17 Burst results for "Rico Daily"

"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

Reset

02:28 min | 10 months ago

"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

"Not specifically addressed at all so this is kind of verifying the experts. Fear that this is either done on purpose or was a colossal mistake and a mistake. That walgreens isn't really willing to fix at this point in time. You know. I don't. I don't know i know it's not fixed yet. I know they know about it. I know the time the fix it before we published. But you know maybe after we published things will change. I really hope they do. Okay sarah last question. Like i said i'm not thrilled about going to walgreens for a cova test but let's say i had to. Let's say i was my only option. Now that we know about these vulnerabilities. Is there any way that i can protect my data and still get tested at walgreens. If that's my only option. I mean you can buy over the counter tests from them that you don't have to give them any information at all but if your only option is to get a test like one of their drive through tests that you have to sign up for you you have to give them data and i believe it has to be accurate So with the walgreens vaccine story we kind of had the same thing where it was like you know yes. They take a whole lot of data. If you're not comfortable with that is more important that you just get the vaccine. If that's the way to get it you know yes. And i think i feel that way about test to you. Think you have cloven and walgreens dot com is the only way you can get it as like. Please please get a test sarah. Thanks for joining us. And thanks for your great reporting on this. Thank you and i'll hundred. I'm adam clarke. Estes and this is rico. Daily this episode is produced by taylor making an engineered by melissa poems from hemlock creek productions. Do you have a tip for one of our reporters send us an email. Rico daily at recode dot net. See you tomorrow. Looking for signs that the economy is rebounding from the pandemic then look no further than american manufacturing which recently set a record for new orders but surging demand is also exposed challenges including a record number of open jobs and piling back laws. A new series on the optimistic outlook podcast hosted by siemens usa ceo. Barbara hampton offers a way forward. You'll learn about the technology changing the game and the more than eight hundred thousand opportunities to start a career in manufacturing nationwide. That's the optimistic outlook. Subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts..

walgreens sarah melissa poems hemlock creek productions Rico daily adam clarke Estes rico taylor siemens usa Barbara hampton
"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

Reset

03:27 min | 10 months ago

"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

"Probably <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> all <Speech_Male> three to five years <Speech_Male> out from consumer <Speech_Music_Male> grade a. r. <Speech_Music_Male> glasses probably <Speech_Music_Male> going to be expensive. <Speech_Music_Male> But that's when we'll i <Speech_Male> see some <Speech_Music_Male> of these devices hit <Speech_Male> the market. <Speech_Music_Male> But yeah <Speech_Male> i. <Speech_Male> It's definitely a challenge. <Speech_Male> It's a technical <Speech_Male> challenge to <Speech_Male> get despising <Speech_Male> glasses that can <Speech_Male> still vividly <Speech_Male> show things <Speech_Male> with sunlight filtering <Speech_Male> through <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> all the different shades <Speech_Male> of the world. That <Speech_Male> you just come in contact <Speech_Male> with every day. I mean it's <Speech_Male> it's an incredibly hard <Speech_Male> challenge to do it in <Speech_Male> a way where the batteries <Speech_Male> don't also burn your face <Speech_Male> off quite honestly <Speech_Male> so there's <Speech_Male> a lot of physics problems <Speech_Male> that are being worked through and <Speech_Male> then you have to add object <Speech_Male> detection. <Speech_Male> Glasses need to have a sense <Speech_Male> of what they're looking at. <Speech_Male> Because if you're <Speech_Male> driving <Speech_Male> you don't want your directions <Speech_Male> in your classes. <Speech_Male> Like blocking <Speech_Male> what you're right <Speech_Male> you want them there <Speech_Male> but you want them to the side <Speech_Male> and so <Speech_Male> these glasses have to be smart. <Speech_Male> They have to be able to understand <Speech_Male> the world around them <Speech_Male> with computer vision <Speech_Music_Male> and that's a whole nother <Speech_Music_Male> challenge in <Speech_Male> an compute <SpeakerChange> challenge <Speech_Male> as well. <Speech_Male> Well alex. our listeners. <Speech_Male> Can't see this. But <Speech_Male> i can see that your glasses <Speech_Male> where i'm also a glasses <Speech_Male> where i <Speech_Male> would not mind. <Speech_Male> My glasses could do more <Speech_Male> things. Is this a <Silence> future. you're <SpeakerChange> excited about. <Speech_Male> I'm <Speech_Male> cautiously <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> excited. <Speech_Male> I would say i think <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Facebook obviously <Speech_Male> has their track <Speech_Male> record with privacy <Speech_Male> and user <Speech_Male> data. That is <Speech_Male> worrisome. Here <Speech_Music_Male> i do think they <Speech_Music_Male> are trying to <Speech_Male> correct the sins of <Speech_Male> the past with how they're designing <Speech_Music_Male> these products but it <Speech_Male> is the same company at <Speech_Music_Male> the end of the day so you <Speech_Male> have to take their word <Speech_Music_Male> heavy <Speech_Male> grain of salt <Speech_Male> but yeah the <Speech_Male> the products that are coming from <Speech_Music_Male> apple and <Speech_Male> others snap. <Speech_Music_Male> I think <Speech_Male> you're going to have <Speech_Male> a suite of <Speech_Male> kind of compelling <Speech_Male> glasses options. <Speech_Male> Like i said the next <Speech_Male> mamie three to five years <Speech_Male> that actually bring <Speech_Male> you some utility that maybe <Speech_Male> less than your dependence <Speech_Music_Male> on your phone <Speech_Male> and that's when <SpeakerChange> things get <Speech_Male> really interesting. <Speech_Male> Yeah that's the dream <Speech_Male> right. We <Speech_Male> can walk around <Speech_Male> and kind of use the <Speech_Male> computer without touching <Speech_Male> anything or <Speech_Male> doing anything. <Speech_Male> It's just always <Speech_Male> sort of their. <Speech_Male> The internet <SpeakerChange> is all around <Speech_Male> us. Yeah <Speech_Male> and it's the history of technology <Speech_Male> right. We started <Speech_Male> with these massive mainframes. <Speech_Male> We moved <Speech_Male> to desktops <Speech_Male> than two laptops <Speech_Male> than two phones than <Speech_Male> to watches. <Speech_Music_Male> Glasses are natural <Speech_Music_Male> extension technology <Speech_Male> becomes more intimate <Speech_Music_Male> kind of closer to <Speech_Music_Male> the body over time <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And then people like elon. Musk <Speech_Music_Male> and working on <Speech_Music_Male> brain tack. <Speech_Music_Male> That is a whole another <Speech_Music_Male> step ahead <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> of a dream. It might be <Speech_Male> a nightmare but <Speech_Music_Male> probably both. <Speech_Male> Yeah <Speech_Music_Male> well alex. Thank you for <Speech_Music_Male> joining us. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you <Speech_Male> i'm adam clark. S <Speech_Male> and this <Speech_Male> is rico daily. <Speech_Male> This episode was <Speech_Male> produced by sofi <Speech_Male> lalonde and engineered <Speech_Male> by <Speech_Music_Male> paul robert bouncy. <Speech_Male> Have <Speech_Male> you ever worn smart glasses. <Speech_Male> Do you want to <Speech_Male> let us know. Email <Speech_Male> us at

