16 Burst results for "Ricki Stern"

"ricki stern" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

REALITY OF REALITY

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"ricki stern" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

"Yeah i just. Don't i don't i honestly. I don't know if impacts how you tell your stories or if it's your life experience because of your you know because of your gender you know so as a woman growing up by was formed and shaped in a certain way and therefore the way i tell stories is the way i just don't like to have it be about gender quite honestly yeah and then in terms of the stories that you choose that you gravitate toward Tour does it. Is it like you know. i wanna tell more. Women's stories or is now it's actually been the opposite. I would say my first film about a wrongfully convicted african american man in winston salem north carolina Mostly man. and you know there was a woman reporter who broke broke some zoom profound stuff. But you know. I would say and then like we did a film about knuckleball pitchers. All men I did a film called in my father's house about a rapper in chicago in his homeless father. Lots of male driven masculine kinds of stories I actually sorta shy. I think i wasn't that interested in women's stories quite honestly i. I don't know why because rain washed by the patriarchy navy. Maybe i was directed because it was john. I'm just attracted to the individuals individuals in great stories. Yeah great well. Everyone can find Surviving death on net flicks can look up your other What will your. Your website is breakthrough yet. It's spelled g. wanna spell. it is and i'm gonna put it on this show notes. Well okay. it's its breakthrough but through his t h. Are you how. I spell it on my texts with a slam And then are you a social media. person should follow. Can we find really. You're seeing a hidden people. People are people are following. My which. I don't even know or whatever my twitter and unlike people never gonna post okay. We'll get to know. I'll still tag you you never know and i'm really appreciate it was so great to quote unquote meet you and thank you for all of your great work and i hope i'm looking forward to whatever you do next. Oh thank you so much was it was fun to talk with you and Yeah and good luck on your on all the work. You're doing these object thank you..

chicago twitter first film john african american winston salem north carolina
"ricki stern" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

REALITY OF REALITY

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"ricki stern" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

"I knew michael dorian The he was the son of john dory and I how i mean have gone there. Yes did i go there at that crowd no but A little bit older than he was in. That crowd was younger anyway but So that was what attracted me to that story in particular. I was like new york in the eighties group in their the eighties. And i knew robert chambers and so part of what was satellites. Sorry i just what. What is your perception of back fan. Before all that happened he was just quiet. He was a quiet kind of tall. Maybe a little bit brooding. He was probably sad in person. I i would say But a lot of the guys. I knew he hung out with. Were kind of dark. You know they were going through there was they. Were troubled were a lot of drugs. They didn't come from families that were necessarily stable and and this isn't an excuse for what he did at all. I'm just telling you what my impressions of him were and we hung out pretty soon as friends with a group of friends pretty regularly. I pretty much. I can't quite remember much. You know because he was very quiet but the access we had in the series was based on people that i grew up with an anne as well had gone to college with his high school girlfriend. So who went on to be an actor right. Yes i kind of deep dive on her a little bit after. Yeah yeah yes exactly. So and then survived differences. Similar like we. We were very interested in having giving the women and going and meeting the women and talking to them about their experience with joan. If you want me talk about joan. Joan is interesting because we had just done. The devil came on horseback. Which was serious and you know again based on this one young former. Us marine captain. Who had been indoor four. And i was talking to my mother. Who was who was friends with joan rivers and said you know you really should spend time with her. She's just like people she really..

michael dorian john dory Joan new york joan joan rivers robert chambers one eighties indoor
"ricki stern" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

REALITY OF REALITY

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"ricki stern" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

"We were on the phone with survivors and sometimes their lawyers and sometimes friends who represented them just talking to a range of women Before we interviewed them. And i think you know we just established from the beginning. This is your story. We just want to help you get it out there. We want to facilitate. We wanna capture it. You know as honestly and profoundly as we can and you are in charge. You're in charge. You say no will ask questions in or you can set boundaries before we even do the interview. Don't ask me about this. And i think that was liberating not just to them. But for us to say we're on the same page. You know enroll in this together. And if i ask you a question two rar too hard for you to raf It's not because you know it. Just let's move on. Let's know that we're doing this together. To to represent the the most accurate and story and again the the reason these women wanted to share their stories. There's a range of reasons but generally they wanted to either make sure that other young people found themselves vulnerable in in situations similar to theirs wouldn't be subjected to such sexual the sexual abuse that they found themselves subjected to They would know what a grooming means. They would understand the their own vulnerabilities and they also wanted to make sure that the the truth was out there. Because for so long you. Jeffrey epstein in in maxwell got away with a lot and many people covered for them in enabled them so this because he had killed himself when we started filming Jeff killed himself. You know this game in opportunity to say what Weren't going to have a chance to say in the court of law in now ultimately who knows what will happen with glenn maxwell will be a trial some of these women not all of them were abused by her but some of them were and they might have that opportunity to make it public You know in the case. God i hope so i mean. Look your your filmmaker. But you're also a human being. And i know for myself. I'm not the best compartmentalize earlier when you do something like this. Like how do you stay. Sane. and not just like. I don't know fold like a into a heap of like rage or depression because it's just watching it. How how do. I even wrap my brain around this. It's funny. I always like you know years ago anne and i did a film called Or horseback which is about this the genocide in darfur in sudan and the images. Were just terrific in the stories in an you know people would say. Oh gosh or we did the boston marathon documentary for. Hbo would say you go to sleep at night. Had i know you know. I'm i'm i can handle this and then i realized. Oh that's right during my darfur documentary shooting that Editing at basically dreamed of bombs dropping.

