35 Burst results for "Rick Steves"

"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

03:12 min | 2 weeks ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"City sponsored murals. So yes, a great one. And Rogue One has another one of the big ones. So how would a Julie mentioned you get a walking tour brochure from the tourists pick up from two stars that gives you the route to follow and there's new ones all the time as well. Beautiful one of saint mungo, the patron saint of the city. It was like a homeless passion that he's got Robin in his hand, and that's one of the legends of Mongol that he brought a Robin back life munger's the pitcher and the sea. I remember there's one where this girl is picking up a little tiny guy. That was smug. That smug as well, yeah. And it comes with a smug message. What's the story about that? So she's actually on a building which houses her strip club. And so you could interpret, I don't know if smug would agree with us or not, but you couldn't interpret that she's maybe picking up a little man who's on his way. She's doing some other gesture with her hand, perhaps the little tiny men that go to the men. Objectify the women of Glasgow and on her necklace that says the name smug as well. All right. Billy Connolly just mentioned of him when we were talking about the Glasgow Pato there and probably people are familiar with the comedian Billy Connolly. They did a TV documentary of him going back to see his mural on the wall of it. And if you want to sort of familiarize yourself with Glasgow and it's accident before you visit, then watch some Billy Connolly, but be prepared. We've said that Glasgow is Gritty. And Billy Conley himself says that he uses profanity like comment like commerce to punctuate. That would be a good bit of video to watch before. If you're open, if you're open minded. With different kinds of punctuation. The humor is very, very Gritty coming out of the shipyards. Other ones that you might want to watch still game and that is one which is absolutely superb if you're open minded, which is an American voice activated elevator. And it's two glass regions in a new lifter elevator and they're trying to get to the 11th floor. And it doesn't understand. There's so much fun we can have connecting and actually feeling like we're understanding a foreign language when we're actually speaking with people who speak English. Julie, thanks for your call. You're welcome. Thank you. Okay. This is travel with Rick Steves. We've been talking about Glasgow with two Scottish guides, Cullen mayers and Liz lister. Thanks so much. Thank you. Thank you. Travel with Rick Steves is produced by Tim camp, kasma, a hall, and Donna bardsley, had Rick Steves Europe in Edmonds, Washington. When you're at a road trip, you can listen to travel with Rick Steves on one of more than 500 other radio stations. You'll find a list of when and where were broadcasts at Rick Steves dot com slash radio. We'll see you next week with more travel with Rick Steves. Hey, I'm Rick Steves. You can experience my favorite European people places and stories in my newest book for the love of Europe. Order your copy today at Rick Steves dot com.

Billy Connolly Glasgow saint mungo Robin Rick Steves Billy Conley munger Julie Cullen mayers Liz lister Tim camp kasma Donna bardsley Edmonds Europe Travel Washington
"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

06:08 min | 2 months ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Travel with Rick Steves, we're talking with Alan lightman, his book is in praise of wasting time. I think a lot of people go, okay, yeah, that's all fine and dandy, but what do you recommend? What can we do? How can we as individuals as parents in the workplace and so on? How can we combat this, just like an environmentalist would combat the destruction of the natural world? How can we who recognize this challenge and the importance for us to be able to be creative to kind of connect with ourselves to be able to be in the moment? Well, I think that in schools there should be a ten minute quiet period and each day and it could be in the homeroom period. But sometimes during the day there should be ten minutes where everyone is just silent. I think that in universities that there should be specially designated courses where there's a reduced amount of reading and instead students are encouraged to mull over and reflect on what they're learning. Introspection, I think that everybody can find 20 minutes a day to unplug to leave your smartphone behind and take a walk or just sit quietly in a chair. I think that the dinner hour is another opportunity for turning off all devices and just having conversation and the office place there should be a quiet room and every company where employees are allowed and encouraged to go there, of course, without any devices, and just spend 30 minutes just with their thoughts. And it would not be part of the lunch hour, it would be a separate time. And companies that have experimented with meditation practice find that their employees are more productive, they're more settled. As a tour guide, I keep coming back to travel because that's my world. And I'm all about helping people have transformational experiences in their travels to have revelations to really have experiences and meaningful experiences and something that we've stumbled onto a long time ago without even any recognition of this whole idea of the value of quiet time is what we call a reflections period where we would just after having a lot of interesting experience, we'd get together and just take time to reflect on what we've experienced today and share these ideas before we jump into another experience because a lot of people are going to just pack their vacation just like parents peck their children summer with no time to reflect and I really treasure those reflections periods with me and my travel partners. Yes, that's very valuable and very smart of you to incorporate that into your travel experience. So we can learn a lot from this that must have been an interesting exercise for you to take a break from your theoretical physicist work and write a book about in praise of wasting time. I guess it's quite a challenge to convince Americans that there's more to life than increasing its speed. Yes, I think that we're going to have to be confronted more visibly with the damage that's being done by not unplugging. I know that it took about 30 years before we acknowledged that smoking was bad for your health, and it took a lot of documentation, increased costs of cigarettes, but finally we were able to change our habit of mind. And I think just as in smoking, we need a new habit of mind about the importance of quiet reflective time. But you're going against a real powerful cultural norm in what you're proposing from an economic from a capitalist point of view, I think, could be seen as subversive. Yes, well, capitalism has a lot of downsides as we saw in the crash of 2008. So I think that we have to be careful in our embrace of capitalism. This whole concept that you raise in your book in praise of wasting time, I think is a lot more important, a lot more fundamental than a lot of us realize. Thank you so much for your work and could you wrap things up with one sort of takeaway thought of the value of paying attention to this issue. We're constantly sifting through the barrage of experiences that we have from one day to the next. And we need to remember who we are and for that we need to reflect back on our lives to remember things that we did, we're constantly reconstructing our self identity from this kind of reflection. And to me, this is one of the most fundamental aspects of taking time for introspection and reflection. To a life well lived is a life where we actually take a moment to know who we are, where we've been and where we hope to be. Yes. Alan lightman, thank you so much for the inspiration. And best wishes with your teaching. Thank you, Rick. Travel with Rick Steves is produced by Tim tatin, casm or a hall and Donna bardsley at Rick Steves Europe and Edmonds Washington. We get website support from Andrew wakelin, affiliate promotions from Sheila Gorsuch, our theme music is by Jerry Frank. Thanks to Maine public radio for their help this week. Find out what Rick's been thinking about lately on his Facebook and Twitter pages or read his blog at Rick Steves dot com. And we'll look for you next week with more travel with Rick Steves. Hey, I'm Rick Steves. I love art. And in my new book, Europe's top 100 masterpieces, I share my favorites with gorgeous photos and vivid descriptions. It's a greatest hit sweep through art history via the finest paintings, sculpture, and architecture ever. It's all in Europe's top 100 masterpieces. Art for the traveler. It's available now at Rick Steves dot com.

Alan lightman Rick Steves peck Tim tatin Donna bardsley Andrew wakelin Sheila Gorsuch Jerry Frank Rick Edmonds Europe Travel Maine Washington Facebook Twitter
"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

02:24 min | 4 months ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Okay. And please would be poor for voort. I know that word. And what's goodbye? To God. Go with God. Yes. All right, cloudy, and Fatima, I'd love to just finish off with your favorite as a tour guide. Your favorite intimate little experience to share with one of your guests in your country may be a meal, maybe a drink, maybe a viewpoint, maybe an artistic experience. What one experience would you want me to have the cap my Portuguese experience? I would say sardines, grilled sardines. That's Portugal for you. The smell of grilled sardines may be being grilled right there under laundry that is hanging from the windows in alfama, and that's perfect. I love it. You've nailed it there. Cloudy, how about you? Well, it's very difficult to just put in the words, you know, just one thing about Portugal, but I'm from the city of Lisbon, so I recommend you the viewpoint. The viewpoints with the sunset, it's really, really nice. Up on the castle, you see the river, you see the bridge. The reverse pasture, it's really beautiful. And if you are in romantic, with someone, it's really nice to share that with someone. Oh, I love it. I can think of three or four viewpoints that I would love to be there with my favorite travel partner. Cloudy close step. Thank you so much for sharing with us a little bit about your beautiful country, Portugal. Thank you, Rick. Travel with Rick Steves is produced at Rick Steves Europe in Edmonds, Washington. By Tim tapton, hall and Donna bardsley. Special thanks to our colleagues at GBH radio in Boston for a studio help this week. Gretchen Stroud read our listener travel haiku, send us your own original haiku about your travel impressions, details are at Rick Steves dot com slash radio. Hey, I'm Rick Steves. In my latest book for the love of Europe, I share the highlights of a lifetime of exploring Europe. My favorite experiences, sites, and encounters in a hundred essays. If you love Europe too, this is four decades of greatest hits in 400 pages made to order a stoke your travel dreams. You can order your copy of for the love of Europe at Rick Steves dot com..

Portugal Rick Steves Fatima Tim tapton Donna bardsley Lisbon GBH radio Gretchen Stroud Europe Edmonds Rick Washington hall Boston
"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

04:22 min | 5 months ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Carol's calling from Pittsburgh and Pennsylvania. Carol, thanks for your call. Okay. I just wanted to comment on a wonderful visit I had at chambord courtesy of the Rick Steves guidebook because I found out that I could stay in a little hotel on the grounds of chambord because it was listed in the guidebook and it was just magical because you are right there. And after everybody goes home at night, you kind of have the place to yourself and it has beautiful, it's in the forest and has beautiful canals and wildlife and you can walk around and I got up at night. I was there in the fall and I set my alarm I got up at 3 a.m. and went down on the doors were just wide open and I walked out and looked at the stars. It was one of those special times when you were just immersed in the place and it's you just you and the beautiful chateau and it was really one of those special experiences that I'll always remember. And Carol for the benefit of our other listeners who have not been their champ board is the granddaddy of the chateaus with 440 rooms it looks like this vast sort of church dedicated to the king almost. Who was it? But my experience is always there's so many tourists there and you stayed in a hotel right on the ground and you enjoyed it before and after the tourist. What a beautiful exactly. At 6 times bigger than the average chateau of del Roy valley. And that's actually the only built by Francis the first started by Francis the first, but Louis the 14th, the sun king, that's the only place he would stay in in the Loire valley because of big enough for him. Is that right? So you're lucky. Imagine the investment to build these things in a lot of times they're almost rarely used, but they would spend some time. It's been lived in 20 years since it was built in a 1500s. It's been lived in completely 20 years. That's it. And that's the difference in the Loire valley between the royal castle and the finance or the minister castle, where those were inhabited the whole year. But here, the court was mobile. And the king would just come for the hunting party. Carol, do you have a ballpark memory of how much you spent to stay in the hotel on the grounds there? Oh, you know, I don't remember that was 2009, but you know, it actually wasn't very expensive. I don't feel that it was any more expensive. And I had a bathroom to myself, and I had a view, I could see the chateau from my room. And it was one of those little kind of oddly shaped rooms, but very charming hotel. I bet it was a building that went back to be one of the service buildings of the chateau. It's probably a couple hundred years old. And I would bet that Carol your hotel there on the grounds of the greatest chateau in France cost no more than a very simple humble hotel in Paris. I stated chateau de pray on my last visit. It was just gorgeous and as a matter of fact, our TV show on France. You can watch on our website at any time. If you just go to Rick Steves dot com and look in the TV section, we have a show.

Carol Rick Steves del Roy valley Loire valley Francis Pittsburgh Pennsylvania royal castle Louis chateau de France Paris
"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

04:27 min | 10 months ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"And it became this sort of default conchita take over this question of Palestine in a committee in the UN and the man tasked with this really enormous question. He was the son of an immigrant and his family had been a victim of, in a way, prejudice against Jewish people, even though they weren't, but they were kind of branded as Jews in a way. So it was more sympathetic to their cause than many other people at the time would have been in Iceland at least. So he made and he was in a committee a delegate from Iceland that really was a key vote on this committee. Yes. There were other people that were meant to deliver the case or the verdict of the committee that a conclusion that they would vote on. But they both had to go home certainly before it was put to vote because they didn't want to touch the situation. And so this guy tore he went to the podium of the United Nations and delivered this sort of really strong speech about how they should divide the Palestine and then it was put to vote and passed later on. So Iceland had a big influence on that decision back in the late 1940s. Yeah, it was I mean it was all kind of diplomatic within the United Nations so you can't say, you know, I did decide this themselves, but they did, in a way, alter the decision in this direction. Because it was a really small window in history that the resolution like this would have passed. Journalist eagle B artisan is joining us now from Iceland on travel with Rick Steves as we look at the oversized impact of his small island nation. Eagles book is called how Iceland changed the world, the big story of a small island. You might also see his byline on articles in National Geographic, Lonely Planet, and The New York Times. There's more with eagle about the genealogy based dating apps they've developed in Iceland. That's in a short extra to this week's show.

