35 Burst results for "Rick Steve"

"rick steves" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

04:32 min | 5 d ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"And have my finger in the pause button and i give people behind the scenes peek at how we made the shows so several thousand people tune in for that every monday night. We're doing things to keep people's travel dreams alive but the big question is when will we get out of this and be able to travel again. There will be independent travel before. It'll be stable enough for organized bus tours. You know businesses like mine. But i feel like with the advent of the vaccines the promise of the vaccines. We are on a glide path to normalcy. Now and i just had a meeting with my tour department and we have decided to plan on. We've got our hotels reserved for the tours in europe to do a few tours to test the water in august of next year and in the fall. We feel like we'll be able to do the tours. With the caveat that are tourists will be less predictable less carefully structured as before. Because we don't know. What are the conditions going to be an end. Franks house in the rakes museum or or whatever and then in twenty twenty two. I think we're going to have a reasonable year. It'll still be a little bit shakey. We don't know how the economy will be impacting the The demand but i think once these viral vaccines kickin. I'm feeling good. I didn't think there was a light at the end of the tunnel a couple of months ago but now with the vaccine and with the new government that believes in science and some top down leadership in our country. I think we're going to get through this horrible spike. Now and then we will return to normalcy and People like me just have to keep their teams together until we can. We can throttle up. And i'm feeling pretty confident. I'm really excited talking to rick steves. Jim just mentioned rick. Your thanksgiving Message tell us about what you had to say about thanksgiving this year. Oh you know in in our state like in every state. I think responsible. Governors and public leaders are reminding people please you know i'm dying to see my kids but i'm not dying to see my kids you know and and i just tried to share with with my my following with a public Public service announcement offered to my governor. It's on my facebook page. People wanted to see it at rick steves. But it's basically i'm celebrating and acknowledging how every country has harvest festivals and when we when we travel and clink glasses we realize how beautiful and interconnected the world is and we realized that joy across the sea is just as real as joy across the table. Right here at home. And and how hunger and suffering across this is just as real as sadness and struggles across her own family tables and reminded people about how thankfulness to me is is really hollow without being mindful of our relative privilege and the needs of the less fortunate and then..

rick steves facebook europe rakes museum Franks Jim
"rick steves" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast

03:35 min | 5 d ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Boston Public Radio Podcast

"For your tv show the radio the books that cetera but you have been fairly affront this season about your support for the biden harris ticket. Tell us about that. Well i just believe in government. And i i want people who are committed public servants running my government. I was just thinking about it. It's like the last four years if you like strangers have ransacked my house I and i'm i'm kind of. I'm kind of offended that people who wear flags on their lapels employed. They're more patriotic than me. I some people say i- i- america abashed because of my travels. I come home. And i. I explain how other countries do it. And i think that's better for their people in the interest of democracy and justice. And for all i mean these phrases just come out of out of our sacred documents and i feel it's america loving to care about my country a lot of times by reading to'real i find myself. I'm just kind of bait read. What do you call rebate or something on on talk. Radio shows on conservative. Talk radio shows and cheryl talk to you. But i i need to a an understanding ahead of time that you're not gonna question my commitment to america as a patriotic citizen. You can question my opinions. But i care about this country as much as any far right winger and we just have different world experiences. My world experiences getting out there and understanding the other ninety six percent of humanity and coming home and sharing how i think our country can be a better place and i'm very excited now when you see. The the cabinet picks that biden has. It's no drama. These people are are just passionate about making her life or our country a better place. They're smart they're nice. They're caring people. They they know what they're doing. We know a person in charge of education will care about education for everybody. A person charge of housing will care about housing for everybody and that makes our country stronger. And even if all you care about at your bottom line. I think it's very good news speaking of your bottom line though a legendary line from michael jordan before he Essentially to get involved in politics which he did this year was republicans buy sneakers to. How does your bottom line do when you come out issues like this rick news. Well you know. I get a lot of cross at tell me. They'll never travel with me again. I don't think they could find your upon a map. They've got no interest in travelling. They're surprised that i'm political. You know for fifteen years. I've had a book that's been quite well known called travel as a political act and i would say half the people who take our tours would be republicans and half of the people that take our tours would be democrats. There's thirty thousand people. Took our rick steves bus tours in two thousand nineteen i think From equally all over the country. And i just think there's a difference between people that are close to the world and just want to shut the place down and people that are have a good healthy difference between conservative and liberal approaches to challenges facing our country. I mean i voted for reagan and i used to respect the republican party and i think deep in their hearts that they were afraid of being intimidated by a guy who can primary them out or whatever i think there would be better dialogue between conservatives and Progressive people in our country. Right now and I frankly i'd rather have a bus load of of Republicans to take around europe than a busload of tree hugging. You know liberal people from bellingham. I i wanna make a difference..

biden rick news america rick steves michael jordan republican party bellingham cheryl reagan cabinet europe
A Bulgarian Feast