"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

Reset

06:38 min | 10 months ago

"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

"Our very own. Ronnie mola is here to tell us about what's going on with the workforce in america right. Now hey running. Hey how you doing. Well it's fun. Having to rico daily hosts hosting at the same time. We'll see who wins. Nice to see on this side of the mic. Sorry okay so ronnie. What's going on with pandemic job recovery. So the unemployment rate is down to five point two percent. It's a lot lower than it was in the height of the pandemic but still not as low as it used to be and more importantly there are six million fewer americans working now than there. Were you know at the same time. Employers are really desperate for workers All sorts of industries are saying. We can't find enough people to fill these jobs. The other end of that is that you know. They're not necessarily willing to pay them a lot more. You also have a lot more people wanting to work from home or wanting sort of a flexible schedule and sort of to fill that void. You've got gig. Were coming in. And there's been a huge jump in the number of americans who are doing gig work and by gig work. I mean any job. That isn't like traditional employer employee relationship. That could be temporary work. It could be driving an uber. It can be contract work doing something like freelance online. For a specific project so the number of people doing gig work jumped an unprecedented thirty four percent to fifty one million this year And that's basically equivalent to a third of the number of people working in the us according to be less data. So why are people turning to gig more now than ever. This is one of those the teen gazillion times that an existing trend has been accelerated by the pandemic basically anytime there is economic uncertainty People turn to whatever work they can and increasingly. That's been gig work. It's also part of a decades long change. That's been happening. A lot of companies trying to save costs have moved people from regular employment to contract jobs or sometime in some cases just missed classifying them as contractors basically it saves employers a lot of money to do so somewhere from twenty to thirty percent see have a lot. Fewer employers offering traditional employment now You also have the rise of a lot of platforms like up work and fiber that. Make it easier to find this temporary work. Also stuff like uber and jordache where he'd get these gig jobs so it's sort of a confluence of things. The dissolution of traditional american work the rise of online gig platforms. So you mentioned a lot of different types of gig workers gig work. Were there any that saw a bigger jump than others were. Was there a specific. Kind of gig. Works at american seem to lock to. Yeah the data on using is from m. b. o. Partners which has been surveying independent workers for years and they said the biggest growth was among the people who did dig work occasionally regularly but no set hours per week and that a lot of the time is what we traditionally think of as gig work you know working for ubereats or finding a job on a freelance job site in that could include people that had fulltime jobs as well. Yeah a lot of the people who are taking on gig. Work are using it as a supplement to their traditional income. Their regular income just isn't enough to make ends meet for a variety of reasons. You know so. They're having to take on extra work. something like three quarters of the people in the survey said that they took on gig work to supplement their income. Right so for instance. If i still have my full time job my wife loses her and we need to have our household and come look something like it was before i might start driving lifted night. Exactly You know if you find something to fill the void. Well it seems ironic at best for workers to demand better working conditions and then ultimately have to turn to gig work which is known for having few if any worker protections to supplement their income are there any protections in place for gig workers. Yeah that that's the huge problem with all of this know there are a variety of reasons why people are choosing gig work mostly because there's just more of it It is just the option now but the largest problem with it is. It doesn't come with a lot of these. Traditional benefits like health care or overtime doesn't even necessarily come with a minimum wage. So you have a lot of americans taking on these jobs that if they lost they could be in serious trouble you know they. They don't have the safety nets that traditional employment affords them and as we've seen time and time again with companies like we'll just use uber lifted as an example they can sort of change. their policies and people's incomes can change quite dramatically. Even if they're doing the same amount of work the work is especially volatile. And then you know this is just part of a larger move from putting responsibility on employers to putting responsibility on employees. You if you're a gig worker than you have to kind of pay for your own healthcare and make sure that you're putting away money for your taxes and we saw happening slowly. Before the pandemic but again dependent make accelerated earlier trends. There was a movement to give gigahertz more protections for the government to step in and start taking better care or at least having more oversight over a companies that offered gig work as there've been much movement on that front now Yeah i mean the freelancers union has been working for very long time to create something called portable benefits. Basically that means that your benefits package your healthcare. You know your 401k. Whatever with stick with you no matter who your employer is so is not contingent on your employment status that you get these very basic necessities. They've had middling. Success added a few states offer. Things like paid parental leave. But now there's been some movement with the american families plan That's currently working. Its way through congress The idea would be to create a comprehensive paid family. leave plan that would hopefully include freelancers but You know th that's still far from affording them all of the same protections that traditional employees have so we mentioned the great resignation before which might have led to more gig work. But i've also heard of something called the great reassessment where people are looking for better jobs. They're not willing to work for terrible benefits or no benefits at all. Has that.

Ronnie mola rico daily jordache ronnie us congress
"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

Reset

03:49 min | 10 months ago

"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

"Day america online is making it easier for people to live work and play. Call now for your free america online. Startup kidding get free software and ten free online hours. It's everything you need to get online. And hotmail sort of shows up and hot meals the first or one of the first things that you can just go to w. w. dot address dot com log in and their dream email. When was the last time using your email. Got you free stuff register for your free. Msn hotmail account from may birth. To may thirty first that you could win five thousand dollars of sports equipment. You have a free email that you can get from anywhere with an internet connection. This kind of opens up email even more to like millions and millions of people and it also divorces your email from your credit card account and potentially from who you are. Yeah you still out a couple of prompts. They don't even have to be true. And then you have an email address so it was just kind of bad luck that i ended up picking the one that became really popular. That's attached to like a whole bunch of other google services in the end. So do you think email can be fixed. I'm talking about big picture but also like this whole practice of using your email to access everything i think. All the ceremonies is needed to really think about what they're doing when they type it in. That's very specific more. Broadly you know there's ways to prevent this from happening. There are services that require you to verify your email address through a phone number or something or it sends a link to me that says did you actually sign up for this account but obviously not all of them do and they don't have to so obviously a lot of them. Don't that would help other than that. You know this is the way it is. We could try to think of something else that would be used as an identifier. I don't think you get the kind of adoption that you get with email. I mean for me. I kind of just came to the conclusion that anything i could do with that email address. The answer was to just get another one. Where i wouldn't have you know domain name share by two billion people got it so there's nothing we could do about it and i've never been happier to have an uncommon name. Thank you so much for speaking with sarah. Good luck i'm running and this is rico. Daily this episode was produced by sophie lawn and engineered by melissa poems from hemlock creek productions. Don't forget to check out our show notes for links to sarah story and for more from recode. Do you have any inbox invaders. Tell us our email is rico. Daily at recode dot net if e commerce business. This ad might change everything for you and i'm not just saying that but if you ever scrolled wistfully do incredible marketing. Emails and text major brands wonder quietly allowed. What sort of magic. Dust with these guys sprinkling over their communications. I'm gonna let you in on a major secret. They're probably using. Cleo cleo takes the mystery out of email and sms marketing offering all you marketers entrepreneurs and creators out there the data driven automated platform. You need to create authentic relationships with your customers like a top tier brand. Say goodbye to a blessing. Vague newsletters to an entire massive faceless. People combine your customer data with a smart marketing platform like clavijo. And you'll engage every customer one on one like they're. You're only customer engagement like this bills valuable relationships that make you money. If you're the creator of ecommerce brand. You need a platform that houses as hard as you do clave you'll unlocks the power of your e commerce data so you can personalize automate messages. That keep customers coming back to get started with a free trial of clovio. Visit clovio dot com slash fox. That's k. l. a. i y. o. dot com slash fox..