Iceland Palestine conchita United Nations UN eagle B artisan Rick Steves Eagles The New York Times
Exploring the Inner Hebrides

Travel with Rick Steves

02:24 min | 1 year ago

Exploring the Inner Hebrides

"In some ways. The traditions of scotland survive most vividly in its islands off the west coast. These are the hebrides we've invited to of our favorite scottish guides into the studio to share stories and tips on their favorite islands. Liz listener is from fife. Cullen mirrors is from glasgow. And they're both here with us now to share a little better understanding of scotland's inner hebrides. Thanks for joining us. Thank you he cullen when you Think about the hebrides. We hear that word a lot hebrides. These are the islands off of the west scotland. But there's inner and outer hebrides. What's the story there. So and our hebrides. They're basically the ones that are closer to mainland scotland to hebrides further out. So probably most people going to visit islands of scotland and are of to access lists when you're thinking of the inner hebrides which ones are your favorites in which one's the most popular with tourists. Well open which is on the west coast of scotland is known as the charing cross of the islands as the saying the air unto the lord belongs and all the it contains except the kyle's in the western isles for these are all mic planes mcleans caledonian mcleans of the fatty company. So people will come to open. And that's the jumping off point to go to the islands. So open is the charing cross. Charing cross would be the big train station in london. Somewhere you depart go to different places so open would be the jumping off point. It's the big port on the mainland. From where the ferries go absolutely so. Kyle's what is kyle's kyle's of the stretches of water so the leyland's eye for the straight and on the missiles ago everything the lord's except for the aisles and the waters and that could make prince how the the the metrolink and forwards to the islands they caught passengers. The coty fleet the cardi tourists. So this is the ferry system caledonian mcbrayer because every time i think of an island scene. There's a dramatic ferry coming across. It is just beautiful thing. And you have the jumping off point in the real terminal Open and so people coming from moscow will die sleek connect with the on out so an answer to your question. Probably the most popular are the ones closest mull. Iona we can come back to 'cause i owned is really accessible as d. Are right for a particular reason

Scotland Liz Listener West Scotland Fife Cullen West Coast Glasgow Kyle London Moscow
Terry Tempest Williams on Her New Book "The Hour of Land"

Travel with Rick Steves

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Terry Tempest Williams on Her New Book "The Hour of Land"

"Terry tempest williams invites us to celebrate the land and the people. You'll meet at a variety of national parks across the united states in her book. The hour of land. She describes the park. She's visited as breathing spaces each with a unique personality that deserve our patronage our respect and our protection by the way our conversation was recorded before the global pandemic. Terry it's good to have you with us. Thank you read your book. The our land takes us not to the obvious parks but it takes us to some of the less famous parks. You chose about a dozen parks to introduce to us why these parks why not win at the grand and famous ones. Would you believe me if i told you that i saw this as a dinner party. You know my mother was a great hostess and she always said you know. Pick your dinner parties very carefully because who knows what will come out of them so you know here. We have fifty nine national parks in our country. How to choose a dozen. So i really did envision it as dinner party i knew who the heads of the table would be my mother park which would be grand teton national park. The other end of the table. I knew it would be canyon. Lands national park where we live closely to. I could count on them then. I thought all right who's gonna be on the other end of the table holding the space that are reliable and for me. It was a canadian national park in maine and teddy roosevelt national park. In north dakota. I had been to the many times and they were trustworthy. Then i thought okay. Who are the dream guests that i would want that. I don't know. But i know other people who do and we can bring them to the table and i thought of big bend national park. I thought of gates of the arctic national park and effigy mounds. And i thought those were my dream guests

Terry Tempest Williams Lands National Park Terry United States Grand Teton National Park Teddy Roosevelt National Park North Dakota Maine Big Bend National Park Arctic National Park
What's it Like Being a Digital Nomad?

Travel with Rick Steves

02:26 min | 1 year ago

What's it Like Being a Digital Nomad?

"Imagine if your life was untethered to any particular place you had a career that was steady and well pain and traveled. All the time working remotely you are digital nomad. More and more people are doing just that and travel writer and entrepreneur. Mike's with guns ski. He's been the digital nomad working and living in about eighty countries in the last decade. And he's written a book on the lifestyle. Mike joins us today from his home. Base in the republic of georgia in cheers ideas from his book called global career. How to work anywhere and travel forever. Thanks so much for having me on. Rick excited to chat with you so mike. I'm a traveler. And i've had the same job the same phone number of the same zip code now for over forty years and i travel a lot. You're a digital nomad in. That's quite a different kind of traveler. What exactly does that mean. And just very briefly. Where have you gone in the last decade. Yeah so over the last decade. I've been to more than eighty five different countries and a big portion of that has probably been in europe asia south america and a few cents to africa. But i would say africa's kind of the next frontier for me to explore your working remotely as you travel. Yeah so i've been working remotely for more than five years now. For the previous five years. I was kind of showing up in physical locations and finding jobs that were going to advance my career and he just kind of job was kind of steppingstone to get me to where i am now. It must have been kind of a a freeing thing sort of liberation. when you realized. I don't need to look for work. Where i'm traveling can travel where i want to go and Look into the remote travel world for my employment. Yeah once. I kind of had that remote lifestyle. It was everything that i'd always dreamed of having that flexibility to build the pack up my little back back in my laptop and just kind of work from anywhere from the comfort of my home In any location that i was interested in traveling to psychologically. Are you looking for your ultimate home like the place where you really belong or is is the journey itself kind of your goal. I would say right now. I'm looking to have a travel hub. Where i can essentially visit countries and visit the world from. So maybe it's spending nine months in that travel hub and then three months traveling around the world. Whatever the breakdown is. I want to have some sort of location where i can have a little bit more deeper. Connections routes and then be able to travel from that location.

Mike Joins Republic Of Georgia Africa Mike Rick South America Asia Europe
A Closer Look at the Algarve Coast

Travel with Rick Steves

02:18 min | 1 year ago

A Closer Look at the Algarve Coast

"Let's start out today on the beaches of southern portugal. The all guard prejean offers one hundred miles of warm sun and a collection of charming resort towns. From land's end to the spanish border are guides are christina. Dorte and robert reich. They specialize in showcasing the highlights of portugal. And the all garb to american visitors christina robert boondi. Thank you together. So when we think of the algarve christina what does it mean to the to a portuguese holidays. Israeli go to holidays with our families knows and normally because the kids are in school until the end of june so everybody goes at the same time so july and august can be pretty crowded but if we have a chance and going out of july august it is a marvelous place to go wonderful beaches. Wonderful food very good offer of of places where to stay hotels and also houses that we can rent houses or apartments and june absolutely beautiful until the first week of july. It's quiet so that is interesting that there's a huge bell shaped curve of demand and in the summer summertime vacation. It's everybody's down there. Yes now robert When you think of the popularity among locals and you were local are the locals looking for a big resort or are they looking for the cute little little cove for the little town. That locals are looking for Just basically good nice relaxing beaches wherever they may be right because What christina was saying is it's kind of like when you go off season little bit off season You have to think that you can't go. You can't go to the beaches that are up north because the weather still not quite a good because there are good beach resorts north of lists. That if you're a little bit shoulder season he wanted to go south. Because you're guaranteed good weather down there by morocco. Now when you go to the south I'm sure that every region of portugal has some different cuisine. What do think about to enjoy the food scene when you're on the elgar food scene is fantastic. Because you're right there on the water. You'd every kind of fresh seafood you can imagine and i guess the the best expression of that in portugal is the is the dish that everybody goes there. Force the cut the planner. The planner is like just a big big mix of all this great seafood. Some potatoes juicy broth. it's just really like the essence of the

Dorte Portugal Christina Robert Boondi Algarve Christina Christina Robert Reich Prejean Robert Morocco
What Separates Peru From the Rest of South America?

Travel with Rick Steves

02:17 min | 1 year ago

What Separates Peru From the Rest of South America?

"With rick steves with an insider look at how peru stands out from the rest of south america. It's where author and journalist. Marie arana grew up before her bicultural family moved to the us. She writes about her identity in her book. American teacup read. Thanks for joining us. Thank you so much. Rik good to be here. I'm just really excited for you to be my tour guide because is country. I know very little about before we get into this discussion about the people of peru. Just give us a quick one paragraph description of your homeland you know for a country that's the size of roughly the size of california not much bigger. It's an astonishing place because it has just every kind of land form you can imagine. Rick it has the coast it has the desert it has the jungle it has the mountain has the planes. It has all of that and if you fly over peru this is amazing to me you go from one land form to another land form just in the course of a few seconds. It's it's really astonishing place geographically when you compare peru to the other south american countries. How would the people of peru see themselves Compared to the countries that surround them. Well you know we are an andean nation and the andean nations are of course colombia and ecuador and bolivia these are the the spine of the andes of course runs through the whole continent. But we are. We call ourselves and ian people because we are a mix honesty so mix of indigenous and white and black in a very different proportion. Shall we say to. The people of venezuela which are are less india less indigenous more more black and the colombians as well which has a much larger population of blacks than we do improve we do have afro peruvian along the coast who have been there for hundreds and hundreds of years but we are distinguished. I think by our indian ness. And i think that you know the people of argentina. The people of that people are why they come. They come up to peru and they're they're struck by the truly indian culture that we have okay so when you say

Peru Marie Arana Rick Steves RIK South America Rick California Bolivia Ecuador Colombia United States IAN Venezuela India Argentina
The Complicated History of The Rhine

Travel with Rick Steves

03:01 min | 1 year ago

The Complicated History of The Rhine

"Our hearts are heavy. Knowing that the romantic views of castles and vineyards and germany's rhine river valley are overshadowed by the recent loss of life and flooding devastation. In germany and the low countries just downstream. From where we're talking about the following interview with tour guides tabby and ruger and nico fava real was recorded last year hot drinks so being. Give us a feeling for the medieval ryan which really created the ryan. We see today as tourists the most important trading river the with the romans already the problems with the rhyme began. It was widely considered that east of the rhine burien live. West of the rhine was civilization. And that's i went all the way through into modern history. France of course try to make for centuries the ryan its eastern border. The germans fought back and eventually of course that ended in one thousand nine hundred eighty. It's interesting when you think about it. That the ryan would have been a huge border culturally between the romans and the barbarians and from a french point of view between the french and the germans. Yeah so when you have a border like that nickel in in europe generally what happens it's Where wars having between. France and germany divorce happen then the ryan either stopped the wars or a lot of areas on the border especially in the french part of the border for instance. The elvas as region has been taken by germany. Many many times am so. It's a war zone between countries. So also been the war zone between religions catholics. Protestants fought over as yes in that area today. Even i mean today. It's kind of the border between catholic and protestant europe. Yes you could say that. Yeah north of the ryan is definitely more protestant. Now when you have the in the middle ages there was not a lot of Paved roads there is not a love law and order. If you wanted to get your goods to the market going down. The river was was one safer way to do it. I suppose it was a safe way. But you have to be careful of something. called robber. Barons who stopped ships along their journey but big chains along or across the rhine made the ship. Stop in and steal everything or steal everything in well amount of duties to say you've gotta pay ten percent of what's on your boat to continue down. Yeah i've heard this word robber. Baron castle so maybe the rhine river fabulous is sort of the quintessential example of a robber. Baron castle zone robot. Baron is a term in particular rob nights for a particular phase during the holy roman empire. Where nights had fallen so poor that the only way to keep the status was to rob traders and so on even if it was not their right to do so and eventually the problem became so bad that you had this middle class of nights who had fallen poor and became robust that the big tradings and merchants. The city's gathered union and under the emperor thing was the second thirteenth century or so. They sent this along the rhine to clear out all the rubber nights castles and literally hung them from the trees along the rhine

Germany Rhine River Valley Ryan Nico Fava Ruger Baron Castle France Europe Rhine River ROB Baron
What Made Sweden's Asa Danielsson Fall in Love Wih Flamenco?

Travel with Rick Steves

02:00 min | 1 year ago

What Made Sweden's Asa Danielsson Fall in Love Wih Flamenco?