Jeffrey epstein Jeff sudan glenn maxwell Or horseback maxwell years anne darfur boston two
"ricki stern" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

REALITY OF REALITY

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"ricki stern" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

"Know i always say about that. Because i don't want people to feel like oh. The alternative is great while things get tough here you know what i mean. I okay fair enough. I'm careful about saying that. Yeah yeah. I mean it's a it's an interesting thing i think it's more than just you know there's some people like my husband's parents are terrified of death and they're both in their eighties and it's like it's gonna happen so i think it's more like it's going to be okay like we want to be here. We want to be with the people we love. But like we're all gonna die is certain and so that when we do. It's not gonna you know unless it's you know you're the guy that just left office this morning you're not going to go to the depths of hell you're promptly gonna you know so i guess that fine line like you said but it that to me. Just felt comforting. I think you know people are like friends of mine. Say like oh isn't scary depressing. Or now i think it's hopeful that i want to create false hope but i think the if you if you give yourself over to the people who've had these experiences for the various episodes there is hope in in their experiences and i think that gives the audience. Hope you know. Because we don't really know i mean you might think you know i don't think we really know and i have plenty. Dr ron's were like. Oh i don't know just watch it and see if you don't feel just a sense of maybe. There's something more that we should like allow ourselves to consider. Yeah again. I said that was the last question. But i'm glad you said that. Because i read my husband and i read this book years ago called proof of heaven. Did you read that or do you know about it. But i heard of it. Yeah yeah and it was by a neuroscientist to look science science science. It's all a bunch of crap. And then he died for like three weeks and he wrote about his experience. And now is the first time that i really was like. Oh my god this is insane because it was from skeptic you know was from someone like this is crazy so anyway. Do recommend that book as well. It's really really interesting. So i wanna move on. I wanna talk about briefly surviving jeffrey epstein on lifetime which i saw Again really well done. That's a brutal story. I mean really really tough how. How did you approach that in terms of talking to survivors. It's you have to i think. Probably m- maybe more than anything that you've done. Although i don't know i would think that that has to be one of the hardest things to approach just to you. Know not only tell a story but talk to people that have been women especially that have been through. Such trauma will that series. I did my stomach partner. Anne sundberg and you know we were on the phone and this is before covid but we did finish during covid..

Anne sundberg three weeks proof of heaven covid eighties both jeffrey epstein this morning first time one ron
"ricki stern" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

REALITY OF REALITY

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"ricki stern" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

"You took serious notes. When when their child was reporting things wrote down names Didn't both parents parents were christian religions and you know resisted notion of reincarnation but their child. Their children had such strong experiences. Such vivid memories that were coming through and they were not pleasant. They're problematic and distrupt disturbing to the child that they couldn't really ignore the information. Yeah that was so emotions. Like i wanna see my kids again. Thank this little kid. I'm gonna see my kids. Yeah heeled while going to california and meeting the daughter of martin who was the the man the actor. An agent who had was reincarnated was fascinating. Because you know she's probably dislike all of us like you gotta be hit as my dad or you're pointing out that she she goes through the list and i had to say to her like that's a lot that he had gotten right and and you have to remember that this now. If you google marnie martin. He's all over. the internet. know what he was bill buddy. Yeah no one. That was written up in that you could easily locate. Or they didn't even know his name was margie. Martin that took to figure out if you so crazy so kind of a side note. But of course i couldn't help wonder because i've been talking to producers for the last ten months. Was that meeting like we're thinks film during the pandemic. when was this may when was it. Just give me the timeline. I'm so curious how you pulled it off. It was mostly filmed. I would say ninety nine point nine percent of it was filmed before the pandemic so we were in post in had been editing. You through march when it really hit In new york but we did we did have the little shoots but yeah all of that was before and the timing you know. People are like oh surviving. Death how appropriate. We'll hit now idea is.

martin Martin california both margie marnie martin new york google nine percent march last ten months ninety nine point bill christian
"ricki stern" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

REALITY OF REALITY

05:18 min | 1 year ago

"ricki stern" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

"Arnold yep she you know look. I'm sure you encountered a million stories. So i guess the broader question. You know stephanie. Had this wild story where she sort of foresaw her death. She had placenta previa when she was pregnant. And basically thought you know this is going to end badly for me. And nobody believed or they all thought she was crazy including her husband and she basically did die for thirty seven seconds and experienced. What so many people report when they have those experiences and then sort of retroactively discovered. I think that she had these sort of medium powers or at least the Six cents or whatever you wanna call it. How did you decide. And she was a great storyteller i understand. She was a producer before. How did you decide what stories to include In in this series was really important that the people felt authentic and that they again weren't seeking attention by you know having near the death experience than just But that in telling of the story and sharing their story came from a very deep emotional place that it was it was important for them to share their story because they wanted others to know that they weren't alone that they weren't crazy that they had had similar kinds of experiences. And that's felt genuine to me. Both in stephanie. Arnold and dr. Mary neil who's the the surgeon who is kept under water for more than thirty minutes when when she was kayaking..

