35 Burst results for "Rick Steves"

Places to Fly Fish

Travel with Rick Steves

03:51 min | 5 d ago

Places to Fly Fish

"Desportivo fly-fishing has become a favorite way for many urbanites to decompress. And that's how Chris Santillo started his fifty places recreation guides. He now also writes about places to paddle bicycle golf end snowboard, but his number one passion is fly fishing Chris thanks for joining US great to be here, Rick. Thanks what is it about fly fishing that those who know it and love it or so passionate about I've thought about this a lot oftentimes when I'm out on the river and I think that people come at it from a lot of different directions I. I think there's the chance to be out in nature in a quiet and beautiful place. There's an old saying that's trout don't live in ugly places and neither do bone Fisher Tarp in Atlantic Salmon. So you're usually in pretty pristine places that can support these fish species. About especially, if you're river fishing about being in the water, I don't mean to sound cliche but there is something about the oneness of being with the river in that sense of flow I drive a lot over mountains and past beautiful rivers in Europe and the United States and I see a lot of people with hip Bhutan standing deepen in the river and there is something. Special about that I would imagine you have there is a feeling of being. In the moment and in the flow of life of the rivers as a metaphor for flow of life and time passing, and it's never the same water that you're standing in and I think there is something profound rap subliminal about that that has an appeal There is an analytic. A fly fishing I think it has appealed to people the whole idea of trying to determine what the Fisher eating at a given time, and then trying to either look in your fly box and find the the right fly that seems to match the kind of bugs at the trout might eating or I know some friends will bring a fly tying vice in some feathers and hair and hooks to the side of a stream, and if they don't have what the right bug is at the time or the right fly, they will go and tie it. Up on the spot and hope that they're going to make that match matching the hatches, the term that writer named Ernie Schreiber came up with years ago the hatch being the kind of insect that is occurring on the river at that time but just having the arsenal and matching the flame with the others that are being eaten that's probably integral to being successful fly, Fisher and very important, and you'll find some anglers that are you know better equipped than others I've been out with some friends who will have literally five hundred or a thousand flies. I usually have one or two boxes and and hope that what I have. Oh, cover things ninety percent of the time, but there's always ten percent that doesn't work and one blanket work. Great. This morning in another flight would work great in the same hole this afternoon exactly because what happens on many river systems as you will have different sorts of insects emerging coming out of river or settling down upon the river at different times of the day you might have may flies that are. Popping up from the bottom of the river as Nymphs, and then turning into adult bugs and being on the surface in the morning, and that might be a white insect, the size of your Pinky Nail, and then in the afternoon as it gets warmer, the grasshoppers might become active and the wind may be him into the river and they are green and yellow, and they're the size of your thumb. It's sort of a a battle going on what are the it is it's man versus nature. Chris and Taylor has written a dozen best selling books about outdoor adventures in his fifty places series. One of his titles collects the thoughts of Passionate Anglers Y. I, fly fish and their favorite fishing places are covered in fifty more places to fly fish before you die you'll also see Chris's byline and major sport fishing publications.

Chris Santillo United States Desportivo Atlantic Salmon Europe Ernie Schreiber Bhutan Fisher Writer Rick Taylor
Travel To Bulgaria

Travel with Rick Steves

04:30 min | Last week

Travel To Bulgaria

"Bulgaria is a small and mysterious country. It's one of those lands that Americans just don't visit very much. It's long faced east impact in communist times it was famously subservient to the USSR. But. Of course, there's lots more to see in Bulgaria and you can learn about a fascinating culture. When you go there to Bulgarian guides, joined us in our studio to help give us a better insight and a little better appreciation of the cultural. Bulgaria. We're joined by Stephan Bush job and you're. Stephanie thanks for being here. Thank you our pleasure now. Americans we don't know as much about Bulgaria as we know about Poland or Germany or Italy, or Greece that. It's not in the news it's signing country of about seven million people probably, not not a lot of Bulgarians have emigrated to the United States like Polish people. So many know when I think of Bulgaria I think of a back in the communist times a little country that was more friendly with Moscow, than the other countries in eastern Europe in fact, your leader little sort of an communist dictator two-door shifts of Shipka He. Actually proposed that Bulgaria joined the USSR and become the Sixteenth Republic. Is that true that? Yes that's still in the early nineteen sixties shifts for wanted us to be so close to the Soviets. So he proposed to become the sixteen republic. Why so subservient? The USSR you know because as a small country, we have always tried to find our big brother because you're right there in the middle of the Habsburgs and Russia and and. The meat of all those crossroads and your. Little so easy to gobble up if you're a big giant country absolutely, but fortunately, the Soviets were in the middle of the Cuban missile crisis saw they were busy and they were not interested in having trouble themselves Khrushchev or whoever was the dictator say There's a joke in becan communist time. The biggest animal in the world was the Bulgarian pig because the head was in Bulgarian. The body was in Moscow I. Was that funny. So many years ago he mentioned the pick when you have the body of the pick of the good meat is there. So we produced Oh the good stuff food and it was expected to the Soviet. Union. So practically, this is the reason why still nowadays in Russia they remember all those fruits and very funds legal, Gary, all good stuff that came from Bulgaria. So the big shot in Moscow and wind as well. Of course, all the Bulgarian wine. Oh, the best bogere in one when Russia. Well today you don't have that problem. You've got wonderful traditional food and drink and and Yuri. What is one thing we should remember about the food of Bulgaria when we visit incredibly fresh everything is fresh. What's been out of the garden? What's IT traditional? A traditional meal I I remember some beautiful soups. You must have a salad. You must argue with Salads and a little bit of Brandy. As world it goes with the Salads. We always have the strong alcohol first, and then we go to the wine and then we go to the beer you start with the strong alcohol yes, we do. We do. Why is that Stephan? It is deep tradition. What my parents belief is that when we have a trunk alcohol to open your perceptions the food, this is the best way to taste it when you have a few sips of follow traditional. Brandy. Code. Of Akia. So when I'm cooking, if people have the strong alcohol, I can actually eat my food. It helps it helps a lot. Gary is the only country in the European Union that has this surreal alphabet I was in Bulgaria when you're on May twenty fourth, that's big celebration. Why does Bulgaria have this unique alphabet and what's the cultural background of that? I remember that day because we were actually fuming Bulgaria episode into our in my hometown. So it is really important to understand these different alphabet because this is an alphabet which helped to spread the Christianity because it's surreal religious named after Saint. And who was his side and his brother Metallica's Methodius and Cyril. So they innovated this alphabet so they could write down the holies holy scripture scriptures and people could read them exactly in idea to have the Christianity. Kuo's to the heart close the. So to understand the holy wisdom to understand the words written, what century was that this was in the eight, hundred, eight, hundred, fifty, five,

Bulgaria Ussr Moscow Poland Stephan Bush Gary Stephanie Khrushchev United States Sixteenth Republic KUO Metallica Yuri Habsburgs European Union Europe Italy Greece Germany
How about a language vacation

Travel with Rick Steves

03:02 min | 2 weeks ago

How about a language vacation

"Tour Guide Kerry Walker is an American language, but she's worked on her language goes in Central America and was immersing herself in Italian lessons when we last checked in with her Kerry, where have you gone in Italy to study the language I? So I started off in a school at Monte Pacino School in town so I Did that for about a week, which was a great start but then left I really needed more so I quickly learned that private lessons for me were the way to go really get the most being my book I said my last two studies have been in home stays with my teacher. So private is better than group for you for me, but is it more expensive because it's one on one? It is more expensive. But my goal is to really learn the language and order to do that. I realized that I really need that one on one, which is focused exactly on where I am where my misconceptions are the things that I want fine tune, and also that the places that I want to go may teacher can take me there much more quickly they can tailor the teaching to your exact interests you know all over the. World there's a lot of people earning their living despite teaching. English. As a second language is it can flip flop it. Are there a lot of people in Italy that earned their living or supplement their income by teaching foreigners Italian without question it's a big business. How you learn about that you know there's a lot of different ways. There's not one place to go to I. Really do it a lot of different ways I. Just asking people, where did you study? So I, got my last home state through my Italian tutor back home had another student that I spoke to I. So I think really getting those references from other people. Also some research, there's a lot of people now that have contacts with teachers all over Italy, and then you move in and you just how many hours a day or a week where he works. So I did I did about four to six hours a day, but I ate breakfast lunch and dinner with that family our table with ALFRESCO. Semi my classroom was Tuscany alfresco outside as living it. I was I was all those things that I needed to learn. My teacher was right there. So so it's it's a lot of work I I've never bothered I I have. A great time in Italy why would you spend all the time and money learning the language I'd love connecting with the culture I mean I think just to be able to move in and really not only did I. Learn the language I learned the culture I said at that table every day and for me that makes travel so much more real. So that is it. If the bottom line, the bottom line is not speaking the language, but it's connecting with the culture and with the language it's like you've got better vision. Exactly. You've done this also in Costa Rica and. Those are two different. Spanish. Speaking Countries. How does your choice of a destination? Impact, the learning that you have and what you come away with because Costa Rica and Nicaragua you went to both of them and you were trying to learn Spanish Why would you go to one rather than the other for me? It was based on what I wanted to see as well. I had some travel goals to for people. I. Think it's often going to depend on what part of the world you WANNA. See a said oftentimes that's the case also, you have to think about what kind of language you WanNa come away with if you went. Back to learn French and then you go to France, they're gonNA look at you like where are you from? Exactly so that's one of the reasons I chose not to study in Sicily obviously Naples I want to for me 'cause you don't WanNa, go around the world speaking. In, Tuscany, the kind of Italian. That I want to come away with what they're speaking there.

Italy Kerry Walker Costa Rica Monte Pacino School Sicily Central America Nicaragua France
Lockdown in Honolulu

Travel with Rick Steves

05:06 min | 3 weeks ago

Lockdown in Honolulu

"Don Wallace is on the line from Honolulu. He tells US authorities they're put in a new set of restrictions because of a recent surge in Cova cases on Oahu justice they were hoping they could start reopening. It's crucial tourism industry. Don's a contributing editor at Honolulu magazine and he's updated us on Hawaii tourism in the past and done you're you're out there about twenty five, hundred miles away from anywhere else in the middle of the Pacific. Hawaii depends so much on tourism and I would imagine it's been quite a stressful time with the coronavirus continuing to spread. What's it like in Hawaii right now. Well the whiny started out as soon as thirty thousand tourists stopped coming way did very well on the virus were the lowest in the nation for states. Now we've had a spike starting at the fourth of July and August it began to get up to two hundred cases a day. I know that doesn't sound like much but. you don't have that many hospital facilities. That, we had to do a banning perks, beaches hiking trails and gatherings over ten So is the response and the impact of the corona virus different from different islands. who gets most of it in fact, it's almost miniscule on now big island, the ninety MILICI, those islands, the people can pretty much go cleese they. You wear masks you're allowed to fly into a walk who without according to you. But people who can't find their without of quarantine. What about people in the tourism industry? Are they impatient or they realizing that haste makes waste when it comes to getting over the so they can start making money again. It's a very interesting case people very concerned. There's no voice irresponsibly pushing for white opener light opening deal like Texas, did for instance. And I think that's because the workers sixty seventy percent of the are. No a minimum wage workers they don't have good health plans. They carry the burden of this, and the other part is the Theresa Stop Coming. Can Americans from the mainland fly into Hawaiian vacation if they want to yeah, you can come We get about three thousand a day. And I think the hitch there is you do a fourteen day quarantine and you check into your hotel and you can't leave your hotel room. The impact on tourism would be you're probably wondering around the beaches thinking this is like it was back in the old days. You're very much in nineteen threes, Hawaii. Waikiki is a ghost town. That's not entirely a bad thing We think tasteful Hawaii empty beaches, very clean water clean here you feel like being caress be hanging out with the beach boys. Old School Beach Boys. And if you do go out to dinner, for instance, you may have the restaurant to yourself just one or two people. Magic. So That's interesting. I mean, of course the you've lost the revenue, but you've regained your beaches as far as the locals go there was something in the news and I think you wrote about it about gun toting extremists who are wearing Hawaii shirts. It doesn't seem like the Aloha spirit to me what's Really thought it. Up in the news, there's one of these Gun Group extremists start showing up at the black lives, matter protests and other places. Instead of what they weren't Loescher it's Kinda create a sort of scary dissidence. Then people here reacted really strongly. Ensured is about Aloha Aloha is welcoming. It's inclusive. And it's actually something. I wrote an article about how Hawaiian shirts fight extremism. Hungary magazines. It's a love story about two sisters from Portland. Hawaii's eighteen twenty. Married South Asian immigrants helped create yellow her shirt industry. It's a beautiful beautiful story and it's that Louis Spirit that sort of loved that easygoing nece that caring for others. What a what a dissonance by these? What do they call? Boo Goo Boo Voice Blue Boys. Okay. Well I hope you have to handle and then we can read about that in your article and then very quickly what's open now if you are in Hawaii, museums, clubs, restaurants what's The dishes and Him after limited reopening had to close again. We hooked to get them back up in a couple of weeks neither good their little outdoor cafes and restaurants they've shifted to putting cafe tables out on the sidewalks and even the streets in some cases. So Madonna. Of Lua. And you know, thankfully, why is a very outdoor culture? So eating outdoors is. No big concession. So that lends itself to social distancing done. It's so great to have you on. We'll talk again soon I hope everything goes well with Hawaii and tourism, and your work there done Wallace's a contributing editor at Honolulu magazine. He's written the French house about buying a fixer upper on the island and Brittany and he's written articles about what's going on. In Hawaii these days

Hawaii Don Wallace Honolulu Magazine Contributing Editor Aloha Aloha Honolulu United States Old School Beach Boys Cova Oahu Hungary Portland Waikiki Texas Louis Spirit Brittany
Inland West Coast Roadtrips

