred dollars on a joke is money against all areas so so we got two rings of power to route two rings to rule them to roll the mall so we put these rings things on and about two days later our fingers were green mass and if the joke uh-huh.

Dave David Elizabeth Elisabeth Sky Mall Elvin Elvis Elvis partner Bucks Lake Komo three hundred dollars fifteen years two days
"rings" Discussed on Love Letters

Love Letters

03:14 min | 11 months ago

"rings" Discussed on Love Letters

"Letters is sponsored by away which makes thoughtful luggage for modern travel away makes their carry on in an array of colors two sizes and with great materials the carry on is lightweight and durable and has an injectable battery for your phone and a removable laundry bag. I chose pink carry on and it was so nice that my sister took get from me and now I need a new one for twenty dollars off the suitcase visit away travel dot com slash love letters use. Promo Code love letters during checkout. That's away travel dot com slash rush love letters and Promo Code Love Letters during checkout to get twenty dollars off. This episode of letters is sponsored by native deodorant a new kind of deodorant talk with clean ingredients. It's earning great reviews making the switch to a natural deodorant does not mean having to sacrifice on odor witness protection. That's why native has more than eight thousand and five star reviews and has been featured on the today show refinery twenty nine an Elle magazine with native less is more. There are fewer simpler ingredients. It's safe effective and aluminum free native comes in a variety of enticing sense for men and women. I chose Coconut Vanilla because it smells like summer but you'll also find lavender and rose who's cucumber and mint and more and there's also unscented and baking soda reversions for those with sensitivities try native with no risk free returns and exchanges in the US for twenty percent off your first purchase visit native Deodorant Dot Com and use Promo Code love letters during checkout. That's native Deodorant Dot Com Promo Code Love Letters at checkout for twenty percent off your first purchase. Have you ever thought about marrying me. Let's kind of like a bold question and I think I was like fuck it like if I get a no then I know but like I had been I had been looking at you for a while and being like I think I could totally do this with this. I think I could totally make a life with him. I think I totally have kids with him and so in that moment it just seemed like the right time and and luckily it was any goes yes and then he goes oh my God. I've never said that to anyone feeling. My arm should explode or something in my arm. I don't remember that part but I do remember you saying that and and I remember just it's like literally like it's almost like a you astro project or something. It's like you. Your body becomes kind of a weird hasn't were lightness to it or something. It's like 'cause you carry around this weight your entire life of how do you know how do you how you going to know how you GonNa it. What if what if you make the wrong decision it's all this angst and stuff and then when you finally say an admit that's like yes. I could Mary you then. It's almost like this. It's lightness all of a sudden. I was like you know the psych. It's this year I felt like a completely different person and that's kind of like when my new life started that moment.

Deodorant Dot Com Elle magazine US Mary twenty dollars twenty percent
"rings" Discussed on High Noon