america sophie lawn melissa poems hemlock creek productions rico sarah Cleo cleo google fox
"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

Reset

01:51 min | 10 months ago

"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

"While trying to get a check. So i definitely advocate for having both at all times. That's a good point. I had mine check over the weekend at a karaoke bar but weirdly enough. They just looked at the. Qr code didn't scan it and then didn't anybody else in my group so there's clearly going to be a learning curve between now and when the enforcement date happens definitely rebecca. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me and thank you for listening to rico daily. My name is adam clarke estes. This episode was produced by. Alan rodriguez espinosa and engineered by paul robert. Bouncy let us know what you want to learn more about email us at rico daily.

rico daily adam clarke estes Alan rodriguez espinosa rebecca paul robert
"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

Reset

05:34 min | 11 months ago

"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

"Do we go back to normal. We may ease. Things are cyclical but the cost of turnover for companies is a year and a half of that individual salary. I think about that and institutional memory that walks out the door and we're actually seeing early retirement people who are saying actually like to be home. We've been through this crazy crisis. I don't want that stress anymore. Lee losses of drastic journal. It's not just you're losing talent. you're also messing with the culture of your organization. Think about a place where. There's an exodus that you're witnessing that's not a motivating environment. That's not a bustling environment. Now not only. Are there pragmatic losses when someone leaves but there's also cultural socio emotional. Psychological blows that companies will take and i would fight tooth or nail to retain my top talent in a company right now i would like to keep my best people because my best people will ensure that i well i've been reading about. How working mothers really wanna work from home. But they've also been having a really hard time doing so the reporting higher rates of stress and burnout. How does remote work help them. I have been a lar- because of the us. Labor statistics data. That showed that over three million women have left. The white were made my head explode and then another survey that looked at the same data was able to identify that almost two hundred thousand our mothers and caretakers what a shame if organizations are not leaning into the gift that virtuality and remote work is so that they can take advantage of flex time as lex jobs to retain their women or to also incorporate some kinds of child care apparatus in order to support mothers some of the smart companies that. I've talked to have done things like from this time to this time every day. We're actually going to have online programs. So that mothers with children between the ages of five and ten can get some kind of respite and like programs or something like that or what would he. Yes we can't send your babysitters in the middle of the global pandemic but these companies have done programs and have found ways to support women and mothers but these are in the minority. We talk about diversity and gender and women and then we see amazing women leaving the have to work hard to bring them back and to reintegrate them into our organization even pre pandemic ways of handling the young families and professional demands. We're not great as i can work from home. My pickup would be much easier than me breaking my neck to get to my child to pick them up between i and whatever time all of that goes away we know working from home can benefit certain groups people with disabilities people were never good at schmoozing and the office in the first place. Some black people say they prefer working from home because they feel like a sense of belonging. And you know experience fewer microaggressions. What does this mean for diversity and inclusion. Oh always been out of the mainstream in their organization suddenly feel like they're not only at the table that no one is calling them the wrong name. They don't have to take that psychological commute every day in order to code switching instead in those with physical disabilities or even newer diversity. Challenges and concerns are finding so much more peace but what we should not do though is to say wait a minute. Black professionals prefer remote. And we're gonna make all of them remote would be the mistake of the century so i've made some really bad predictions before. So i want you instead to make a prediction. What is this going to look like in a year or two or five from now. My prediction is not the guidelines in the policies of settled competencies around flexible workplaces will rise individual managers will level up to figure out how to lead a distributed workforce. People will be more agile with using digital tools so things like tech exhaustion will go away. After people experienced a hybrid format. They will settle into a rhythm that really works. Ah them and. I think that we'll see more remote than in person days. I also predict that physical spaces office spaces will look very different remote. We're has totally influence. What people want smart boards global furniture outdoor space for work. So we're going to see physical spaces of offices look very different than they are today as well. I'm ronnie mola and this is rico. Daily this episode was produced by sophie lalonde and engineered by melissa pawns from hemlock creek productions. Don't forget to check out our show notes for more from recode and as always send your questions to.

Lee us ronnie mola sophie lalonde melissa pawns hemlock creek productions rico
"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