Travel with Rick Steves

04:17 min | Last month

Inland West Coast Roadtrips

"If, you're ready for a memorable road trip where there's more to explore the freeway rest stops Chandler O'Leary wants to take you up the US west coast. She joined us a few months ago with tips for driving the Pacific. Coast highway from San Diego to big Sur, the redwoods and the Pacific northwest rainforest. She's back to recommend a few of the inland highlights from the desert playground palm springs through the orchards. California's Central Valley, old western Sacramento, and all the way up to my home turf around Seattle the detailed in her book the Best Post, a road trip Alice Chandler welcome back. Thank you for having me. So we talked about the coastal route before now we're GonNa talk about the inland. Route make a case for not taking the coastal route because I would think everybody wants to go up the coast, but you make the inland sound pretty good. I feel like if you like your vintage, Americana this the road trip for you and yeah, you're not gonna see the coasts until you get all the way up to Washington but if you're really into things like palm springs and mid, century architecture old neon signs, a roadside attractions, you're going to get tons of that on this route. I love roadside attractions, publicity stunts from fifty of your. What are few of those that come to mind because I just think they're so funky. The giant oranges that used to be Oliver California and there's a couple of them left and they were they to be drink stands for you know when you were thirsty on the road, you get fresh California orange juice right and they're still a couple of them left along old either farm. There's farm country all the way along the way absolutely all three states. So we're going sixteen hundred miles and apparently it's the old isn't isn't like the highway ninety nine is of it is yeah and in California highway. Ninety nine mostly is still intact and it's even a freeway in some places, but once you get into Oregon and Washington because of the mountains, it starts getting a little bit tricky kind of pick. Cherry pick sections of the old road and then connect with I five. Yes. It's just like route sixty six how it's kind of been swallowed up by interstate in places like five is it's sort of the enemy on the other hand. It's practical because he gets you from A to B in a hurry. Yeah. What's your philosophy you're gonna go from going basically from San Diego to Bellingham Right What's your philosophy on the balance between I five in the old roads I think you wanna use I five when you WanNa, make good time and take the old rose if you wanna have a good time. That's kind of how I look at it good time or have a good time. That's good. So let's talk about California first of all New Mexico on one side of the border and collection collects. It collects co is on the or is on the California side and Mexico on the Mexico side. So that's where a route starts are these kind of sister towns in away or are unfortunately there's a big old wall separate him so you Or now you have to go through the big international the big national checkpoint because I did that between San Diego and Tijuana was easy just walk across I think right now that's not the same as it used to be, but it may be again I mean who who knows what we're starting in Calexico then What's the flavor of collects goes? That's just a springboard or anything to do there. It's a sleepy small town and but it's kind of you kind of get the flavor of where you're starting and you're going to start out in the low desert. You're below sea level here that's below civil come into palm springs. A waste. It is palm springs to us. Palm Springs is is kind of Wacky. It got big in the nineteen fifties. So there's a lot of great mid century architecture there, but it's very glamorous. It's very glitzy. There's a lot of designers their fashion show was movie stars that doesn't retirement communities to. snowbirds it's kind of this weird mix of college spring breakers and snowbirds. Okay. So you put that in your checklist and then some I know in your book, you talk about a lot of worthy detours you know in one of your favorites would be Joshua Tree National Park. Yes. Joshua tree is stunning and Joshua tree trees actually the high desert. So it's above palm springs at altitude. So it has a completely different desert climate different plants, different animals. So Joshua Tree is one of these cartoon book yeah. Of Justice Joshua Tree is these classic kind of quintessential cactus Yes. Yes. So what do you do in Joshua Tree National Park Jessica cactus there's a great hikes. There's actually only those cactus in one small part of the park is an enormous park. So there's different bombs great rock formations they are beautiful scenery and

Palm Springs Joshua Tree Oliver California San Diego Joshua Tree National Park California Joshua Tree National Park Jess Washington Big Sur Chandler O'leary United States Alice Chandler Sacramento Seattle Central Valley Mexico Oregon New Mexico Calexico
Urban Australia

Travel with Rick Steves

03:53 min | Last month

Urban Australia

"David. Because Australia's so far away from the other continents. It's easy for the rest of the world to not really have a clear image of what it's like. The stereotype made include kangaroos on every corner and Paul Hogan Wrestling Crocodiles, in the outback. Do you find that a lot of visitors you meet in Australia come armed with a lot of misperceptions about what they'll find preconceptions invariably wrong. Suddenly it's the case in Australia where as you saw the introduction, the business about Kangaroos hopping down the main street with nothing could be further divorced from reality that image and a Crocodile Dundee. Well, he came from the northern territory and he actually lives in America now, and he's one of our favorite experts. So, there you go. Australia's quite urbanized then. It's very of an is and it's a huge landmass. It's only a fraction smaller than the United States and everyone will the vast majority of people live within twenty kilometers of the coast say fifteen miles of the coast. So you have a huge concentration of people have been buried narrowband typically stretching from Cy Melvyn in the south up to Brisbane that halls probably seventy five percent of Australia's population right there. Yes. Okay. Now, the two dominant cities would be Sydney and Melbourne where where do you go for the best urban thrills? What would you recommend? How do they compare comparing? Them is very difficult and the answer you get when you ask that question will dependent tally on where that person was from. They are Mel Benon. Sevan for Melvin or Sydney Saad and the endless rivalry between the two. People from Sydney Regard Melburnians as easy as boring or as people for Melvin C Sydneysiders as frivolous where you fun loving I come from northern New South Wales I'm a country boy. Oh so you can get unbiased I i. have a Sydney Wife. Sybil on wife. So my leanings now with Sydney, but the only city I've lived in Australia in Melvin. Okay how do you characterize the two times? Is there a different culture for the people in the United States you know we got the coast and the West Coast I think there's a big difference between the two and the difference is really driven by climate. And that Melvin. Has further south and thus it has quite cold winters Sydney's lot warmer and therefore the accident is more on outdoor activities and as a coastal city, you have wonderful beaches what the bond I beach is. One of the world's iconic beaches now is their rivalry between the two cities naturally. So arrival of everything, which is why the capital of Australia is halfway between the two because they could not decide where to put it to avoid a civil war related had to had to avoid. That's great. Now you live in Melbourne and understand there's a lot of Greeks living in Melbourne maybe that's why you do tours degrees. Is there some connection there what's with the Greeks and Melbourne while the Greeks came to Melbourne after World War Two an after the Greek civil war which fetch -ly trashed all the great infrastructure and at the time. Metro will populate or perish, and they wanted to populate with Europeans and so the offer went out to Italians. Of various descriptions as populate Oh perished, I was the manager they were afraid that they would be swept away by the Asians from the north. So perish sort of a almost a racist thing populate with white people or we're going to be bowled over by this rising Asian hord. I. Think at the time that the policy was put in place. It was very overtly racist right and they will also terms that we use which totally unacceptable today and I can't use them already now either. So the the word went out and maybe perhaps the more poor countries in white Europe per day call and let Greeks went on there absolutely, and the time they were considered a little bit too small the. They really wanted white northern Europeans say Germans. Rather, than southern Europeans

Australia Sydney Melbourne Melvin C Sydneysiders Mel Benon United States Paul Hogan Melvin America Sydney Saad Crocodile Dundee Cy Melvyn David. Europe Sybil Brisbane Sevan New South Wales
Pico in Lockdown

Travel with Rick Steves

04:35 min | Last month

Pico in Lockdown

"Start by checking in with friend of the show author Pico to hear how he's faring during this pandemic summer Pico was raised in England in southern California by parents who were both philosophers and religious scholars we caught up with him in Santa Barbara Pico welcome back travel with Rick Steves Real Delight. It's always. Highlight, to talk to you. Thank you know people used your life between California and Japan tell us how you are dealing with this crisis. Well I spent the first half of the pandemic in Japan and I'm almost embarrassed to say that things are quite beautiful and the sense that things look very much the same as normal as you know from your many trips, the people wear masks much of the time in. Japan anyway literally and figuratively to protect others. If you were in a bus in Japan in November, usually, there'll be forty percents of the people wearing masks. So that part was not different and as you also know, Japan has managed to avoid the west of the virus. So even in the middle of April I was playing Ping Pong every day with my neighbors eight year old men were diving across the hard floor of the wooden Jim to hit back at forehands and really looking around everything seems same as usual except, of course, no foreign tourists. And I think the other thing about Japan which is one reason I moved. There is as you know, they're very STOIC uncomplaining and resilient, and so they've been dealing with challenges for fourteen hundred years there, and they don't see these kind of crises is shocked sore in the south. So aberrations they think of them almost as the way life always is they used to earthquakes some Salamis forest five. So in that way to it was quite a complex to be. and. Then I flew back in the middle of the pandemic to Santa Barbara where I am now because my mother who's now eighty nine just come out of the hospital and I knew I had to have and California did look very different from usual but in certain ways, people seem thoughtful and focused and reflective kind and. In some ways. Conversations I had with people here on the telephone if I in is in the supermarket with Michio the they might be otherwise I'm lucky again in both places because I'm in. The small town of not as affected as big cities and. Towns of privileged. So everybody was most concerned about those without a roof over the heads with family nearby jobs I had a pretty lucky I. Think you know, Pico, you mentioned in Japan people are to wearing masks both literally and figuratively and I cringed at that because I don't want to have a world where we wear literal masks I would want even less to have where we all have figurative masks and maybe we'll have more literal masks in our future. But what you're saying is when you got back to California, people might have been wearing masks but they were being a little more honest and open with each other's is that right? Yes. That is right. I'm I think in Japan the FIGURATIVE MOSQUES Seen as a form of social duty I think you know as you know, the Japanese define themselves by the the whole unit, the neighborhood or the country or the company, and they feel everybody around me is suffering, and so my job is to make people feel better. I don't want to inflict my own suffering on people who already going through a lot. I want to offer them what I can in the way of help Williamson. And support, and so actually I like that quality about Japan essentially positive and and also they're not rattled by things sometimes very small things will come along and and other places. I'll see people get very shocked and caught up in the fight of the moment and Japan has much more level suffix, which makes it in some ways a calm place you're right that they're not good at facing up to some of the DACA places. The, dogs spots in history. But as a win a sort of social lubricant, I think it makes for at least a cheerful atmosphere and it's sort of related to being considered socially. Exactly, it's. It's. It's. It's a matter of thinking about the other person before yourself and then recalling if remember in the Nami two, thousand eleven, eighteen, thousand, five, hundred people died and when people watch the footage on TV they were surprised the Japanese was so quiet uncomplaining and I think that's because even though one person that loves to people right here at the house, she knew that everybody around her had losses also and so she didn't want to compound that. Grief

Japan California Pico Santa Barbara Pico Rick Steves Santa Barbara Daca Michio England JIM Forehands Williamson
Traveling To London

Travel with Rick Steves

03:20 min | Last month

Traveling To London

"If you're planning a trip to Europe, you may have noticed that a lot of flights in the United States connect through London through. Heathrow airport, and sometimes you're left with an awfully long layover instead of wasting hours hanging out at the airport. Why not head into Lemon for the day we've invited. London guides, Steven Beck and Debra to join us and share their tips about getting into the city to make a damn it, and then getting back to the airport in time for your flight. Stephen, Deborah. Thanks for joining us here in our studio. So. Is it realistic to have a long layover? Let's see. You got a eight hour layover in Heathrow Deborah. Is it realistic to actually check your bag and go into town? Very easy. It's fifty minutes on the P- me underground. To get into central London and it's soon. You've got the the express. Heathrow express goes into. Paddington. Depending. And from there you've got the time outs, fifteen minutes, every fifteen minutes. So four times in our and you're downtown and less than half an hour. And, and when you can go into town, you can go out back the same way and just as reliable convenient. Yes. So Stephen most people would go through Heathrow, but it's also conceivable. You could land in Gatwick, London's second airport and yet because a good connection into London, a similar thing, the Gabrielle Express and that heads into Victoria in some ways if it depends where you want to be in London, but if you wanted to go to Buckingham Palace or Westminster that's even closer. So it takes thirty minutes. Okay. On the fast train and Deborah. No, we were discussing about leaving luggage. And building some time for perhaps maybe a delay. But you know an hour and a half, maybe a couple of hours. If it's got workings, if you allow that on either side and you've got eight hours. Yeah, you could afford in. London. When when you are going back to the airport as an American, especially, you should give a little extra time. I. Know The from the Airports in Europe, you have to go through security hoops to fly to the United States. Yes. Yes. You have to allow time also to get into, there's Gatwick Express but southern rail. One of the other train companies, they run a service into Victoria, which is about every thirty minutes. It's a lot cheaper than the guy he expressing takes about the same time. Okay. So there are ways to get quickly efficiently and economically into London a lot of people are stressed out by Heathrow because it is five terminals I. think generally when you go to and from the United States, use terminal five, is that right? Depending on the airline? Terminal to terminal five or. Four. Okay. So I've been trying from seminal three with virgin in Delta. Okay. If you're flying in and out of different terminals, how tough is it to connect the terminal? It's very easy. Follow the signs. It's really well signposted what about the practicality of your bags if you have a chance to check your bags through, that's the best thing. But if you're picking up your bag, is there a way to lock it up or do you check it onto the flight You can't even check on that early to a flat out. I, don't think they have those baggage storage facilities Bernardo. We're thinking about this and talk about this. Heathrow, at sint pancras up Paddington. South. At. The airport. Don't take it into town. Yes. Yes. Yes. You can pre book as well. Online. You can pre book to leave your luggage. Should save time good tip

London Heathrow Deborah United States Debra Stephen Europe Paddington Victoria Gabrielle Express Steven Beck Buckingham Palace Gatwick Sint Pancras Delta
Locked Down in Switzerland and Belgium