High Noon

09:54 min | 11 months ago

"rings" Discussed on High Noon

"Greetings earthlings high noon is being to you from above the Heineken river deck appear seventeen jeep last Stevenson and so filling where we didn't know his destiny destiny will probably is his destiny which getting lots of buckets in China it is this is the coney island to China pipeline following. The footsteps of Steph on Margaret is right every Abraham they get high schools MARV Albert calling the game when another Abraham Lincoln High School graduate. I feel like the neighborhood changed a little bit. Those are the last. Oh Oh I want this to be. A reality series a movie everything. You might win an award for it because that's on Marbury actually did but Mani money we have to talk about this. Dallas cowboys story because anyone who's ever met a cowboys fan knows that the franchise actually believes in its own exceptionalism and now with Dak Prescott Scotts extension looming sports illustrated has detailed how being a star for Jerry Jones might actually be more profitable than being a star for pretty much anyone else so Bomani. You are resident. Texas experts do the cowboys really matter as much as they think they the mistake here is limiting this to the state of Texas right the cowboys that America's team southern they came up with but I would venture that every city that does not have a football team. The most popular team in that city is the Dallas cowboys. They heavy reached the nobody else. Does they are the only franchise they could get us to talk about them in a segment like this. They do matter in that way but let's talk about this story connor or wrote for sports illustrated. We're basically talks about how at the cowboys facility ability. Jerry's gotta set up for all these different business people who come in and hang out with the players and nobody's allowed to take pictures of what he's selling it as for players at least is access to these folks access to to make connection better help you make money and then in turn. The cowboys don't have to pay you as much money because they put you into rule with all the money that's there and that all sounds really cool. Who'll however I can get in all those rooms and still get my money from you right like it's not like Zeke Elliot tries to fight hard to get his bread and then get to the Jerry's going to be like no you don't need the extra bread. UK Hang out with the rich people. You could still do all of that stuff but Jerry is selling the idea of playing for the cowboys almost like the idea of like playing for one of the top not universities. It's a much different scenario. They most teams to sell it but that's where I was going to go was that this reminds me of college. When you have cap spending on salaries whether because of law or because of your habits and preferences you end up trying to Max out everything else. The clippers and basketball have been doing this and it's smart. We'll we'll give you we'll build you the giants space ship of a stadium. We'll have all these connections alumni business networking and also like as they do at the cowboys stadium. We have a pro shop where we'll spotlight the products you WANNA on a cell but all of this just reminds me that when you're signing up to play for a sports team which really Dune is trying to sign up to be on television show and this is the television show that is the most popular and by the way in so far as that is true marketing dollars will follow Dak Prescott advertising beads advertising whatever hunky soup equivalent it's because he is the quarterback of the cowboys because he's the quarterback of the cowboys commercial you seeing. Sean Lien child he'd been there forever and all he he does is get slaughtered on by Joe Book and Troy Eight and this is one of the things that they mentioned in the story is at other ages brought up. A lot of players brought up is this is something that applies to certain level of star that the cowboys aren't going to let go anyway so yeah. Dak Prescott can get money that he probably could not get playing for another team. I don't know how much this applies to everybody else. The other thing I found interesting about this story this idea that you can go in his room and it's going to be on his business. People there and you can talk to and you can make some connections. Yo fellas be careful like you new football player no real business bag background in business you going in there with shorts. Those sharks have got to be like Oh yeah. Please put us in the room with these dudes. Please give me an opportunity and you figure how I can make money off this doing if they don't tell you agent or your business manager that's right and if you'll financial dude you're coming in here like the Jerry Sake. I'll be doing some real monitoring about who is leading into to that space because otherwise this could flip around to be bad for the place and Jerry himself like it is safe to say that he is shrewd that he is savvy. It is not verging to the level. I think that you're suggesting when it comes to the possibility those business people but in terms of the cowboys as this Grand American investment this experiment and capitalism. They're paying these guys. I believe they just signed a bunch of guys for about one hundred eighty seven million dollars right. How much did they pay to get this team around that and now it's worth five point five billion dollars more expensive than or highly value than the Yankees any soccer team like this. Is You face. Ob Business Genius and now he's trying to sell your ideals genius. Let's be careful here. I do. I do WanNa make at this point. Though if you demand just about any