Arnold thirty seven seconds Six cents Mary neil more than thirty minutes Both dr. stephanie previa million stories
"ricki stern" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

REALITY OF REALITY

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"ricki stern" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

"I had made into a two hour special for the history channel. So i i had a new leslie's work and i read her book and I am not a captive audience. I am what people call a skeptic. I am not like someone who Never went to medium. Wasn't that interested but her book is really fascinating and it is A a look at the subject the notion of consciousness living outside the body the physical or life going on after physical body dies that you know she explores through scientists and researchers and doctors in the fields of various fields who had studied this and our continuing study at her. Take on it. I thought it was really interesting. And i than developed it and brought it to net flex and net. Netflix was very interested in. Wow that's interesting. yeah. I think your point about the grounding it in science was really important i think especially to win over people like you who are skeptics. Because you know. Look and i think anecdotally. There's so many powerful stories that you cover that. I think could make somebody a believer but when you do ground it in data and science i do think it gives it a way that feels different than just like some tinfoil hat thing which is what a lot of skeptics. Think that's okay well. It's nice that you believe it. Yeah and i. And i think for me. The interesting part of it is asking the questions being open to it. so when i say wasn't quote unquote a believer. It's more than i. I hadn't really thought about much. But when i started to research a through lesley's bug and then started to speak to for example the division perceptual studies at uva in their medical school. They have this of doctors who've been studying this idea this notion or phenomenon of consciousness outside the brain and they've been studying whether it's through near death experiences or the work on mediums reincarnation they're open to it and looking at it and in a scientific way and i thought that was really interesting and it raises questions that i think are worth asking and what are some of those questions..

Netflix two hour lesley net of those flex
"ricki stern" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

REALITY OF REALITY

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"ricki stern" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

"But not on my model so my question is to my listeners. Since i can't seem to figure this out online is there a way for me to watch apple plus on my old devices. is there other than buying the apple. Tv box is there like a fire. Stick or some kind of work around that. I could do 'cause. I really hate watching shows on my computer. I really like watching them on the big screen. So i ask you audience. Please let me know if there's something. I'm missing so today on the podcast. I'm excited to have ricki stern. So ricky is a very prolific director who is heard about way back. I guess about a year or two ago. When i had an elliott goldberg on the podcast talking about the preppie murder series for amc and Ricky directed that and and i've been following her work longer than i knew. Actually she She's right now. Has an incredible series on netflix. Call surviving death. Which i really enjoyed and we really dig into that mostly but we also talk about the amc series and surviving. Jeffrey epstein for lifetime which she also directed and m one of my favorite documentaries ever that that ricky directed About joan rivers called a piece of work Ricky is a manhattan i. She reminded me of me. Homesick for new york. And the pandemic We really get into a lot of sort of the filmmaking in this latest netflix series. And of course. I ask her about her own beliefs because life after death is some some serious business Not for the not for the faint of heart. But if you're interested in in any of that a highly recommended on net flex now so hope you enjoy my chat with ricky. Hi ricky welcome to the podcast. Hi thank you so much for having me. I'm so happy that you're here. I always start my podcast by saying how i met my guests so we're only just meeting each other but we were introduced by elliott goldberg. Who is a good friend of mine. And i know he's been talking about you since the preppy killer Documentary that you did for amc. And he actually came on my pod a to talk about it way back and had high praise for you and and anti. Who's your director yes can it. It's the preppie murder the murder. Yes oh my god. You know what i was reading from. I cut and pasted from your website and run it's ripe but i'm looking at preppy killer in quotes and then the next line is quote unquote preppie murder. So yes i stand corrected. I'm sorry the preppie murder death in central park was the name of the doc is still available for people to see if they haven't seen it right. Yes it's a series on. Amc on sundance on the sundance channel on amc. Great well definitely want to talk about that a little later. But i'm excited to talk to you about your latest work which is surviving death on netflix. It's a six part series. As i said in my intro really i was look. I'm definitely a captive audience on this one because this is something that i've always been interested in. I did a series with the medium years ago and have always been a believer However i was not a believer in reincarnation until i saw your series so before we get into the deep dive on it i would love to hear Was this your creation. Were you a gun for hire direct. Like how did it come to you. So the series is based on a book called surviving death. Same name by leslie. Cain who is a an investigative journalist who i've known for years and who had written a book about ufo's that Anti my phone partner in..