Travel with Rick Steves

05:29 min | 2 months ago

Locked Down in Switzerland and Belgium

"Start with Stephen mcfeely he operates being be on Ireland's dingle peninsula in just before the pandemic head Stephen an interest in the hotel Oberland in October and Switzerland that's where he's had to ride out the first few months of the global lockdown good and. My goodness. My Irish friend is learning Spitzer dykes. Good here in the Alps where I've been for four months. Now in splendid isolation, my plan originally was just to come for February and March, but I've I'm still here right well, what does the vibe in Switzerland right now there's a positive vibe. The society is reopening. Tourism travel has started again just no we're on the same level as it was before we had two weekends where there was crazy crowds here huge big crowds from all over Switzerland everybody who was here was from Switzerland or had to be from Switzerland. They weren't necessarily all Swiss because there's lots of international people living in Geneva and Derek and whatnot but everybody from within the barger of Switzerland over with crowds, and then it just died and Monday to. Friday went back to being really really quiet. Okay. Well, this is sort of the very beginnings of the rekindling of tourism I would imagine it'll be people traveling with within their own countries first, and then traveling within Europe, and then finally international travel and transatlantic travel. Yes. That's exactly what we're seeing. The borders here have just reopened. So we're expecting Germans and some Austrians and maybe some French to come now also, I don't anticipate huge numbers like that would have been heretofore. One. Very noticeable thing in the Valley of course, there's no American visitors. As you know, the valley also is very popular with. Chinese travelers Indians many people from Dubai and Saudi Arabia would come here and they're not here this year. So there's a noticeable difference there. So the people getting the real cultural change would be the French speaking. Swiss. German speaking part of his Switzerland and not even leaving their own country exactly. Fifty percent of our guests. Last week were French speaking Swiss and it was the first time I've ever actually met those people and I would say to them. Are you French Swiss would say no, no, we are. All MOM and so I I learned something new immediately the K. The identify as swirl. They were saying exactly what you just said they said it's like we are in a different country it's very dramatic here it's different toossion either those on the do shut down it was really cool. They were very excited to see a different part of their own country. So that was wonderful. Now Stephen you own a hotel in Ireland in Dingle Peninsula and now you own a hotel in Switzerland in Loudoun valley two of my favorite places as a businessman working in both these countries how do you compare the support getting from the government and how the two governments are dealing with this crisis? Well, the difference is. Very. Big. I'm still on team. Ireland. So I want to be positive about my own country, but there's not a lot of support coming. Heretofore in Switzerland for example, within two weeks of the crisis occurring. The. Swiss Federal Council which is the Swiss government offered ten percent of the previous year's turnover and So that's quite a considerable amount of money and they offered that as a loan which was repayable over seven years. Zero percent interest. So they're not looking to profit from it and in Ireland we really struggled to get some assistance. And we got ten thousand euros of overdraft line of credit and but repayable at seven and a half percent interest in Switzerland. We got three hundred thousand. So it's quite a big difference there no-interest at all. No interest at all. Of course, Switzerland may have much stronger and deeper reservists than Ireland, but they were able to immediately come up with assistance very little bureaucracy paperwork, and they immediately got to help us in Ireland. The experience was just simply much different to the government really weren't as proactive for as immediate as were here in Switzerland. The roots here what's around her a lot less strict as well There is a two meter rule here, but I haven't seen anybody wearing masks very much, which is kinda shocking for me because I know in Ireland the whole north of is people should be wearing masks. People definitely are observing social distance. One of my friends said to me that the two meter rule has actually brought Swiss people closer together so. That is so insightful to the Swiss society. It's more difficult thing. It's more difficult thing for Irish people or Italian people are Spanish. Two meters distance than it would be for this people or maybe the. Scandinavians. I can see by home people are wondering. Is the Irish pub culture ever going to come back the way it was with social distancing whereas in. Switzerland. Here for me like I'm I'm in the Alps I'm surrounded by fresh air and. Of of lovely space and it's been a wonderful place to be stranded, I don't even want to complain about it because although I I was stranded here for four months. It was the perfect place I felt very safe. I might have felt different if I was in the middle of Zurich or something or Geneva but I felt very safe. I'd in the Alps and it is lovely and peaceful and quiet, and of course, that's what people are coming here for anyway

Switzerland Ireland Alps Stephen Mcfeely French Swiss Dingle Peninsula Swiss Society Swiss Federal Council Spitzer Europe Geneva Swiss Government Dubai Zurich Saudi Arabia Derek Loudoun Valley
Checking on Friends in New York and Italy

Travel with Rick Steves

04:28 min | 2 months ago

Checking on Friends in New York and Italy

"Let's start today's travel through exterior with a call to our friend, Fred Plotkin in New, York City his work on Italian. Cuisine and opera earned him special honor from the Italian government a few years ago. But like the rest of us, he's staying home and Haton Intel. The risk of infection improves. Giorno Fred. Great to be with you wherever you are, Rick. You Fred first of all you call yourself a pleasure activist, I love that term, and it sort of reminding me of your passion for Opera Your Passion for Italy your passion for cooking, and all the lecturing and writing and work you do. Turn people under those joys of life. How was your life like right now in new? York City I'm in the thick of it. In terms of what the epicenter has been in New York. And my philosophy became at the very beginning better six feet apart than six feet under so I've been very very responsible as I encourage everyone to be if people can get to the plays in world, wars and pandemics, the vast. We need to learn from what people did. Or didn't do and that's sustenance to me to study the past at times like this. Because otherwise we feel abandoned. The past there to teach us, and so I've been reading I've been studying I've used the opportunity to begin to work on a book. I've been wanting to write for years, but haven't had the time. Time is a gift. We need to use it very very well, and I tried to. And I've been reminding myself and my friends that rather than spinner wheels and try to do something. We can't do during this period. Find a way to make it a constructive time and a blessing when you think about your passions opera for instance to me I am so saddened by the notion that one of the most dangerous things. This time is being acquire because the worst way to. To spread this virus is by singing with Gusto, making a joyous sound that depresses me frankly that choirs could be deadly now I have to see them in these checkerboards zoom world singing solo right now and you know I have many opera singer friends who are very dear friends of mine, and I feel for them terribly some of the managing and they sing, and they practice, and they steady new music, but others feel that without the sound of applause in the presence of colleagues. It's not their work and my feeling is always been that when we go into a feeder or church where people are seeing where. Action happens and air shared. Is that sharing of the air the electronic current that happens between humans? That's a huge part of. Our experience at alive theater as a communal setting and something that virtual technology just cannot replicate I never. An opera on the radio or on video and operates a report from an Opera House. But I'm not saying. These things are bad and right now I, certainly enjoying audio operas well but communal gathering. Is something fundamental. You talked about the sharing of air I never thought about that, but I've been thinking about it without knowing it. It's the sort of a communion of course when pastors are struggling with. How can we be together at church if you can't have the sharing of the peace or communion or fellowship or singing? There's no sharing of air and when you go to a pub, you want to share that air when you go to a theater when I give a lecture I want the house packed. It's the sharing of the air, and that's going to be an adjustment for us, and we can hope and pray it will come back, but in the interim we can be singing solo and doing it in a community kind of way. I. Suppose think of the word inspiration. That's where that comes from. It's about breathing together. We do breathe together. I I WANNA make a point to that New York City during the complete lockdown. was incredibly quiet and I heard birds and all kinds of things. I did normally here and frankly the air was much. Cleaner city has slowly begun to try to read self up again. The air is kidding dirtier. This is the place you're activists in me that I'm very sensitive to these things. And although I would not wish on anyone what we've been through nonetheless. I wish we could learn that. There are ways to keep the air cleaner

Fred Plotkin Opera House York City Intel New York City New York Italy Rick
Romantic Bridges and Little Museums of Paris; Burgundy

Travel with Rick Steves

05:18 min | 2 months ago

Romantic Bridges and Little Museums of Paris; Burgundy

"Of the small specialty museums in Paris were allowed to reopen weeks before the Lou, but just because they don't attract the big crowds of the famous museums doesn't mean they aren't worth your time in just a bit. We'll hear why they can be worth. Including in your travel plans next time you're in town and we'll explore what you'll find in the peaceful countryside of Burgundy and easy giant from Paris. Let's start. Today's very French edition of travel with Rick Steves along the banks of the Seine, the busy river that winds through the heart of the city. Paris to me, it's the capital of Europe and you can never get tired of ten. I just love the way the THEMM lined through. The city in the city faces. It's river and I also love the way it's laced together by bridges that just give so much meaning to your wondering through Paris. Lynch Lima is a journalist for the New York Times. She's written books about Paris to her. New Book is called. The river that made Paris, and she talks about the bridges that lease together the right bank and left bank. In Paris Elaine. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me on your show I. Love The way your book. The Seine the river that made Paris illustrates the importance. To France end to Paris and of course, Paris was born on this end, wasn't it? Yes, there would not have been a Paris. Had it not been for the Senate and for the heels lessee tae the island that is the center, the heart of the city of Paris, and that goes back to Roman Times. Pre Roman Times Poetry Roman times absolutely now when we think about the send through the centuries through most of the centuries, it's been a mucky riverbank where. Where you've got all sorts of slime and sewer and garbage and poverty, and and then over the centuries built this wonderful embankment that sort of teams the river, and and makes it an elegant part of the city. Talk a bit about the embankment in Paris will the embankment of Paris really the way it looks like now was conceived in the nineteenth century at before that you could pretty much walk along the banks of the Seine and bring your cows and horses. Horses and dogs right into the river, your laundry, whatever now it's a little bit more challenging, although there are places right now in Paris that you can walk down into the river and go swimming if you're so inclined, but with this mighty embankment you also have elegant bridges, lacing it together to the right and the left bank, and one of my favorite things in Paris just to walk along the banks of the river, and in or cruise the river and enjoy the. The bridges I've got so many vivid memories of just being on the top of one of those river, Seine, tourist boats, and going under these glorious bridges, and the more you know about the context of these bridges, the more funded is to sail under them. Let's just go and there's four bridges that really come to mind from. Yes, I'd love to just talk about each of them as if we're cruising down the river and I. we come to the punt new. Means the Newbridge, right? It means the new bridge, even though it's the oldest bridge in Paris. And when it was built, it was finished in the beginning of the seventeenth century, it was a miracle was an architectural dazzling creation, because it was the first bridge that didn't have houses on either side, so that people would come to the pontiff and look at the expanse of the river. It became the heart and soul of Paris where. You would come and have all sorts of wild activities. You could join up for the army or by. Orange juice or have a tooth pulled or watch jugglers or exchange God. You could buy false teeth and glass is and wooden legs and life, poultry and skin whiteners, so it really was the place to be was a gathering place a Piazza for the city. It was. You know what that's exactly right? It's like a piazza in the shape of a bridge. Now when you said it had didn't have houses on either side. Are you talking like lined with houses and shops like the punt Vecchio in Florence and the London Bridge in. Exactly and that you finally had an open view to the river, and you didn't have these barriers in the shape of houses blocking your. Visual joy of Helseth Martavis city that has some pride because it's just a practical matter. If you had a bridge that you needed help, pay for and maintain. You'd rent out space to it and it would obliterate the fact that it feels like a bridge so London Bridge and the Punt Vecchio it would be lined by shops that were paying rent to the city, so they could have that great bridge. Bridge punt new F-. It's a piazza. That's great. The next bridge we come to is the punt art that right the what what does that mean, and how is it unique well? It's the bridge of the arts and I love this bridge. Because it joy. It's a walking bridge. It's a pedestrian bridge, and so it's a great bridge for picnicking, but if you stand front of this bridge at the Louvre. And look through a gorgeous courtyard, but not many people know about is called the core cafe, the square courtyard you can look through the arch, and you can see right across the bridge to the St to default on the other side of the river, which is where the economy foss says is head. You just feel like you've got this magical long view of Paris

Paris London Bridge Punt Vecchio Seine Roman Times Rick Steves Europe New York Times Louvre France LOU Lynch Lima Senate Newbridge Helseth Martavis Florence
Aniakchak

Travel with Rick Steves

04:44 min | 3 months ago

Aniakchak

"The any AC national monument and preserve gets the fewest visitors of any national park, and it boasts no rangers. No trails and no waiting in line. All the more reason Christopher Solomon went out of his way to hike a few summers ago. Chris, welcome great to be here. Is this actually a national park or what's the technicality they're. Technically Rick any act check national. Monument and preserve is its name and it. It is not a national park, but it is the least visited unit of the four hundred and one properties in the national park system, so nobody goes there white. Why do they even bother thinking of it? As part of the system you, you'd think that the least visited might be something like the Martin Van Buren national birthplace right, but no It's Antioch Chat in two. Thousand Twelve Anne check had nineteen visitors last year might have picked up to a hundred or so and you were there with how? How many people in your party three of us three of us now? Where is it and how do you get? There visualizes for me if you look at the map of Alaska Alaska? has this big tale that kind of frozen, fourteen hundred mile tail, that wags westward at come shotgun, and that's the Aleutian islands and the base of that tail is the Alaska Peninsula, and that's where any act check. You know if I wanted to go there next week. Where would I fly? What I just rent a car and drive there, or how'd I get that so one of the reasons rick? Not, very popular is it's hard to get to from Seattle where I live. It took US three flights to anchorage to King Salmon to Port Heiden which is just an airstrip built for World War Two in the middle of nowhere on the Bering Sea and then we backed packed with sixty five pound packs for twenty two miles to reach the centerpiece of the the. The National Monument, which is a gorgeous volcanic crater, so ease of access is not one of its selling points. Is it worth the trouble? Yeah, I was thinking about this on the drive over here and how to summarize it. I have had the good fortune to travel all over the world as a travel writer, I was with a photographer who shoots pictures all over. Over the world and beautiful places we agreed we'd never seen a place as unique as okay. How can you write in? Your article is just gorgeous about this that it was mind-bending. Lee Gorgeous is the desolation that's part of it, or what makes it better than just going to any national park, so maybe to convey what it's like I need to tell you just. Just a little bit about its geologic in human history, which is more interesting than it sounds about the time. The Egyptians were ruling the world. A seven thousand foot volcano blew its top with a with a force of ten thousand nuclear bombs ruined the bigger eruptions we we know of, and then the volcano collapsed on itself and created a crater that could swallow Manhattan. That crater filled with water, so it looked like crater lake national park, then that lake blew out in his biblical flood in over the next couple thousand years, this lost worlds was sort of created inside that crater, and it just went kind of unnoticed, except for the native peoples for thousands of years until nineteen thirty, when this man called the glacier priests arrived, and the Glacier priest was father, Bernard, how he's one of these Jesuit priests who was cut from the old cloth, swashbuckling sort of Jesuits, and he, he barnstorm all over the forty-ninth state, having these wild adventures by Bush plane. Plane by dog sled is write ups win the Saturday Evening Post and the National Geographic and in nineteen thirty, he wrote about visiting Antioch Check, and he described it as paradise found this this lost world where orchids bloomed in the volcanically warmed soil, and the rabbits were gigantic, and they came up and walked right up to his crew, which was a bunch of the Santa Clara football players, and and they felt bad killing them to eat them, but they did anyway. Did you read his writing the in preparation for your trip so I? Did I read about his writings about the great? Great Moon Crater of the earth called it, and then what happened is he wanted to go back the next year nineteen, thirty one and any act check blew up again, and he goes back and talks about it no longer in these Milton, s Kinda paradise found terms, but but in this dante-esque hellish terms describes himself peering into this blackened inferno, and then they go into the crater a couple months after it's blown up again, and they nearly die of poisonous gasses, and they're, and they're put their beans on a funeral and their beans Boileau, and they shove a thermometer in the ground. Ground thermometer explodes, and it's just this hellish wild landscape. That's the setting we go back eight years later. Just kinda see what it's like, and a lot of the soot has washed off from that nineteen thirty one explosion, but it has this kind of Sier Flinty beauty desolation sublime.