"It's a long way. From stockholm to seville but it never damped danielsson's lifelong enthusiasm for the fiery traditions of andalucia today. She teaches the art of flamenco dancing in between tour guiding in sweden and spain forsa welcome back to travel with rick. Steves thank you so hundred dish woman. Get all excited about flamenco. It's the opposite end of europe. It is that is for sure. I was a little girl. When somehow i picked up the flank existed. And when i went to spain for the first time with my mother i was six years old i told my mother i went to see flamenco and i saw these women and they were so strong and passionate and i decided i wanted to be flamingo as i had no idea what it meant but that dream i kept it alive through my whole childhood. I bought this little doll. You know with the polkadot dress and everything in plastic doll and headed a home. Like little alter and i knew that i was going to be a flamenco dancer. When i was big you were you. Were six year a little bit older than now. Yeah are you dancing. Or what fleming in your life today teaching performing i was the president of the swedish fleming society for some ten years of organized festivals of organized workshops. I've been tour manager of one of the most famous fleming dancers. All all that you can think of. I cannot think of any two more opposite. Cultures in a temperament kind of wave of sweden and southern spain is the heartland of flamenco. I think it's opposites attract and actually. Spain is the favourite countries of the swedes to visit to travel to. And why would that be. I think it's that got although this has. The son has the laid back Passionate lifestyle that you need a little doses of every year. Exactly exactly. maybe you don't wanna have all of it all the time. You want a little bit more structure and calm so you can go down and have it and then you go back to your normal senior regimentation efficiency.

Danielsson Spain Andalucia Steves Seville Sweden Stockholm Swedish Fleming Society Rick Europe Fleming
Exploring the Underappreciated Museums of Paris

Travel with Rick Steves

02:11 min | 1 year ago

Exploring the Underappreciated Museums of Paris

"Let's talk about some of the museums that that i think are substantial but i think they're under appreciated What what is your take on the colonel fillet. The music have day is undergoing a big renovation. I actually haven't been there yet but it's going to be fantastic and it's a history museum. The history of paris and it has period rooms which are are very fun to walk through and just all sorts of of relics from hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of years of the city's history and you explained in your book the littler museums of paris. That barron houseman actually had something to do with the creation of this collection. Or 'cause houseman. I think of as the guy who who brought parasol of these grand boulevards and all of this uniform architecture where you've got the same amount of floors in the in the nice Slate roofs and so on Did he recognize that. All this development is going to bulldoze some of the heritage of the of the city. You know it's it's funny because he is. He's really criticized for destroying medieval peres but at the same time was was looking to create a place that would preserve some of the history and that actually incorporated elements from some of the buildings. He took down in. The carnival has more items than the liuw actually. So they've got plenty to show off in that museum. Yeah their reserves are insane. There's no bench and that goes back to the sixteen hundred and they actually took over a second. It's actually now To urban mansions that are combined by little walkway. So if you want sort of. Just your quintessential kind of historical museum for paris carnival as a good one absolutely now. Another one is the museum of the middle ages museum to clooney and that's actually built on the remains of a third century. Roman bath reminding us. That peres was a roman town. Yes it it is also something that that started from a private collection like a lot of museums did and has just grown and grown and is a really special and unique place to visit and it's never crowded it's amazing to me. It's exquisite art of the middle ages. This is the museum of the middle ages in paris was so important in the middle ages. And it's right there in the in the left bank. You can walk to it in ten minutes from all the touristy stuff you do in the latin quarter

Barron Houseman Paris Houseman Museum Of The Middle Ages Muse Clooney Peres
"rick steves" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"rick steves" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Should go there come along for the our head. It's travel with Rick Steves. Live from NPR news. I'm jail. Snyder Tropical Storm cloud that is bringing severe weather to coastal Louisiana and Mississippi. Eric Blake is with the National Hurricane Center in Miami. They hazard we want to emphasize is The risk of heavy rainfall. 5 to 10 inches with isolated totals of 15 inches are possible across portions of the central Gulf Coast. We also expect life threatening flash floods. Possibly from coastal Mississippi, Alabama and the far Western Florida Panhandle, applies flood warnings and watches up for parts of Mississippi, Alabama, Florida and Central and northern Georgia. Claudette forecast a weakened into a depression by tonight in the Pacific Tropical Storm. Delores is expected to make landfall along the west central coast of Mexico later this evening. The ongoing heatwave in Western states is bringing scorching temperatures from the central Plains to California. Phoenix has been baking with record breaking temperatures above 115 all this week. Multiple states. On alert for heat and fire danger. President Biden stepping up his campaign to encourage more Americans to get vaccinated against Covid 19 the administration less than three weeks away from its July 4th goal of inoculating 70% of American adults with at least $1. But NPR's Windsor Johnson reports. Vaccination rates are lacking in many states. President Biden.

Rick Steves Eric Blake 5 Florida Mississippi California Alabama 15 inches 70% Claudette July 4th NPR Miami Phoenix 10 inches tonight Central less than three weeks Gulf Coast Louisiana
A Tour of Turkish Markets

Travel with Rick Steves

01:56 min | 1 year ago

A Tour of Turkish Markets

"Joined by turkish tour. Guide lally sermon iran. Bali thank you for inviting gets a pleasure now first of all when we're in the town of konia i know from my experience taking groups around people get a little bit like an anxious. It seems a little more conservative. Women are more covered up into town like this described the atmosphere in cornea compared to a place like izmir or ankara. Well as you just put into words. It's little bit more conservative. But what's attract people's attention is not the conservatives off the town being a conservative is not a bad thing. It's just the personal understanding of how you want to practice your life and your religion. The reason i'm saying is that muslim women prefer if they are developed. They prefer to cover up but in different religions. People don't or may or may not need to show their face with what they wear because there's a visual aspect to it. It attracts attention. Otherwise cornea is not any different than any more conservative city anywhere in the world. Okay so different Groups in different religions will have their women wearing hats and their men wearing beers visual indicator. Then you to said if there was not you would not notice. A life is not different in konya than anywhere else in turkey. It's just men have more beards and women have more scarfs. That's okay we're going to go to the market now when you step into a market like anywhere. It's sort of a cultural scavenger hunt and you have a chance to learn about the culture from the market if you were going to take one of our listeners into the marketing konia. What are some of the things you would see. That would give you a better understanding own loved the marketing. First of all. What i love is that it's was a market two thousand years ago. One thousand five hundred years ago one thousand years ago five hundred years ago and today it's still at the same place in the same layout and more or less. Probably the items carried in the market are the same.

Lally Sermon Konia Izmir Ankara Bali Iran Konya Turkey
Finding Europe in America

Travel with Rick Steves

03:01 min | 1 year ago

Finding Europe in America

"Says you have to actually go to europe to taste of the old world after all many american and canadian cities and towns were settled by european immigrants. Sometimes they tried to recreate a bit of what the new from the old country. Even if we can't go to europe we can discover benefit prayed here. In our hemisphere samantha. Brown hosts public television travel series places to love where she films from destinations. Both around the world in closer to home. She joins us today on travel. With rick steves to look at some of her favorite places to find a bit of europe. In america samantha. Thanks for joining us. Pleasure to be here rank. Boy know all i do is go to europe again and again and again but i really. There's a lot of europe hiding out here in the united states during covid lockdown times so we can't travel overseas like we'd like to but we can find little knockoffs here in the united states from all around the globe knockoffs because some of them are terrific kind of constructions and others are honest to goodness immigrant communities. That are still the way they were hundred and fifty years ago when they were there were settled just in my state washington. We've got leavenworth which is a famous little german. It's kind of a touristy. Gimmick but poulsbo is originally a norwegian town and its norwegian to this day and we have linden up by the canadian border which is a very dutch was settled by holland immigrants. What are your favorite slices of europe in america. Well one of my favorites is a city that i had gone to my entire life. My family Was brought up right outside of it and then after doing two years of europe came back to and it just hit me like a ton of bricks that this was a european city and that is philadelphia pennsylvania. It is by far the most for me. The most year of paean city in the united states and so then i started like do a deep dive like why is it so it was just a feeling i had like. Wow i just feel like. I'm in europe. And there were so many connections One of the main architects was an emigrant from leon france. He designed the ben. Franklin benjamin franklin parkway which is now. We're all the museums are lined. And he designed that off of the sean z z. and along this beautiful roadway parkway where they're abuse. There's the rodin museum. there's the philadelphia museum of art. Which has the largest collection of renoir in the world. Incredible and others rittenhouse square. They're all these not just pockets. Because i think you know there's places we'll talk about today the have pockets but this is a city that is just so of france and the best connection that i love about philadelphia is that it is also it has the most mural arts i think in the world and its sister city is leon so if you ever go to leeann france and the kuala rouge is where you see those phenomenal murals and that art that is available to all end. It's all over the city. That's what the to share so the city a definite of brotherly love is a great. If you want that. European and more specifically french you know kick

Europe America Samantha Rick Steves Poulsbo Franklin Benjamin Franklin Par Brown Linden Holland Philadelphia France Washington Rodin Museum Pennsylvania Philadelphia Museum Of Art Rittenhouse Square Kuala Rouge Leon
"rick steves" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

08:18 min | 1 year ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Before nine eleven i was i was giving travel talks europe through the back door. You know travel tips and after nine. Eleven i started giving a talk Well keep kept giving my traveled talks. But i was. I had morphed into more political speaking. And i finally said you know. I better call this beta spayed here and renamed might lead talk travel as a political act and the idea was. There's a kind of hierarchy of travel needs. I you learn how to pack light and catch the train and to get a hotel and a restaurant. Then you learn how to appreciate the history art and culture but the ultimate pinnacle of this may be rick steves. Hierarchy of travel needs would be to travel in a way that broadens our perspective that recognizes that culture. Shock is a good thing. It's the growing pains of broadening perspective and cool thing about travelers. Get to know the other ninety six percent humanity. You realize. We're not the norm and you come home with that most beautiful souvenir and that's that broader perspective. One thing we haven't talked about is marijuana and there are people sitting at home thinking what. You are an advocate for the decriminalization of marijuana. Tell us about it came. Yeah for actually most of my adult life. I've been perplexed by the fact that people are locked up in our country for smoking pot and And then some for some reason fifteen. Twenty years ago. I decided to get active in it. I joined normal the national organization for the reform of marijuana laws and I realized first of all. I'm not pro. Marijuana marijuana's a drug can be abused. It should be carefully regulated. I'm just anti prohibition. I'm pro civil liberties. I'm kind of pragmatic harm reduction. Europeans are all about pragmatic harm reduction. And i think we americans are more all about legislating morality and incarceration and bottom line. What's better for our society and with the status quo and tell a couple of years ago. Anyways marijuana was was a horrible thing with the prohibition because you got privileged guys like me who can smoke marijuana with impunity and then you've got poor people back people who get caught with joint in their pocket in totally messes up their life. There's seventy thousand people doing hard time right now for nonviolent marijuana fences and so there's that one injustice there's also just the the business end of it which bugs me but you've taken it from an illegal market to a legal one and you're recognizing people civil liberties and my hunch bringing a european sensibility to the equation because in europe joints about succeeding as a can of beer. Is that if you take the crime out of the equation Teen use will not go up road. Safety will stay the same. You know this the world won't change you'll just take a black market away and turned it into a highly wrigley highly tax legal market. And we'll be able to smoke pot at home if we want as mature adults not for kids for adults and that was our hunch we stayed in colorado where the first state to legalize texts regulate recreational marijuana not medical recreational. Just for fun in two thousand twelve and i get to. I'm not scary. I've got credibility like you said people are surprised. Rick steves marijuana and just talk about it in a common sense european kind of sensibility. And what i do. It's my contribution to my community. I see it that way. Every two years i go on the political warpath to legalize marijuana in another couple of states in two. Twenty fourteen oregon. Two thousand sixteen massachusetts and maine twenty eighteen illinois michigan last year. I was locked down. But i spent ten days here at my desk. In virtually in montana south dakota arizona new jersey and we were victorious in all of those states. Getting more far more votes than the president's are the people who win those elections that you're and We are state-by-state taking down. This prohibition I've been no elected to be the chair of the board normal and we are excited this year because it's going federal and there's a law that Are build that house. Representatives passed in the senate now which will honor states rights to have their own choice on this complicated issue it allow for expunge meant letting people whose records whose lives are burdened by a nonviolent marijuana offense to have that expunged from the records and it will de schedule marijuana so this is a big change and i just i just feel like it's. It's exciting to help tackle up prohibition that's wrong minded lots of parallels to alcohol back in the thirties. I don't think they said booze good. I think they realized the laws against jews were causing more harm to society than the drug. They were designed to protect us from and they decided. Let's do it a different way. Tax it regulate it so long story. That's my little spiel on marijuana and I just feel like i'm one guy who can talk about it. Because i don't need to get elected and nobody can fire me because my boss and i can just bring my european friends once in a blue moon. Somebody'll say rick steves. We know what you think about marijuana your guidebooks or take your tours anymore. And all i can think is europe's going to be a little more fun without you. Well i was going to ask whether you got any pushback to stay in your lane Summit counseling about reputational risk Even from pbs and other more Button-down quarters yep. I had to talk very carefully with my friends in public radio and public television. Because that's very important to me. And i don't wanna go out of my lane And i've always stressed that. I'm not a proponent of marijuana it's a drug it can be abused. I've never given a talk without starting that the people who were on our dream team to be the first state to legalize index and regulate marijuana for recreational use for adults in washington state. They weren't potheads. It was our was our republican appointed. Federal prosecuting attorney. It was our seattle city. Sheriff it was president of the bar association. It was much respected. Legislators who careers had been built on. What's good for young people. It was the was the children's alliance. It's the nwa cpi. These are all important leaders in our community in groups in our community. That really wanna have pragmatic harm reduction and We're proving it now. And i mean i look out here from my window and edmonds and you know for ten years. Marijuana has been legal and the only difference is people don't need to buy marijuana from somebody on the street You know. I mean it's a long story we could do hall interview on that but But this is so important if somebody says this is not good for your business. I wouldn't cow to that I believe in this. This is to me appalling. What's going in our country to the new jim. Crow it's it's heartbreaking and i'm principled in favor of civil liberties you know my this organization normal. It's not a lobby organization for people who sell marijuana they you know. There's a huge industry now. It's called the green rush and they want us to be a lobby for the legal marijuana industry. I'm board chair in part because we don't do that and we're never going to do that. We are defending the civil liberty in a principled. Way that if you know. I'm hard working churchgoing kid raising tax paying american citizen. If i work all day and i come home. And i just wanna smoke a joint and stare at the fireplace for three hours. That's my civil liberty now. Do i have the civil liberty. Get in my car. When i'm intoxicated or high of course not through the book at me. But there's a civil liberty issue here that that is very easy for me to frame when i'm talking on conservative. Talk radio shows in south dakota montana. I thoroughly enjoyed talking about this issue on conservative. Talk radio in the states. I was working in last october. Because it makes sense regardless of where you are in the political spectrum. If i can just have twenty minutes of people's attention they can at least respect that there is a solid grounds for questioning the wisdom of carrying on with this wrong and prohibition against marijuana in all states you named where they have rolled out and some after considerable debate in the state legislature about the the house and the and the wears and the winds of marijuana sales have any states. Learn some lessons from the rollout. Done it right done it wrong. Have we been able to adjust in mid course to make this as unthreatening a social change.