Jeffrey epstein leslie ricky netflix Amc elliott goldberg six part new york apple today Ricky apple plus medium years ago amc Homesick ricki stern one about a year or two ago joan rivers sundance
"ricki stern" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

The Nick Taylor Horror Show

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"ricki stern" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

"Were allowed to just sort of be there with them and be truthful and that is what really inspired me as a filmmaker than you know sort of as i get older. I'm very interested in visual ways to tell stories when you don't have the whole verite story there when you can't spend hundreds of hours filming with someone you help. How do i. Visually like create. The the feeling. And i think that was a lot of what was fun about surviving. Death is. I got to really be creative with visuals and music and tone And and so and then over the years also working with great people working with great. Dp's and music people in Lighting people I've learned from them to You know ways in which we can get more. I do encourage i think. Filmmakers documentary filmmakers. They you should know what lenses you like. You should know about equipment. You don't necessarily have to be able to shoot but like it's helpful because then you can talk about some kind of lights you on in certain kind of lenses you want to create Which will give you what you want. Yeah that's important understand the tools that you're using the toolbox definitely so what is next for you. So we're doing. So am working with anne on a feature doc for hbo and that has been on a bit of an odyssey In that We started it pre cove it about a year before covid head about inspired by the college scandal a well. Yeah and Then became a film about this musical that had been written about college pressures parallel to the time that the college scandals coming we follow the musical through high schools as sort of a window into these high school. So yeah yeah and in west virginia and then of course covid wiped all that out and shut everything down including our stories that we were building building building to these moments where the kids go to college. Like how's the play gonna come off all that kind of pretty straightforward narrative stuff. And now we're looking at like the sort of post covid George floyd like the impact that has had filming actually in new york city in the bronx and brooklyn well with kids. So that film. And then i'm working on a subpoena film about parole with Jesse sweet so. And then i don't know i'm always looking for stuff. Cool will ricky. Thank you so much great to finally be able to do this. Thank you thank you neck..

west virginia George floyd Jesse brooklyn new york city ricky hundreds of hours bronx about a year before covid anne
"ricki stern" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

The Nick Taylor Horror Show

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"ricki stern" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

"More coming out. And obviously the market itself is getting flooded but for those aspiring documentarian out. There are there any distinguishing characteristics. That you think good documentaries have now. They'll allow them to kind of stand stand out amongst the fray. So now i feel like there's so many series out there and everything you know when it used to be featured docs like hbo or showtime cinemax. Whatever back in the day it was featured docs and so it's like what is the good story that can sustain for an hour and a half or and now it's like what is a story that we can tell over five parts to make you know and i think sometimes it shouldn't be five parts giving sometimes. It should be an hour and a half. You know i think sometimes stories we're getting stretched and there's a lot of pressure on still makers to find something that feels big whereas sometimes the best stories are these small stories. You know some of the films that are out there. Now that are sort of a name kademi. This a film called kunda about two black and white film about farm animals. And it's just this quiet poet poetic film and i think you know what it's doing really well filmmakers. I think we just don't looking for something different now. You never know you never know what's necessarily going ahead Which is why. I think also when you go back to like film trope of like do with this way. Is there like a journey hero story. I just would encourage people to be truthful to the story you know. If it's a palm let it be a poem you know. I always refer who referring to announce a film called iraq in fragments and it really just touched down. James longley film was nominated for academy award just touched on in iraq at the moment during war and like you live with three different. I think it's three different stories for period of time without some super narrative structure. And you just get like iraq in fragments these fragments of that world and that was enough. That was enough. And i think sometimes were Included world like. Wow you know is this gonna is are people gonna care. Is it going to have a life. Are people going to tune in and and unfortunately we have to ask those questions. Because that's how you get funding these days but sometimes it said unexpected little story than unexpected. You know maybe it's the one about truffle hunters this year or or quiet from about time or something that is unexpected in people. Are you know last year. Like the honey. What would they gave the bees. The honey keeper shoot. What was that called. Oh my gosh. It was really beautiful and Again like who. They didn't go in there thinking they're gonna get an academy began. Get kademi awards like you. Just can't go thinking about your audience per se. Have to be true story. I think that's huge last few questions. Obviously in the world of directing and filmmaking. There's a lottery sources a lot of books on the topic. Most of which are not so great for that being said were there any key volumes or resources or or just books that were essential for you and your career either from a business perspective or filmmaking perspective and wasn't certain i definitely would say no about books. I think it was just watching films The like mazel brothers. You know greg. Garden's great gardens justice Films like that or even even an war room or penna bakers films. Or i mean i kinda grew both were even you know. Gimme shelter these old films Which are all very character driven. You know they could just go along with these characters and let the stories unfold and And they were unexpected in that way and they just were filmmakers..