Great Moon Crater National Monument Crater Lake United States Rick Antioch Check Alaska Christopher Solomon Lee Gorgeous Alaska Peninsula Chris Sier Flinty Martin Van Buren Seattle Aleutian Islands Antioch Chat Anne Bering Sea Writer
Vancouver Tourism

Travel with Rick Steves

04:18 min | 3 months ago

Vancouver Tourism

"It's often called one of the most beautiful cities in North, America for twenty one years Kenton was the president and CEO the Tourism Authority that promotes Vancouver British Columbia to the rest of the world. During his tenure, the city successfully bid to host the Winter Olympics. City's growing into a top shelf destination that attracts to end residents from around the World Vancouver is prized for its natural beauty and recreational opportunities. recanting joins US now on travel with Rick Steves to share some of the lessons. He learned as an international tourism promoter. Rick thanks for being here. It's nice to be here. Every time I meet a tourism director for a godforsaken depressing city I won't say which ones I think. What a shame and then what I meet a tourism director for a place like. Vancouver I think you got a good Gig well has a nice city to be the tourist and promoter for well. It's terrific to be able to invite the world to come and visit your hometown, and when it's a beautiful place like Vancouver in Canada. It's all the nicer, but it brings with it the complexities because it's you want people to come want them to enjoy things. You want them to extend their length of stay. You want them to feel the things that you feel on your. Want them to meet the locals, but you know that what they wanted to come and see is. That's the mountains and there's the ocean I could touch both of them right now in the next half hour. It's a pretty special place, but you were running the show for twenty years there and Essentially you're hired to ring money out of people who come to town for the economy not to help people have. Experiences I mean. How do you balance that? Did you ever get in trouble because you have some ideals? I was constantly in trouble because. I have to remind the hotel community that people don't leave home to go stay in hotel room. They leave to go and have an experience and too many in the tourism businesses. It's about a cash registering, and that is but one element and we pushed. We had it in our mission statement. That tourism is about the financial. Ecological? Social and cultural benefits that come took community by having visitors from around the world. Spend time with them, so it's four pronged. Only one of them relates to the dollar. If we don't travel, we don't have empathy for the rest of the world here in the United States were four percent of the planet, and they're actually people in our country. That think we're exceptional and you can't think that when you travel. You just can't think that if you travel smartly and tourism can help with. With that empathy or it can actually hurt with that empathy and I'm glad that there are people in tourism that can speak up for the the real transformational value travel, sadly when I go to a tourism convention, and I meet somebody from a developing country like say Egypt. They're all about sending people to a resort and a golf course and you know something where you jet in, and you have this utopia, and conceivably you would never even meet a real person. You'd meet only this. Fancy version right and when you do get the real people and the real food and the real occasions it's uplifting spiritually, uplifting environmentally uplifting and it. It works so I like your tact in that there are challenges around global warming and around the footprint of travelers, but there are solutions that can be brought, so there are offsets that can be used off her convention. Organizers offsets for their delegates that were coming for. For the air air flight damage. You know you talked earlier about conference actually. Lou, Damore, who had more that was him. Yeah, he heads up the International Institute for Peace Through Tourism Yeah and every time, I talk about tourism as a powerful force for peace I attributed to a more, but there is also an Indian cabinet minister. That I heard once at a conference for the Pacific Asia Travel Association when we're in. A New Delhi and he addressed the group, and he said something else that I will never forget, he said. Tourism sits on the right hand of peace. I love that. Yeah, wonderful it powers it is. We've got so much in common, and there's so much fear, and the fear really is strongest with people who don't get out and when you get out, you realize. Hey, we're all in this together.

Vancouver Rick Steves Tourism Authority United States Director Pacific Asia Travel Associatio America Olympics Damore President And Ceo Kenton International Institute For Pe Canada Delhi Egypt LOU
From The City To The Megalopolis

Travel with Rick Steves

05:48 min | 3 months ago

From The City To The Megalopolis

"It's amazing to think that. In the nineteenth century about three percent of humanity lived in cities and today. That number is fifty percent, and it's growing rapidly. We live in the age of the Megalopolis. We're going to talk about that now with Dr, Salvatori satis Dr set. This is an emeritus professor of the history of classical art and archaeology at the school normality superiore in Pisa in Italy. He's an archaeologist and art historian. He's the chairman of the Louvre Museum. Scientific Council his the author of several books on art. Art History and he's known as the conscience of Italy for his role in spot, leading the neglect of it all national cultural heritage. His book is if Venice dies, and it's a look, not only at in the struggles, Venison the twenty first century, but at the increasing urbanisation of civilization general doctor says thanks for joining us. Thank you for inviting me. Can you talk about if finished is? How much of it is about Venice? And how much of it is it about the changing urban landscape across the planet? Well my intention in writing. This book was to focus on Venice. In order to make people meditate about what's going on on on a global scale about what I would call the shape the form of the city Savannah's. Sample account that example, contrasting some of the most disturbing. Of Urbanization in our current world end, it is quite dramatic. What's going on in your book? You explain there are fifteen megalopolis. That have over twenty million people is the advent of these massive cities twenty million people cities people have to live somewhere is is that a good thing or a bad thing? Why does it concern you well? I'm concerned about the quality of life. Those people because although this organization may look something that happens naturally, it is also prompted by economic forces. It is a concentration of workforce. which is not necessarily living in good conditions in order to create profit for a very low number of people, so it's the usual formula ninety nine percent, the best one percent, the megalopolis is a consequence of a complication of the world, the general commodification of the world that includes to an increasing extent human beings. This is just a very efficient thing for the elites to have a concentration of workforce where people who will be able to work cheaper and produce more by being right there at the center of production. Is that what? What you're saying, produce more and also by more become consumers, because workers are simultaneously consumer, so there is a a bishop's or two, if you so wish seal between being workers and consumers and I, think that there are two your which are combined, and normally one is made. Opera is the big over-centralisation to the other one is the verticalisation of AF- architecture. May Boca Use a? It's an example Chung Ching in China which had the six hundred thousand people in the nineteen thirty s and now thirty four million people living in it. I talked to contrast this with a different. Format Orbis or shape of the city. A form of the city in which that is some sort of harmony of balance between the body of the citizen and the body of the city where the citizen doesn't feel The one thing I'm saying is that it is good that we presser diversity in urban form and preserving diversity means among other things saving and saving the other historical see also because there is in even more. More disturbing feature of urban farming cities taking shape in in our time, and that is the fact that wide ancient cities. Historical CDs had a boundary around the city in the case of Venice Lagoon, case of other cities, the walls around the city now the boundaries around the boundaries of the city are being gradually substituted by boundaries within the city which has boundaries between the gentrified areas. For. The Hey and the have nots. You can see that in Paris very well. This can impact is. Also in Rome or in Milan dimension, Italian cities, the gated communities are increasingly frequent all around the world, but the gated communities are for those who are wealthy or relatively wealthy, while the other people are condemned to live in favelas. Zeal or in in be don't be like this aim French. I'm just thinking of Paris. I was just in Paris with a group. And I was explaining how they protect the center of Paris where everything is the months heart, scale you know six or eight story tall monster building, so you can see the domes, and you can see the spires, and you can see the Eiffel Tower and then right when you get to the periphery. Periphery this big boulevard that circles the city outside of that. It's just no-holds-barred, and it's like keeping the Cadillac Bay outside of that periphery. It's forced of skyscrapers within that you've got the elegance of the classic people friendly city that is in a sense, a gated community, because it's unaffordable for lot of people, and they end up outside a town in the rougher downtrodden neighborhoods. This is what's going on. Your description is absolutely perfect I think. But this involves a separation with inside, which is socially potentially very dangerous for the future. which is not precisely what I would call democracy.

Paris Venice Venice Lagoon Italy Louvre Museum Savannah Professor Scientific Council Eiffel Tower Chairman Pisa Cadillac Bay Venison Chung Ching China Milan Rome
West Coast Road Trip

Travel with Rick Steves

08:04 min | 3 months ago

West Coast Road Trip

"Hey, I'm Rick Steves. The certainties of the global pandemic sure can do a number on our travel plans, but we're the kind of people who trust that better times are ahead whenever that may be. Part of what we have to look forward to are. The people and places will meet in our future travels today. Let's remember why we travel in the first place and explore some of our options in the hour ahead for a great American road trip will also indulge in some of the taste treats. You can find across the south. What's the best way to take in the sunny coast of California organs, rocky beaches and Washington's rain coast, author and illustrator Chandler O'Leary argues it's by car. Chandler illustrated that beauty, spanning the road trip up the entire west coast of the USA in her guidebook, the best coast, a road trip, atmos-, her book takes, both the coastal end the internal routes from the bottom of California all the way to the Washington Canadian border, and she describes it all through detailed. Detailed and colorful imagery and words chambers here today to take us along arguably the best coast Chandler, thanks for being here. Thanks for having me Rick the best coast you're going to get a little bit of a calls from the east coast might be fighting words a little bit. I actually grew up in Massachusetts so might be in a little bit of trouble there. I am a west coast guide to so we'll call the west coast the best coast like. Like your book does what's unique about a west coast road trip? I mean what's the culture? That's just kind of rewarding and a stall. You can gratifying fund about the West Coast for me I. Think it's a mix of natural beauty and Americana. They're still a lot of great old roadside relics that are they're old neon signs, old fund fiberglass statues like Muffler men, but also it's watching the scenery change. It's watching the climate change from southern California all the. The way up to the raincoats. Yeah, and I love that about it and I like the way you set up the book because it's kind of a lighthearted guidebook for the two routes up the whole length of the west coast and the interior, but you also talk about how with the arrival of the interstate five that was sort of the end of an age and You know you can get there and twenty four hours, but why? Why would you? The more you know, slow down and smell the roses part. You got a little bit of sort of stalled motor courts and drive in restaurants thing yeah, and what's great, especially in California is a lot of that stuff is still there and its well preserved. I mean the climate helps right. Yeah, and so I don't know that it's really stepping back into time, but there's a little flavor of that. These were sort of. Weren't they kind of gimmicks just to get their themselves ler I'm sure. With the teepees or you go to the base with the big LUMBERJACK, nobody to get someone to stop and spend a few bucks right? And then we've got the advent of neon signs in the nineteen twenties. Yeah and so much of those are still around I. Mean Los Angeles was the first place that they arrived in the US from France so they were really on the vanguard of this new technology. A lot of them are still there survived. Yeah, that's great now you're also an artist and love it when a writer is also an artist and you can illustrate the book as you go. Yeah, it was that process like because he must have spent a Lotta time on the road to write this. I did yes. I carry sketchbooks everywhere that I. Go, and so these are kind of my preliminary. Preliminary drawings that I work with, but I think it goes hand in hand with this taking the slow road, because you can't work quickly with a pen and pencil as you do with a camera. Oh, that's a good point, so it just forces you to slow down and really look out the car. Sit on the driftwood and the waves crashing. Yeah, and then of course when I look back at previous trips wherever I've been when I've been drawing I really remember those trips in a way that I. don't want I'm letting the camera. Do the scene for me, so we've got that poetic dimension. Dimension to the book, and you've also got a practical dimension. You know you travel tips and packing tips and what you should know about wildlife park permits, and so on Let's just the whole triplets. They were going to do the trip and you know in another interview we'll go up the interior, but right now. I want to go up the coastal route just in general. You've got the California coast. The Oregon coast in Washington coast set it up. What should I be expecting different? What's the highlights of each of those thirds of the trip while the book goes from south to? To north and I do that. Because the highway system in America is set up that way from south north, also it kind of lets you do the fun. Southern California Sunny Bits I kind of a nice introduction to it so I think it is kind of southern California northern. California Oregon, Washington and so start out in San Diego right away, and you're in the sun. You're with the palm trees, and you get to kind of watch as you head north, you get to watch that landscape

California West Coast Rick Steves Chandler O'leary Washington USA Massachusetts Washington Canadian Border Los Angeles Oregon America Writer San Diego France
Millennial Netherlands