Rick south dakota montana ten days colorado seattle last year two seventy thousand people washington ninety six percent three hours ten years last october twenty minutes Twenty years ago this year republican fifteen montana south dakota arizona couple of years ago
"rick steves" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Break comes.

"rick steves" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

07:51 min | 1 year ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Second thoughts about plunging in. Don't worry just go spend some money. They needed. Patience is not an american forte. It's it's certainly not a rick steves forte and for the last year patients has been my middle name. Mice you know everybody's chomping at the bit and It from a practical point of view. I think there's a lot of haste makes waste here and if we can just relax a little bit you know. This is sort of god's way of telling us to slow down for me this is. This is the therapy for a workaholic. Very good lesson. I've had in the last year. There's more to life than increasing its speed. My life was so fast and so productive and everything was exhilarating in this last year has been walking dogs playing the piano enjoying every son said like it's a devotional End it's been a beautiful year for me People there is going to be a spring back with vengeance to travel. I think i've noticed that in thirty or forty years of doing this every time. There's a setback. Some kind of terrorist event or economic problem are volcano You know it it. It stops things. Demand doesn't dissipate But i'm just reminding people that It's gonna come back incrementally and if i could go to amsterdam tomorrow and have dinner in a bubble so i don't get somebody else's germs go to amsterdam i mean there's nothing about social distancing and rick. Steve style travel that that has anything in common. I go to paris. Have my cheeks kissed. And i go to rome to pack into the piazza's and get a gelato and stroll in the past the jot down those beautiful pedestrian boulevards and i go to the pubs in ireland clink glasses in a in a steamy crowded. Massive people people who really believe that strangers are just friends who've yet to meet. And when i when i consider what's a good trip what's a good traveler it's connecting with people. It's all about connecting. So that's going to happen. You know we're still going to be shaking hands and kissing each other cheeks but it might take a few more months than what we want. So i'm distant advising people to go slow. I ask because. I wonder if there are places that before the pandemic were kind of being loved to death that might have gotten a breather apart from the very real economic losses. And i'm not minimizing that. But they might have benefited from not having a million people trudging through. And i'm thinking of Last ramblers in barcelona dubrovnik on croatia's adriatic coast. After the game of thrones monet's g varney the charles bridge in prague. These were places that were just. You know it wasn't a it was becoming not so much of a great experience anymore because they were so patent and so over. We know that that is that amazing. Sorta odd little thing. You don't want the crowds but tourism butter your bread. You know so. And then maybe you'll your business is not tourism but all of your neighbors is tourism and you're tired of the tourist but your neighbors are employed by the tourists so it's a very poignant little Struggle going on and Yeah i've got friends who are living in rome And they say for the first time local people are going to piazza navona with their kits. It's like fallow. Land is being re-inhabited Or whatever you'd call it by the community I would imagine the ramblers. Was that way i mean. You mentioned the ramblas at grade boulevard in barcelona in my last edition i said ron bless our ip rest in peace. Because it's still there is still full of people but there's no local community along the wrong bus that kept the bird market going that kept the book. Korea market vibrant. It's now you know it's called the byrd market but there's no birds being sold because there's no grandmothers taking their granddaughters. There to buy a little parakeet. You know they've been pushed out by airbnb to the suburbs and everything's been inhabited by the tourists. So now you go to. The classic market the bow korea and instead of Older people buying their fava beans. You've got tourists buying slushy and fancy fruit on skewers and the average tourist doesn't realize it but if you've been going there for years like i have you kinda you're sad. It's still fun but it's not the same now. All not all rear but places like you mentioned ray and amsterdam and salzburg florence especially barcelona There is a little backlash against the tourist crowds and This has been a time when they realize. Hey maybe there's more to life than tourism. But i do think the hunger for the money that tourism brings. I think it's the number. One employer in europe is gonna. It's gonna trump any sort of ideals. They might have keeping their places more peaceful unless trampled by tourists. I would hope that travelers when they come out of covid well recognized that We need to travel thoughtfully and sensitively to the local cultures. We need to remember that emerging economies you know a billion people in indian china. There's a middle class in those countries of one. Hundred or two hundred million people who've always wanted to see big ben and the eiffel tower and michelangelo's pieta. these are the marquee sites of european culture dislike. The taj mahal is in india. You know what america going to. India doesn't have taj mahal on their list. You know well the same thing when somebody from china finally has enough money to go to europe so we need to remember that Yeah put on your shoulder pads if you want to visit the the sistine chapel and michael angels assist you know less judgment because it's going to be a shuffle and it's not ours to say we don't want these crowds. It's the world's and everybody's wants to see it but we gotta remember that. There is ninety percent of europe that has no crowds at all and you could lose all that great famous stuff and still have a marvelous experience. We've got more to come with. Rick steves after the break on top of being a leading expert on european travel. Rick is also an outspoken advocate for marijuana decriminalization. Maybe it didn't know that it's fun right. We'll hear more about that in just a minute. It's bullseye for maximum fund dot org and npr support for bullseye and the following message. Come from cultural cultural. Wants you to know that. An estimated forty five million americans may have ibs according to the international foundation for gastrointestinal disorders cultural ibs. Complete support is a medical food for the dietary management of ibs. It's designed to relieve symptoms like abdominal pain bloating. Diarrhea and constipation in a safe well tolerated. Once daily dose save twenty percent with promo code radio on culture l. dot com. It's time to emerge from our homes and get outside. You have no idea what you're gonna see there. You think you might know but every time there's a mystery there that you're gonna on earth all this week. Life is headed outdoors with episodes on camping. Birding biking and more. Listen to the life kit podcast from npr without coming up with movie ideas over the course of an hour. Because that's what we do every week on story break. The writers podcast were three. Hollywood professionals have an hour to come up with a pitch for a movie or tv. Show based off totally zany prompts. Like that time. We re imagined star wars based on our phones autocomplete. Luke skywalker is a family man. And it's star wars but it's a good idea. By the time we broke the story of a bunch of disney channel original movies based solely on the title and the poster fifty foot woman. Go with the time. We finally cracked the adobe photoshop feature films. Damn tool is your woody and the auto fill. Is the new buzz join us. We have a good time and matching all the movies. Hollywood is too cowardly to make story.

india amsterdam croatia Hundred Rick Steve ninety percent thirty europe fifty foot Korea last year twenty percent ireland tomorrow barcelona america piazza navona indian paris
"rick steves" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Willing as you mentioned. You've been a body in motion for a really long time. Did it take you some time to throttle back to realize that there was going to be another wave that the road predictions of in twenty twenty weren't coming true that in fact it was gonna be a while before you went anywhere where they're sort of almost shades of steps of Of the grieving process where you finally had to come to terms with the fact. I'm not going anywhere else. Well there's my woes. I'm not making any money. And i can't do my research and make my tv show. We shows all figured out for poland and iceland. We had the flights booked we had the permissions with scripts with crew lined up. I was excited about it. But i got over that in a hurry. You know this is much more important than than a privileged my ambitions as a businessman or by travel dreams. I employ one hundred people That's beautiful responsibility. That i take seriously and we have a lot of people that looked us for you. Know how to put their travel to europe together and then we have all these people that work with us indirectly in europe. And i remember ray Again we were. Euphoric were gearing up for the biggest year ever. I mean it was just a gang of travel nuts and suddenly we couldn't have our staff meeting inside and we met you know behind the extra house that we had across the street in the backyard syndrome by a white picket fence. One hundred of us. And i was standing there at saying. We don't know what's going to happen but we are not going to after today. That's our last in the office. I was not a fan of remote work. I want people there because we have the core and really loved being right there but our staff knew what was coming our way and we had scrambled people in the last or two to get us capable at home and we said goodbye and then it was that emotional day. I still remember it. Vividly and You know our our inner circle. That did the tourists we said. Well we'll have to see. We had the tours full. You know twenty five people on a on a bus. One hundred tours. That's a lot of people. Twenty five hundred people whose travel dreams. I mean i got over the lost income. It's their travel dreams. They saved they planned. They dreamed they got their friends together. And we had. Oh we have to cancel through april. We have to cancel through. May we have to cancel. Not through june through the summer we have to cancel till the end of the year. You know it just was worse and worse and worse and then i just realized we gotta hunker down. We got trim the sails and we just have to survive this thing. So it's been a year and a half with with no revenue in one hundred people on the payroll and I just met with my staff this morning and You know it's it's it's discouraging because we want to do our work and and we can't in there. I'm committed to keeping people on the payroll i've even. Yeah but my focus has been as more on our community and our roles as leaders in our community and so on. I'm paying my staff to work even if we don't have the work so i decided well. Let's mobilize people to help out in the community because older people can't do the there the normal volunteer force their nervous about covid And their people in the needs are greater than ever. So i thought well you guys i'm paying you if you can Use your company time and help out with meals on wheels and food banks and you know cleaning up the parks and all this kind of stuff so in our own little way. you know. we're doing four hundred hours a week with volunteer work on company. Time and i'm hoping this cove will cause us all to recognize that there are things more fundamental at stake here than our own travel dreams our own bottom line now. I'm not. I'm not trying to be like a wise guy but i think the brand the way the public sees you as a decent guy and you do in your work. Think about the impact of travel about the relationship of visitors to the places they go. Does the calculus change a little bit after so. Many tourists dependent economies probably had an awful twenty twenty that instead of being cautious about those things instead of having.

europe april june Twenty five hundred people twenty five people today One hundred tours two One hundred one hundred people this morning four hundred hours a week a year and a half end twenty twenty poland iceland
"rick steves" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