Travel with Rick Steves

06:13 min | Last week

A Bulgarian Feast

"Let's start today's culinary edition of travel. With rick steves for the sampling of bulgaria's lively food traditions. That's one country where you definitely want to be invited over when he was going to be a feast as a crossroads of dynasties for centuries gary is one of the oldest tenure in it is a proud cuisine based on all of these cultures that have come and gone it. Mir's it's complex demographic makeup end it's fascinating history. You can learn about people through their museums and art and you can also learn about a culture through its kitchen and right. now we're going to is. We're joined by stefan motza jeff and we're gonna talk about book garin cuisine seven. Thanks for joining us. Thank you for having me here. Ick stephan how does bulgaria's history and it's complex ethnic makeup show itself in your cuisine. It's interesting question because we have always been. At across of civilizations turks greeks mediterranean culture slavic culture and all of these different cultures they reflect in our cuisine. And this is the reason why. Our cuisines has many specifics. Okay so you're gonna take me out to dinner and we're going to demonstrate that. What are some dishes that would illustrate the many different invasions that bulgaria has endured the first and most traditional dishes actually liquid. It's our alcoholic beverage. Here rakiya we start every meal with rakiya typically made of grapes or other fruits while we're waiting for ourselves to come. We hear foley. Our first sakir finished your drink the rookie through the meal. Exactly okay. So the first course would be solid kind of salad may have the most traditional one East coat subsc. Sarut literally means a solid from subscribe region this region our capital cities software. So around sophea. But i find that every meal all across bulgaria the beloved chops ca salad. Yes it's like our traditional south in every single restaurant from the obscure the most upscale restaurants to those in the remote villages. This is a must on the menu. If you are familiar with the greek salads. It'll be something close tomatoes cucumbers onions peppers. The best peppers are not the robust but roasted peppers roasted peppers s and on the top. You put some cheese. Typically countries couches. Yes and increase it a slab cheese. Yes is a slab of jason here. We grated cheese. Stefan when you eat the very best shops ca salad. You've been eating at all your life in connecticut. This is really good. Why is it really good. really good. What distinguishes a chops salad. I this is the cheese. The cheese chase is important and the other thing the peppers. they must be roasted in some restaurants. They don't want to work quite much in the kitchen. So they're all but roasted peppers and cheese. I've catcher this is travel with rick steves. You're talking stephan. Both jeb about garin cuisine. Okay you've had your salad. What comes next after salad. It came to the main course. Our main course. Of course a lot of grilled and barbecued meats kickboxing or give up is means meet crooked and meet bo grilled meat balls so these are minced meat or meat balls stuck on long stick. No no no long six. No no. they're just like pure meet. Maha put on the grill and then put on your plate. What kind of spices. Oh all kinds of spices. Actually the spices that we use of course a lot of parsley a lot of do savory. These are very traditional spices and on top of that. We have one very traditional shot in a soul this mixture of different herbs. This is a sauce. It's not a sauce. It is sort salt. Yeah it's okay. Bold colorful sought and different herbs. So red paprika sage savory everything put together and we dip our breath insight and we just enjoy. That sounds very good. Do you have an influence of greece. Greece's a big culture and and a lot of ways. You have the similar environment in your cuisine. What sort of greek flavor would you find for sure. One of the most traditional meals that bulgarians belief. It is bulgarian. It is the moussaka sexually coming from our southern neighbours from from the greeks but here in our version we add just minced meat and potatoes. We don't at zucchini or eggplant inside. No potatoes mainly towards the potatoes and and the minced meat in greece. Of course they have a lot of these appetizers. You have this way of serving people family style plates yes. It is also very popular in bulgaria. The missouri style intellectually is the same word that we use for that. We have different. Appetizers some Cheese some dry sausages and also different dips. Now i'm remembering some beautiful cold soup kind of a vegetable called supporters that this is called the the atar. It is very traditional bulgarian soup during the summer. It consists of yogurt chopped cucumbers garlic. Do walnuts and a few drops of olive oil on the top sound just beautiful. Yes and it saves us during the hot summer days because it can be quite hot in the summer. Yes that's very possible. You talked about the Grilled peppers in the shop salad. But also i remember when i go to a restaurant. There's a lot of stuffed peppers as part of the main course. Yes stuffed peppers. This could be on the menu of every bulgarian family very traditional one. The most traditional one is to have stuffed pepper with rice and minced meat but also on the other hand we have a stuffed peppers with what which is of course and these are very delicious. Choose sca buick

Bulgaria Rick Steves Stefan Motza Sophea Stephan Gary Foley Mediterranean Greece Jeff Stefan JEB Connecticut Jason Missouri
Visiting Frankfurt