James longley last year an hour and a half both kademi iraq this year room about two black and white five parts three different stories many series Garden mazel brothers kademi awards kunda
"ricki stern" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

The Nick Taylor Horror Show

05:49 min | 1 year ago

"ricki stern" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

"She spends her own money like she works hard at her job and spends her own money in travels around to these haunted sites and tries to connect and that is what makes her interesting to me makes her feel like her journey. Her searching is authentic and real. Yeah and it's again that the character centric human element of it. All i think is what is so interesting in addition all the supernatural elements. So we have a lot of filmmakers inspiring filmmakers listening. Could you give us a sense of your origin story. How you essentially became a director. Yeah i started really in theater. And i was thinking it'd be more in the acting world of theater And went to graduate school for year and theater and then came out and wanted to tell stories and wanted to be in control and realized that as an actor i would not be in control of my destiny and Through many many jobs in new york working production working at like saturday night live which sounded glamorous but was not at all you know working on the film unit but ultimately documentaries for me as a woman Twenty three year old. I gas twenty. four Was a way to work with france. Re college in a camera that we heat. My friend had camera. Someone you know had sound equipment and we would just go and tell stories and that was for me. The way i could tell a story was to be a documentary filmmaker and not have to necessarily prove especially than in hollywood to be woman like as director. It was much more difficult than i think. Now i think it you know and The documentary filmmakers was was much more open to it and the budgets are lower ultimately. You know you can do a lot on her own can do a lot you in so that that was like my path into it. I mean i hell jobs. And i worked at. Hbo and all this other stuff. But i work on the weekends and at night making my own films. Because i never i always say like if i could paint. I would have been a painter if i could. If i could plant instrument i would have been a musician to me. Making documentaries is is my creative outlet and so when i worked at hbo As i was. I worked on the Autopsy series i as an associate producer and then as a producer of shows rudolph who was really rabbi. Now we had like some either as producer like. She was from harvard and she lasted a week. The by photographs of autopsy issues. Like i'm out But i always wanted to make my own stories. And so i would just do it when i could and you know. Sometimes it took years to make a story and your first feature neglect. Not the children ryan. It was it was. It was a film that i did about a youth program in harlem i had met..

harlem new york twenty four first feature Twenty three year old harvard ryan a week years Hbo saturday night france rudolph
"ricki stern" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

The Nick Taylor Horror Show

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"ricki stern" Discussed on The Nick Taylor Horror Show

"And they feel duped and then she gives me no defense that had i know that but also That atar being medium because there is so much information out there i mean there were moments like that where it was very helpful to have a character. Go through the doubt to be a skeptic so that we could have those moments of skepticism. We could had those moments of doubt. They came through the story. Bryson as opposed to me having to impose these there were always experts of people for example that people from the society for psychical research in cambridge in the uk. They're the ones that could be talk about skepticism. Through the through the years regarding physical mediums for example So it was helpful. I think you know you want to ask this question. You wanna have some balance that grounded the show in a railway just showing but like you said it didn't seem agenda-driven you allowed those those things that potentially could you know disprove just to emerge naturally through the story which you know as documentarian. I feel like it. All has to naturally emerge from the story agreed. Were there any concepts that That hit the cutting room floor that you really wanted to get in there. We know it's interesting when you doing. Survival it kind of veers into psychic cy kinds of work as well because you know as a lay person getting into an odd like. What's the difference if we study remote viewing or psychic abilities. Why why isn't that part of this kind of a series and and now i fully understand it but lesley was like no. You won't our stories. All are about investigating looking at the possibility of survival after death and side that sort of hugh super human or human powers of being psychic and able to read. Someone's mind or being able to take your mind and remote view. It's not about survival. And so so it really. It took me a while to sort of stay focused on.

Bryson uk cambridge lesley
"ricki stern" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

REALITY OF REALITY

05:32 min | 2 years ago

"ricki stern" Discussed on REALITY OF REALITY

"Hello hello this is reality of reality. I'm elise arose in a longtime tv producer and development executive every week on the podcast. I talked to interesting people in all aspects of unscripted content. So before i introduce my guest. I want to talk a little bit about what i've been watching and listening to this week. I watched the whole four part series. The nights the hunt for the night stalker. Netflix really really well. Done by the abc company Had those guys on the podcast early on eli holzman and aaron said men Just you know if you love true crime. It's very well told. It was a harrowing story of a guy that terrorized los angeles county mostly In the eighties and sort of how the detectives Finally caught up with him really really good until the very end real nail biter also super dark. I finished surviving death. Which was very well done. I'm having the director ricki stern on next week which i'm really excited about To talk all about it. I started watching the series. That's been around a while but sort of discovered it on. Cnbc called american greed. I- embarrassingly was slightly obsessed with mike. Alava nadi when he came on the scene and then was very obsessed with his downfall and so they premiered their new season with his story on monday night. You can watch it on demand. It was really well done. I mean this is sort of like traditional doc storytelling but even if you like that kind of thing. I watched another one with that. Anna delhvi that con artist. There's one with nexium coming up so they have some good stories. And then i do want to recommend a podcast that i have grown to really love. It's sort of like a good antidote to these trying times because it's just funny which is smart less. It's the podcast hosted by jason. Bateman will arnett. And sean hayes may have a great chemistry the really good friends on guests at celebrity guests and then one of them gets the guest and then surprised the other two and then keep it really light. I highly recommend the mardi short interview. I was laughing so hard And always stay tuned for their banter after the episode for some reason. That's become my favorite part. And i also really love the julia louis dreyfus and the bryan cranston interviews. So i'm making my way through those on my morning walks and i recommend okay so the podcast today. A very special guest someone who i've known for almost eighteen years and i also live with. It is my husband. Brian club so i never thought. I don't think either of us ever thought we'd see the day we would be doing a podcast together. Because he's an attorney works in a very different field. Doesn't watch any of the trash. That i watch so we found something. We found something to come together on for the podcast which his love of golf and deep knowledge of tiger woods and i really loved the documentary tiger on. Hbo so on the podcast. Today we will be breaking it down. And even if you don't like golf which admittedly i do not like off. You will enjoy the a banter. Shall we say between. Brian and myself and a highly recommend you check out the documentary tiger on hbo. It's two parts okay. So i'm here with my husband brian. Hello brian louisa. Welcome to the podcast..