07:00 min | 1 year ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"He organizes tours over the continent and since around march of last year. He hasn't been able to do any of that stuff. He's been away from europe for the longest time in his decades of covering it. So he's instead taken to finding ways to bring europe home to the united states cooking reading up on history looking back at fond memories of travels past so we decided to bring him the show and to interview him. Pair him with another public media legend. Our friend ray suarez. It's a clash of pbs. Titans before we get into that. Let's hear a little bit of a recent streaming event. He hosted called monday. Night owl. here. Rick is talking about some of his favorite european dishes something. We didn't anticipate when we started this monday night. Bumble ben was that it would evolve into sort of a shared meal. And every week i i. I'm surprising myself. I'm getting into the cooking. And i want to share with you. What i'm gonna be eating tonight. And i put the the menu on our Information so people can of eat with but look at this beautiful beautiful plate. I miss my kids. They're saying who is this man. I could this place. It's nothing betsy but it sure was it together and this is the danish meal. This is called smarter broke it. It means a butter on bread. Motorboat is open based on is in all over scandinavia. Buying these open base. Which is you go into a shop and you just choose what you like. rick steves. welcome to bullseye. Well thanks ray and listen to that. I just felt like an enthusiastic little kid who somehow just learned how to cook well. Let's be clear you weren't much of a cook before where you know this. I call it a corona bonus I'm a travel guy. I spent one hundred days a year in europe. I love my work. I'm writing guidebooks making public. Television tv shows leading tours and suddenly. I haven't been on an airplane for a year. And i just decided at the outbreak. This to play the cards. You're dealt you know i was telling my tour groups You know if it's not to your liking ginger liking and i've changed my liking were there a lot of irons in the fire. When the world shutdown things that sort of stopped in the middle. Oh yeah. I mean i had. I had one hundred tour guides from every country in europe in my living room having an amazing party the week that all the said in that Retirement homer senior center in kirkland that the first cases of covid were being reported it was just. It's just a twenty minute drive from my house. And we had just finished a week-long Celebration are annual summit of all the tour guides. We fly them into seattle every every january in february and And we have a big huddle and we're just having a big party. We were going to go home and have the best year of touring ever you know. Twenty nineteen we took thirty thousand people on fifteen hundred tours and we were already almost sold out for the next year and they flew home. We're all euphoric. And then i look at this. I'm looking out at puget. Sound here from my my window at home and is like a su- nami came in and it just submerged everything i remember. The the next couple of months was busy in reverse. We had to send back twenty four thousand deposits tours I had to keep my staff of one. Hundred employed somehow had one hundred guides in europe. That are now not able to do their work and it was. I mean know you think every time strange during this last year i just every coupla days it occurs to me. Oh that industry's been in crisis also and you know i'm focused into tourism. We lead bus tours. And we write guidebooks and you know. It's it's devastating From travel point of view are guidebooks. Ray were right up to date. These were the labor of love over thirty years of researching. I've got fifty different guide books on europe and they're all based on little moms and pops you know the the the the the entrepreneurial ventures that i think make travel so much fun to connect with these little guest houses and being bees and cafes and restaurants that are the dream of a husband and wife and It's just ski saddens me to think of how many of these works of love labours of love or are in crisis now and what's going to be a big emotional thing for me is to go back to europe. Once we get through this and see who still standing. I mean the big corporations will be standing. And they'll be the starbucks still be where we know. Starbucks is in in paris and so on. But what about the the little guys. And that's what really makes good travel so our initiative right off the bat is going to go back and sweep through and and see what's still there and put the guidebook make the guidebooks accurate. And then patronize the little guys. As if the way we consume can help shape the future. Well that means that An up-to-date book given lead time the time to run down. All these leads figure out. Who's still in business and all that We're talking about what twenty twenty two twenty three till you can sort of figure out what still here in the world and from you know people who value guidebooks. That's that's my thing is writing guidebooks to me. A guidebook at twenty dollars tool for for three thousand dollar experience if it's any good at pays for itself on the shuttle and from the airport and A lot of people are going to be traveling later in. Twenty europe's might beeped but anywhere you know and And then it's going to be almost. I'm i'm i really believe. Travel be wide open in twenty twenty two but from guidebook point of view. Anybody who's updating now is wasting their time you gotta wait till you're expect to some semblance of normalcy before you go back and find out you know who's there and who can we recommend so the workable research is only going to be possible if all goes well. People get their shots in europe and in the united states and so on in early two thousand twenty two and then it takes eight months. If it's just pedal to the metal to get it out into the bookstores so anybody traveling in twenty twenty one or two thousand. Twenty two will be using guidebooks that are either. I think dishonestly claiming to be updated because he can't update it or you're gonna be using information that was accurate in two thousand nineteen when the last of our guide books were updated for twenty twenty. And then you just. There's still much better than nothing at all. I'm going to europe. I hope later this year and be equipping. My i'll be traveling with a guidebook. Like i always do. And we'll just have to realize that you know things have changed and the only way to have information is to be flexible and use. What was accurate before covid. But what i'm committed to is by the end of two thousand twenty two. We will have what we're calling post covid guidebooks researched and updated by experiences after cova had passed. And then you know from twenty twenty three on. we'll be back back in her stride. God.

Rick europe eight months scandinavia thirty thousand people Starbucks ray suarez starbucks twenty dollars fifteen hundred tours next year kirkland seattle twenty minute three thousand dollar twenty twenty one hundred guides january twenty four thousand deposits united states
Why I Love Rome

Travel with Rick Steves

02:17 min | 1 year ago

Why I Love Rome

"Let's start the hour with three guides from rome. Who tell us what they love. Most about their city rome. It's the eternal city to one of the most romantic and popular destinations in the whole world but many visitors met with a harsh reality when they wander rooms. Ancient streets overcrowded sites chaotic. Urban seems unpredictable transit strikes. If you're not prepared. Rome can be a challenge. But many will agree with me that it's all worth it. Bernardo francesca russo and susanna perugini specialize in guiding american tourists around italy and. They've all made rome their home because they love their city. They join us now on travel. With rick steves to share their love of rome and share with us some tips on how we might enjoy it too you know. Francesca susannah bondar. Generate one so rome. I love history. And there's history every where you look. Francesca you're born and raised in rome. What's it like just to go to work. Surrounded by all that history. Sometimes i think about it that i can wait for the bus right by where julius caesar was stabbed to death. So i'm thinking that rome is a place where history goes from printed words on the page of a book to something. That's alive every minute of every day so you can feel it. Something had happened. Two thousand years ago happened right now. And there's layer after layer after layer. I mean there's like an archaeological dig isn't it but it's right before your very eyes. He has over two thousand years of history. Front is every single moment. Wherever you turn all at once pub is living in rome shape your outlook. I would say that most romans take it for granted. I think they gain a sense of how special the city is when they go elsewhere and they always find everything else so new so you become you become aware of how what it means to live with two thousand years of history once you leave it i think if you grow in it and you see coliseum every day when you drive to work in the sense you don't even see it any more than you might make a case that if you live in a land with very little with the shallow history. You don't appreciate history quite as much. i mean. The oldest building in my town is one hundred years old building a new town twenty times that could maybe if you live with things that are two thousand years old and every day i think you forget it and it just becomes something many conversations with my roman friends who say they've never been inside the coliseum where he could for take it for granted. Yeah but once you open their eyes to one thing then they understand and appreciate as well

Rome Bernardo Francesca Russo Susanna Perugini Francesca Susannah Bondar Rick Steves Francesca Julius Caesar Italy
The Simple Life: Sweet Home Croatia

Travel with Rick Steves

02:11 min | 1 year ago

The Simple Life: Sweet Home Croatia

"Tired of the rat race mid western mom. Jennifer wilson decided up route or young family and seek out something simpler so she moved her husband and two kids to the croatian mountain village. Her great grandparents to learn what they would have taught her about life. Jennifer makes sense of her family's adventures in her book called running away to home. She joins us right now from the iowa public radio studio in des moines to tell us what she and her family gained from living in croatia. And how it's changed them now that they're back in america jennifer. Thanks for being with us. Thank you so much for having me. So you took your family from iowa to croatia. Set up the story here. When did this happen. Why did you do it. How long you stay well. It was in two thousand eight when the economy was melting down here in america we were really feeling a lot of restlessness at the time. So we sort of collectively decided as a family to take a big risk. We decided to get rid of all of our sort of consumerist lifestyle stuff and we took our young family to the ancient croatian mountain village of my ancestors in it was. It was a pretty amazing. Right how long did you stay in. Croatia trump. We were in the country itself for about seven months. The majority of that in the village itself is your husband croatian. Also he's norwegian alsacien but he sort of adopted my ancestors for the time we were in the village. It was really like hitting the reset button for our family. They're in what way. Well jim and i have a fairly modest lifestyle here in the midwest but even a family like us sort of in our american culture tends to super size everything and we were just ready to kind of get away from the american buzz and we went back to the most basic way of living. We were living in a small pen sione in this very small village that felt like it was suspended in amber since my great grandparents left and it really gave us the time and space to connect as a family we wanted less business in our world and we thought there can be no better way of doing that than going to a place where there was really nothing going on We had heard a few things about mirka pie research and a scouting trip and indeed. It was sort of this quiet time outland. It felt like to us

Croatia Jennifer Wilson Iowa America Des Moines Jennifer Midwest JIM Mirka
Making Athens Neighborhoods More Evironmentally Friendly

Travel with Rick Steves

01:34 min | 1 year ago

Making Athens Neighborhoods More Evironmentally Friendly

"Let's start today's travel. With rick steves increase hosting the olympics in two thousand four forced that famously chaotic and polluted city of athens to invest in more pedestrian and eco friendly alternatives tour guides cars and pastas doris joining us. Now to look at what you can expect when you scroll the neighborhoods their city by the way we recorded this conversation before the pandemic shutdown international borders things very much. What's it like when you hear. An american. say athens used to be terrible today. It's changed big low. We are old enough to remember what you mean. Because i grew up in the nineteen ninety s where we had these serious problem with his cloud. Above athens was pollution cloud. Yeah but then a they introduce measurement which was not. All cars are allowed to enter the city center the yukon enter Based on the you and your license plates so this improves the today. Absolutely yeah and athens benefited a lot from. That's an apostolakis. There's more sensitivity for pedestrian zones. I think from syntagma square. You can walk downhill on on. What used to be a very crowded traffic street and now it's like a park weekly unification for q logical sites so he can start working starting from sedan west and you can make your way old down to get me. Cost the asking symmetry of otherness. It's beautiful walk without motorbikes. And there's this beautiful pedestrian sort of park. That goes to me almost all the way around the acropolis also the hill that the city is built around. That just seems designed for people and it's beautiful in the evening. It's beautiful in the day.

Athens Rick Steves Doris Olympics Syntagma Square
Sevilla April Fair - Pre-Covid

Travel with Rick Steves

01:52 min | 1 year ago

Sevilla April Fair - Pre-Covid

"The week. Surrounding the easter holiday are traditionally a big time to celebrate with the family and spain even while spain has to prevent the crowds of pre. Covid times a little longer. By cancelling the big april fair again this year. Let's anticipate how celebrate vs biggest social event of the again next year local guide. Concepcion delgado joined us a few years ago to describe how they normally like to pull out all the stops in her hometown. Concepcion thanks for being here thank you. What does april fair into who've grown up in severe well april her age like the explosion of life. No he's like the explosion of colour c k. Everybody happy and having party. What are you celebrating life. I mean is it a spring thing and there was no. There was a reason why the fibia was started. But it has nothing to do with that anymore. It was a livestock market to improve. The economy of the people were gathering there not clear whores on cows and old that but Because people had to spend a few days while they were selling out older animals they were taking some food and wine along on. Does the only thing that's a revised now actual industrial horse market that had affair with it and now the horse businesses nuts so important in the in the party survives. That's good and lucienne style for a way that all the warring stuff anti-subversion correct now an end lucia do different cities have a professor or is it always the same date in the in the big city. All of them have a fair. But it doesn't need to me in an spring fair anymore. seventy starts severe. Sat which has been celebrating a fairy for longer but the rest of an alluvia adopted that idea of having party in spring or fall and they do a federal. So you can come to on the luthier. From april winds heaviest starts to september up to get to a town. Where a ferry as going on.