Reset

06:38 min | 11 months ago

"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

"More kind of qualitative finding that we had was talking to journalists who had been covering the pandemic or talking about how difficult it was to deal with link. Rot looking at things like kovic. Statistics dashboards so if the municipal government is tracking cova cases in their city or in their state. They want to have the most up to date information. But a lot of people who are writing about trends and how things have changed over the pandemic had a hard time finding that historical information even going back a week or a month so those kinds of things tend to be really volatile and again kind of just the nature of a thing more than anyone being malicious or irresponsible. Did you find the same problem at other. High levels of government se congress or the supreme court. So this study. Interestingly is is almost a sister study to one done previously in two thousand fourteen. I one of my co-authors looking at link rot in supreme court opinions so when a judge issues an opinion on a particular court case obviously citations are very important and on occasion. Those linked to the web as well and unfortunately there were similar findings. There was a really high rate of rot in website. So we're being pointed to by. Us supreme court justices which isn't a great look. Sure in the short term. It might seem like kind of annoying when you get a four zero four or don't find the page you wanna find but the internet is still young and it's gonna stick around. We're only going to be soaring more and more historical information there. So let's say one hundred years from now. Do you think that link rot. Means that we won't have a clear picture of this moment in history or the next ten twenty years. Internet is absolutely changing the landscape when it comes to the historical record and there are tons of libraries archives and museums. Who have been working on this question of translating archival practices to the internet space. Basically since the internet existed. A library of congress has not amazing web archiving team and of course there is the internet archive which also has the goal of kind of capturing the web at a large scale. But it's also clear that in some cases like in digital newsrooms in courtrooms just. The pace of the internet is beating out those preservation efforts in this release specific way got kind of shifting the shared responsibility down to writers and journalists themselves to preemptively help with this archiving important links and historical record. Because yeah at this point even though there are a lot of really smart mines working on this. The pace of change on the web is out. A lot of our kind of traditional archival practices in there is this threat of losing a big portion of the historical record. And you also mentioned a more militia side of this. I think you called it content drifts when one hyperlink points to something that's different than what it originally pointed to maybe a lot different like a gambling website or like you said more nefarious content. Does that mean that. There's actually a black market. For dead hyper links. Unfortunately there is some evidence of that there has been reporting about. Some hyperlinked have gone dead in publications like the times that have been replaced with exactly those types of things more not suitable for work content. Let's just say and again. I think a lot of this comes back to the search engine optimization world where having your website linked to buy an important place like the times i is good for you. So there's some incentive to try and find websites that have out links from important places that have stopped being paid for or are now kind of empty and replacing that information with your website to try to get some of that. Seo juice so right now. We don't really have a link. Police necessarily authority that can stop. This problem. is there anything. Publishers can do to kind of make themselves less. Vulnerable to getting hijacked. The first step to all of this is kind of creating a partnership between the folks who are making this content putting it on the web using hyperlinked in this important way and people who have a background as information professionals who have been thinking about how are practices can translate to the internet age. There are a lot of questions to answer like. When should a link be archived in frozen in time versus one should it be alive length to point users to the most up to date information. There's really a need to just build frameworks and an understanding across the spectrum of content creators and writers to know about this problem e proactive in ways that they can be about either archiving or using more stable links to the extent that that's possible and training and some of these mindsets in practices of archives and libraries for writers themselves so they can be more protected against the downsides of of of link rot even if they happen at some level and as i understand it. You and your colleagues at harvard's library innovationlab have taken matters into your own hands. Can you tell us a little bit about your efforts. sure Yeah we're trying to to help in the effort for sure the angle that we're coming at it from is there really needs to be technology to back up. Those frameworks once. They're written so once that critical thinking has been done about where stopgaps can happen in. How newsrooms can work on this internally. They need to actually have the technology to archive the web and show it to their readers and users in a real way so we have built a tool called primacy c. Which is going around in the legal sphere for a long time at which allows folks to create a capture of specific webpage and replace alive link with an archive link. We add that content to our collection at the harvard law school library and we have a network of academic libraries that work with us to do that kind of backing up so that things are preserved into the future. We're very excited about that. Work and we are looking to collaborate with newsroom specifically to to build technologies and try to help in this problem a little bit on the next step because it's complicated just as the web changes all the time the way that you capture it and archive. It is changing all the time. I think we can all agree that the internet would be better if it works perfectly all the time but this is an ambitious goal that will have to keep working towards claire. Thanks for joining us. Thank you so much. Thank you for listening to rico daily. My name is adam clarke estes. This episode was produced by ellen. Rodriguez espinosa and engineered by. Melissa pulse from hemlock creek productions. Let us know what you want to learn more about email us at rico.

kovic supreme court municipal government congress Us supreme court harvard harvard law school rico daily adam clarke estes Rodriguez espinosa claire Melissa pulse hemlock creek ellen rico
"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

Reset

03:15 min | 11 months ago

"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

"Want to see like the most shocking things the most well and it seems like How are these influencers making their money. Is it the partnerships with the brands or is it selling products that are actually good products. So i think ultimately like the vast majority of influencers talk influencers are making the bulk of their money with sponsored content with brand deals who brands pay them to. Maybe do a couple of posts on there tech talk feed. Maybe an instagram story. They set up a deal and they either long term or short term deals and those can be incredibly incredibly lucrative and then there's also a revenue source called affiliate marketing aware. You know an influence or recommend something and then like okay. Click the lincoln my bio to go buy it and they get a cut of that sale but for the most part ran deals sponsored content are making up the bulk of these influencers paychecks. That makes sense. So there's not really like an incentive for the things to actually be good it's just for the things to be first and paid exactly for sure and it's it's really that's sort of like the ethos on there it's like i got this thing burst and like i am the one to tell you about it where it's like you know it's funny if he's in skin-care take talk. People are kind of just talking about the same brands. Because you can't really do much better than sarah of you know like it's an affordable brand that uses very like simple ingredients and those are kind of all you need and so there's only so many ways you can say it out without being like boring and repetitive even though that is i would say quote unquote objectively the best option for most people. So we're actually like pretty early in the days of talk selling things to people. What do you think is the future for tech talk in sales so i think we can see what kind of happened in china in doyenne. Which is the tech talk. Version that exists in china. And they made i think twenty six billion dollars in their first year of adding ecommerce to joy in and so. That's obviously coming eventually to talk. I think that like what we've seen with social platforms is ultimately a lot of them. Just want to be shopping platforms. And so i think that this could have a huge impact on the way we buy things. And what kinds of products we buy and this viral cycle of like really high popularity for a minute and then really big crash is just going to become more common than i think like. People are already starting to buy much more of their stuff through social media and online. And i think tick-tock talk could be a huge huge place. Where people do that thanks listening. I'm adam clarke. Estes and this is rico. Daily this episode was produced by schuyler. Swinson and mixed by paul mounsey and melissa jones from hemlock creek productions support for this episode comes from lincoln today many small business owners are busier than ever. That's lincoln jobs. Made it easier to get two candidates worth interviewing faster and it's free creative free job post in minutes on linked jobs to reach the world's largest professional network of over seven hundred fifty million people each week nearly forty million job-seekers visit lincoln. Your job for free. Lincoln dot com slash rico daily. That's lincoln dot com slash rico. Daily terms and conditions apply..

lincoln china sarah Swinson paul mounsey melissa jones hemlock creek adam clarke Estes schuyler rico rico daily Lincoln
"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

Reset

01:47 min | 11 months ago

"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

"And explaining such a complex and difficult topic. Thanks for having me. I'm adam clarke. Estes and this is rico. Daily episode was produced by. Sophie lemond an engineered by paul mounsey. Make sure you check out our show notes for links to more information about apple's new technology and let us know what you think about the update. Are you worried about what this means for your privacy or are you a parent who wants more protections for your child email us at recode daily at recode dot net. If you've e commerce business this ad might change everything for you. And i'm not just saying that but if you ever scrolled wistfully do incredible marketing. Emails and.