brian aaron elise arose jason Anna delhvi brian louisa sean hayes eli holzman ricki stern Netflix bryan cranston julia louis dreyfus Alava monday night next week Bateman two parts two today Today
"ricki stern" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

06:59 min | 2 years ago

"ricki stern" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"And and I the last thing I think in, Leslie would agree. We want to do it well, I would say from the period itself is not convince anybody of anything. It's really to ask questions and hopefully watched series and you walk away Ask you more questions. Leslie. The idea of consciousness is sort of a buzzword in the UFO and paranormal worlds. These days, people would just spout out. Well, I think consciousness explains how these things might be interrelated. And you give me sort of. Ah, capitalization of what we know about consciousness now. And is that what moves on is a human consciousness? What moves on when our physical bodies die? That's a big question. I mean, I have to say as far as I'm aware, we really don't know very much about consciousness. As far as I understand it, at least the scientific community that philosophers will basically say we don't know what it is. You know, that's that's one of the interesting things is that I think when people argue that consciousness is created by the brain, and it's just a matter of neuron firing things, and then when the brain dies, there's nothing left. That's really more of a theory than a proven fact before I understand that, But you know, I'm not an expert on unconsciousness. I'm really not. But that's my perception is there are many scientists And we feature some of those in some of them in the series who takes the position that consciousness is not generated by the brain, but it's more like the brain is an antenna. And this consciousness is something much bigger than our physical brains. And that There are experiences people have that illustrate that fast if they can leave their bodies when they had when their brain is essentially dead, and they could go on a journey, and they can come back and talk about what they heard in the room, even though they had no capacity for hearing. They didn't have a brain. You know, you have to question what is how can consciousness he created by the brain if it functions when there is no brain. So I think there's a lot of rocket of questions like that. I don't think science nobody has really solved the mystery of consciousness on that level. You know some of the examples the stories that are told the personal narratives especially like the first episode that comes to mind this physician who's basically drowned in, uh South America. And she's underwater for 30 minutes or something like that. And then she's she's dead. She's gone on yet she wasn't you know that it kind of raised good goose bumps on your arms and get listen to the her because she's so credible and it's so emotional. Same time you have some great witnesses for sure. Yeah. Ricky, do you want to come in on that case? Ou told gotten so much attention that the very case that opens up the whole series. I mean, it was very important for us to As you said, have credible people who are not You know, she didn't go. She was kayaking and chilly, You know, e think over 20 years ago now, um she wasn't seeking attention. She certainly didn't think she was gonna die. Andre, but he has a profound experience. She is a spinal surgeon to the doctor. And, um you know her understanding of death. Medical deaths is When the body when the brain stuff onto one body when it dies, and she was underwater for over 30 minutes. There were a number of witnesses, you know. I'm looking for her her She was on the bottom of the some of this water bed after having gone over a cliff of waterfall and She had this incredibly vivid experience and she came back and she she says she should have been brain dead. But she wasn't and she shares an experience that Has been studied by doctor Bruce Greyson. At the medical school and the division of Perceptual Studies, and he catalog these very similar kinds of near death experience phenomenon in such a way that There's a pattern to these people have these experiences that they're not. Sort of anomalies in some ways that they kind of fall within the study that he's done in this pattern, so there's You know they're similar. There was And what does that mean? I don't again. We don't really draw conclusions, but it just raises questions. A. You know, there are there's Her story in particular is amazing as many of these near death experience cases that you cover in the in the first episode. How people can know these things when they're effectively brain dead. I mean, that really does refute the idea that Consciousnesses exists in the brain. Right, Leslie? Yeah. I mean, that's what I was saying. And I think the other important component of it because you know, especially in the serious. We're very concerned with the characters themselves, the human experience how it affected them. I think the other really important element about near death experiences is Profound effect that they have on the people who experienced them. They usually been absolutely changes their lives forever. And it's almost it's not easier for every person when that happens, so that's one of the things I also loved about. The first episode is that we You know the film, the filmmakers visited a the center in Seattle. Internationals is I am the International Association from near Death studies, and there's a A. So you know, I guess she's a social worker, Kimberly Clark shark who works there. And you really, you know, we get a sense from the people that were there and that it's not easy for everybody Take to die and come back. You kind of think Literature so far has sort of shown this of being this wonderful, blissful experiences and come back and you're never afraid of dying anymore. But it's really not that simply. We've had a trauma by actually dying in the first place, and then you have to integrate a whole new reality into your life. Did it affect your relationships, and it affects a lot of things Not always easy, but it zipped up evil. That That's also another thing. That sort of points to the profound reality of it is that it's not. It's something that really leaves. A lasting impact on a person is not just like having a dream or something. You know, it's It's real. Some of them say it's more real when you're in that world than it is in the physical world. That's how visited profound It was for them. We're talking with Leslie Kean and Ricki Stern about the Netflix docuseries surviving death. When we come back, I want to get into reincarnation. Memories of past lives. Some of the other compelling stories that they've dug up for the Syriza. We go into the break with Linda Ron.