Concepcion Delgado Spain Concepcion Lucienne
The Future of Tour Business in 2021 with Steve Perillo

Travel with Rick Steves

07:02 min | 1 year ago

The Future of Tour Business in 2021 with Steve Perillo

"This is a bad year tour companies. So what do you do when you run into tour company and suddenly. Nobody's traveling today on travel with rick. Steves we're joined by steve parilla of perello tours to talk about how we who make our living in the travel industry are trying to stay afloat in these months of zero revenue during the global pandemic. Steve is joining us to discuss. How the pandemic is hitting his industry and his expectations for the future steve. Thanks for joining us. How are you holding up. Pretty good considering pretty good. Have a driving tour company. Bring about what fifteen thousand people to europe each year. You're the third generation. Ceo of your family to her company. Perello tours how was twenty twenty looking before the pandemic hit it was going to be our best year since probably nineteen ninety-seven. It was going to be a very good year. We've been through a bad time so you know it's not an essential purchase trip so Before nine eleven we had all kinds of stuff If you're in the trump is every ten years you're going to have a really bad year but you lose half your business okay. But twenty twenty It was one hundred percent a loss of business which is astounding. We were euphoric in the tourist industry. We were queued up for our best years ever. The economy was so hot. Everybody wanted to travel. Everything was coming together. You know and you ramp up for it. And then said and bam not only do you have revenue. But you've got a lot of people that have given you money and you have to give back refunds. How did you know that. That is the bane of every tour operator. That's how they go out of business. They spend the deposits before the trip. You're not supposed to do. You're supposed to Ideally put it in escrow you put in a separate account. You don't touch it and we touched it but My father taught me about the rainy day fund and It was millions and millions of dollars. We had to return. Well i we as people to postpone it to this year and a lot of them did but now we're facing march april and may and this time they really do what their money back and it's justified so Were returning all the money and We're not gonna pay taxes for a few years i assume and We're gonna be fine. I don't wanna go through this again in my lifetime though. I don't really want to go. i don't either so you're returning all the money. Meaning you're not gonna pay taxes because you've lost so much money that you'll have losses to take forward under obama two thousand and ten You could deduct losses for five years after the bat. You're right now. There's there's actually laws in some states that prohibit tour companies like ours from doing anything in where i live in washington state. We don't have that option. I mean that money is protected until the tour is actually performed and at first. I didn't like that love. But i see i see the need for it and i'm glad we have it now. It gives us a little guidance. I always think capitalism uses chaperone and. That's what good government is all about for sure sure Now when you look at the industry in general how do you think. The industry did as far as relations and respect to their clientele. There were millions of people who were more than just inconvenienced by the advent of the pandemic when it comes to prepaid to her plans and so on. Well we all wanted to. We all wanted to ask the customer. Let us hold the money and we're going to Apply to next year or the next year. We're even going to give you some money off. And sem didn't really have an option that some of the cruise lies i really You know we're going to give you credit for the future but we have whatever. The customer wanted We did in this regard so we returned the money and a lot of cases and the goodwill is amazing. And they're gonna come back to us for sure. Nancy the goodwill. I mean we made a point of just not even letting people leave their money with this. Thank goodness we had the capacity to do. We sent back. Twenty thousand deposits took months to do it. It was a lot of work. We're not geared up to send the money back but that's what we had to do because as you said we're in this together for the long term and we gotta take care of of our public What do you think about the cost of cancelling tours. You had already set up as a tour organizer did you have to. Did you take a hit. By cancelling out of buses you had arranged in hotels. you had booked on not really the The airlines were considerate. You know we're on the same boat so So they were nice. They were nice. They worked with us in after the whole Catastrophic advent of this for tourism. How did the insurance companies come out. Did they step up to the plate and help people with it. Was the public generally satisfied if they had purchased. You know trip interruption insurance or was this something that was not covered It's not covered. They were tough. They were tough. I found them really not helpful at all. The insurance companies In general they didn't their reputation. Took a hit then after that because they didn't lose much money because depending people lost money in the insurance companies did not right and we have to make up the difference. if somebody We have penalties if you cancel but this was a totally exceptional situation so I don't care where. I don't care about money. We got through it. It's all gonna come back. You know you gotta be classy in this world and then you got to be standing you can have your team together when when you come out of this and we can ramp up again. So when i think of the long term consequences of covid in the pandemic. I'm concerned about the small mom and pop businesses especially in italy. That's your forte. Big companies can get through this pandemic. They can even profit from it. But it's the little moms and pops whether it's the little museum or the the little restaurant or or the little Hotel our guest house. What is your sense about. What's gonna be still standing when when the clouds of this pandemic lift. I know a lot of restaurants are not going to be there. But the italian government european governments are a lot more generous with their citizens so People still got their paychecks. Some checks were protected. I don't know all the details of italian government law but there are a lot more A helpful than the america you know. We have our our strengths to. Yeah well they pay high taxes and part of that is they expect their government to stand by them in a in a time. Like this it's Different from country to country. But in general i think it's fair to say that small operations mom and pops and so on her have a good chance to get through this at this second year of this cova. I don't know how long they can last. But that really is what makes travel so appealing is not to have to go to a strip mall and buy from international corporation. But you have that character you got the local little entrepreneurial ventures and the people with a passion and they love their clientele and it's a joy to be part of that scene and it's a fun puerta. Tourism isn't the old crafts are still alive. And well you know the Inlaid wood is an amazing art. Mosaics are fantastic. We can around these artisans with are group's at the table and and watch that happening. This is travel with rick. Steves were comparing notes on running a tour company in the middle of a pandemic right. Now with steve. Parilla

Steve Parilla Perello Steves Rick Italian Government Steve Europe Barack Obama Washington Nancy Italy America Parilla
Portugal's Art and Architecture

Travel with Rick Steves

04:53 min | 1 year ago

Portugal's Art and Architecture

"Let's start today's travel with rick. Steves in portugal. The architecture and the art of portugal to tell the story of that small country squeezed between spain and the atlantic ocean. You can wander through museums classical and romantic paintings to styles with the largest impact on portuguese painters or you can take in the beautiful. Blue azoulay zhou tiles. That ornament many of portugal's buildings to learn more about portugal's art and architecture. We're joined in our studio by two portuguese guides. Christina duarte and refco christina and raphael. Thanks for joining us. Average abuse here. Rick christina so often to understand the art of a country you need to understand its economy. There's money behind the art. How does money shape the art in the architecture of patrols. When you have money you want be surrounded by beautiful. Things actually is universal. Everybody wants to be surrounded by beautiful things. The thing is that you don't afford it many times and when you afford them you have them in portugal much money then because they have great art from five hundred years ago yes well. It is a combination of two major. Factors the fifteen hundreds with the discovery. Spirit that allowed us to have for the first time money enough for our trade with many places in the world so automatically the royalty had many the nobility had money and the church have many and the coincidence is that your have money and you have also religion behind it so which. She's being major catholic. Contrary in thinking that you want to give your best and you'll beauty to your your glorify gone exactly to glorify god so They were two kinds of ways of spending that money in art. Which was the private and that will be for palaces that nobody will see and to god in churches and i consider that public art so review. All you have this money coming in from the trade in fact the churches were actually nicknamed spice churches. How how does the space tie into the building of churches. Well when portugal arrived to places like india and china and we started to bring all of these new products. Back to portugal. They revolutionized portugal they revolutionized our economy and from there on the society started to change and that is one of the interesting aspect of art is that it reflects the other dimensions of society. So the spices. There were They were a major factor. For example the jeronimos monastery that began to be built precisely with the money that came from the spices. Which bases were these that were so valuable. So you had Pepper you had cinema And many others in christina. Why would people spend so much money for pepper and cinnamon app to preserve no sleaze to preserve refrigeration also to Pigments of any kind for linen. Or tying dying yes. it was something exotic. It was different. People never seen it before. So imagine the first time you are smelling coffee or you're tasting pepper or you're smelling cinema. Imagine the impact that you had imagined how it sparked your imagination so the wealthy people would want this. It would be titillating for them now. You mentioned the monastery at toronto's same just outside of lisbon b. l. e. m. I believe that was men. Welland style architecture. What is men whalen. What we're does that word come from so The men willing style is named after our kingman. Well actually the name was given only in the nineteenth century during the romantic period but kingman while he was one of the most important kings during our age of exploration so he ruled from the time of columbus until fifteen twenty began to rule in fourteen ninety five until the fifteen twenty s in the nineteenth century. They figured out that. We had a several monuments throughout portugal. That shared the same characteristics. So what are the characteristics. If you look at the front of a church what will you see and you go. Oh that's men welland from fifteen twenty so the manor line is late gothic style so you have the basic structure of the gothic and then over that basic structure of the gothic. You have a very specific declaration. You have for example. Maritime mothes you have the strong. Heraldic of manuel specially to miller rece- fear so that the coat of arms of the royal family and then themes from the sea because the money came from the see exactly like the rope the rope a rope with an art. He's a very very important symbol of maryland.

Portugal Christina Duarte Refco Christina Rick Christina Steves Atlantic Ocean Jeronimos Monastery Raphael Rick Spain Christina India China Welland Whalen Kingman Lisbon Toronto Columbus
Take a Trip To the Island of Crete

Travel with Rick Steves

04:33 min | 1 year ago

Take a Trip To the Island of Crete

"Let's start today's show with a look at what you can find when you visit the largest of the greek islands crete. It's where the earliest advanced civilizations in europe were found more than four thousand years ago. We're joined by greek travel. Experts david and anastacia guy tanu. Our conversation was recorded prior to the covid. Pandemic closures david. How're cretans. The people who live on crete different from greeks and their outlook. I don't think there's a proud of person to be found in greece than creighton. Credence are extremely proud of their long history. There island and they're wonderful food. The people from crete really see themselves as being a little bit different to the people from the greek mainland anesthesia. When you think of the pride of crete people and the traditions. How does that survive in their dress. In the way the look when we travel there you can find that still worn by older people in the largest cities bad. You find it definitely in out in the country and in small villages and the further up you go on the mountains the more you find that and you have this. Very particular scoff. That they were on their head. It's black of course and usually there is also big moustache underneath definitely because that's Masculine thing and they have a black shirt in. They have brown trousers. That up. The very distinct and to create and usually black boots and i was struck when i went to crete that these traditions survive more there than elsewhere in europe. I mean everything's becoming modern in the same issue travel around more and more but increased. You do find those traditions alive David i was an increase just last june and having been there for a while i was wondering with ride. See some of these things like the old britches and the long boots and the the coach but to my great surprise they have not disappeared in fact they've now become trendy and symbols for the young symbols for the young. Would that be. Is that sort of an expression of independence. I think it's because they see themselves different and they wanted to let people know that they're proud of their traditions. There's lot of guns returned. There used to be synonymous with crate guns. But you see less of these days although when you go walking plenty of cartridges from the hunting season is that right what would they be hunting farm firm and anything that moves birds. Rabbits has if you're an athens. How easy is it to get down to create. It couldn't be more simple because there's Boats that do the trip overnight. And there's lots of lights with a gna so let's see you got five days crete. What would you do david. If you're helping me plan my very if going have five days. I would stick to the north and i would stick to iraq leo which is the capital and access point fo the famous minoan palace of knossos. And then i would go across honey. Which is the second city on crete. And it's just a beautiful Old venetian city from honey. Can't you go up to the top of the mountain in hike down the gorge of samaria. Have you ever had that. yes i have. what's it like. well you have a very long descend and the beginning. It's in kilometers about four kilometers to go down. You just go down a winding backing back inbound down and then you move through the gorge. But they're really beautiful spots at that gorge in you meet people. There are people there. There is once goal the gate in the result shepherd they who knows of course every guide and every person who goes often through that gorge unusually. He has cheese. And if you know you can well he can bring some other stuff out as well and you see. Also a lot of the very unique flora and fauna of crete and the. Raise your liking usually. You're uc wild ibex. That they have their only on crete and has a very funny name. Actually it's called click critically. Can i xe david. If i remember correctly the tourist generally catch a minibus or something up for the almost like at sunrise and then they walk switch backing down then. They have a long hike along the river with little places to swim along the way they reach a very very narrow part in the gorge where you can almost stretch your arms out and touch either of the sheer cliffs and then at the bottom you have a beautiful remote beach and boat waiting to take you to the next town from where you catch the shuttle bus back to your home. Base is still basically the routine that is still the routine la. They have come up with an alternative for the lazy person who does not want to do the whole walk. You can take a boat to. I think it's really the base of the gorge and you can do what they say. The gorge short way. When you simply walk up to the iron gates and walk back again undone to all the other stuff okay. So there is for the quick tourist and for the person wants to spend a little more

Greek Islands Crete Anastacia Guy Tanu David Crete Europe Creighton Famous Minoan Palace Of Knosso Greece Athens Samaria Iraq LA
How to Fly to Australia Without Getting Bumped