football team you're going to be around business people. They can put you into some situations like what Jerry is actually offering. I'm not sure is that much different than what you can get from anywhere else you play for the rams. I bet you can be some movie studio. People right there. We go coming up next the steelers better with Mason Rudolph Fair question. Let's see is going to be offered we. We don't feel that it they so they throwing out that after it it is something pounds because of you said he lost. I just like to know we live in Nigeria. That food was mad spicy. Look at Joe well here. You're still putting Nov All Africa Paul. You're looking at him like begging US look. That is a very good point and meanwhile yeah that's what I wanted to see. I wanted to see a thin embiid but I hope it works. Well actually think the steelers are in better position to succeed with Rudolf than they were with an injured thirty-seven-year-old Rob's Burger quarterback obey Roger Sherman of the Ringer about Mason Rudolph. Pablo Rudolph wasn't bad and his debut but do you think the steelers would be better with him. In Place Rothlisburger I think I think they will and it's because Ben Rothlisberger didn't look great. I mean the guy last year did lead the league in passing yards but also led the league and interceptions and this year he had had the bomb elbow so it's not much of a stretch to say that. Mason Rudolph will be better than him in the present tense. It's just that the rest of the team I also have massive questions of what we don't know what raw casillas Rudolph is and we don't know with Rothlisburger was going to be but it wasn't trending positively in the last couple of years of his so it is possible that as a Rudolph could be see that guy and look. He's got the physical tools. He was a good player in college in the steelers feel really good about him and they know more about him then the rest of us so. I don't think it's out of the realm the possibility that Mason Rudolph could be better. Keep this in mind and I'm not saying that he's this other guy but none of us would have thought man drew bledsoe's Outta here. They're gonNA be better with this. Brady Guy Guy. You know what I mean like that. Just say that this is going to be that dude or that. They'RE GONNA win the Super Bowl but it is possible that the guy they took to maybe be the quarterback of the future might be the quarterback in the future. No maybe the steelers for an office office. No stuff that nobody else really does but here are the concerns because beyond the defense being a problem beyond the wide receiver as being a problem. Dante moncrieff responsible for his one pick. Mason Rudolph is because of the bobbling of that pass. It's the fact that Mason Rudolph is going to be figured out and scouted by these teams and so what can you not do. Apparently he's incredibly we stationary far less than rothlisburger. Any loves play action because that is something that has been really effective with him when teams figure that out we'll we see a performance like we did his debut. I just want to make this right fast. Yes maybe teams may figure it out but if you knew that stuff they do does it the all right all right. We didn't get it. The secret is going to sound like total body. What if the stuff that worked is like a novelty. What happens when it becomes less than one right forty six? That's the number of injections at the bills home opener last year team. Officials are warning fans about their behavior. If you're ahead of this week's home opener against the bengals so Bomani the bills are to know. How successful do you think they'll be the season l. No we'll see I mean they actually have a good chance to start start off a little bit of schedule to go off on a decent assuming Josh Allen could keep playing like a competent. NFL quarterback but anyways you WanNa talk about you. WanNa talk about these people that I'd never hang out with. I do want to go shots autumn man. That's over there in the corner. I got a lot of questions and I'm just wow okay cool. Laws you enjoying yourself there buddy. They put out forty six people in game one last year. I don't know if these folks really fear authority in that right way right I mean. I don't know if they're going to be that but the bills have a fair point here. This isn't isn't a good look like I understand why they don't want us to think of this when they think of their football team but the bad news is this is all I think about when I think of their football team team and that's with all due respect given to Josh Allen who's looking way better than either of us thought but this is what gets me this gets me. Bomani about this plan the baby. Oh no wait what what's going to happen here. Oh but anyway the reason they're doing this. The reason they're concerned because that stuff is happening and so what's the solution. They're we're going to charge nine hundred dollars to bring a boss that can carry sixty people now. You're the math guy on this. Show that works out to what fifteen eighteen dollars a person does that sound like an incentive a disincentive for these people throwing babies through tables to not do that. Oh it is not the disincentive tip income all man. We know the fuel behind. All this stuff and drank drank was folks. Get out there and start sipping on Drake Drake. They wanted to places where they got. All the Dragon. Okay drank. It'd be cold outside late in the year and how you go to war yourself up with a jacket no would a fifth golden but the drag he drank is not merely effective in the ways you you described. It's something that the police seemingly are like. Oh Yeah. That's the drink drink..