"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

Reset

02:00 min | 11 months ago

"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

"Jobs made it easier to get two candidates worth interviewing faster and it's free creative free job in minutes on linked in jobs to reach the world's largest professional network of over seven hundred fifty million people each week nearly forty million job-seekers visit lincoln post your job for free dot com slash rico daily that's linked dot com slash rico daily terms and conditions apply square. The owners of cash recently announced that they're buying after pay the ever-growing buy now pay later service. This acquisition is a big deal. The company's paying twenty nine billion dollars in stock and will likely integrate the service into cash app in the near future. That means that soon it could be easier than ever for the app. Seventy million users to pay for everyday items in installments. That sounds like a pretty good deal right but the bite i'll pay later. Model can't be risky. Fox's tearing win has been looking into services like after pay and she's heard from shoppers who use it. I asked her to tell us more about the risks and potential benefits. Terry's here to join us hairy adam. So let's talk about these. Buy now pay later services. How were they different from one another. Yeah so buy now pay later is exactly what it sounds like. Although they're kind of grouped into this larger umbrella. They're generally point of sale services that allow shoppers to split a purchase across several payments. So there are ones like affirm typically used for bigger purchases like furniture or peleton bikes and they usually require some sort of credit checks and might charge interest but then among general shoppers there are smaller pay for services like after pay clark or sessile quad pay. These services don't charge interest and they don't often report to credit bureaus and they're usually applied for purchases under one hundred dollars or.

"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

Reset

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

"True that's happened. I think to like facebook but you know. I don't think anyone's to jail for this. And i don't think there's a law that say they should well. This all. sounds like a pretty big bummer book can users of apps especially apps like grinder. Do to feel better about how their data is being treated or protected online. Why i mean grinder They do have some details in their privacy policy about how you can opt out of having your data center advertising services. Trust them as much as you want to this point you can delete your account altogether I don't wanna tell people that they shouldn't use apps that provide like a net good in their life that they think will It's always good though that people are just aware of the potential of things and don't just always assume that these things might stay private so you know there's there's stuff that you can do yourself Maybe sort of you know bigger way. You could advocate your lawmakers to make privacy laws that forbid these practices or make them more transparent So something like. This wouldn't happen again. we've got. I think three states. Now that have these consumer privacy laws But again nothing on a federal level. That would be really nice to have followed sales. Just put your phone in airplane mode. Whenever you're doing anything that you really want to be private or just all the time. Just turn it off all right. Thanks for joining us. Sarah thank you and thank you listeners. For listening to rico daily. My name is adam clarke. Estes episode was produced by. Alan rodriguez espinosa and engineered by paul mounsey. Let us know what you want to learn more about email us at rico daily at recode.

facebook rico daily Alan rodriguez espinosa adam clarke Sarah paul mounsey Estes
"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

Reset

08:13 min | 1 year ago

"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

"Recode rebecca hi. Awhile has been talking with experts in privacy advocates who are working to put an end to this practice. She joins us now. Hey rebecca hey so rebecca. How does this technology work in. What's it used for so the basic premise of a lot of retail companies using facial recognition in stores they say is to track shoplifters so essentially what happens is they have their security cameras. It's picking up information about people's faces and essentially these companies are coming up with watch lists for people they don't think should be allowed in the store. And when people enter the i like runs their face against the database and flags it to the store beyond the sort of application of tracking shoplifters. There's also concern that. This technology is being used or abused in the future to sell them ads or track their shopping habits collecting data about them and making predictions. There's a whole other element that they're concerned about two. Which is that. This technology is sort of implicitly tracking all the employees who work in these stores as well. So there's a real question of data privacy and what you're accepting when you just walk into a store so it's a little bit like that technology in the movie minority report where tom cruise walks into the gap and they try to sell them a certain pair of khakis komodo welcome back to the how those assorted tank tops for you right which stores have been using this technology so one of the stores that has openly said they're using facial recognition technology is macy's which recently confirmed they use it and like i said earlier they say it's a security method to deal with that and shoplifting in stores but there are other companies that have been accused of using facial recognition or collecting biometric data in lawsuits. Sometimes these big retailers deny it. And that's part of why activists think it's really important that we need transparencies and law requiring companies to disclose when they're collecting this type of data us and even a reason to ban facial recognition stores entirely so macy's at least has been open about saying they use this tech for preventing shoplifting or there are other uses in what's their justification for for doing so i think the emergence of facial recognition in stores has been part of the increasing trend of the security systems getting smarter and smarter with smarter being in quotes we've seen before retailers being sold ai powered security systems. Other informed or technology enabled security systems. That do more than just collecting video footage. And i think the stores adopting facial recognition has kind of been an extension of that but there are real problems with facial recognition. One of them is just being inaccurate. There's countless examples of ai. Like this producing sexist outcomes and disproportionately targeting black and brown people julia robinson and her husband. Derek are considering legal action against a lavonia skating rink. After their fourteen year old daughter. Maya was misidentified by the businesses facial recognition technology. I was like what is not me. These algorithms are trained on data at aren't necessarily representative. The i can be biased. It could be designed with bias but even then there's just a fundamental data privacy problem we're not necessarily signing up to have our data collected when we walk into a macy's people aren't necessarily aware of that you know it can end up being a real problem in people's lives in in two thousand. Nineteen apple was sued by a student in new york who says they were inaccurately linked to thefts didn't commit thanks to facial recognition technologies. You had to face multiple false allegations from thefts at apple stores in delaware new jersey and manhattan all while working through his freshman year of college leading to severe stress and hardship. So it's really really controversial. Well now that. I know about the macy's example. At least i have to think that anywhere. There's a security camera. There could be facial recognition technology in it are there companies that have come out and said straight up. They don't use this so the reason why you're hearing a bunch about this right now is because this digital rights not profit called fight for the future. Basically made a list of all these major retailers that may or may not be using facial recognition. And then ask them to state publicly whether they would commit to not using this technology so in response to that list that fight for the future created stores including walmart kroger costco. Cvs have all said that they're not going to be using this technology in their stores. So rebecca like you said facial. Recognition technology is being used in all kinds of other venues. Schools law enforcement uses it. Do you know how long stores have been surveilling. Their customers using this technology can't give you a start date but it's definitely been awhile facial. Recognition has been around for years rite aid recently came out and said that they were going to stop using facial recognition but that was after they put the technology in about two hundred stores over the course of eight years. We have to remember that. There are private businesses tech firms that are actively looking to sell this technology. It's a really lucrative business you know. There's the clearview. Ai example. There's also the ai startup any vision that recently you know. That's all facial recognition. It recently raised more than two hundred million dollars in funding round. So while we have all these concerns about this technology investors potentially see a lot of value in a lot of money in it And that's another reason why activists think that we really need regulation to step in because the market is encouraging the use of us. Will i know that technology over time gets cheaper. We're seeing more cameras more places because cameras are getting cheaper to make. That's why you see dash cams and you get in a cab now. It's also we'll have cameras in. Our pockets is debt leading to more facial. Recognition technology being rolled out or is that tech itself getting cheaper wise. It seemed to becoming more popular more recently. I think in general were having more cameras and cameras that are hooked up to computer systems that make it very easy to just plug in some ai. Whether or not that. hey. I actually works. One of the s- cursory stores near my house. Now has a camera attached to every single self-checkout that is constantly filming you. Every time i walk by think wow very easy for them to just put some facial recognition in there and and sort of identify customers. So i think it's a product of there being a lot of money in this and cameras being everywhere and facial recognition kind of being normalized. Despite all of these really important concerns about the technology and of course amazon is testing out there. Cashier 'less stores. Which i know. Our full of cameras and sensors. Is there anything being done to discourage or ban companies from using facial recognition technology so on the state level there have been efforts to create biometric privacy laws biometric privacy basically refers to privacy related to things that your body. So you the privacy. Of your iris data your fingerprint data face data so illinois actually seen several stores sued for using facial recognition under its biometric privacy law which is basically one of the strongest in the country. New york city recently had a law go into effect that requires stores to let customers know when their data's being collected in this type of way. But i think what's interesting is that there have been these local efforts in some places but there is yet to be any really significant law on the federal level. Curbing the use of this technology though there have been some proposals. People are really concerned about that. Because it creates a patchwork where it becomes normalized some places and illegal other places and you have this weird regulatory world where people don't actually know when they're being surveilled or whether or not that's kinda creepiest thing to me. Is you never know what the cameras are doing. And there seems to be more and more cameras everywhere. Exactly thanks for joining us. Rebecca thanks for having me and thank you for listening to rico daily. My name is adam clarke estes. This episode was produced by. Alan rodriguez espinosa and engineered by paul bouncy. Let us know what you want to learn more about email us at rico daily at recode dot net..