AFF on AIR Podcast

03:54 min | 1 year ago

How to Fly to Australia Without Getting Bumped

"From the past fortnight and fiscally wrecks and virgin. Australia have become embroiled in a bitter price. War ahead of wrecks launching. Boeing seven. Three seven flights between mellon. See in just over a week from monday. The first of march rex will fly five times a day between siemian. Melvin using least ex. Virgin australia boeing seven. Three seven eight. Hundred's rex had started selling economy seats for seventy nine dollars. One way and business class from two hundred ninety nine dollars but last week. Rick steves candidates prices even further to forty nine dollars in economy or one hundred ninety nine dollars for business costs which is kind of unheard of that price includes checked baggage for all passengers and a snack and drink onboard including for economy. Close now that sale ends on the twenty eighth of february and covers travel dates throughout much virgin australia quickly matched with forty nine dollar economy costs and one hundred ninety nine dollar business clawsf as as well traveled during much. Jetstar is now selling nobody flights from thirty nine dollars one way which is even cheaper. Although that price does not include checked baggage qantas meanwhile has reduced. Its economy class ticket. Prices on that rejoicing. Much to one hundred and ten dollars although business class fares during much still quite high at nine hundred twenty three dollars said clearly not matching on price at the moment and pats qantas feels like it doesn't have to match on price because it recently introduced hot meals during Meal times on many domestic routes in economy class and it will bring them back on old remaining routes from next month in addition alcoholic beverages. Complimentary on all qantas flights previously. They were free on. Some routes like sydney to perth or any route of camera. But on other routes like the fullness city fly routes in brisbane to melvin for example that will only free off to four pm on weekdays. The change means that you no longer need to grab six dollars from your wallet. If you'd like a glass of wine or a beer on conan's flight even if you're flying in economy quantities also bring out a limited edition. Centennary henry beer which is brewed by james squire qantas. This week announced three domestic routes which will begin operating on the first of april. The regional subsidiary qantas link will operate the new direct flights between melbourne and coughs. Haba brisbane in coffs harbour and camera to balance byron bay vision. Australia also announced two new routes this week which will be operated over the easter school holidays and maybe extended as long as state borders remain. Open his demand. Those flights will be from melvin to ballerina and from adelaide to the sunshine. Coast qantas invasion astray. We have also both extended the flexibility available on new domestic flight. Bookings with both airlines bookings made any time. Until at least the thirtieth of april can be changed and unlimited number of times without paying any feats until the end of january next year. He can say cheese to cancel for credit voucher without paying any extra fees. Similar flexibility also applies to reward bookings made using frequent flyer points except the e channel say cancelled as for a full refund of the points and taxes without paying any fees overseas now in the national carrier of namibia and was placed into liquidation. Last week all flights were cancelled and bookings were taken down on the namibian government decided that the airlines mounting debt had become unsustainable although covid nineteen has worsened enemy is financial problems. It was already in financial trouble for quite a fees before now there were media reports that any maybe a could immediately declares insolvency back in september of two thousand and nineteen although those were denied by the airline at the time and it continued to operate until now despite fifteen of the airlines. Nineteen routes being estimated to be loss-making enemy. Be a

Qantas Rick Steves Australia Mellon Melvin Henry Beer James Squire Jetstar Boeing
"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

05:35 min | 2 years ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Hi, I'm Rick Steves one of the few things certain about this corona virus pandemic is that this crisis will pass sooner or later it'll pass, and we'll be back to normal. And when that day comes, all of us will eagerly turn our pent up. Travel Dreams into smooth and bursting with fun reality. Let's continue to share. Our travel dreams together on travel with Rick Steves. Today on travel with Rick Steves are virtual travels. Bring us a millennials. Take on enjoying yourself in the Netherlands. Also stroll the sights on a guided walk around Edinburgh. Get a taste of that passionate atmosphere and end Lucia and go searching for Venus in the hour ahead. The. Netherlands seem to specialize in festivals. Fun Ways for the millennial generation to celebrate life to learn how we travelers of all ages can get it on the fun. We're joined in our studio by tour guide sisters, Yoda and Ruby Van Angles Dwarf who both happened to be millennials, Yoda and Ruby thanks for being here. For having us. You're actually twins. Ruby and Yoda and It's one of you older. Yes, maybe one minute older them a one minute older so Yoda. How do you to differ in your temperaments? Well I'm always told that Ruby, Nice. One Which is true? <hes> I am a little bit more direct assistance. Dutch people are think I'm <hes> a little bit more. Outspoken where we very patients and lovingly, and yeah, so you complement each other we do I think. Together the Dutch are famous for being direct. Yes, we are yeah. This is so fun to think about generational differences, and so on in America and what we call a baby boomer and you got in America people in their twenties and thirties or generate millennials do the Dutch <hes> look at generations in certain ways like that? Also? Yes, exactly the same we have baby. boomers are parents are a baby, boomers, and yeah, we're millennials, so millennials people in their twenties and thirties, gen-x people in their forties, baby boomers people in their fifties and sixties, baby boomers, being the most interesting and fun, loving and entertaining. Okay so tell me about the characteristics of millennials. In the Netherlands. Well, it's probably very similar. <hes> we are we millennials. Because we got handed everything to us right. We always learned where you're growing up. Everything is possible everything you wanted to do and instead of creating people who are very secure. What they WANNA do were all very insecure, and we're very well like I'm going to do and like every ten years. We changed jobs and <hes>. There's a lot of enterpreneurs so a lot of people who want to create their own little thing, but we're all sort of this known at were unhappy with everything because we can have everything we're unhappy. Little bit spoiled came easily old. Yes, and impatient. You want it now. Yes, and if you don't get it now, you'll go somewhere else. Yeah, we're own press. And we invented the burn out. Is! Still Alive and kicking. This is travel with Rick Steves. We're talking with Yoda angles store and her twin. WHO's one minute older? Ruby angles. Talking about millennials and when we think about having fun as tourists, we can learn a lot by having fun as millennials millennials love. It seems like in the Netherlands parties in vegetables. Yoda. What's what's an example of festival that a millennial looks forward to every year and Amsterdam? We Love, King's Day. That is one of our favorites. Once <hes>. It's not we do not have as many festivals in Amsterdam anymore more dough, so <hes> I'm stem because such a busy city <hes> day try to take people away from Amsterdam, so if you want to experience the holidays like King, stay or Liberation Day <hes>. It's better to go to one of the less bigger cities. Also. Just what what? What is it? You'd like to go to for one of these big. Go to Harlem, because the most I am from Harlem, so we always love Liberation Day that is in Harlem. It's known to have the biggest festival only ration- days that its fifth of May we got free from the Nazis and <hes> every year. We celebrate our freedom. It's just really fun with a lot of artists in music. Video of me. I remember the festival Yeah Amsterdam is getting so congested so touristy. I was there for a King's Day once and there's so many boats you could walk across the canal just from boat to boat. who was just solid votes in the canals, but people were certainly having a great time Ruby. Festival that you look forward to. What would it be every year? ooh I always look forward to the food festivals. There are many food festival also around to Amsterdam. And we have a shoeless that SURF SC fall in the neighborhood of Amsterdam <hes> where people go to, they have to take off their shoes and walk bare feet it. It's <hes> of course when festival Shula Festival. They have a lot of food everywhere. Fit of electro music seems okay. Let's me to one of these food festivals. Then okay. So, what kind of food would you be enjoying? You would be enjoying some Sushi macos, but also local foods like French fries. The real food festivals hundred stance. You can try a little bit of everything

Rick Steves Amsterdam Netherlands Ruby Harlem Medieval Times Inigo Museum Art Party Shula Festival America Lucia Edinburgh King
"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

06:37 min | 2 years ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"They call the feeling Saddad and have a music tradition. They called Fido that I think expresses it beautifully here to help us understand this core character of Portuguese culture on travel with Rick Steves are tour guides. Raphael Pereira and Christina Duarte Christina Raphael. Welcome thanks very much. So sowed how would you. I'm Christina define how this is a part of the Portuguese soul sowed. It's a very very difficult word to translate in just one word. I think that we are the only country country in the world that defines all these feelings deep feelings in just one word Soda if you really want to relate that I think that the best translation is the presence of the absence. The presence of the absence of the absence exactly is that is a longing of of something that is constantly with you in your mind in your soul in your deep feelings but physically is not there so to wear of something you do not. Hello yes you have on your thoughts you have it on your heart. You have it on your on your way of looking to things when we look took to the sea for instance is something that the Portuguese have very much rooted in our culture is that we have this kind of look and I- faraway Raphael Y Y Portugal and Sao Dodd. Let me introduce an idea that my help our listeners. To understand this idea of so that you cannot understand so that rationally and that's my problem to be rational cannot understand it with your mind something that you understand which your heart. There was a Portuguese. This king from the fourteen hundreds called don't want us known has the philosopher and he wrote Soledad is the sense of the heart. So it's the the brain of your heart are Thomas or the thinking of the feeling of your heart again I I again. You're you're coming back to the logical you're going the brain of the heart of the heart not just the heart and I think it's so that it's paradoxical because it is at the same time the longing for a lost best and wanting wanting this last past two back in the future but is never gonNA come back and all do you know is never gonNA come back. You don't let go you keep loving that which you have lost and that is so that that's why the presence of the absence is constantly there do you cry. Is it a sadness or is it a kind of a love or is it a awareness of your culture and losses of the past. It's all of that. It's happy you long for something that happened in the when you reap you think about that again you are leaving again. Okay okay so now both of you. It's just like it is who you are. It's woven into your DNA and blood and for me as a tourist coming to Portugal. I want to to connect with this and I don't have the heritage and I don't quite understand how to not make it logical. How would I experience it? Where would I go to find sowed in my travels I would say go to a place where you feel comfortable alone and with yourself just to my favorite place will be by the water by the water where my eyes can look along with the line of the horizon without seeing anything really is just with the line? Just leave your is to go in your thoughts probably is just being with yourself being comfortable with silence silence. Yes with silence refuse to let me continue on this idea of Christina of the ocean because if you look at the geographic position of Portugal we are an Atlantic country. Return to the ocean and and today We know a little bit of the mysteries of the Atlantic Ocean but in the past it was not like that the ocean was mysterious. Was the unknown case. Okay so when you're looking at their arise and you're in deep relationship with the mystery of life and that is so that you cannot understand the mystery of life to reason through your mind definition Asian it is unknown. The relationship to the ocean is a key element to understand Portuguese culture and also we can connect it of course the Portuguese explorations to the ocean. Was it sustenance. Did Bring Food and did it pay for life or was it. Death was it Happy was it sad. Is that the enemy or a friend. It's the paradox again. The the ocean is something that gives you a way of life but can take away from you what you love in one second. So it's the paradox. At the same time is your second chance life. Second chance again with our geographic situation. We are pretty there. We are the less country of continent of Europe Europe and the the nose to the Western stock between Spain and the ocean so looking to the ocean is looking to our opportunities in life through. It's the past and the future together. I was talking with a very old man in Salima on the Algarve in the south coast on and I was just asking him about his childhood and today the tourism bed and breakfast and there's very little restaurants and he said when he was a little boy sitting on the same little town a port town with the colorful fishing boats dragged up on the sand he said for him. Life was only sardines and the sea in the air and the sea the sea spreading our culture culture. This is travel with Rick Steves. We're talking about Portugal and something fundamental Portugal. It's this nostalgia feeling feeling of Saddad. I'm talking with Christina Dorte and Raphael Pereira and we're talking with Lisbon guides about how as travelers we can connect we can do more than just seek cliches on stage. We can connect with the culture now. The logical thought for a traveler. Portugal Christine Raphael is to connect necked. This feeling of Sao Dot with the wonderful fodda music tradition. First of all. What is photo so father is? Our is our unique traditional music. Style that you'll only find in Portugal. It is part of what is defined the country and in our cultural DNA and expresses Portuguese soul. It expresses Portuguese uniqueness and in my opinion it is the most beautiful expression of the feeling. Soledad I can be alone in a restaurant enjoying enjoying my sardines and my wine and that can be looking into the face of the photo singer.