cowboys casillas Rudolph steelers Jerry football Dallas cowboys cowboys stadium Mason Rudolph Bomani Jerry Jones Texas Dak Prescott Scotts Pablo Rudolph Brady Guy Guy Joe Book Abraham Lincoln High School Josh Allen MARV Albert Dak Prescott coney island
"rings" Discussed on 99% Invisible

99% Invisible

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"rings" Discussed on 99% Invisible

"Hire. It's never easy to find the right candidate. There are too many or too few without the right skills but ziprecruiter makes it easy ziprecruiter's your job to over one hundred of the web's leading job boards and it's so effective that four five employers who post on ziprecruiter get a quality candidate through the site within the first day right now ninety nine p._i. Listeners can try ziprecruiter cruder for free at this exclusive web address. It's ziprecruiter dot com slash nine nine. That's ziprecruiter dot com. That's the numbers nine nine ziprecruiter cruder. The smartest would hire so joe rosenberg word on the street is is that you have have a ring tone story. I do i do have written stories my one and only ringtone story and i it's not <hes> it's not about my ringtone. I should just say that straight off and takes place. It takes place in this golden era of ringtones. It's a circuit two thousand four. I'm a senior in college and <hes> it takes takes place in every college has that kind of <hes> student lounge area where there's just like a bunch of sofa chairs and <hes> the heat is turned up like five degrees warmer than everywhere else because like like the the nominal excuses at your there to study but really you're there to sleep confront and there's just all these kind of sleepy undergrads kind of dozing off in the oversized chairs rolling right and like the golden rule places places of course. He's like silence. It's the one place besides like the library were silence rules right and so anyways <hes> i went in there you're too like study slash sleep and i found a sofa near the roaring fireplace and i start to kind of you know <hes> a sit down. I'm starting to kind of doze off and <hes> but just before i kind of actually followed sleep in ernest. <hes> i hear this tinny recording of a voice similar to the voice of alicia silverstone in clueless and it's going excuse me your phone. It's ringing and i'm fine..

alicia silverstone joe rosenberg ernest five degrees
"rings" Discussed on 99% Invisible

99% Invisible

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"rings" Discussed on 99% Invisible

"It may not Load up your favorite song. Something says something about you. Turn volume up in wait for a robot scammer to call <music> <music> <music> <music> <music> <music> <music> <music> <music> things that happened when we hit peak ringtone own in the two thousands after this.

"rings" Discussed on iMore

iMore

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"rings" Discussed on iMore

"Put a special counsel captain america when he found out two thousand could cut through a shield. They're gonna say they're going to say you were carrying. It wrong pocketed wrong. Yep sorry sars <unk> i. I think that you are the voice of of a certain number of people who are outraged by it too. I and your voice does need to be heard isn't who isn't when and you found out you can't put it in your gene pocket. You didn't care it because it's a credit card. I don't care if it gets dirty. It's just a credit card. It's it's apple. Apple doesn't just it's not just a phone. I hear you i hear you i hear you these are beautiful products yeah pristine and beautiful beautiful and this one isn't i'm not angry up. You know i'm not angry at laurie laurie gossip. You know who i'm angry at. I'm sorry i have so what i need to talk to. We had a discussion for whoever they're beautiful. Beautiful designed is pretty if apple releases apple cart version two and it straight titanium and has kohler <unk> like do you think that that makes up for version one being you know like a disappointment to a lot of people including you won't get it. I don't know like what does makeup cup for right. I would wanna get it and unfortunately apple has me right. They've already. I've eaten the candy on there now. Why would probably i would wanna get it. I'll be honest. I don't wanna wanna get this card again. I don't really need an it's not like that that i knew also need the physical cartoonist just like a in the u._s. in hard. How often do you use your credit card in canada while unfortunately usually when i update my watch i have to redo all of my information from my credit cards so that it doesn't work and so now i've been using it more often but so i would. I would always if it was a titanium card. I would use it all the time. Use it use it. I would throw up. Yes it's horrible. I know i myself. He's like you wouldn't i would throw it down on the table and make a little daring shane weird thing herself with the card. It was saulo evil but i liked larry eyeliner light but it was. It looked like a paper card. It's the funniest thing to feel some house special because you have a credit card. I i do feel like i want to show. I think i had mentioned i the first time i used it. I called attention to it to the cashier relate. How did you do that the new card here. I'm gonna pay with my new apple credit card that i was approved for. One of the first people practically like that and her response was a <hes>. What what is that and then i was like oh. I'm an idiot. A hewlett packard credit card how that would have gone down is h._p. Cut it's my other nova card but wouldn't it titania. It's it all card. You want to adult car the plastic. It'd be black plastic that breaks off the side. That's what it would be so at least applecart might get dirty but it'll it'll never you could bury out yeah that is actually when the questions how the heck do you destroy your applecart. Ooh that's a good one when destroy a credit card when it's like okay i it's you know there's for some reason i can't use this card anymore. Cut it up and throw it in in the recycling bin or or something like that. You can't destroy these things like what are you doing down. Those those like catch strimmers or the the metal shutters the metalwork ones you know a whole bunch of people are very creative ways. Yeah both colors would work creative ways of destroying your a card. I look forward to seeing all videos if people destroying an apple cart because seeing that a <unk> it's bulletproof. That seems like okay so there's a lot of work. That's going to have to go into breaking one of these things to cut it up to destroy you know i wanna i wanna see it being destroyed like terminator of the ring in a thing of lava of a yes yes i would love to see it gets thrown in the fires of mortar..