macy rebecca hi rebecca julia robinson tom cruise apple Maya Derek kroger delaware costco manhattan Cvs walmart new jersey new york amazon illinois New york city
"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

Reset

10:28 min | 1 year ago

"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

"So. Let's start with the people behind the documentary. Who are they. The director of roadrunner is morgan novel and most people might have run into his work previously from. Won't you be my neighbor. The documentary about mister rogers. That a lot of people saw a few years ago he also made twenty feet from stardom. One thing i really have always appreciated about morgan's work is that he's really good at finding the cultural significance of particular figures or particular events and turning them into a film that is really enjoyable to watch does never achieve that effect in his latest project. I think he does. I think that for the most part. This film is very successful. You are watching anthony. Board danes life. he kind of appears onscreen at first as a chef as an adult. So we don't spend a lot of time slogging through background story. And then we learn a lot about him through just watching video of him of course his thousands and thousands of hours video because he made these tv shows and he was widely beloved for his. His travel shows differential lovely italians on one side but the terrifying swiss on the other there close to close for me. A man with a neurotic childhood fear of alpine vistas yodeling. Even cheese with holes. we also get b. Roll and archival and backgrounds video. That helps build out a bigger impression of who anthony bourdain really was it also leads to one of the more questionable about this documentary. So what is the thing. That's raising eyebrows. So there's really two things. One of them has nothing to do with ai. It's more the treatment of our gento who was Ordains girlfriends And they broke up not long before he died by suicide in two thousand eighteen. But the other piece of this and it kind of only emergent interviews right as the film was being released is that there's actually small bits of the film where you think you're listening to ordain speaking but it turns out what you're actually listening to is an ai. Recreation of his voice reading things that he had written down so they're not making him say things he never thought or words he never put in that order but they were able to use hours and hours of recordings from his tv show. Podcasts audiobooks ends in artificial intelligence engine and turn it into board danes voice so they're not faking the text but they are faking his voice and that could seem sort of creepy because he never recorded that right exactly and in reality it might be kind of been all in this case. It's certainly something that he wrote something. He thought Although you could argue that maybe intonations wouldn't necessarily match up But also it's a bigger problem overall because as soon as you kind of open the pandora's box which arguably has been open for a long time but once you do it in a sanctions space like documentary. People feel like they've been lied to and with good reason right. Seems a bit like fake technology where you create a video out of archival footage and make someone do something that they never did. Is this the first time studios have used technology in these sort of ethical grey areas. So obviously not right like the movies are always showing us things that don't actually exist or creating things. That never really happens. The difference with documentaries is that there is this. I guess i would think of it as a contract between the documentarian and the audience And the contract. Says i'm going to show you stuff and to the best of my ability. I am not going to manipulate you by tweaking. It so that it's inauthentic or lying or you know sort of portraying things. That aren't true of course. Every documentary includes things like editing. You decide what goes in and goes out. You can compress time. You can recreate things. Everyone does this. We're quite used to it. But there's still this presumption on the part of the audience that everything in documentary is one hundred percent true. That's not actually true. But it is the presumption we have right. And this is a little further along on the spectrum of that exactly and so what we do with. This is that we present something that literally didn't exist and say this did exist and then when people hero it didn't exist then suddenly they're going to call into question not just that choice but every single other thing that they've seen in the film you know other ways that it's been used in film for instance i think of the star wars films. So carrie fisher. And peter cushing have both passed away but they both portray pivotal characters in those films and so disney chose to recreate them You know in some cases to like basically reanimate their image and have them speak lines and essentially play part that they weren't there to play your host transmission. We received what does it. They've sent us. Hope we the audience know that these actors are gone. But i do think about maybe a hundred years from now. Someone watching star wars film might not realize that. That wasn't the real person playing that part and this has also been used outside of studios and more nefarious ways. The sort of technology right absolutely. Yeah and you know one really scary thing about the fake is that it keeps getting better and better really quickly. So it's been used to create sexual images of celebrities or revenge porn Certainly people are worried about. Its use in the future in politics right now. You watch a video of someone saying something you're pretty sure they said it But that trust has been slipping away and at some point we may totally lose the ability to distinguish between reality and not reality in that can destabilise economies that could star wars. That could elect horrible people to office impossible. This technology is still pretty new. And it's not quite perfect but obviously it's causing a lot of debate and backlash how have critics and viewers reacted to nevels decision to use ai. To bring bourdain back to life in a sense so the fact that this had happened had come up in an interview With morgan novel the helen rosner did in the new yorker and he sort of tossed it off as like. You didn't even realize it had happened. It was a seamless transition and a lot of people of course as soon as this quote hit twitter. Got very angry about it Some people are just uncomfortable with that technology being used. Some people wondered like would ordain have wanted this what they would. This have been acceptable to him Neville push back and said you know. I checked with the stay. I checked with his widow ends. They said that it was something that he would be fine with. She pushed back on that as well. So there's been some kind of back and forth about this story. What would anthony bourdain have wanted. What is acceptable for him. em for some critics including myself honestly. The frustrating part isn't even so much the use of this. Hey i understand that this is an email that what i'm hearing is a voice narrating an email. I understand the subject is gone. That's the whole point of the documentary. But i want something to tell me that. That's what i'm listening to and there's different ways to do this. We could put a no on screen. Could even be a notice before after the film that in some cases we have recreated anthony ordains voice so that he can read texts. He wrote down if i had known that going in. I would have a different impression of when i'm watching it. And i think for me and for a lot of people it's not even so much about this particular instance it's just about Very successful documentarian. Setting a precedent. That could be used in ways. That could be much more troubling in the future right. So do you think we'll continue to see the sort of technology this sort of. Ai re-creations in movies going forward. It's hard to imagine that we won't right and again. That's that's deeply troubling. One would hope that documentarian who often are very concerned with ethics And with truth would put notices up would inform people when they're going to use this. You know it makes sense that you might want to for storytelling filmmaking purposes. But we want to know that. That's what's happening in a documentary But it's equally possible and even likely that for instance. A polemical documentary made about a political issue might fake a politician or a scholar or pundits saying something and then the people who watch that who are already kind of inclined to believe that this person might say this thing would then believe it as if it is true indus could cause all kinds of problems. And that's really what we're up against. Thanks for joining us. Elissa thank you and thank you for listening to rico daily. My name is ronny mullah. This episode was produced by ellen. Rodriguez espinosa and engineered by paul muncie. Let us know what you wanna learn more about email us at recode daily at recode dot net if e commerce business this ad might change everything for you and i'm not just saying that but if you ever scrolled wistfully do incredible marketing. Emails and texts from major brands and wonder quietly allowed. What sort of magic does these guys sprinkling over their communications. I'm gonna let you in on a major secret. They're probably using flavio. Clave you'll take the mystery out of email and sms marketing offering all you marketers entrepreneurs and creators out their data driven automated platform. You need to create authentic relationships with your customers like a top tier brand. Say goodbye to blessing. Vague newsletters to an entire massive faceless. People combine your customer data with a smart marketing platform like flavio. And you'll engage every customer one on one like they're. You're only customer engagement like this bills valuable relationships that make you money. If you're the creator of e brand you need a platform. That houses as hard as you do clovio unlocks the power your e commerce data so you can personalize automate messages. That keep customers coming back to get started with a free trial of clovio. Visit clovio dot com slash fox. That's k. l. e. v. i. y. o. dot com slash fox..