Travel with Rick Steves

05:35 min | 4 months ago

Millennial Netherlands

"Hi, I'm Rick Steves one of the few things certain about this corona virus pandemic is that this crisis will pass sooner or later it'll pass, and we'll be back to normal. And when that day comes, all of us will eagerly turn our pent up. Travel Dreams into smooth and bursting with fun reality. Let's continue to share. Our travel dreams together on travel with Rick Steves. Today on travel with Rick Steves are virtual travels. Bring us a millennials. Take on enjoying yourself in the Netherlands. Also stroll the sights on a guided walk around Edinburgh. Get a taste of that passionate atmosphere and end Lucia and go searching for Venus in the hour ahead. The. Netherlands seem to specialize in festivals. Fun Ways for the millennial generation to celebrate life to learn how we travelers of all ages can get it on the fun. We're joined in our studio by tour guide sisters, Yoda and Ruby Van Angles Dwarf who both happened to be millennials, Yoda and Ruby thanks for being here. For having us. You're actually twins. Ruby and Yoda and It's one of you older. Yes, maybe one minute older them a one minute older so Yoda. How do you to differ in your temperaments? Well I'm always told that Ruby, Nice. One Which is true? I am a little bit more direct assistance. Dutch people are think I'm a little bit more. Outspoken where we very patients and lovingly, and yeah, so you complement each other we do I think. Together the Dutch are famous for being direct. Yes, we are yeah. This is so fun to think about generational differences, and so on in America and what we call a baby boomer and you got in America people in their twenties and thirties or generate millennials do the Dutch look at generations in certain ways like that? Also? Yes, exactly the same we have baby. boomers are parents are a baby, boomers, and yeah, we're millennials, so millennials people in their twenties and thirties, gen-x people in their forties, baby boomers people in their fifties and sixties, baby boomers, being the most interesting and fun, loving and entertaining. Okay so tell me about the characteristics of millennials. In the Netherlands. Well, it's probably very similar. we are we millennials. Because we got handed everything to us right. We always learned where you're growing up. Everything is possible everything you wanted to do and instead of creating people who are very secure. What they WANNA do were all very insecure, and we're very well like I'm going to do and like every ten years. We changed jobs and There's a lot of enterpreneurs so a lot of people who want to create their own little thing, but we're all sort of this known at were unhappy with everything because we can have everything we're unhappy. Little bit spoiled came easily old. Yes, and impatient. You want it now. Yes, and if you don't get it now, you'll go somewhere else. Yeah, we're own press. And we invented the burn out. Is! Still Alive and kicking. This is travel with Rick Steves. We're talking with Yoda angles store and her twin. WHO's one minute older? Ruby angles. Talking about millennials and when we think about having fun as tourists, we can learn a lot by having fun as millennials millennials love. It seems like in the Netherlands parties in vegetables. Yoda. What's what's an example of festival that a millennial looks forward to every year and Amsterdam? We Love, King's Day. That is one of our favorites. Once It's not we do not have as many festivals in Amsterdam anymore more dough, so I'm stem because such a busy city day try to take people away from Amsterdam, so if you want to experience the holidays like King, stay or Liberation Day It's better to go to one of the less bigger cities. Also. Just what what? What is it? You'd like to go to for one of these big. Go to Harlem, because the most I am from Harlem, so we always love Liberation Day that is in Harlem. It's known to have the biggest festival only ration- days that its fifth of May we got free from the Nazis and every year. We celebrate our freedom. It's just really fun with a lot of artists in music. Video of me. I remember the festival Yeah Amsterdam is getting so congested so touristy. I was there for a King's Day once and there's so many boats you could walk across the canal just from boat to boat. who was just solid votes in the canals, but people were certainly having a great time Ruby. Festival that you look forward to. What would it be every year? ooh I always look forward to the food festivals. There are many food festival also around to Amsterdam. And we have a shoeless that SURF SC fall in the neighborhood of Amsterdam where people go to, they have to take off their shoes and walk bare feet it. It's of course when festival Shula Festival. They have a lot of food everywhere. Fit of electro music seems okay. Let's me to one of these food festivals. Then okay. So, what kind of food would you be enjoying? You would be enjoying some Sushi macos, but also local foods like French fries. The real food festivals hundred stance. You can try a little bit of everything

Rick Steves Netherlands Amsterdam Ruby Shula Festival King Harlem Lucia America Edinburgh
Enjoy Your Seat; Lisbon Neighborhoods; Buenos Aires Bio

Travel with Rick Steves

05:09 min | 4 months ago

Enjoy Your Seat; Lisbon Neighborhoods; Buenos Aires Bio

"Rick Steves with borders temporarily closing countless travel. Dreams are now on hold. But I know that we'll get through this crisis and when we do it'll be more important than ever to venture out into our world so for now. Let's enjoy these virtual adventures through the Radio. And when we're able again let's promise to keep on traveling if you like to explore historic cities with funkier festive neighborhoods. We've got to for you to choose from in the hour ahead. Tour guides from Portugal will help us navigate the street life and the tangle of cobbled lanes and lookouts and their capital as we get acquainted with the neighborhoods of Lisbon and an architecture critic finds a lot to like faded charisma of Buenos Aires. But I writer Wendy. Simmons returns to travel with Rick. Steves to help us look forward to our next long airplane flight in coach as a photographer and contributor to Huffington Post. Wendy's traveled a lot so far she's been to eighty five countries. She doesn't read the overseas flights at all in fact she joins us now with her tips on enjoying your next flight. Wendy thanks for being here. Sorry my so you write that long haul. Flights can be more fun than short ones. That's pretty good trick house. Oh I travel all the time as you said and I've come to really not lake. Short flights feel long only. They're not so I can't get anything done and instead you know. I look at long haul flights as uninterrupted me. Time just ten twelve hours of time where? I don't have any guilt that I should be doing something else and instead I can use the time to do all the things I wanna do that. I never seem to have time for one on the so that takes a little bit of intention and thinking ahead. I do the same thing when I'm planning a trip to Europe and I know my departures a week out. I've actually got a little list of things I'm going to do during the flight because I will get hours of me time. What are some of your meantime activities that make that flight actually blessing? Well it can be fun stuff and it can also be stuff that I just have to get taken care of that. I never have time to do so. For example it's a great time. I listened to a lot of music. I love music and I am always frustrated. That can't find the song I feel like listening to her playlist and that type of thing so it's a great time to clean out my tunes library and get rid of music. I don't like or create playlists. It's a great time to go through my email inbox and just finally cleared out. You don't have to be online to do that. Those things take a long time in our lives are so busy and never get render so tedious and who wants to do that on weekends. You know for me. A related thing would be Hall the piles of photos. I've got packed into my iphone. You can just go through in down. It's actually it's the perfect time to do all the stuff you don't WanNa waste time doing during the weekend or at night. Also you can just do something that you would normally invest time in other ways. Absolutely you know I'll to things like if I've always wanted to read about the history of someplace or I've been wanting to learn a few key phrases in the language of whatever country I'm going to you know that's the perfect time to catch up on movies or season of television shows all season of whatever or watch a movie that you wouldn't have exactly those are the exactly the kind of thing so it's really about mindset or a movie that your partner wouldn't WanNa see with you exactly are the ones you'd be so embarrassed ask anyone to watch with you. If you're anywhere else I love to walk up and down the aisle and just look at the way. People are spending their time and see how they're really getting into all that trash on the screen. I mean I've watched some of the most embarrassing movies ever on airplanes humiliated if anyone knew but it's the perfect time and I think you know people go onto airplanes dreading it and if you just you know if you make a few simple changes and you bring a neck pillow and you dress in layers and you take your shoes off and you have a glass of wine and you sort of look at the airplane is your you know your personal private space albeit. It's not comfortable but it's not permanent. I know people that would they would travel less in order to go first class and makes no sense that ultimately. I don't know how much more I think you'd pay five or six hundred dollars more one hundred dollars hour or something at least just sit in first class and just makes no sense to me because what you can do is you can creatively work to make your coach seat. Feel a little more elegant. And there's ways that I always say I would rather sit in coach with my noise reduction headphones than to sit business without them because the rumble of the airplane is. It's just exhausting to me and I can have my own little cone of silence and when I put my headphones on nobody talks to me and I do have that meantime I remember this interview that the CEO of Spirit Airlines did one time after a poll came out ranking them dead last in customer service and seat size and space and all these other statistics and he basically said listen. We get you from place to place really cheap. You can spend the money where you're going and I thought you know what a brilliant response and that's how I look at it. The airplane isn't part of the vacation. It's to get me to the big Russian affordably. Say money to it up and uncomfortable for thirteen hours so I have an extra thousand dollars when I get wherever it is that I'm

Rick Steves Wendy Buenos Aires Portugal Europe Lisbon Spirit Airlines Huffington Post Simmons Writer CEO Partner
How Berlin Remembers; Turkish Delights; Travel to Bhutan

Travel with Rick Steves

03:59 min | 4 months ago

How Berlin Remembers; Turkish Delights; Travel to Bhutan

"Berlin has become the high tech and cultural powerhouse of today's dynamic German economy but there are still plenty of Berliners who can tell you about the difficulties. They faced back in the twentieth century as a divided city and stories of life under the Nazis during World War Two. We're joined now by German tour guides older Timur and Fabien Muga. Look at some of the most impressive monuments and memorials. You can visit to remember the lessons from Berlin past gentlemen. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having to live in Berlin as a tourist. You just come and go to live there. You're surrounded by all of this history and all of these memorials when you walk down the streets. Does it become just background and you just see through it or are you constantly aware of this happened there? This happened there and so on holger is part of everyday life. Yes but it's not like you kind of oversee it because it is there it is right in your face. I've seen most of the memorials like many countless times. As a berliner as tour guide here but they still are some of them are really haunting especially when it comes to divided city to the wall or to the time of the National Socialist period and in the case of Germany. With your complicated history. The memorials are almost there to not go away to be in your face. I mean there's even something called stumble stones right Fabio yes. There are a memorial stones to victims of the Holocaust who had deported from particular houses. And if you have a friend or relative was deported from that house you can donate some money to this foundation and they will put stumbling stone into the pavement Princeton pavement. Like you need to trip on this to never forget the horrible thing that happened right there when you think about Germany. A lot of our fixated on World War Two in the whole fastest thing but of course there's many layers of the city that was the leading city of of the PRUSSIAN empire and so on Fabio. And when you think about memorials of the horns period and Prussia what is there in Germany to look at our Berlin. I think the most visible that everybody know will know. Is The victory column. That's in the center of the main park often. The victory column was built as a symbol of victory over the French. This is where history and Berlin connect. It was originally standing on the spot where it is today. The Nazis moved at there to make it stand in a more triumphant spot in the very center of the city. It was originally built near the rice stuck building and was not looking quite some one mental there today. Six major streets of lead straight towards the listen to that part of a big access isn't it? I mean Hoeger. The whole city is built on this axis which lined by memorials. The East and west access really is this fascinating thing. You look up. And you see Golden Angel Hair and you think. Wow that's wonderful. Then you close in you. See while this is all candidates made cannons French cannons French cannons. Like as a AS A TO Z. Boy To as spoils of war multiple. Yeah so it is weird thing. If you you would think that's nice to call between can look at it that it has a little jab at the French. It's a big Jab at Big Jab at the French or the Germans the French and of course I in the next century. We've got the whole Hitler situation and a lot of memorials relating to the nightmare of Berlin being the capital of Nazism. What are some of the memorials that you'll see when you go to Berlin that way what I found very haunting as the memorial to the burning of the books right near onto the Lyndon right near the State Opera House? And it's basically a memorial that you wouldn't really see because it's underground and you would just maybe pastas Query Newton. We have no idea what it is but quite often you see consumerist groups looking at nothing really and then you look there and it basically is a hole in the ground. It's a glass plate in the ground and he looked down and there is an empty library like five by five five meters containing empty shelves for twenty thousand books. Symbolizing was happening in the tenth of May Nineteen thirty three. When the Nazis took all the books and literature that they hated that it didn't understand they didn't like and were putting them in a big pile and burning him openly for people to see and that's now empty. Shelves are very haunting memorial to that.

Berlin Germany Timur Fabien Muga Fabio Holger Prussia Hoeger Princeton State Opera House Hitler Lyndon
"rick steves" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