apple special counsel laurie laurie hewlett packard captain america canada shane larry kohler
"rings" Discussed on iMore

iMore

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"rings" Discussed on iMore

"No we need this. You don't understand we know with using it doesn't matter how it looks in the industrial cruel design lab. We're the ones who have to type on it. You bastards yeah. They've been fixing all this stuff over the last couple of the last eighty two months right. I think we heard that apple had kind of brought all these professionals in and were getting their feedback and we're starting to see the effects of that feedback which is stop worrying about its design start worrying about its functionality and like it'd be great if you can make it pretty but how about let's make it functional i and and then work from there yeah it was possible. We'll get pricing information on the mac pro wheels. We don't know that yet. We all you know how much it is. How many yeah i don't know i feel like they're going to just leave that off the table face. They saw that mistake and they're just gonna win. It comes out then you can buy the wheels and that's when you'll find out. How much do you think the mattress the press and the mac pro stand in the the display that is called the <unk> exterior x._t. I think do you think those are actually going to be available right after the september event or do you think that if there is going to be a separate event for mag it'll come then. They said this fall may be like my thing is they've already shown that off. So all it does is distract from whatever other stuff. I would guess they might just say and it's coming this fall. All were blah blah blah but i don't think they're going to want it to step on. I think apple is one of those companies. It's usually smart enough to let each product habit space. Look at the reviews views come out and everything is like carefully staged so they get maximum attention. It is very rare that they'll just like dump a wanted different stuff all out at the same time. Yeah i guess on those occasions when it does happen..

apple eighty two months
"rings" Discussed on iMore

iMore

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"rings" Discussed on iMore

"Office. Blowtorch angle lens will help with that because capture much. Ill capture much more of the room. Even a short distance within it will compensate for the fish affect and then you can use one of those filter apps that makes it look like it's fish actually have the room i do that in a lie. I can still live. That's yeah okay pharisee. I'll wait for my macro and my joint through look old you can make. It looks like it's male or female younger. I can make the room. Look you know thirty years dared. It's great so <hes> this is this coming to all. We'll all the the iphone line or is it only the pro. This is most likely perks yeah so if you look at like ifa will was the iphone ten is getting an extra cameron. That's gonna be the iphone and then what was the iphone tennis. Tennis maps are getting an extra camera as well three tunnel and they're going to become the pros because the whole problem here is that and it's actually actually kinda clever. I don't know if it will work but it's clever is that people think that iphones are too damn expensive because what people consider to be the normal iphone ten estimates n._s. Max and those are a thousand twelve hundred dollars with this is ten dollars less expensive iphone at seven hundred and fifty dollars so this is going to do is just reset that expectation if the tenor becomes the the iphone than the regular iphone is only seven hundred and fifty bucks or seven hundred bucks. You can get in my phone. If you really want to spend a thousand bucks only those geeks seeks do that sort of like what apple does already with the ipad the macs so it kind of fits the general branding and and how we the context of what they've been doing for a few few years right yeah yeah so okay so then we've got <hes> the camera update which is a big deal now. We're also hearing that there's going to be <hes> u._s._b. See this year on the new iphone is does that sound right to you renee mills would they keep. I wish people would just read lever for the gets upset because it's so clear and they keep doing it and i think it's just for the collects. The cable is the cable and the iphone right. Now is lightening to u._s._b. A the cable in the next iphone will be lighting u._s._b. Cable is getting p._c. But the phone will still be lightning so what happens to what happens to all of your little wall plugs that we've liked saved. Essay was the ipad pro like you'll. You'll have to get either you either use your old one getting adopter. We're using new one with the new brick because it'll come with the new charging break to one but i i now have like thirty reasons why you can't see if they don't make a u._s._b. See the nerds words will cut you if they do make it u._s._c._c. georgia and her and the rest of the mainstream billions of the books just mainstreaming..