"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

Reset

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

"Lot of things are really <Speech_Female> good. <SpeakerChange> But nothing <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is guaranteed. <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Heard it your. I thank <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you so much for being here. Sarah <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> sure thing. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> I'm running me <Speech_Female> in this rico. Daily <Speech_Female> this episode <Speech_Female> was produced by sophie lodden <Speech_Female> and engineered by. Paul <Speech_Female> muncie if you <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> wanna learn more by <Speech_Music_Female> links to articles in our show <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> notes <Speech_Music_Female> and don't forget <Speech_Female> email us. Let <Speech_Female> us know what you wanna hear on the show. <Speech_Female> Send your <Speech_Female> questions rico. Daily <Speech_Music_Female> at recode <SpeakerChange> dot <Music> net. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> If you've run an e <Speech_Male> commerce business this <Speech_Male> ad might change everything <Speech_Male> for you. And <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> i'm not just saying that <Speech_Male> but if you ever <Speech_Male> scrolled wistfully <Speech_Male> do incredible marketing. <Speech_Male> Emails and texts from major <Speech_Male> brands and wonder <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> quietly allowed. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> What sort of magic. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Dust with these <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> guys sprinkling over their <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> communications. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I'm gonna let you in on <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a major secret. <Speech_Music_Male> They're probably using clovio <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> clovio. It takes the mystery <Speech_Music_Male> out of email and sms <Speech_Male> marketing <Speech_Male> offering all you marketers <Speech_Male> entrepreneurs <Speech_Male> and creators out their <Speech_Male> data driven automated <Speech_Music_Male> platform. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> You need to create authentic <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> relationships <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with your customers <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> like top tier brand <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> say goodbye <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to blessing. Vague <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> newsletters to an entire <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> massive faceless. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> People <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> combine your customer data <Speech_Music_Male> with a smart marketing <Speech_Music_Male> platform like clovio. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And you'll engage <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> every customer one <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on one like they're. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> You're only customer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> engagement <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> like this bills valuable <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> relationships that make <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you money. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> If you're the creator of ecommerce <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> brand. You need <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a platform that houses <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> as hard as you do <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> clave you'll unlocks <Speech_Music_Male> the power of your e <Speech_Music_Male> commerce data so you <Speech_Music_Male> can personalize automate <Speech_Music_Male> messages. That keep <Speech_Music_Male> customers coming back <Speech_Music_Male> to get <Speech_Music_Male> started with a free trial <Speech_Music_Male> of vio. Visit <Speech_Music_Male> clovio dot <Speech_Music_Male> com slash fox. <Speech_Music_Male> That's k. <Speech_Music_Male> l. a. v. i. y. o. dot com slash fox.

"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

Reset

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

"And makes the case stronger for those laws getting passed. I realized there's a legal definition for a monopoly and that could change but for me. What's striking about this. When i when i saw the decision. And maybe think about how you almost can't use the internet without touching facebook in some way. Facebook has tracking pixels on all kinds of websites for its advertising network. I don't go on facebook much. But i look at instagram reflexively. Sometimes and it is startling to step back and take about what a powerful role plays in not only people's individual lives but society as a whole it does but you know you still have to make the legal case and facebook is going to argue to the strongest degree possible that it actually has a lot of competition. The companies like to talk and youtube which is owned by google. And maybe the next stop that we don't even know about that. Those companies could all come and sort of eat facebook's cake at any given moment i think facebook's pass playbook we're just to buy up some of those companies but it can't easily do that now. I think facebook tried to buy tick talk. It would have a lot of issues trying to even do so. So it'll be interesting to see this battle plow legally politically socially about whether facebook google amazon all these companies are truly monopolies or not or a trine. Thanks for joining us. This is really helpful. Thanks so much. I'm adam clarke. Estes and this is rico. Daily this episode was produced by. Alan rodriguez espinosa and engineered by christian ayala. Let us know what you want to learn about. Email us at rico daily at recode dot.

facebook instagram google youtube adam clarke Alan rodriguez espinosa amazon Estes christian ayala rico rico daily
"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

Reset

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

"So i guess. The gift cards were actually a little too much release. Maybe you got a better. Abc that's that's also. I bought an air conditioner with its own thermostat control and remote control so wouldn't have needed new anyway. Nice well thanks for joining us. Sarah stay cool. I'm i'm adam clark. Estes rico daily. This episode was produced by. Alan rodriguez espinosa and sophie. The lawn and engineered by. Paul muncie. let us know what you want to learn more about. Email us at rico. Daily at recode dot net Thanks.