11:27 min | 5 months ago

"rick steves" Discussed on The Daily

"We are recording. Okay Iraq Sam. Nice to see. Rick Steves one of my favorite people on the planet. Sam Nice to hear from you again and we had a good conversation a while ago. Now it's all different world yes I profiled you. My profile view came out in the New York Times magazine last year and part of the reason I wanted to call and talk to you was you and I are supposed to be hanging out. That's right it was one of the last things I deleted from waking up. I'm Sam Anderson and I'm a staff writer for the New York Times magazine and last year. I wrote a profile of Travel Guru. Rick Steves Hi. I'm Rick Steves. For many travelers quintessence have. Spain is found here and Lucia. Rick Steves for anyone. Who doesn't know he's really an evangelist of travel today like Turkey. In general. Gazillion is Muslim. The power of Rick Steves is that this is not just a business for him. It's a whole life. Philosophy set me means the ball tough life tastes like that when it goes from the herring. Okay well this is the learners dose here. But I'll give it a go. He wants to empower average everyday Americans. Who MIGHT NOT OTHERWISE? Leave the country to get out of their comfort zone and go explore the world they give an insight into a people who in a thousand years have evolved from fearsome some marauding vikings tap people like me and. I've been thinking about them a lot since. We'VE ALL BEEN HUNKERED DOWN. Because here's a guy who's in constant motion he just thrives on moving from one place to the next he's always travelling and suddenly the entire world is shut down. It's like a switch was flipped and his whole life mission is just cancelled. All these dreams that have been dashed are actually put on hold and so I was wondering what does Rick Steves Time. And maybe an even bigger question. If Rick Steves can't travel then who is Rick Steves? It was nothing on. My calendar is just a blank slate for my future. Wow so what? Have you been doing day by day instead of hanging around with me? Well the big part of my life is a part. That was always squeezed away by workaholic. And that's just enjoying being alive in this privileged little world. I've got a nice place in Edmonds. Half are north of Seattle. I've got a view of the mountains. it seems like the the volume of the birds have been cranked up. When I step out of the morning there's less traffic and more more bird sound and I've been thinking about dusting off old. Passions got out my trumpet and the Valves Heddon wiggled for literally decades and I could still play the trumpet. Which is fun. I didn't even know you played the trumpet. I thought I knew everything like to keep a few things to pull out later. One other elements of life. Have you been finding yourself enjoying? I mean it sounds ridiculous but I have never cooked in my whole have never cut into an onion in my entire life. What I had never really made pasta until now and my gosh. I've had a bad attitude about it. I've always been at parties and people put on a on a on. A what do you call it a bib. Or what was that you aprons Nathan Apron? They put it on an apron and everybody having a good time convivial. Lisin you know mushrooms in the kitchen and and just was awkward and I would just go to the living room and I'd sit there alone with my gypsum dip and now realizing what I've missed. Wow it's like somebody just told me there's a whole new world out there you can do something more than go out to eat. Bring home leftovers and make picnics. So I mean that's that's just a delight so you really expanding your horizons. Yeah well you know. I'm learning to travel without without an airplane tickets. Wow you know so a huge change. It's a great thing but I have to be mine. Mindful that I'm really privileged and when people think about this they think about it mindful of the fact that it hits a lot of people who don't have the ability to weather as well as we do pretty brutally But one way or another. We'll get through this. I guess. What am I big hopes? Sam Is that Sofa. Distancing doesn't become the norm. I just love the way the French kiss each other on the cheek I love a a nice high five when I get to the top of a little peek in Switzerland. And you WANNA sit next to a stranger and share your French fries in an English pub I think one of the great pleasures that you provide people all the time is the fun of traveling vicariously and I. I remember people telling me That you often get letters from prisoners saying that even in prison people watch your show and feel like they're out in the world and so I wonder if that aspect of your of your teaching Is even more powerful now. If anything from people about that I actually have because one of my themes lately is this virus can stop our travel plans but it cannot stop our travel dreams. We're not in business to make money right now. We're our mission is to keep people's travel dreams alive and to give people something positive we just a couple days ago designed Big Steve's your Bingo where the cards have all of the goofy cliches that show up in almost every one of my shows and we've got we've made that available and people can drinking game if you want but it says okay. Hold on wait. What are the? What are the key triggers in the Rick Steves Travelled Drinking well it's a BINGO board. They've got all of your If I use alliteration both stirs saw and stokes the appetite nor if I have a thinly-veiled guidebook plug I've been recommending that Kaskel farm and my Britain guidebook now for over twenty years Dorky. Joker if I use the word for convivial you'll enjoy CONVIVIAL CAMARADERIE. That convivial had loonier charming convivial. If I enjoy a drink locally homeboy here comes another wine if old baby. Oh baby if I have. Innuendo towering high above is a skyscraper built in the nineteen seventies in erection. Like this was a big deal in communist times. I can't say anything explicit but I can have plenty of Innuendo. The lady strokes the UNICORNS Horn in the Lyon looks out at us to be sure we get the double overtime. That's kind of what I do almost almost every show. So you can certainly get Bingo if you watch the show and keep on travelling child. I'm developing this. This notion that you can. You can play a little game of bringing Europe into your home. Oh okay which might be kind of. Maybe it's not to tell me about that. What's well people who are addicted to European travel? This is kind of frustrating time for them. So I've been thinking about a few ways that you can bring a little bit of Europe into your home and I don't know how workable it is for everybody but you can wash your socks and sing. You can actually Serve Coffee to your quarantine mates in tiny cups and charged for refills. When you get real desperate you can eat a slug with lots of garlic and color. Desk are go And I actually made a little table with the dish for coins. Upside of my The toilet in my house and you can charge family members for a few sheets of toilet paper over desert for Europe. Always an entrepreneur. Even in your own home so I make Europe my beat. That's I do For Me Europe is the wading pool for world exploration. Even my favorite country might be India so know that your favourite countries India. Yeah I love India. When did you first go to India? I've been to India. My best trip was in seventy eight after I graduated college These are from the days of. That's great that's great photos of you with the long hair and the beard and always the classic traveller in the first time ever smoked. Marijuana was in Afghanistan. I knew that. Yeah Yeah and I think the one of the happiest days of my life was hanging out in Katmandu with a bunch of people who did not depend on to get high you the the straight laced repressed. Protestant kid right you know. They were selling marijuana. The market as a medicinal herb and it just seemed quite natural there so okay I'll be like do as the locals do temporary local. There's place in Katmandu called. Pien Chai and the famous all the travelers for their fresh out of the Oven Apple Pie in the Himalayas. Be surrounded by all this new wonder and people that clasp their hands together and say Nama Stay. I salute your virtues. Feels like a Tabet in dreaming and I just thought life is so good and that was I mean I hate to say one of the happiest days of my life and must have been smoking pot in the same breath but you know it was a beautiful thing and you. You became a real powerhouse in that battle for Leo's Ation in Washington your home state and then travelled around to other states on these of barnstorming tours to get it legalized. And that's my big. I see that as a contribution to our democracy in our society not that it's pro marijuana. It's pro civil liberties you know I'm a traveler and for me high is a place in sometimes. Sometimes I want to go there One of my favorite things that I learned about you when I was at your house was the existence of this journal. That you've been keeping for most of your life now and you write in only when you're high that not many people know about that until you wrote about that in our magazine and Yeah. That's a treasure in someday. I'M GONNA continue adding to it but it is. It's forty what is it. It's probably forty years of Brilliant that came to me absolutely. Actually this is what I do. When I'm traveling anyways is I always have a little more skinny book? A little note pen in my pocket. And you grab whatever flutters by. It's like butterflies grab it. It's gone.

Rick Steves Europe India Sam Nice Iraq the New York Times magazine Katmandu Spain Sam Anderson Turkey Edmonds staff writer Seattle Lucia Nathan Apron Switzerland marijuana Marijuana
"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

06:37 min | 8 months ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"They call the feeling Saddad and have a music tradition. They called Fido that I think expresses it beautifully here to help us understand this core character of Portuguese culture on travel with Rick Steves are tour guides. Raphael Pereira and Christina Duarte Christina Raphael. Welcome thanks very much. So sowed how would you. I'm Christina define how this is a part of the Portuguese soul sowed. It's a very very difficult word to translate in just one word. I think that we are the only country country in the world that defines all these feelings deep feelings in just one word Soda if you really want to relate that I think that the best translation is the presence of the absence. The presence of the absence of the absence exactly is that is a longing of of something that is constantly with you in your mind in your soul in your deep feelings but physically is not there so to wear of something you do not. Hello yes you have on your thoughts you have it on your heart. You have it on your on your way of looking to things when we look took to the sea for instance is something that the Portuguese have very much rooted in our culture is that we have this kind of look and I- faraway Raphael Y Y Portugal and Sao Dodd. Let me introduce an idea that my help our listeners. To understand this idea of so that you cannot understand so that rationally and that's my problem to be rational cannot understand it with your mind something that you understand which your heart. There was a Portuguese. This king from the fourteen hundreds called don't want us known has the philosopher and he wrote Soledad is the sense of the heart. So it's the the brain of your heart are Thomas or the thinking of the feeling of your heart again I I again. You're you're coming back to the logical you're going the brain of the heart of the heart not just the heart and I think it's so that it's paradoxical because it is at the same time the longing for a lost best and wanting wanting this last past two back in the future but is never gonNA come back and all do you know is never gonNA come back. You don't let go you keep loving that which you have lost and that is so that that's why the presence of the absence is constantly there do you cry. Is it a sadness or is it a kind of a love or is it a awareness of your culture and losses of the past. It's all of that. It's happy you long for something that happened in the when you reap you think about that again you are leaving again. Okay okay so now both of you. It's just like it is who you are. It's woven into your DNA and blood and for me as a tourist coming to Portugal. I want to to connect with this and I don't have the heritage and I don't quite understand how to not make it logical. How would I experience it? Where would I go to find sowed in my travels I would say go to a place where you feel comfortable alone and with yourself just to my favorite place will be by the water by the water where my eyes can look along with the line of the horizon without seeing anything really is just with the line? Just leave your is to go in your thoughts probably is just being with yourself being comfortable with silence silence. Yes with silence refuse to let me continue on this idea of Christina of the ocean because if you look at the geographic position of Portugal we are an Atlantic country. Return to the ocean and and today We know a little bit of the mysteries of the Atlantic Ocean but in the past it was not like that the ocean was mysterious. Was the unknown case. Okay so when you're looking at their arise and you're in deep relationship with the mystery of life and that is so that you cannot understand the mystery of life to reason through your mind definition Asian it is unknown. The relationship to the ocean is a key element to understand Portuguese culture and also we can connect it of course the Portuguese explorations to the ocean. Was it sustenance. Did Bring Food and did it pay for life or was it. Death was it Happy was it sad. Is that the enemy or a friend. It's the paradox again. The the ocean is something that gives you a way of life but can take away from you what you love in one second. So it's the paradox. At the same time is your second chance life. Second chance again with our geographic situation. We are pretty there. We are the less country of continent of Europe Europe and the the nose to the Western stock between Spain and the ocean so looking to the ocean is looking to our opportunities in life through. It's the past and the future together. I was talking with a very old man in Salima on the Algarve in the south coast on and I was just asking him about his childhood and today the tourism bed and breakfast and there's very little restaurants and he said when he was a little boy sitting on the same little town a port town with the colorful fishing boats dragged up on the sand he said for him. Life was only sardines and the sea in the air and the sea the sea spreading our culture culture. This is travel with Rick Steves. We're talking about Portugal and something fundamental Portugal. It's this nostalgia feeling feeling of Saddad. I'm talking with Christina Dorte and Raphael Pereira and we're talking with Lisbon guides about how as travelers we can connect we can do more than just seek cliches on stage. We can connect with the culture now. The logical thought for a traveler. Portugal Christine Raphael is to connect necked. This feeling of Sao Dot with the wonderful fodda music tradition. First of all. What is photo so father is? Our is our unique traditional music. Style that you'll only find in Portugal. It is part of what is defined the country and in our cultural DNA and expresses Portuguese soul. It expresses Portuguese uniqueness and in my opinion it is the most beautiful expression of the feeling. Soledad I can be alone in a restaurant enjoying enjoying my sardines and my wine and that can be looking into the face of the photo singer.

Portugal Rick Steves Raphael Pereira Christina Atlantic Ocean Christina Raphael Soledad Saddad Christina Duarte Sao Dodd Christine Raphael Sao Dot Europe Christina Dorte Salima Thomas Spain Algarve Lisbon
"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

05:54 min | 9 months ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"What is the proper term to call this wildlife refuge. Can you just tell me the politics of of the name game here. It it's interesting you mention that Rick because I think this place has been so contentious that even the name is something. People can't even agree upon so just to give view an example. The the proper name of the place is the Arctic. National Wildlife Refuge in the energy industry generally referred to it as an war which is an acronym for for that title It is now referred to exclusively especially by the environmental community as the Arctic refuge or the refuge that is to underscore its value as the premier wildlife. Refuge is the largest refuge in the United States and not to diminish I think by by reducing it to an acronym dot got to diminish its importance politics even in what you call it. Okay so Chris tell us about the actual trip sure so I think from Fairbanks back to fairbanks is about ten day trip about nine days out in the Bush as they say and it required a couple of different Bush plane flights to get out there so we flew from fairbanks to Arctic village which is a rich and village so I was able to talk to some locals there on the south side of the refuge. Then we flew across the brooks range onto the north side of the Brooks range and then we floated for the next several days down the Hula Hula River. Which is one of many rivers that drain the north side of the brooks range toward the Arctic Ocean? Miles was the float I believe it. Sixty five River miles sixty five miles so just again to remind people. This is a vast natural refuge the size of South Carolina with no roads roads. And there's a town on the on the South End I guess and then you flew over that to the flat area north of the mountain range. And then you you rafted for sixty five miles else tells us about the boats. The company guides the people. You were traveling with it so I went with Arctic wild which is just a few companies that specializes in travel so in the High Arctic Very reputable company. We took like around fourteen foot large rubber inflatable rafts. And there were ten of us in in all a few guides and and the rest kind of adventurous people and kind of the rhythm of the days we would paddle we would get up and if it was a moving day we would break camp and paddle for maybe several hours and get to a camp and set up camp and then we might a lay over for a day and we would We'd maybe have have dinner. And then one of the most amazing parts about being up there is that it's it's light twenty four hours a day and so you just throw away your watch. Time has no meaning up there in in in late June and so we would maybe paddle when we wanted to. We would eat when we were hungry. We went on Hikes at eleven o'clock at night until two in the morning and then we would maybe have a snack and we would get up at eleven in the morning again and then maybe go for another hike and so it was really amazing to get on some more get in touch with the more natural pulse of life for for about a week. Didn't you in your article call that. Arctic timer yes. Does the guys told us at the beginning that we were going to do this. And every once it's in a while Someone say what time is it and the guide would just say you know the time is right now. It's right now. This is travel with Rick. Steves we're talking with adventure travel writer. Christopher Solomon. We have links to Chris's website and recent articles by Chris with today's show notes had rick steves dot com slash radio. So your your guides. How did they contribute? They actually teach you about the flora and the fauna. And they teach you about the The issues what was their agenda as teachers. Or were they just helping you make the trip safely. Yeah the guides really amazing young guys enthusiastic guys incredibly well informed about the flora and fauna and very good paddling instructors a lot of experience bears and other wildlife they knew a fair bit about The current events but you know they know they have to deal with a lot of different kinds of peoples. They didn't weigh in on the politics of some of the stuff we've talked about but extremely well versed in a lot of the natural history of the of the area so they could answer almost any question and they got a lot of odd questions from US city city. That was it comfortable. Was it safe. Did you eat. Well yeah how I would describe this kind of trip up for an experienced outdoors person. Who is up for a good time in the outdoors but who is I guess I I would say is game for anything because you can have seventy five degrees in the Arctic June or you can have twenty five degrees in snowing and so you have to go with that kind of High spiritedness in mind. You traveled a long way. Spent a lot of money. Spent a Lotta time. Tell me what you learned. What if you take away from it? Was it worth the trouble. Oh it definitely was worth the trouble. I mean I I just wanted a sense of the feeling and in value of a place like this that I could take away the show I understood it when I when I saw that acronym again and the Arctic refuge refuge and I knew I knew what it meant in some visceral way and to sit at the front of your tent with a cup of coffee and have a thousand Caribou stream past you. I understand what that place means a little more now a lot more now after ten days there. I think I've spent more time time there than some of those Alaskan politicians. Now not that. It's that much time I've spent there but I think I understand a little better. You wrote this. Someone whispered is sacred. They said that pretty well. And quite a remarkable impactful moment when somebody.