ifa tennis apple renee mills georgia thousand twelve hundred dollar fifty dollars thirty years ten dollars
"rings" Discussed on Tony the Movie Guy

Tony the Movie Guy

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"rings" Discussed on Tony the Movie Guy

"That's enough from the book at all but I was like oh no that'd makes a lot of Cool Yeah you put any dad in any movie and I'm just like I relate to you bro. Get you good dad good dad. I mean I guess it is kind of a testament to there being a bit of a fought with these films when probably the biggest thing I love because you're right it was Bilbo and smog. Were really highlight. They may I when young liked. Evangeline lillies character totally made up just not necessary to me. Dowager was what I loved the most seeing Frodo again see scandal and I think that on that point us right now you could have put to`real in the in the story and had her necessary you know but they didn't. I felt like she was put that to have a romance liked her. Exactly that's what's so sad is when you see like good actors playing line good characters with so many good elements and it hasn't been it hasn't been condemned seized to a perfect whole really think that is because and there's a whole story why it wasn't Peter Jackson for a while and it's the fault of some of some like executives chiefs who we don't know about we don't you know I mean I know about them but a lot of people yeah exactly and they don't get the blame for people like well. Peter Jackson screwed up and it's like to do you know what he was working with like. Come on the way those movies made almost a Billion Dollars Z. Film. They are still like Tony says still on film movies. They don't they don't measure out they don't have the emotional resonance connection only only characters I really connected with his Bilbo because Mine Freeman was genuinely he was very and smog the embodiment of smell absolutely fantastic okay. I think we're actually pretty much with the habit I can move. I'm from that. That's talk about one other thing before. WE'RE GONNA wind down Amazon spending over a billion dollars on the Lord of the Rings TV series. Are you worried wow Garrett took off like tell me your thought why hang his the what is it about. I don't know there's all these like from. Whatever theories from what I for the best thing that I have heard is that they are taking from the Sylmar million right this summer land? That's why have you read that by the way yeah couple times they that can mean many different is like the Bible it really is and it's written like the Bible. It's not an easy very haven't touched upon it. The similarly includes the Lord the rings that doesn't tell us anything the the the entire story of the Lord of the rings is a paragraph in the summer alien that basically says and then the ring was found by Hobbit and given to an end take into mortar and destroyed like it's a paragraph that's that simple and that's the whole that's all it says about the Lord of the rings so era Gorn is mentioned in the summer early and so a lot of people are like well young our going right so like a young airborne series could be could be kind of whatever but maybe it sets up middle of the wealth in different facets of young Gandalf I mean candles like he's alien entity his Angel Essential Angel Yeah. I don't okay so so to answer your question. I'm extremely nervous. Yeah I think yeah I think they're no anything we don't know costing..