Travel with Rick Steves

03:50 min | 2 weeks ago

Visiting Frankfurt

"Let's start the our in one of germany's power cities frankfurt in an interview recorded just before the global pandemic lockdown typically berlin. Munich can steal the show at the german city of frankfurt shines on its own as a modern city that also offers a great look. Today's germany devastated in world war two bombings and rebuilt with a new design. Today it's a gleaming city of towering skyscrapers and powerful straddling the mine river and the mine river is find riverside park lined with museums and taverns that are popular for their apple. Wine to learn more. We're joined in our studio by two german guys. Caroliina marburg and barbara ship kofsky barbara and carolina. Thanks for joining us. Thank you having us. Currently know when people think frankfurt in germany. What do they think. What's the reputation of frankfurt. The reputation is of. I think in english it's referred to as banquet but we more often call it mine. Hatton mind being the river that runs through it and mine. Hatton the reference to manhattan so skyscrapers banks and all that which however implies a certain lack of soul and therefore a lot of germans like well frankford so it's it seems to be just bank money trade however if you actually get to know it. Compared to at first sight frankford is a love at second side because it is it has a lot of local. Beauty has a lot of local charm. But it's something you need to discover. Yeah and it does have a shiny skyline. It's a city of skyscrapers. I think mine. Hutton is a good name because in germany. There's nothing so close to new york as frankfurt and it's a beautiful sky and they take care of how it is assembled so even though it keeps growing it's nicely assembled. There's a pedestrian bridge across the mine. River the irony. The irony is energy and when you stand in the iron bridge. You've got these beautiful parks on both sides of the mine river and then you've got this skyline and it just feels like a kind of a german new york. It's actually the recommendation for some a night is to go to the other side of the mine river and sit down on the green get. Maybe a fish sooner and napa valley and then marvel at. That's gallon i you know. Most americans they go to to old stuff. I love to see modern skylines also. I like modern architecture. London is great for that and in germany. You wouldn't find that in munich that's for sure to find it in frankfurt and the the big skyscraper that's open for the tourist as i understand is the tower named after the river and it's fifty four floors tall six hundred and fifty feet up there and the terrace on top is just an amazing view at the city. Now barbara one. We're thinking about frankfurt. It also has obviously a lot of history. And i know there was a big struggle in the nineteenth century when germany was being united. There's a small states that spoke german and there was prussia and there was and those were of the leading contenders to be the force behind which germany was united but apart from prussia and bavaria. You had a bunch of little states than looked to frankfurt talk about frankfurt in eighteen. Forty eight and how that was part of this german unification while you have in frankfurt. The famous poet skier it used to be an actual protestant church and if somebody gets the german medal of honor. I'm gonna macos going to give that to that person. In that church it goes back to that assembly in eighteen forty eight. The first national assembly democrats were getting together and saying this is what we want. We don't want the monarchy. Let's be democratic country so it was sort of the home of the german Feeling for democracy rather than autocracy. Yeah you mentioned pulse church. i think. The englishman repulsed. And that's a museum for that today. Essentially can go and see paintings and etchings that period. Our german tour guides to frankfurt on travel. With rick steves barbara schakowsky and carolina marburger.

Frankfurt Germany Caroliina Marburg Kofsky Barbara Riverside Park Barbara Munich Hatton Berlin Hutton New York Manhattan Carolina Apple Prussia Napa Valley Bavaria London
Paprika In Hungary