Leslie Kean South America Bruce Greyson division of Perceptual Studies Netflix Ou Seattle Ricky Linda Ron Andre Syriza International Association Kimberly Clark Ricki Stern
"ricki stern" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

09:01 min | 2 years ago

"ricki stern" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Mainstream scientists, no one gets out of here alive. When our bodies were out, we die and that's it. Just the dust. The idea of a soul or a consciousness or some part of us living on after physical death has mostly been left two religions, philosophers, ghost hunters and the like mediums. There are scattered pockets of academics who've been interested in this have been quietly working on it. Back in 2017 journalist Leslie Kean took a deep dive into the subject in search of evidence and experts and compelling narratives. Her book Surviving Death inspired a six part docuseries. Now on Netflix. Leslie is an independent investigative journalist. One whose work should be well known to coast listeners, a 2010 book, UFO's generals, pilots and government officials is considered a landmark in the field. She is also one of three journalists responsible or the blockbuster New York Times report Back in December, 2017 about the Pentagon's then secret UFO study that initial piece along with some follow ups change the UFO subject forever. Working with Leslie on the Netflix series, is a veteran producer and director Ricki Stern, who's a co founder of Breakthrough films. She's directed. Three other highly regarded documentary projects, including The Devil Came on Horseback. Welcome to Coast, Ricky and Welcome Back, Leslie. Thank you. Thanks, George. Great to be here. Ricky, I want to start with you. What is the reaction so far to the Netflix series from critics from the public and you know from from Netflix, I guess. Well, we've had amazing response. We were in the top 10 trending on Netflix for I think about 10 days, which is some pretty stiff competition so that Incredibly rewarding. And, um, I think Leslie will tell you she's received. Maybe hundreds or more or emails to her sharing. Glorious people have been inspired and and just a great overall response. So it's been graces, you know, to know that people are watching. You know, I told you we had our earlier conversation. And I told you that I was trying to figure out how are they going to visualize this? You know, it's a Preed. You don't have stock footage of, you know consciousness going up to heaven or whatever, but it's a beautiful film. You did a great job with making us feel that we, You know, the visual elements go with the storytelling and the narratives you got. These people are just so powerful. I wanted to know if you Ricky had any strong feelings about this topic before you started working on the Syriza. Well, First of all, thank you for saying that because it is quite beautiful theories, and I think that that was really important to us that it was it was elevated and that we know Sometimes this topic can be a little sort of silly and people don't take it seriously in the production value was kind of Laughable and I think that was very important that this felt a zoo grounded and reflective of people's real experiences because they're very emotional in the you know, people have some confound experiences that are shared in the series. Um, going into it. I really was not someone who thought much about it. This notion of Consciousness continuing on our living outside the body, and I read Lizzie's book. I know Leslie and you know, but she's Which is thorough reporter and investigator and, um, researcher and so she makes her book of quite compelling and and I think, you know, I was very interested in Serious nature of it, and that there is a department the division of Perceptual Studies at Easy A in the medical school, where There are doctors who have been looking into this idea of consciousness. For decades. You know, a persistent aiming for the past 50 years, some of them and you know they studies reincarnation. This study am study near death experiences and side. And I think that that to me was very compelling. And then we traveled around. To Europe and around the United States on there are people who are looking into this and that's sort of the ground in Cardiff theories. Leslie, When you wrote the book surviving Death. Did you think of it then as a possible movie, or syriza and tell me how that happened. How you how you made the leap from the book to the Syriza? I really wasn't thinking about it as I wrote it, George. I mean, I was just focused on, you know, writing this book not know the answer is no, I never did. But once it was done, and there was like, a year, you know, when you want to turn it in at Random House, you have to wait. Maybe it's nine months before it comes out. I started to think about it then, and I had People. I knew that were connected to the field, and I actually knew breakthrough films. And I knew Ricky because we had worked on projects before, So it just turned out that you know they were interested. I mean, I went to. I went to breakthrough films like supposed to Ricky and she had other a team members there and Ricky was the one that took it to Netflix. I had nothing to do with that. But I am Least got them interested, and I have to say I'm so Leaves with the way they work, and we work so well together that I can't really imagine wanting to have turned my book over to anybody else. So I feel really fortunate that they were interested in it. You know your interest as as well learn in the Serie XYZ, not only professional but personal. Many of our listeners here will certainly remember the name of Bud Hopkins, a Talented, successful artist who later became a hugely influential investigator of alleged alien abduction experiences. He coined the term missing time you You two were close. You were with him when he passed away. Can you describe that experience and tell us is that when you really started thinking about this subject for yourself? Yeah, I mean, I had thought about it before. I was very interested in the cases of young Children with memories of past lives, and I studied a lot of both cases. The work of Ian Stevenson. And But you know, yes, but that that experience of actually being with someone at the moment of death when they take their last breath. Was something I've never experienced before, and it really did ever profound effect on me. It just seemed so sort of cereal. It hard to believe that this could happen. And you just can't. I don't know. I felt the space is just not being able to comprehend it. How somebody can just be there one moment and then be gone, and it just seemed to me like You know, it's just what is going on here. It just was. It is a feeling of being in a surreal kind of incomprehensible states and I don't know. I think other people have experienced that will probably understand. I'm talking about it's hard to communicate it. But it's just it's been touched me very deeply and and sort of a very provocative for me putting the tragedy of it aside, but really the element of wanting to understand. More about what was going on, You know, because I've experienced that and Ricky also new buds for many years. So I think maybe that connect to that little nugget of this connected to her as well. Right, Ricky? I mean, where he had done a lot of filming of, but Hopkins actually prior to his death, so Right? I think the Syriza's is not heavy on. You're not beating people over the head. You tell the stories you let people tell their stories. And you, for example, you point out where there are other possible explanations for this or that. Mediums, For example, we could cover mediums and episodes two and three and and you will introduce critical ideas that well, Maybe people learn this stuff on On Facebook of You know, you're doing a session with somebody and connecting with their dead relatives on the other side. Maybe these mediums or Charlotte because there certainly have been people like that, did you? Ricky? Did you set out to not be too heavy handed and allow people to Sort of wade through this on their own and make up their own minds. Yes, very much. So, I mean, this to me is about asking questions. Not about trying to convert anybody or trying to prove anything. Um, you know the questions themselves. They're fascinating and the way people Experience. Either death or questions about it. You know whether it's a lost loved one, um, trying to communicate or reincarnation case. These are all provocative questions and I think the theories approaches them in an intellectually curious kind of way and allows people to, you know, have these very authentic experiences in the series..