rick steves National Wildlife Refuge Arctic Ocean Arctic Chris United States Fairbanks Hula Hula River Miles South Carolina Bush five River Christopher Solomon writer
"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Have if you were designing a big landscape and i wrote about that and i found that fascinating that trying to changed the shape of a really tiny space is extraordinary difficult and i think kerry has done extraordinarily successful job in doing doing so you know reading your book garden list and i just want to remind people. This is garden less technical tour of the world's best new gardens by christopher woods. I'm inspired to make make a point to get more out of the gardens that you encounter when you travel. Let's close out with just take me on a stroll for a moment through a bit of a garden that really really resonated with you and tell me what you're experiencing you mentioned it's like a favorite sweater sometimes walk me through this garden and give me a sense the wonder essentially one in america and it's the naples botanical garden in florida and it was a parking lot and nothing before it was created and it was designed by five landscape architects and to have five landscape architects in room is a very dangerous thing in terms of temperament and so forth but extraordinarily they got on very well now it's in naples florida so it's tropical and therefore has everything has grown extraordinarily fast but it's a series these are experiences and while they have labels like this is the brazilian garden or the caribbean garden or the javanese garden if you you change the metaphor and away and take it as a musical piece when you enter the music starts to unfold and it's adagio oh and so forth i mean it's just classical concerto of botany added to that of course you're hearing that but you're seeing it but you're also smelling it so because it's in the tropics you get the sweet scent of frangipani that just comes down one avenue into your nose. Listen and heightens your senses and then you move on and there's another fragrance and then then the sounds of birds various birds and you walk out to a natural area this is on the edge of the everglades and it's the preserve sixty acres of natural area and all of a sudden things quieten down. I don't know who composed this. Could it be beethoven because after you come away from the quiet of the preserve is a riot in a crescendo of flowers hours noisy and loud and so forth and it's just this continuing experience that rises and falls for your senses but inside side you to there's the reisen full of excitement and quiet and peace and curiosity and this whole range of experiences this is and it applies to music or if you go to an art museum and you see three or four different paintings and the emotions those those paintings you've oh can you any of the expressions of humankind and gardening is no different from that while that is a new frontier tear in pleasure to unleash your sensuality and it all comes across in this book christopher woods. Thanks for writing garden last. Thank thank you so much travel with rick. Steves is produced add rick steves europe in edmonds washington by yours truly tim tapping with isaac kaplan wilner and casimiro mahal special. Thanks to our colleagues at the u._c..

rick steves christopher woods naples botanical garden florida kerry naples isaac kaplan edmonds washington america sixty acres
"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"I can't remember the name of the bread that everyone <music> you get from street vendors everywhere that this is the quarry the pretzel that's where they make it. You know we tried to more than just the traditional tourist spots and edry that wonderful. What's interesting here. You talk edry is. It's not that tough to do. I mean athens is a huge city. I don't know four million people. I mean nearly half of all the greeks live in athens these days. They saved from the top of the acropolis. You can see half of all the people in greece much of the city is just nondescript sprawl that wouldn't be of a lot of interest to a tourist but in the centre with a half an hour walk walk you can go from syntagma square in the capital behind that are some wonderful museums. Just to the left you've got the kissed in circa and then you can hike up up to the acropolis and you've got the old clock at the base of that and then siri that maria was talking about for the trendy sort of artsy area and the marketplace that you're talking about really is just a few blocks from there and locals will know just where to go for their favorite souvlaki stand. Frankly i used to just try to see the famous sites and get out. I like athens a lot more these days. It's got personality. It's got a pride. It feels like it's come through different crises in the last decade and there's a confidence in athens. There's a celebration athens. I like it. That's what we found in in athens and that you know i could look and see that for some people who maybe haven't traveled outside the united states often <hes> mhm. Maybe they only gone to london or something like that actually well. It has a tough exterior in some places but well. That's nice to hear the the people in the big. City are sweethearts and <hes> you said it has kind of tough exterior. It used to be just so overrun run with traffic. I just remember when i went to athens. My kleenex would turn black so city and now they've controlled the traffic. There's more pedestrian areas. It's remarkable. What happens has done edry. Thanks for your call. This is travel with rick steves. We've been talking with maria sioulas and phillipus curse and i would love to get your take on our feelings that athens is changing how you know athens has dealt with the crisis. Athens has dealt with their refugees. Economic challenges right now for travelers is a positive feeling maria. How do you see the changes happening in athens. Oh it's phenomenal. I mean it really has changed in the last five years. So small things really far more pedestrianised areas for tourist friendly. We have a great infrastructure as far as getting around in the city so people can leave their cars behind us. I used the metro systems. The olympics were turning point for infrastructure and you found yourself in a big economic whole from a debt point of view but you certainly have good infrastructure now moving around and <hes> relatively good governance sounds like yeah you can sense in athens now. This is a feeling of pride yes. We've really gone through some tough times and continue to go through through tough times as far as the economy is concerned but as i say there's the sense in in athens with the people that they're taking back control of their city..

athens maria sioulas rick steves syntagma square greece olympics siri united states london five years
"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Bones but if you're somewhere like france or germany this is basically a comfortable guest house that just happens to be situated in the mountains where you'll be cooked some of the best comfort food of your entire life life. You can purchase wine or beer. You're surrounded by all this gorgeous scenery and you can either have a private room or you can share a dorm room with other walkers and when it comes to eating you are exercising exercising. You're hungry. You've got high altitude. This food's going to taste better than ever and you can eat all of the hugh want your burning so many calories that there is nothing that you will want to say no when you you set out on a four day hike. Do you generally have your mountain huts reserved before you leave or do you just play by ear so i almost always reserve mountain hudson advanced because a lot the times they're situated one day apart and so you know everybody wants to stay in the same place each night so it can be good to just get those reservoir the best the most most characteristic and well run huts and they're the ones that will probably book. I and it's pretty straightforward to make a reservation and it's reliable and then you get to see the same people all along your eggs exit. Make friends along the way yeah. This is travel with rick steves. We've been talking with cassandra overby about exploring europe on foot. That's the book and <hes> it's an inspiration. I'm going to plug a little bit of that dimension of europe into my next trip. Thanks cassandra. Thank you next office athens to see what's new in greece and christopher woods recommends the most interesting contemporary gardens you can experience around the world. We're at eight seven seven three three three rick on travel with rick steves. It's been a while since the news from greece has had much of a positive ring to it. Come to think of it. It seems like they've always had squabbles among their politicians.

rick steves cassandra overby europe greece france hugh germany christopher woods four day one day
"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"I. I love that because then to people don't have to risk having one person scuttle the whole mission yes. I think that's pretty important. Cassandra overby is our guest on travel with rick steves ebbs. She recommends fifteen favorite hiking trails and she's mapped them out for a walking vacation in her book. Explore europe on foot. Her website is cassandra cassandra overby dot com now when you go. Do you like to have companionship or have you gone alone to see that you'll just meet people as you go or are. We just appreciate this time alone with nature. What thinking do you go through before you determined that so i like to mix it up on all of my trips so i did a lot of research trips for my book and and sometimes i had people join me and that was really wonderful. Sometimes i did the hikes alone which was great for really getting into an area and kind of losing my identity and losing myself and just kind kind of soaking everything in like a local and then it was also really nice to reach out and actually make some new friends so i wanted to hike the thirty four and france. I didn't know anyone who wanted to go and i felt like i really wanted people to join me on that section because it's on cliffs so i reached out to appreciate hiking group and i said hey i'm coming to hike this trail. I'm an american author. Do you have anyone who would be interested in hiking it with me and i found a couple parisians couple who came out to mont saint michel and met me for two days together her and it was amazing. That's a great idea talk about a nice initiative and i would think on the trail. People are inclined to be friends. I mean it's like minded people. Everybody's in a in a positive spirit and so on. I wanna talk a bit about the gear because i'm always looking at german and germans are sort of famous for their walking sticks with those walking sticks anyways so they really help if you have creaky knees <hes> or you know if you've just been hiking for a long time and you'd like to extend your hiking life because they make the little easier on your body. Yeah i would think a little it's a little safer if you have four legs instead of two when you're going down a rocky slope or something yes especially for balance by no means you have to have those something aerobic also or something getting for exercise when you're just walking straight on a paved trail to have that our motion going because i see germans like germans are famous for this. I mean it's just like there's people almost kind of think. It's kinda funny. 'cause okay six germans. They've all got their walking sticks. Look like a little animation almost yet. What about <hes> boots. I grew up thinking you've gotta have boots but i know there's options. There are options so my favorite option is called the european walking shoe..

Cassandra overby rick steves mont saint michel europe france two days
"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"This is travel with Rick Steves. We're talking with George Farkas and Monica Push about hungry George. I mentioned earlier that the Hungarian language is sort of unique UNICO. It's different from the Slavic languages around it could could you talk just very clear and slow like a teacher count one to ten in Hungarian so we can get a little dose of your language Okay H.. Kathy had them need hot thought he knew what's key lands these. There's no no dose or Einstein tray of it. We're we're we're in no mislead challenged. Oh my goodness and Monica. Is there any fun. Little tongue twisters fund well. Would you like to really hear a melody or some really tongue twister in Hungarian like for example Charlie Bunch Richer Water Metro Vancouver Chaka check check is few troubled Shag. Oh my goodness I want to hear tongue-twister say that again slowly slowly and Hungarian and then tell us what you said so Charlie Bungee Chug is Chato Gash trouble charitable Gash csonka Chad fan to torture Rag Cherokees Few troppled achieve egg and it says <hes> that <hes> in the Lilla forests the Lilla birds are singing and Lilla Lake is can be seen so practically it is just an interestingly porter attacked listener little birds actually since <hes> Hungary had just received the title that Hungary is considered to be one of the most difficult language in a word and you may wonder why you know I mean there are grammatical rules. <hes> there are exceptions read the Rose and then you learn the language so what could be so difficult well the problem is that <hes> we have more exceptions from the rules then Roussy itself so that really frustrates me when I'm trying to learn a foreign language is is this way except when it's not this way you are not the only one who is frustrated. I'm trying to find find the solution. <hes> how come that the Hungarian society is still even in two thousand eighteen is completely Hama gene probably because everybody else <hes> who had not learned the language of in the language environment. It's almost impossible to learn so they find other areas so that it has a actual impact on the budget Nadya on the demographic makeup of because your language is harder to learn than German absolutely harder to learn than any any other languages actually in the European environment. What can we learn from the Hungarian language about the Hungarian people? Does it give us any insight into the culture language sets the mind and so if we have a language which has so many unexpected twists then please don't be surprised if you feel things which are unexpected in our culture in our history in our everyday life as well if you come to our Roman Catholic coronation church and the interior area of the church is decorated Pagans Tribal Hungarian motifs and so on in other words Monica. You're saying <hes> when you walk into a Roman Catholic church it has a deeper heritage than Christianity. There is a religious undertones that survived to this day that are actually the Pagan Magyar routes. Yes and the makers just came a thousand years ago right. The Magyars are the Hungarians seven Hungarian tribes arrived in eight hundred ninety six in the ninth centuries came about twelve hundred years ago from way over by Mongolia or something like actually a whole bunch of commerce rivers area therefore we have this language sitting in the middle of all these <hes> more Western languages and it's <hes> it's part of the Finnish Hugo Rick language grew house need three <hes> there are in Finland Estonia and Hungary. It reminds me of the independent spirit. It's just hard to defeat the Hungarian spirit for the Soviet Union. The Hungarians were just the biggest problem and you actually we had to be able to have your own Goulash version of communism and so on what is it about the Hungarian independent spirit. I think the Hungarians would really want to express themselves and they don't want to be compressed one of the examples if you're bringing <hes> something unique up is how we do our bads <hes> your bed yeah so working your bid and how our bedsheets are prepared and I I'd like to share a personal experience very first time we came over to the United States of America and we went into. I don't know if it was a hotel. Someone's house we were introduced to our bedrooms and we went in and then it took us time to actually decide where we go like we lifted one layer another layer and another layer. We couldn't decide between where we go because we have where you put your body fantasies. Where do we fit in his bat setting? They're all tucked into tight exactly and then you had these sheets and then all we have is basically a cover sheet which sits on the mattress and then we have a single engle do which is top to bottom sites basically a standalone unit and it's not tax in so we can easy lift it up and then go under and then our feats are are free. We can't have our feeds compress down at the end and still still today when we go to a hotel and get up in the middle of the night. I have hard time to pull the sheet out from the bottom to freer exactly to have a Georgia practically even today even I'm putting off the don't disturb sign because <hes> the housekeeping ladies are talking beautifully my bad and every single day I'm struggling it out because I need freedom during the night so I can't be oppressed underneath the in bed sheets story sorry he does this. All the comforter.

Monica Push Hungary Rick Steves George Farkas Chato Gash UNICO Lilla forests Lilla Lake Roman Catholic coronation chur Soviet Union Roussy Roman Catholic church Kathy Nadya Georgia Mongolia United States Hugo Rick Chad porter
"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"In Irish comedian one you might be starting to hear about tells us how much fun she's been having starting over in New York. That's coming up in just a bit on today's travel with Rick steves. Let's start the hour with a look at what it's like to reinvent yourself in a new country with the stories of two Americans who've made a life for themselves in Italy. Have you ever liked what you saw in Italy so much that you dreamed of actually moving there? I have to admit I've been tempted myself we're joined now on travel with Rick steves by two people who gave into that temptation and now they're living. They're -talian dreams and pip rata left her job in two thousand fourteen and moved to CNN and long so for him to Mataya and settled down within near Sorrento above the scenic amalfi coast Anna in and join us now to tell us their story. Thanks for joining us. So Anna, how did you end up in Sienna? I studied Italian in college fell in love with it decided to move to Italy after college moved to terrain, then ended up doing graduate work in Manchester became professor, and then realized that I needed to get to Sienna because I did my thesis on Saint Catherine of Sienna and every summer I went and every summer got harder to come back to the states. So I just decided to move there and that was a few years ago, and you must like it because you're still there. I do I love it Feren, by the way, big industrial city in the north no nonsense fantastic city, though, the best food really entering people. Think about that. But you ended up in sort of the fairytale medieval town, no an end lung. What's your story? I changed my major twice in university. And so decided to take a six months break to go to Italy to try to learn the language because I'd been there on vacation before. And then after six months decided to stay in ended up marrying an Italian and been thirty eight years living in Sorrento thirty eight years in beautiful lemon cellos. Ice cream and lemon cellos with those nothing better. I can't think of a more dull cheetah rental. So now you've been there. Thirty eight years in a small town, a small community and his community above Sorrento. You always the foreigner. You don't look at talion. I'm the foreigner. I definitely have strange ways the way I do things it's foreign, but I've been absorbed into the community. They think of me as a local because I've withstood thirty eight and you respect to the respect them. And there's a lot of my friends that were foreigners that have left sense. And they get no respect, I respect. So are you accepted in the community? Are you taking seriously at community meetings or parent teacher meetings, or whatever you might be into you sit there at the table, and and you're part of the community, and they'll ask me about my opinion about local ideas and things and I'm raising family in the community as well. So it touches my life. Yeah. Now, Anna, I I always think of Americans who settled down in Europe is ex pats. Yes. But you're also just flat out immigrants. Magritte's exactly it which my friends in CNN always remind me of oh here comes the immigrants. What's the difference between an ex Pat and immigrant, well, if we're going to be blunt, the color of your skin, isn't that something? Yeah. I know in Italy relationships seem to be really important to get things done personally. And in your in your work life talk about the importance of relationships in Italy, the hugely important. And I think that had I not found myself in a contralto in Sienna. I don't think I would have stayed because it's so important to be a part of a community..