Travel with Rick Steves

05:26 min | 3 weeks ago

Paprika In Hungary

"Let's start today's travel. With rick steves with the role a little pepper from the new world plays in that tasty cuisine of hungary. Note that today's interviews on paprika galicia where recorded just prior to the global shutdowns pepperoni as the backbone of hungarian cooking as the crucial ingredient in chicken pepper. Cash and hardy hungarian stews from mild to hot. We'll find out why this spicy so central to hungarian identity. How to best buys and pepper on your trip and we're going to learn how you can spice up. Your own meals was well to get this education hungarian paprika. We're joined by to guide tonight studio from hungary. And leonard and george farkas anna and george. Thanks for being here. Thanks for having us thrill to be well. Thank you from coming all the way from budapest a long trip. And we're gonna talk about paprika. I mean when we think of hungary we don't know a lot about hungry sometimes. But we think of paprika. What's the connection actually public. A strong connection because it is actually from the american continent and it was The physician of christopher columbus or columbus who brought it to the old world to i not to hungary of course but to spain that through the commercials of the mediterranean sea it got to the ottoman empire and when the ottoman empire extended its political power to eastern century up. We glad to not only bad things that we also got things like the patrika. What are the coffee so paprika and cuffy came as your time in the ottoman empire in paprika actually from america via columbus actually us. So i like teasing are two members and americans who is. That's why to travel here. Righ- flying through the But i like my publisher hungary. There's something romantic about having paprika in hungary. And why does hungary embrace paprika. What does it mean to hungarian. I have great micro-climate lots of sunshine. And what is very important that when we got the paprika was a hot spice and it was the hungarians who grew the might version of it it is from the nineteen twenties when in a small. Get in sega. It was kind of discovered. And since then if you come to our covid market hall you can always buy tubers the mild paprika and the hot fabric honky now. George when i go to budapest i always go to the big market hall right. But it's the name of that. Hologhan bashar knocking hungarian big market or century. You can't miss it when you're a tornado in credits. The first one out of five actually that they built at the time. And what you're going to find is well everything that hungarian cook would want to find. But certainly find peppers. See when you look for the peppers in the market. Well actually. you're not looking for peppers you looking for paprika is already well there is. It is basically a huge difference because many people don't realize it in hungary. Everything is called paprika. Let it'd be around fat skinny red yellow sweet and hot so i'm a little confused. Then so because Is it a pepper or it is a but we call it paprika but we also called a powder paprika yes because when i think of peppers and my supermarket we've got yellow ones and green ones red ones and that all of that. We call paprika even if it's Any shape really And then you have. It already powdered. If you're looking for the paprika that you cook with powdered yes okay. So it's a very unique technique to powder because One of the things that you have to be extremely careful with how you approach paprika once you grind paprika after all the time you spent with it to become dry and ready to grind. You have to do it very slowly makers as soon as you pick up speed you burn the paprika and that remains throughout its lifetime because once you come to cook it again you have to be very careful with a not to burn it because then you just have to start over again tour guides from budapest anna leonard and george farkas are filling in on the importance of peppery cup in the cuisine of hungary right now on travel with rick steves. Okay so when we're talking about this have rica and i think it goes back the days when spaces were really important. I mean spice was big money in the early days of training today today at that time and originally now why was spaces in general very important economically for people well. It was a very important product. It was expensive at that time. It was not so easy to fly from one continent to other a trip two months of making food more interesting or is it a matter of preserving food actually spicy i got to the highest study stock chrissy those who had the opportunity to get products from far far away and paprika also i was introduced for the highest stock resi in hungary after people realised it is not poisonous because i it was considered a supposin and when they discovered that it has healing effect. You know it here the colorado and screw after it they started to make its production but it was a rarity and it was very expensive so at first who is just for the very wealthy and then you learn it. It helped as medicine against scurvy and cholera. Yes but also medication. Very often is a privilege of the wealthier class. Not available for everybody. Some

Hungary George Farkas Columbus Budapest Rick Steves Cuffy Hologhan Bashar Mediterranean Sea Leonard Anna Christopher Sega George Spain Anna Leonard America Rica Chrissy
Pirates of the Carolinas

Travel with Rick Steves

03:45 min | Last month

Pirates of the Carolinas

"Let's start with some wild tales of historical characters from the coasts of North and south. Carolina. Terrence Zip key is brought to life thirteen notorious pirates in her book pirates of the Carolinas. She relates stories of ships weighted down with gold crews too drunk on rum to fight treacherous colonial officials, mutineers, privateers, and the sad end of the line for the pirates who got caught. White Barents thanks for joining us. Hi, thanks for having me. Give us some background on this. What was the golden age of piracy in the United States? Well, we really don't know how long piracy's been around It's been around at least twenty, five, hundred years they are, and there was an era during its hey day that was known as the golden age piracy, and that was the light seventeenth century to early eighteenth centuries and The United States it'd be colonial America. It was colonial. America. When they came over here and Interesting Carolina had a lot of the officials had partnerships with the pirates. We were sort of commerce poor place back then. So we actually welcomed pirates like blackbeard until they had the big crack down on piracy and that was the end of that. So is it kind of the fine line between a privateer and pirate? What's the difference? It was such a fine line rick and basically a little piece of paper because a lot of the pirates started out they were privateers. And they were involved in Queen Anne's war wars all over Europe and everything, and they were commissioned to attack enemy ships in order to get money to get booty to help fund the war and they split the money with the crown. So yes. So the the king or the governor would say you are licensed to attack ships as long as they're not our ships and you p half the booty, but you gotta give the rest to us. So we can fight war whatever right and so then imagine when the war is over and your navy is no longer needed. All these men I've ever known. There's no employment. You know it was a fine line anyway between privateer and pirate. So a lot of them just became officially pirates and they got to keep everything. Nice business model. So, now, what was the basic action? It was mostly ships going from Europe to the Americas or where did they get their best opportunities at that time? That was all these merchant ships that were doing these trade routes and so you could just sort of sit out there. It was just like fishing and just block them off. They weren't very well armed or anything they were slow because they were big heavy. Ships with a lot of merchandise onboard now also, and it really didn't matter. This is one of those falsehoods that people realize people thought pirates just want gold and pieces of eight. But the truth is that they wanted what they could sell when they got these merchant ships and they had all these realms of fine linens and silks and tobacco and rum, and all this was this was pay dirt so they would. Get this stuff, and then they would go to the next port and just like you see when you travel a lot people stealing stuff off of ships and setting up a little stand and selling a cheap absolutely, and that's what they did like a lot more in partnership with the authorities here and so when they came into port and all that they would look the other way and then they would get A. Cut for looking the other way and the merchants would get discounted goods. The pilots would get money I mean everybody was happy sounds like a win win win lose situation I'm rick this is travel with Rick Steves speaking with Zip in her books called pirates of the Carolinas. We always think pirates of the Caribbean and your book is pirates of the Carolinas. Why was there so much pirate action and the Carolina? coast. Well at that time, these were pretty poor state. So we needed to get commerce wherever we could. So pirates were good for business. So we saw there were a safe haven for pirate in fact, blackbeard who was one of the probably the biggest chapter discussed in this book, he actually set up shop actually made a home and actually came part of the community and all up and north. Carolina. No,