"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

Reset

08:16 min | 1 year ago

"rico daily" Discussed on Reset

"Got more real june. Eleventh congress introduced five antitrust bills the target amazon apple facebook and google and could potentially break up their businesses a few days later. The white house appointed lena con a big enemy for big tech as a commissioner of the federal trade commission the agency that enforces anti-trust laws. Then it made her their leader kendra. Explain is trained ghaffari history. Hey ryan so we've talked about her before but for those who don't know. Who is lena con. So lena con is a legal scholar. And she's actually the youngest person to ever join and furthermore lead the ftc. She's thirty two and she's really made a name for herself. As a kind of expert on antitrust law and someone who's been a major major critic of big tech and it's alleged monopoly power. I think one of the challenges is deep information a cemeteries that exists between some of these firms and enforcers regulators You know. I think it's clear that in some instances agencies have been a little slow to catch up to the underlying business realities and the empirical realities of how these markets work. And so i think at the very least you know ensuring that the agencies are doing everything they can to keep pace is going to be important. So she's publicly advocated for breaking big tech companies like amazon. She wrote a famous paper a few years ago. That totally changed the way people were thinking about how you could potentially go after big tech companies for being monopolies and she has a lot of support politically from a wide range of people. So everyone from progressive senator elizabeth warren to republican senator. Josh hawley have supported lena kahn. Which is pretty notable right. Yeah it's crazy to have. bipartisan support. These days so how big tech industry leaders reacting to her appointment so big tech industry leaders clearly are not pleased about her appointment. Let alone her being chair of whole ftc which is quite powerful agency right because the ftc can block major tech companies from buying other smaller companies so for example. The ftc code in the future stop facebook from acquiring the next instagram. It could even go back and retroactively tried to separate out companies like facebook from instagram. That would be harder to do but overall the fact that someone who so openly has said that she thinks that these tech companies have too much power is now in power and has the ability to really harm their business that that is not looking good for the tech industry so they see someone who could fundamentally harm their business. Do we know much about khan's plans for the ftc yet. We don't know exactly what she's going to do. But we know that she is going to pursue the whole strain of legal thought that she has essentially pioneered around trying to make the case that went. Big tech companies are too big. They're hurting consumers. They're hurting every day. Americans even if let's say facebook is offering a free social media network for people that it's still could be harming us because we don't have as much of a choice about other alternatives that you could use to facebook for example. So she kind of changed. The definition of how a monopoly can harm consumers because traditionally people thought that if something's a monopoly that means that you're going to be paying higher prices like if a railroad company was a monopoly. You would see that reflected in the fact that you're paying really high ticket prices. That's not the case. Here with these tech companies google facebook amazon services or pretty much free to us but lena con has really made a case that there are other ways. These companies are hurting the economy and individuals so our big tech companies trying to counter that argument. Well they're trying to say that basically. It has no basis that you know that. Actually when when companies like google or facebook acquire startups like instagram or fitbit that they're helping the economy that these companies may have not succeeded if a big tech company hadn't come in and bought their business and made them more profitable. A lot of them are really making the case. That over-regulating tech industry could do more harm than good. And so one thing that they're worried about for example is if you start telling a company like apple that you can't free install apps on phones. Well that could mean that you don't have maps and sells on your phone. You don't have even or something like that installed on your phone and you know there's a case that when apple puts its own kind of software like i message or find my iphone on there that you're sucked into kind of their environment but on the other hand people so find the stuff incredibly useful and it may be hard for them to sort of navigate around that and like hack thrown iphone apps so You know the congressman who is leading legislation came out and said he would make sure that iphones can still have absence stalled on them and he would just make it so that it's more fair but we're going to see a lot of this back and forth where industry people in big tax are going to say. Wait a second regulations going too far. This could actually hurt people and make it more inconvenient for them to use these tech products that we all know love. 'cause they're so easy to use the iphone. They're also arguing that if you were to start separating out the different very lucrative lines of businesses and these big tech companies like. Let's say you took away. Google ads business from g mail on everything else that it would be hard for the companies to continue to give away things like g mail for free so they may hang this sort of threat of. Hey do you really want to be charged for your email or for doing google search. Because that's what it may come down to you if someone like lena con enough to see where to break up our businesses right. Okay so just. Before khan's appointment. Congress introduced five antitrust bills. How do those play into all of us. The are very related. Because lena con actually was helping a lead an investigation into all these tech companies alleged monopolistic practices for like a year and a half and that investigation. That she was running was with. Congressman named congressman. Cellini and says alenia is the one who's now really leading all these new bills to try to regulate big tech. Many of the practices used by these countries have harmful economic effects. They discourage entrepreneurship destroy jobs. High-cost and degrade quality simply put. They have too much power. This power staves off new forms of competition creativity innovation so essentially cisa lenient con are working hand in hand to have this two pronged a antitrust action against big tech companies. One is through these actual bills. That could turn into laws right. That could change the game. For how big tech companies are regulated and the other is through the actual enforcement agency. Which lena con is now in charge of the ftc which would go and pursue those potential new laws and actually start finding or demanding. The company's changed your business based on the law. So all of this is well and good but can can really make these sweeping changes. That would fundamentally change the tech industry. It's gonna be tough first of all. She has a narrow margin of support on the. Ftc forest strong antitrust action. You know she has to get a majority of the five commissioners to support whatever agenda she wants to pursue right now seems like things are in her favor but that could change if if one member of the ftc changes the other thing is under existing antitrust law. It's pretty outdated. And it's difficult in some ways to go after these tech companies which are fundamentally very different businesses and the railroad monopolies or even the telecom companies of years past. So that's why congressman says lenient are trying to change a to update it to make it more applicable to tech companies. But if those laws don't get updated it will be harder for khan to make the case that even under these old outdated laws. These new tech companies are still applicable. Thanks so much for talking with us. Thanks for having me. I'm ronnie mola and this is rico. Daily this episode was produced by sophie. Lalonde ellen rodriguez espinosa and engineered by melissa. Pawns hemlock creek productions. Let us.

Josh hawley Congress google ronnie mola iphone amazon ryan Cellini fitbit elizabeth warren lena kahn sophie five commissioners congress facebook iphones Lalonde ellen rodriguez espino thirty two republican a year and a half