Peter Jackson Garrett Mine Freeman Gorn Sylmar Amazon Tony Billion Dollars billion dollars
"rings" Discussed on PTI

PTI

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"rings" Discussed on PTI

"Things seem is not the same as basketball where one player can disproportionately impact the game it football's not that there's nothing lane johnson can do other than help keep us quarterback and live yes sony there guys without rings like france tarkenton and jim kelly who i think are truly great players they don't have rings the i'm not gonna think you compare sino crash judged only on rings but the notion that they don't matter they matter johnson is saying if i'm hearing correctly is the guys who have rings talk about it as if they directly were always responsible for their rings and he's probably talking about a lot of guys who played football we have rings on this network and other networks because that's mostly who were hired right what he's saying is you know what you're great player but you didn't put their ringo your teammates fingers and i think that's a fair thing for a lineman or i think win and if he keeps winning you get a ring he may never wear to may always be in a box but every once in awhile he's gonna open the box i'll no question about their open the vox this is interesting this next story conference usa which is a slapdash conference of fourteen teams that has been a one bid league for the last six years is jiggling around its schedule to try and do something about that starting this season after the first fourteen league games the top five teams will be grouped together and they will play the remainder of their games against each other presumably the ncaa seeding committee will see these as quality late wins and make it a multi bid league women don't you love this idea no we the people who hate this id more than me and it's a stupid idea it'll be done because all the coaches who lose their jobs because they were put on the bubble a second time suppose your fourth or fifth place team in that league and you've done your deal to play a patsy to raise your profile and get a win and give your.

basketball football jim kelly johnson france ncaa fourteen league six years
"rings" Discussed on PTI

PTI

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"rings" Discussed on PTI

"Time probably going to lose to lose a series i think this is optimistic too so pessimistic about the view to win that go this is the guy who was benched at the beginning of the class amazing how off series are we have two more veteran players both eagles joining the amen chorus and offering testimony that it's no fun playing does patriots the first guy lineman brandon brooks said quote it's crazy that people haven't known this it's been this way for like a decade close quote and lay johnson added quote all these guys talking about take the rings okay you can have your rings you could also have bleeping fifteen miserable years close quote it's only lane johnson right that people are too focused on rings you know i don't mind if people continue to take shots at bella chick that doesn't bother me at all but shut up with the rest of this stuff shut up because let's quote the great philosopher herm edwards i mean you go out there you know what your schedule is you play to win and if you keep winning as a consequence of that and you wouldn't championship then you get the ring i if lane johnson never got a ring i bet he would be unhappy now it's easy because he's got one now let's say all this stuff doesn't matter all and i'd rather have peace of mind and fun with my friends but i think most athletes go out there to win every single game and maybe we shouldn't count all the rings but bill russell has eleven in it matters and tom brady has five in it matters getting a ring matters mike matters matter it does matter is that the only thing that matters in football when you're linemen and you can't control the action tony this is not to say his sins.

johnson herm edwards bill russell tom brady football brandon brooks
"rings" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"rings" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Rings ninety three seven the fan comeback for the pirates come back for sean rodriguez who's back in pittsburgh after being acquired over the weekend from the braves any contributes to walk off win over the padres on sunday pirates walk off asteroids walk off raise the border sweep against milwaukee a 10 pitch what oh god zac efron vic twenty w da ease souza with his first career walk off homerun is twenty four th homer of the season to one the final over milwaukee souza with the why settle the game i mean i think we're just trying to piece together some with over skipper can call a homers like bellamy who knows by a lot of ticket blerta in over centuries ago some good atbats unfortunately the series we would you can get that big bigna whose greg broke thirty to come through raise avoid the sweet thanks to the souza walk off in the bottom of the ninth inning souza referring to his manager kevin cash going into that common vision exists on tuesday homer one of the two we are piecing together bronze you that we we try them for three days and failed so take somebody leave the ballpark that was fun needed let's get exhausting there my gosh was not the fall asleep to us three days but you know what credit are pictures just an outstanding job i really all three of our starters did everything they could to keep us in the ball game i know we came up short ruling won the final game at the final game milan's us leave you know you never had a walk all former near tangiers i mean i i knew the stat coming in or i've known it for a while now check that wonderful us nothing oculus having cash in the raise get the wind chris archer metra's pitchers.

sean rodriguez pittsburgh braves padres milwaukee bellamy greg souza kevin cash milan three days 10 pitch twenty w