Terrence Zip United States White Barents Carolina Carolinas Queen Anne Europe Rick Navy Americas Rick Steves Caribbean
Pirates Of The Carolinas

Travel with Rick Steves

04:31 min | Last month

Pirates Of The Carolinas

"When I asked a couple of my friends from Ireland to join us on the show to talk about their country's legends of fairies and benches and things that go bump in the night. They were a little reluctant at first I thought it was because they didn't want to appear superstitious or maybe out of date. And that's what they wanted me to believe. But I wonder if they weren't just a little afraid. Coming up today on travel with Rick Steves we hear how the Irish comedy tells they grew up with very folk lurking in their surroundings in their testing their luck right now by making an exception to talk openly about it with us. We'll also explore San Francisco's legends of Ghost sightings from Al Capone on Alcatraz to a grieving mother who still wonders Golden Gate Park? Let's start with some wild tales of historical characters from the coasts of North and south. Carolina. Terrence Zip key is brought to life thirteen notorious pirates in her book pirates of the Carolinas. She relates stories of ships weighted down with gold crews too drunk on rum to fight treacherous colonial officials, mutineers, privateers, and the sad end of the line for the pirates who got caught. White Barents thanks for joining us. Hi, thanks for having me. Give us some background on this. What was the golden age of piracy in the United States? Well, we really don't know how long piracy's been around It's been around at least twenty, five, hundred years they are, and there was an era during its hey day that was known as the golden age piracy, and that was the light seventeenth century to early eighteenth centuries and The United States it'd be colonial America. It was colonial. America. When they came over here and Interesting Carolina had a lot of the officials had partnerships with the pirates. We were sort of commerce poor place back then. So we actually welcomed pirates like blackbeard until they had the big crack down on piracy and that was the end of that. So is it kind of the fine line between a privateer and pirate? What's the difference? It was such a fine line rick and basically a little piece of paper because a lot of the pirates started out they were privateers. And they were involved in Queen Anne's war wars all over Europe and everything, and they were commissioned to attack enemy ships in order to get money to get booty to help fund the war and they split the money with the crown. So yes. So the the king or the governor would say you are licensed to attack ships as long as they're not our ships and you p half the booty, but you gotta give the rest to us. So we can fight war whatever right and so then imagine when the war is over and your navy is no longer needed. All these men I've ever known. There's no employment. You know it was a fine line anyway between privateer and pirate. So a lot of them just became officially pirates and they got to keep everything. Nice business model. So, now, what was the basic action? It was mostly ships going from Europe to the Americas or where did they get their best opportunities at that time? That was all these merchant ships that were doing these trade routes and so you could just sort of sit out there. It was just like fishing and just block them off. They weren't very well armed or anything they were slow because they were big heavy. Ships with a lot of merchandise onboard now also, and it really didn't matter. This is one of those falsehoods that people realize people thought pirates just want gold and pieces of eight. But the truth is that they wanted what they could sell when they got these merchant ships and they had all these realms of fine linens and silks and tobacco and rum, and all this was this was pay dirt so they would. Get this stuff, and then they would go to the next port and just like you see when you travel a lot people stealing stuff off of ships and setting up a little stand and selling a cheap absolutely, and that's what they did like a lot more in partnership with the authorities here and so when they came into port and all that they would look the other way and then they would get A. Cut for looking the other way and the merchants would get discounted goods. The pilots would get money I mean everybody was happy sounds like a win win win lose situation I'm rick this is travel with Rick Steves speaking with Zip in her books called pirates of the Carolinas. We always think pirates of the Caribbean and your book is pirates of the Carolinas. Why was there so much pirate action and the Carolina? coast. Well at that time, these were pretty poor state. So we needed to get commerce wherever we could. So pirates were good for business. So we saw there were a safe haven for pirate in fact, blackbeard who was one of the probably the biggest chapter discussed in this book, he actually set up shop actually made a home and actually came part of the community and all up and north. Carolina.