Portugal Rick Steves Raphael Pereira Christina Atlantic Ocean Christina Raphael Soledad Saddad Christina Duarte Sao Dodd Christine Raphael Sao Dot Europe Christina Dorte Salima Thomas Spain Algarve Lisbon
"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"We'll get in tune with how the Portuguese express their emotions in music with hunting sense of longing and melancholy. Find out how that can actually make you feel good a little later during the hour today on travel with Rick Steves I I learned of James mcclatchy love for his home in the woolley Hebrides islands of Scotland in an email. He wrote me. He wrote that he felt his life began at age six when he was adopted. Out of Glasgow Orphanage his foster parents took them to live on one of the outer Hebrides where kid could explore floor all day and where he soon learned to speak Scots Gaelic bike. Everyone Else James. It's good to have you with us so tell us your story. How always at that? You ended up growing up on this remote fringe of of the British isles that actually closer Iceland than it is to London. It's a really bizarre story. Sorry I was somewhere sitting darkness. I had no memories of living tall and one day. A door opened understo- man came in dressed in a suit only when he took me out into a room. Money put on table a big map and he pointed to the map and he said you're going there he said you're going to see your new mum and Dad to two women you were an orphan often and some home somewhere. I don't even know memories. It was someone Glasgow but there was no memories. Nothing and this was my first day of of something so significant in my life and I still remember this man pointing to this very small dot. And you're going there and I don't even remember going there for the first thing I remember was getting in their home and coming into this incredible place with big skies amazing color of C.. And this little boy in his own shorts on his jacket jacket with a teddy bear and he could put into a car with big red seeds. It trundle down this road in what can only be described as one of the most beautiful moments in your life. It was the first moment I believe I was born because this was given to me. whoa yeah the child went into the light? Why what is it about the HEBRIDES? The HEBRIDES it just those remote islands where many people live way on the on the fringe and the north west of the British isles where the HEBRIDES are divided into two sections. So we've got the inner hebrides on the air to have resulted within a heavily for example. We'll have skye terrier from Judah Connor. Ao and all those places and then the outer Hebrides where I live. We've got eleven occupied islands. Thirty miles awesome. Nina's mainland Scotland five hundred miles from Iceland. But this is one of the oldest archipelagos. In the whole of Britain we rock zero to three thousand five hundred million years old. It goes right away across the ocean towards Labrador and the people who live there still speak the native golic language and is still live and work in a way of lifestyle that it is so rare and unique to see in Scotland today. Now you wrote about how you fell in love with its beaches nature and culture talk about the beaches. The beaches are poder white pitches. We've got one of the top ten which is in Europe and Neil of Harris. But where I live in. US We've got thirty five beautiful beaches that are so accessible to people. These bitches which is in the summertime are fringed with what's known as the Mahar Land which is this unique habitat that grows next to the sea and those over one hundred seventy seven different wildflower types growing throwing there so it's a carpet of incredible floor and fry guns coming through the Air Howard the seasons different for a traveler when they go to the outer Hebrides this if we go from Spring to summer to autumn all in one it's combined so when you come there you have to expect seven seasons in one day. It's always a breeze blowing. It's fairly warm in the summer. We'll get up to maybe about seventy at the best in the wintertime. We don't snore but we don't get darkness in the summertime so we've got eighteen hours of daylight and the fun for visitors is head we sleep in that. And what's your local people do so when the summer comes we work until it gets dark so we take advantage of the light and conversely in the winter it probably is dark much of the day it gets doctrine avert Three thirty to four thirty after the shortest day. We get fifteen minutes a week and we start to see the birds. This travel with Rick Steves. I'm talking with James mcclatchy. And he's He's a Hebrides. Man What do you call a person who lives in the HEBRIDES. I Have Dan the HEBRIDEAN. And when you think about the Hebridean the population is quite sparse. How many people live in the outer Hebrides? We've got about twenty six and a half thousand twenty.

outer Hebrides James mcclatchy Rick Steves woolley Hebrides Scotland Europe Iceland Glasgow Orphanage Glasgow Judah Connor Britain Labrador Mahar Land Dan London Nina Neil Harris
"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Strange eclectic and wonderful place now. A cow De Style Mosaic Music Park is in the process of being finished by the local artists. Had you heard of that. It is not in the book but it is in the site. I am a big fan of the orange. It's on the website at lescure. It come to travel with. Rick Steves talking with Dylan. Thrust and Ella Morton about Atlas Obscure Their website is Atlas Obscure Dot Com of all the places that you've put into Your Book Atlas Obscure. I'd like each of you just to share one. That just comes to mind as a place really impactful that is wide open into visiting and that you would recommend people put on their wishlist for future. Travels Ella start with you. One that I went to a child and that made a very strong impression on me just because it was so magical was the Y.. Tomo glow worm caves in New Zealand. It's just a most amazing experience. Because you go into these dock caves and you get into a little boat and get road along as subterranean river where it's really really dock and you get asked to look up to the ceiling and you see what looks like a whole galaxy up there and each of the twinkling lights is a florescent fungus natch it's an laval stage so it's just one of those experiences way if you look at a photo of it it looks like a galaxy but when you that yeah you conquer believe what you're looking at all right and Dylan. What's your favorite? So I got a chance to go to a place in Peru about four hours outside of couse go it is is called Cashew Chaka and sometimes referred to as the last Incan Bridge. Imagine a kind of Suspension Bridge.

Dylan De Style Mosaic Music Park Ella Morton lescure Rick Steves Incan Bridge Suspension Bridge New Zealand Peru
"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

05:54 min | 2 years ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"What is the proper term to call this wildlife refuge. Can you just tell me the politics of of the name game here. It it's interesting you mention that Rick because I think this place has been so contentious that even the name is something. People can't even agree upon so just to give view an example. The the proper name of the place is the Arctic. National Wildlife Refuge in the energy industry generally referred to it as an war which is an acronym for for that title It is now referred to exclusively especially by the environmental community as the Arctic refuge or the refuge that is to underscore its value as the premier wildlife. Refuge is the largest refuge in the United States and not to diminish I think by by reducing it to an acronym dot got to diminish its importance politics even in what you call it. Okay so Chris tell us about the actual trip sure so I think from Fairbanks back to fairbanks is about ten day trip about nine days out in the Bush as they say and it required a couple of different Bush plane flights to get out there so we flew from fairbanks to Arctic village which is a rich and village so I was able to talk to some locals there on the south side of the refuge. Then we flew across the brooks range onto the north side of the Brooks range and then we floated for the next several days down the Hula Hula River. Which is one of many rivers that drain the north side of the brooks range toward the Arctic Ocean? Miles was the float I believe it. Sixty five River miles sixty five miles so just again to remind people. This is a vast natural refuge the size of South Carolina with no roads roads. And there's a town on the on the South End I guess and then you flew over that to the flat area north of the mountain range. And then you you rafted for sixty five miles else tells us about the boats. The company guides the people. You were traveling with it so I went with Arctic wild which is just a few companies that specializes in travel so in the High Arctic Very reputable company. We took like around fourteen foot large rubber inflatable rafts. And there were ten of us in in all a few guides and and the rest kind of adventurous people and kind of the rhythm of the days we would paddle we would get up and if it was a moving day we would break camp and paddle for maybe several hours and get to a camp and set up camp and then we might a lay over for a day and we would We'd maybe have have dinner. And then one of the most amazing parts about being up there is that it's it's light twenty four hours a day and so you just throw away your watch. Time has no meaning up there in in in late June and so we would maybe paddle when we wanted to. We would eat when we were hungry. We went on Hikes at eleven o'clock at night until two in the morning and then we would maybe have a snack and we would get up at eleven in the morning again and then maybe go for another hike and so it was really amazing to get on some more get in touch with the more natural pulse of life for for about a week. Didn't you in your article call that. Arctic timer yes. Does the guys told us at the beginning that we were going to do this. And every once it's in a while Someone say what time is it and the guide would just say you know the time is right now. It's right now. This is travel with Rick. Steves we're talking with adventure travel writer. Christopher Solomon. We have links to Chris's website and recent articles by Chris with today's show notes had rick steves dot com slash radio. So your your guides. How did they contribute? They actually teach you about the flora and the fauna. And they teach you about the The issues what was their agenda as teachers. Or were they just helping you make the trip safely. Yeah the guides really amazing young guys enthusiastic guys incredibly well informed about the flora and fauna and very good paddling instructors a lot of experience bears and other wildlife they knew a fair bit about The current events but you know they know they have to deal with a lot of different kinds of peoples. They didn't weigh in on the politics of some of the stuff we've talked about but extremely well versed in a lot of the natural history of the of the area so they could answer almost any question and they got a lot of odd questions from US city city. That was it comfortable. Was it safe. Did you eat. Well yeah how I would describe this kind of trip up for an experienced outdoors person. Who is up for a good time in the outdoors but who is I guess I I would say is game for anything because you can have seventy five degrees in the Arctic June or you can have twenty five degrees in snowing and so you have to go with that kind of High spiritedness in mind. You traveled a long way. Spent a lot of money. Spent a Lotta time. Tell me what you learned. What if you take away from it? Was it worth the trouble. Oh it definitely was worth the trouble. I mean I I just wanted a sense of the feeling and in value of a place like this that I could take away the show I understood it when I when I saw that acronym again and the Arctic refuge refuge and I knew I knew what it meant in some visceral way and to sit at the front of your tent with a cup of coffee and have a thousand Caribou stream past you. I understand what that place means a little more now a lot more now after ten days there. I think I've spent more time time there than some of those Alaskan politicians. Now not that. It's that much time I've spent there but I think I understand a little better. You wrote this. Someone whispered is sacred. They said that pretty well. And quite a remarkable impactful moment when somebody.

rick steves National Wildlife Refuge Arctic Ocean Arctic Chris United States Fairbanks Hula Hula River Miles South Carolina Bush five River Christopher Solomon writer
"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Christopher Solomon spent nine days on a guided river expedition through Anwar the Arctic Arctic refuge. It started in the interior of Alaska and ended up on the shores way in the north in the Arctic Ocean. He writes in a feature article that ran in the New York Times that that he wanted to see the refuge before the proposed drilling plans of the trump administration would get under way in fact the articles called exploring a timeless wilderness before for the drilling begins. Chris joins US now on travel. With Rick Steves to report on what he learned Chris. Thanks coming back great to be here. Thanks for having me so you you describe this place. which is the size of South Carolina with no roads as something nearly forgotten like some package? That's freezer burned in the back of the the national icebox I just love that. Why did you spend nine days exploring something so remote well? I am a freelance writer. Who is both a travel writer at times and who switches hats and who's also an environmental writer and I frequently have written about places that what are well off the beaten track both as a travel writer but sometimes as an environmental writer in the Arctic refuge is rather dramatic example of this it someplace that few you people end up getting too but is in the headlines and has been in the headlines for decades and frankly I get tired and of of writing about these places is that that are just up you know a scrolling headline across the TV screen? Enter so abstract that they'd really don't mean anything to me or to other people. I wanted to see this place for for myself. I wanted to understand more what was at stake and so interesting because I'll go to a country to humanize it to get to know the people that live there but you can kind of in an environmental sense humanize a place apart from humans. I mean just the reality of the place the nature of the place as a travel writer and and a person who cares about the environment you can go there and bring home a maybe a better appreciation that we can learn from your experience. How would you describe the land that that you explored? What what is this? Arctic refuge. Well it's I mean just to give you a few broad outlines. I mean the Arctic refuge itself is the size of South Carolina and the place I was particularly interested in is the coastal plain which is to say the area between the Brooks Range and the Beaufort Sea which is people would think of more more as sort of the Arctic Ocean though the water at the top of the world in that place is about the size of Delaware and that's the area that different sides have ward over for years a year decades about whether or not it should be drilled for oil. That's what the headlines have been about. In the last two years Congress passed a law to open it up to potential central drilling so most of this area is mountainous uninhabitable not very welcoming interior. But there's this flat coastal area then. Yeah Yeah and so just to be more specific you have the very rugged brooks range which is up to nine thousand feet and then it drops down and gently leans toward salt water like the bays of an an old pool table and it's it is marshy and tussock. He just kind of humming and very flat. I mean to the point the I kind of water S. tries to take in the immensity of the flatness in your New York Times article you wrote what lives here grows low because I mean between the the intensity of the seasons in the coldness and the winds. It's completely true us. I guess I should say I got moss edges and in short a very short season intense flowers. I'd never been to a landscape like it and I've had the good fortune to travel all over the place but north of the mountains north of the Arctic circle it is almost a surreal landscape Flat treeless often marshy Some people would say well. It's a wasteland but not as a beauty that's particular I would say so you wrote that. It has a brief Frenetic Arctic summer and explosion of Wildlife. Is that when you were there. Yes yes the summer is both one of the more hospitable times to go if you time it around the so. You're not there when all the mosquitoes are hatching. But then the Caribou or on the move there the predators that are following the Caribou whether it's Wolverine or or Grizzly bears two hundred and some odd different species of birds are known to Live and made in the coastal plain of the refuge a millions and millions of birds shore. Birds Geese Al's the place comes alive for for a few months and then can hunkered down in the wintertime. When you're more.

Anwar the Arctic Arctic Arctic Ocean New York Times writer Arctic Chris Christopher Solomon South Carolina Rick Steves Alaska Brooks Range Congress Beaufort Sea Delaware