Italy Sorrento Rick steves Sienna Anna CNN New York Pat Mataya Magritte Europe professor Manchester thirty eight years six months Thirty eight years
"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Highest peak of the adirondacks and he he talks some guy some local into taking him down the mountain on a buck ford in the middle of the night so he's just careening down this mountain to get to the train station to go to buffalo where the president has been shot and then you can go into the house where he took the oath of office after mckinley guide servewell's our guest on travel with rick steves we're taking a closer look at her travels and discoveries that went into two thousand five book assassination vacation you can listen to sirius earlier appearances on travel with rick steves in which she discusses how french general lafayette helped to actually save the united states and the american colonization of hawaii looking this week show notes at rick steves dot com slash radio you mentioned that there's some sort of you know irreverent moneymaking and entertaining ways to turn these deaths into into funding profit what or something i'm not a communist rick what are some ways that they i mean the probably the dumbest one i saw at the aforementioned mckinley memorial is the mckinley i don't know if they still make this but the mckinley memorial yoyo which is a yoyo with a picture of a muslim on it that's pretty morbid those knows i mean there are some unsettling things like when i was in virginia you know after john mcstay shot lincoln he wasn't caught for a few days and he went through virginia on on horseback in near like one of the places where he stopped there's this weird memorial to him kind of on this highway median sort of shrouded by the shrubs and it's it's a memorial to john wilkes booth you know which is very unsettling a memorial to john wilkes booth it's kind of it's kind of a fly by night why some people find him heroic i mean have you ever heard the maryland my maryland of the maryland state song there's there's a whole section of it that's word says you know six emperor which is what booths yelled twenty jumped to the stage and route part of the song is about assassinating lincoln lincoln was very view it was a contentious guy he was not an entirely popular figure a lot of us forget that that when lincoln was assassinated he wasn't like everybody's favorite president yeah i mean one person who had the most to do with that change of fortune besides lincoln himself was booth because that dummy shot lincoln on good friday and then lincoln died saturday morning in so by sunday morning all the sermons were all of easter was turned into a lincoln memorial noah's all these comparisons between jesus and lincoln which we still kind of have those connotations i think in your book assassination vacation there was an interesting quote you wrote the eagle mania required to be a president or presidential assassin makes the two types brothers of sorts the way las vegas in salt lake city are brothers yeah because they're just kind of company towns devoted to one thing in the desert you know once in when is salvation yeah i mean the only thing crazier than wanting to kill the president is wanting to be president you know i mean just think about the amount of egomania takes to want that job and to think you could do that job so i mean it's you know sometimes we have these problematic presidents and that's what we see yeah for sure and that's what we get because we're only going to get people to run for that job who think they can do it and who think they should do it you know and that's insane same with the the assassins you know this is a democracy i mean the reason presidents weren't really protected before you know like after the third assassination they started getting protection but because they thought assassinations happened in monarchy's they thought interru a public that could never wasn't even a concern for protection because the people choose the president you know but these assassins they decide like said thing we're doesn't count yeah you know what when you think about the killer's tell us just where they all just nutcases that just wanted to kill somebody or did they have ideals where they doing something machiavellian way that they make ideals but yeah they are were on cases we go janis booth was a real racist.

"rick steves" Discussed on Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

"All these factors might change from time to time but eventually you kinda get a sense so i know that i love 25 milligrams i can totally do five milligrams if i'm talking to folks and two point five to five is generally fine for me but more than that i wanna be at home watching a funny movie or not really have any responsibilities beyond beyond that and everybody has to kind of figure that out for themselves and for example i know i i as a fellow i was working with who really never consumer wanna his whole life i think he's 45 probably ways hundred and fifty pounds a lean skinny guy uh hit he would have to three cookies to feel it thirty milligrams well aware that would just knocked me over so how do you incorporate the pot or thc into the food because anyone you know who's experimented before it would always going to the butter more moyal is what i understood so there's an various methods to extract thc or oil fr from the cannabis plant you could use ethanol extraction you could you co two you could use hard hydrocarbon which is butane hash oil or and we're all learning that's right this is all kind of newer technology that's now out in the light we actually by the oil we're not growing marijuana and extracting marijuana you're not throwing chunks of wheat into a a vat of butter we're letting the growers helped make that for us said it keeps it clean and green is a really important to us we don't want pesticides and so we have very stringent specs on what we're looking forward don't look for a very uh high chloroform tastes plant wheaty tastes we we distill it to kind of we'd that out literally al and that was rick steve's last meal emperor lucky that i found wearing it david murray paraffin my hobby of it by workers travelling the third edition of rick steve's book travel as a political act is out now you can find that book along with all of his guide books and.

"rick steves" Discussed on Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

"It is cocktail hour here at your last meal with our sponsor heritage distilling company and if you've ever had a conversation with me you know that i love word play in puns so i was very impressed when justin steeple the owner and founder of heritage this only company came up with this sweet slogan you can't spell baseball without bsp he's talking about their brown sugar bourbon inherited to selling company is a proud sponsor of the seattle baseball team of which we cannot named for legal reasons you can figure it out you portent thing is you can't spell baseball without bsp and honestly drinking is the only reason i go to baseball games not a sportsperson but i love sitting in the stadium looking up at a blue sky looking down at the greenfield eating a hot dog and having a nice drink so you can drink heritage the sowing company at the ballpark in seattle or you can make your own nice drink at home coulda heritage distilling dot com to find out where you can get a bottle of their vodka gin whisky or brown sugar bourbon you can find a supermarket near you that cells heritage or have a bottle delivered right to your door an emme hey we're back with travel expert rick steve's so you've been an advocate of legalising marijuana for many years i think i interviewed you probably like eight years ago or something about this long before became legal in washington uh i think a lot of people our learning that you know there are not these leg stone or sooner stereotypes attach where it's like someone sitting on the couch i'll dating cheetos a lotta people smoke it's fine but i do have to ask what is your favorite stone or snack like if you're smoking pot what do you crave what do you like to eat.

"rick steves" Discussed on Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

"Listen you the podcast as well uh and she heard gill simmons say that she loves benassi pie so lauren was inspired to create eight benassi pie icecream flavor roasted banana ice cream homemade dolchai to let jake handed graham crackers and milk and dark chocolate flakes so she makes this ice cream she packages it up and then she sends six pints of it to gales simmons i think in new york city gale receives the ice cream tries it loves it ends up tweeting about it instagram me about it tells the world that she loves it lauren has the best day of her life i'm excited it's a good plan full circle experience so i thought that was pretty fun and if you want to follow the action on social media you can follow me at i am rachel belle that's on twitter and fell with any and that concludes your your less meal news all right let's get into the episode with rick steve's so your new book is called travel as a political act how to leave your baggage behind new explain the concept of your new book this is not your typical you know pick a city in europe guidebook yeah will people who know me know me from decades of teaching european travel and i've been teaching enthusiastically and tirelessly here in the seattle area since the eighties enough i look back on today i didn't have any grand plan but they've been sort of a logical evolution in the 80s i was talking about you know uh europe through the back door that was the book and and it was a budget skills how to use a train pass how to get a good hotel how to pack late and stay healthy and so on uh and then in the nineties that occurred to me okay you know we've cut the train we know how to pack and find a hotel that's the bottom rung of mass slows hierarchy of travel needs you could say uh the next step up would be enjoying the culture and the history and the arts and the cuisine and i i wrote a book called dearborn a one and i was enthusiastically teaching classes about appreciating the culture in the art and.

"rick steves" Discussed on Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

"Roundly and not knowing what we're getting into are we getting into a margarita we having a fists quila it's it's not a good feeling when you when you over by no no it's not i recall uh let's see 2000 one was the last time that i ate a pop brownie i hallucinated i was afraid of the dark and ironically spent the rest of the night under the covers and back to rick steve's it was actually tough to get receives to say what his last meal would be because he would rather let a chef of a restaurant cook whatever's in season and what's delicious that day instead of choosing something himself i had to ask him three times to really focus and tell me what he wanted for his last meal so we're going to hear from my colleague cairo radio host john curley about his 2017 new year's resolution to never opened a menu and order based on what the server says it's the most popular item on the menu what most people were young most people get the rack of lamb i'm like it's forty seven dollars really most people get the rug of wealth were you asked what most people get the get the rack of lamb so then i get the rack of lamb iit more racks of lamb than i've ever eat before two thousand seventeen turned out to be the new year's resolution eat more racks of lamp and in your last meal news yes we have news a really sweet thing happened recently literally a very sweet thing uh back in december i had top chef judge and food and wine magazine editor gale simmons on the program and her last meal was but nafie pie but nafie pie is a british desert it is a banana cream and dolchai to lecce pie well there is an icecream company in seattle called sweet lows homemade ice cream you may remember them of i had the owner lauren wilson on for my darcy carton episode that's when we were talking about why marshmallows don't freeze and rocky road ice cream so warren is a fan of the podcast there she was listening to the l simons episode i like to think she was like laying on a bed with a canopy on top and like talking underpin princess phone to our other friends.

"rick steves" Discussed on Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

"Your last meal is sponsored by heritage to company craft in small batch vodkas jin's and whiskies drink locally drink responsibly borrow seattle sure no i am rachel belle and this is your last meal a show about famous people and the stories behind the foods they love most today on the program the last meal of travel guru rick steve's rick steve's is put out more than fifty european travel guide books he hosts a public television show called brick steve's europe and a public radio show called travel with rick steve's boy oh boy this recollect to travel and despite being kind of a buttoned up detail oriented guy rick has been a proponent for legalizing marijuana for a very long time what is your favorite stone snack grech remote widow coming through okrec remote gordon durie a they look like little dog third pellets but i love in order to reduce our i love our minority to more retirement i was listening to my favorite music or whatever rick and i both left in washington state where pot has been legal for several years now and thc and cbd infused every time i save as thc in cbd i feel like vvd pvda what was is obviously yeah unlimited it was that motown fillers how philly uh such a good song anyway moving on we have edibles in the state they are infused with chc and cbd you can listen to abc nbc d while you eat them all but you can easily buy them at putt shops so i chat with jody hull she's the founder of seattle cupcake empire cupcakery al and she hasn't edibles company called good ship one of the things that we work on a good ship is to kind of eradicating the notion of edible relent a lot of us have experienced a an opportunity where we might have had a little bite or a rat's nibble or a whole.

"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"In the hour we'll hear what turned south korea into an economic powerhouse thanks for coming along its travel with rick steve's we're exploring fed plotkin six favorite cities in the world for people who like to eat treads reputation as an expert on italian cuisine is confirmed by his definitive guidebook italy for the gourmet travel as we've heard so far bologna is his top food city in the world when a series gets rave reviews court cosmopolitan pilot and right now we're exploring how its international character has boosted london's reputation as a culinary capital if you were to really make your point by taking me out to dinner in london would you find the best cuisine in example of english cuisine or would it be something more eccentric or from distant land some exotic as were speaking i was london about three weeks ago i try to eat local foods in every country go to and i happen to love fish and seafood and there are a few restaurants so they go to in london more i always have local british fish is beautifully prepare dover sole lives heaven marie example and the only to places that you can eat it really wells in england than in belgium and the dressed kravitz call which is really undressed kravitz taken out of his shell uh the pronounce that come from the ira the bay of ireland bay of dublin and all of this fantastic seafood from penns ends from cornwall means that you really can eat first class fish and seafood at london every day and then of course her fish and chips if you were in london and you wanted to go take meter nice uh fish restaurant what's your favorite fish.

south korea rick steve plotkin london england belgium kravitz ira ireland bay dublin cornwall three weeks
"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"You can listen to ashley and tina's earlier appearance with tips for taking younger children on a european vacation at the travel with rick steve's show archives it's in the radio section of rick steve's dot com look for program number four ninety from june of 2017 this has been so much fun talking about traveling of teens in any can't talk about travel and teams without dealing with the challenge of cell phones ashley what's your wisdom on cell phones and teens on the road i think cellphones can make for a lot of fun you can give kids a lot of photo assignments with their cell phones also that will take us photo of something you need like the bus routes in and they can soumen scan and be the navigator the kids be the tech wizards absolutely and then you might want to limit they use for a social media to a certain time every night when they can have wi fi wherever you're staying and they're going to want to share their experience for their friends it's gonna make it more fun for so let's make that a positive thing but within parameters because they're gonna wanna share it on facebook but you don't want them to be at home all the time in europe tina from your experience as a tour guide with families which your wisdom on cell phones and social media yeah i would say just give them tasks um we usually do like a foot photo competition in to steer stereotypes about certain places and countries and they should be in the picture so it's like a competition for them and i always say that they should also focus on the fact that you know it's great that they have cell phones but just look outside look where your parents have brought you appreciate that and and coming from a person that's not their parent i think they take it for real and they appreciate it that the end and it's normal and you can tell them i always say with kids being honest as well is very important if there is wifi tell you'll have wifi tonight so that's why now you don't need to focus on that business it won't be working but do something else instead put your phone away and it's just wonderful it's such an exciting time to be traveling with teens it's more important than ever as there's a lot of fear and.

rick steve social media facebook wifi ashley tina europe