Terrence Zip America White Barents Rick Steves Carolina Carolinas Al Capone Golden Gate Park Ireland San Francisco Queen Anne Europe Rick Navy Americas Caribbean
Traveling To Medellin

Travel with Rick Steves

07:26 min | Last month

Traveling To Medellin

"Let's open today's travel with Rick Steves travel writer Dave Seminar. He took his whole family to many in Columbia which used to have a reputation as the headquarters for a dangerous drug cartel. Our interview was recorded just before the global lockdowns kicked in. Hey. Thanks for having me on the show wreck. So you went to Medigene I, mean the image of Medina's like scariest a generation ago is one of the most dangerous cities on the planet. That's right. But but it certainly isn't any longer. I mean these days the murder rate in Medellin is lower than New Orleans Saint, Louis Chicago and several other cities as well. It's an amazing turnaround and. Tourism. Is a booming part of the economy I was just there. My son loves it so much. He bought a condo there and I was there for years this last year with him and we were standing on his balcony and and everybody was blown up fireworks and My son had a Colombian friend there with him and and we were talking about. It and when the Colombians see those fireworks, they remember in the days of Pablo. Escobar. That's what they would explode when they made a deal in the United States with the with the drug trade they're not making deals with the drug trade anymore with the Pablo Escobar outfit that's just celebrating. So they've gone from supplying America's cocaine habit to actually building A. City on live biting entrepreneurs. That's true. They I Columbia is still does produce eighty percent of the cocaine I mean to be frank. However look I went there with my ten and twelve year old sons and my wife, and I would never take them to a place that I thought was too dangerous. So I really consulted with a lot of different people before. Going, there, however, my parents and several other people said, Columbia. You're taking your sons to Columbia you nuts but I did my research and I talked to enough people who had had great experiences there that I felt comfortable doing it and we spent two weeks traveling all around the country and I felt very safe. The whole time tell us about the public tour. It was interesting. You know my wife said Pablo Escobar to are you sure that that's appropriate for our sons who are ten and twelve years old side I called one of the tour companies that had good reviews on trip advisor and he said Oh yes our tour is good for children aged six and up said really okay. Well, let's do it. We thought maybe we can teach them. Okay. He's a bad guy you know here's the. Evils of drugs and teach them a little bit about why the drug violence in and I thought maybe they a lot of it might go over their head but I thought well, they'll learn something. Let's do it but you go through a you goes through your neighborhood community thirteen, which is now trendy. It's filled with street art and is just a festival of good living not good living. It's still a poor area but a festival of happiness. Community Thirteen is sort of an interesting area I've I've found it to be one of the more disappointing stops to be honest with you on the tour I mean, it doesn't really have much to do with Pablo Escobar although it was a neighborhood that was wracked by gang violence, and then in two thousand eleven, the government installed a series of escalators there the idea was. Allowing people to be able to move safely through the community, get from their hilltop neighborhoods down to where jobs and transportation and things of that are. But when I was there in July about the experience maybe if you traveled at a different time of year, you might have an off more authentic experience, but it was absolutely full of tourists which really shocked me because here is. Sort of an impoverished neighborhood that has all credit to them. I. Think it's wonderful. They found a way to turn the violence of the neighborhood into a marketable commodity, but it was absolutely crawling with tourists and I sort of felt like, wow I really don't like going to places that are too full of tourists. So for me, it fell a little bit flat to be. Quite honest. But maybe if I visited another time of year, I would have I would have liked more. No, I don't think. So I mean I was there in the winter but to me, it was a former violence ridden gang ridden community that now is a kind of a tourist trap and it just like an amusement pier in San Francisco, almost or something like that. And what was really fun was the street art I mean, the street art was like it's like going through an art gallery and it's all this edgy colorful tropical kind of street art and you've got it all together by escalators I can imagine before those escalators came you know ten years ago you would have desperately poor people and You'd have the intimidation of the gangs and all of that and and the high murder rate and today there's there's not a hint of that and the escalators let people connect and I think you know the way Columbia has invested in its infrastructure has given poor. Barrios the confidence and the feeling that this is progress and changes possible and and one thing great about going to Medine is you write these cable cars because the city is in a very mountainous area and the poorest communities are pushed way up the mountain sides. But these cable cars, they're just like cable cars had a ski resort. They connect the people in the poor neighborhoods with the good jobs and the good shopping and the good entertainment down in the valley floor and writing these cable cars was just a kind of a celebration of community to me what was your experience on those cable cars? Well I love the cable cars just like you know I took the cable cars up to the park. RV. which is it's a long ride as interesting things that you take two different sets of cable cars. You can take one set of cable cars, which sort of goes through some of the rough hillside neighborhoods, and that one is actually fairly quite cheap to go through and actually when you're. On that first cable car, you're actually getting ordinary people who live in those neighborhoods coming on and off of your Gondola but then to go on the second. Gondola. which takes all the way up the mountain up to the park RV, which is just fantastic and I do recommend that that significantly more expensive so that that second cable you know Gondola is more for tourists in it's it. Would be too expensive for people who live in the humble neighborhoods. But as a traveler, it's worth it's worth it to do both at the lower part words the transportation for the community you you get a sense of the community and you get to talk to people. It's Kinda cool because you're floating above all of these barriers and then after the top city, stop you sort of plateauing you. Go across this amazing lush forest in a giant National Park and they're the only people still on the cable cars are tourists who can afford that but you get to the terminal point way in the middle of the park and I think the locals will come in there by bus, which would be much cheaper because it is a a wonderful jumping off point for for hikes in this nature reserve. Yeah. So the neighborhood that Pablo built I mean now it's called Barrio Pablo Escobar, Pablo Escobar's. But it was originally called million sin to a jury US medicine without shantytowns and the idea was he was really trying to improve his image in the country and he built about three hundred and sixty six humble homes in this neighborhood for people who are down on their locker many of them were homeless and actually living in a garbage dump area and in that region and you talk about street art they're. So there's a number of murals celebrating Pablo. Escobar would say that most Colombians despised Pablo, Escobar and everything he stood for. However in this little neighborhood and I met some of them. There are people who still revere him as quite a small minority of Colombians I would say, but you see mural several murals right in this borrow Pablo Escobar. Depicting. El Patron the hero, the Robin Hood that you're talking about in and some of those people, and there are some young hustlers there who are very interesting entrepreneurs. One of them has created, which you'll find in in the middle of this neighborhood is a Pablo Escobar memories. Museum now there was another Pablo Escobar Museum that was run by Pablo's brother, which was actually shut down and it wasn't in this neighborhood with the government closed that one down. This one is sort of a homemade sort of museum that some young hustlers in the neighborhood of made, and they also sell visits to the US through some of the homes where you can tour the homes and. It's kind of it's bizarre but yeah.