Ricky Leslie Kean Netflix Syriza Bud Hopkins George New York Times investigator Europe Ian Stevenson United States Random House Lizzie Pentagon wade Charlotte Ricki Stern division of Perceptual Studies co founder Cardiff
"ricki stern" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"ricki stern" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Of the universe. 2021 has started off right where 20 20 left off. Kind of bumpy to put it mildly. But here at least we can take our minds off the turmoil for a few hours. And tonight we have an excellent program in mind for you. You've been reading about this strange object spotted in space back in 2017. Homo Omura is the name that was given and scientists were ready to write that office and interesting but not exceptional piece of space rock. That is until the Harvard astronomer and some colleagues detected problems with that explanation. They think it's an anomaly and could be an expert terrestrial probe sent from another solar system the first interstellar object ever detected, perhaps sent here on purpose to get our attention. Dr Avi Loeb has taken on a lot of grief. Open this hypothesis, but he's doubled down on that. He joins us tonight in the second half. I'm pretty jazzed about that. But first Was a stirring and provocative new Syriza a Netflix. Have you seen it? Yet? It's one of the most popular programs on Netflix. Right now. It's called surviving Death, a six part documentary series looking for evidence that life goes on after physical death. The stories told by people who've experienced near death experiences where they die, and then come back. It's powerful stuff. But in another episodes that producers looked for compelling stories of Kids who have memories of past lives. Also looking at ghost hunters and mediums who say that they're able to connect with the other side. Leslie Kean is a journalist, author of the book. We profiled here on this program a few years ago, same title surviving death. And it really did a great job of synthesizing the case for human consciousness, Surviving physical death. Leslie is part of the team that created the Netflix series. She will join us momentarily, and for this first hour, we're also speaking with Ricki Stern, a producer and director of the surviving Death series will dig into these stories and the people behind this hit series. Powerful stuff. Web Master Lex Loan Hood and I have pulled together our usual assortment of items and the oddities called from media around the world. We call it nap snooze and you can find it on the coast to Coast Am website. Some of the stories featured on that tonight are directly related to our subject matter this evening. Normally I'd list a few of them and go over some of the details. But I'm getting gonna let you exploring on your own, because when we have Ricki Stern for this first hour, so I want to get to it. I'll just say one of these stories, though, is a news report We did this past week about the you AP Task Force that's working on a report to Congress covering what the Pentagon has in its vaults and files. Regarding UFO evidence in cases and while you're there, checking out naps news, please click the link that tells you how to become a coast insider. The cost is pennies a day..

Leslie Kean Netflix Dr Avi Loeb Ricki Stern Homo Omura Coast Am Harvard Syriza Congress Pentagon producer director