Barrio Pablo Escobar Pablo Escobar Pablo Escobar Museum Columbia United States Murder Rick Steves Medina Cocaine Robin Hood Dave Seminar Writer Medellin America San Francisco New Orleans Saint Barrios A. City National Park
Travel To Medellin

Travel with Rick Steves

05:32 min | Last month

Travel To Medellin

"Let's open today's travel with Rick Steves travel writer Dave Seminar. He took his whole family to many in Columbia which used to have a reputation as the headquarters for a dangerous drug cartel. Our interview was recorded just before the global lockdowns kicked in. Hey. Thanks for having me on the show wreck. So you went to Medigene I, mean the image of Medina's like scariest a generation ago is one of the most dangerous cities on the planet. That's right. But but it certainly isn't any longer. I mean these days the murder rate in Medellin is lower than New Orleans Saint, Louis Chicago and several other cities as well. It's an amazing turnaround and. Tourism. Is a booming part of the economy I was just there. My son loves it so much. He bought a condo there and I was there for years this last year with him and we were standing on his balcony and and everybody was blown up fireworks and My son had a Colombian friend there with him and and we were talking about. It and when the Colombians see those fireworks, they remember in the days of Pablo. Escobar. That's what they would explode when they made a deal in the United States with the with the drug trade they're not making deals with the drug trade anymore with the Pablo Escobar outfit that's just celebrating. So they've gone from supplying America's cocaine habit to actually building A. City on live biting entrepreneurs. That's true. They I Columbia is still does produce eighty percent of the cocaine I mean to be frank. However look I went there with my ten and twelve year old sons and my wife, and I would never take them to a place that I thought was too dangerous. So I really consulted with a lot of different people before. Going, there, however, my parents and several other people said, Columbia. You're taking your sons to Columbia you nuts but I did my research and I talked to enough people who had had great experiences there that I felt comfortable doing it and we spent two weeks traveling all around the country and I felt very safe. The whole time tell us about the public tour. It was interesting. You know my wife said Pablo Escobar to are you sure that that's appropriate for our sons who are ten and twelve years old side I called one of the tour companies that had good reviews on trip advisor and he said Oh yes our tour is good for children aged six and up said really okay. Well, let's do it. We thought maybe we can teach them. Okay. He's a bad guy you know here's the. Evils of drugs and teach them a little bit about why the drug violence in and I thought maybe they a lot of it might go over their head but I thought well, they'll learn something. Let's do it but you go through a you goes through your neighborhood community thirteen, which is now trendy. It's filled with street art and is just a festival of good living not good living. It's still a poor area but a festival of happiness. Community Thirteen is sort of an interesting area I've I've found it to be one of the more disappointing stops to be honest with you on the tour I mean, it doesn't really have much to do with Pablo Escobar although it was a neighborhood that was wracked by gang violence, and then in two thousand eleven, the government installed a series of escalators there the idea was. Allowing people to be able to move safely through the community, get from their hilltop neighborhoods down to where jobs and transportation and things of that are. But when I was there in July about the experience maybe if you traveled at a different time of year, you might have an off more authentic experience, but it was absolutely full of tourists which really shocked me because here is. Sort of an impoverished neighborhood that has all credit to them. I. Think it's wonderful. They found a way to turn the violence of the neighborhood into a marketable commodity, but it was absolutely crawling with tourists and I sort of felt like, wow I really don't like going to places that are too full of tourists. So for me, it fell a little bit flat to be. Quite honest. But maybe if I visited another time of year, I would have I would have liked more. No, I don't think. So I mean I was there in the winter but to me, it was a former violence ridden gang ridden community that now is a kind of a tourist trap and it just like an amusement pier in San Francisco, almost or something like that. And what was really fun was the street art I mean, the street art was like it's like going through an art gallery and it's all this edgy colorful tropical kind of street art and you've got it all together by escalators I can imagine before those escalators came you know ten years ago you would have desperately poor people and You'd have the intimidation of the gangs and all of that and and the high murder rate and today there's there's not a hint of that and the escalators let people connect and I think you know the way Columbia has invested in its infrastructure has given poor. Barrios the confidence and the feeling that this is progress and changes possible and and one thing great about going to Medine is you write these cable cars because the city is in a very mountainous area and the poorest communities are pushed way up the mountain sides. But these cable cars, they're just like cable cars had a ski resort. They connect the people in the poor neighborhoods with the good jobs and the good shopping and the good entertainment down in the valley floor and writing these cable cars was just a kind of a celebration of community to me what was your experience on those cable cars? Well I love the cable cars just like you know I took the cable cars up to the park. RV. which is it's a long ride as interesting things that you take two different sets of cable cars. You can take one set of cable cars, which sort of goes through some of the rough hillside neighborhoods, and that one is actually fairly quite cheap to go through and actually when you're. On that first cable car, you're actually getting ordinary people who live in those neighborhoods coming on and off of your Gondola but then to go on the second. Gondola. which takes all the way up the mountain up to the park RV, which is just fantastic and I do recommend that that significantly more expensive so that that second cable you know Gondola is more for tourists in it's it. Would be too expensive for people who live in the humble neighborhoods. But as a traveler, it's worth it's worth it to do

Pablo Escobar Columbia Dave Seminar New Orleans Saint Rick Steves Medellin Escobar Medina United States Pablo Louis Chicago Medine Barrios Government San Francisco
Travel To Medellin

Travel with Rick Steves

05:32 min | Last month

Travel To Medellin

"Let's open today's travel with Rick Steves travel writer, Dave Seminar. He took his whole family to many in Columbia which used to have a reputation as the headquarters for a dangerous drug cartel. Our interview was recorded just before the global lockdowns kicked in. Hey thanks for having me on the show wreck. So you went to Medigene I mean the image of Medina's like scariest a generation ago is one of the most dangerous cities on the planet. That's right. But but it certainly isn't any longer I mean these days the murder rate in Medellin is lower than New Orleans Saint Louis Chicago and several other cities as well. It's an amazing turnaround and Tourism. Is a booming part of the economy. I was just there. My son loves it so much. He bought a condo there and I was there for years this last year with him and we were standing on his balcony and and everybody was blown up fireworks and My son had a Colombian there with him and and we were talking about it. And when the Colombians see those fireworks, they remember in the days of Pablo Escobar. That's what they would explode when they made a deal in the United States with the with the drug trade, they're not making deals with the drug trade anymore with the Pablo Escobar outfit that's just celebrating. So they've gone from supplying America's cocaine habit to actually building a city. On live biting entrepreneurs that's true. They I Columbia is still does produce eighty percent of the cocaine I mean to be frank. However, look I went there with my ten and twelve year old sons and my wife and I would never take them to a place that I thought was too dangerous. So I really consulted with a lot of different people before. Going there however, my parents and several other people said Columbia, you're taking your sons to Columbia you nuts. But I did my research and I talked to enough people who had had great experiences there that I felt comfortable doing it and we spent two weeks traveling all around the country and I felt very safe. The whole time tell us about the public tour. It was interesting. You know my wife said Pablo Escobar, to are you sure that that's appropriate for our sons who are ten and twelve years? Old Side I called one of the tour companies that had good reviews on trip advisor and he said Oh yes. Our tour is good for children aged six and up said really okay. Well, let's do it. We thought maybe we can teach them. Okay. He's a bad guy. You know here's. The evils of drugs and teach them a little bit about why the drug violence in and I thought maybe they a lot of it might go over their head but I thought well, they'll learn something. Let's do it but you go through you goes through neighborhood community thirteen, which is now trendy it's filled with street art and is just a festival of good living not good living. It's still a poor area but a festival of happiness yeah. Community Thirteen is sort of an interesting area I've I've found it to be one of the more disappointing stops to be honest with you on the tour I. mean it doesn't really have much to do with Pablo Escobar though it was a neighborhood that was wracked by gang violence, and then in two thousand eleven, the government installed a series of escalators there the idea was. Allowing people to be able to move safely through the community get from their hilltop neighborhoods down to where jobs and transportation and things of that are. But when I was there in July about the experience maybe if you traveled at a different time of year, you might have an off more authentic experience but it was absolutely full of tourists which really shocked me because here is. Sort of an impoverished neighborhood that has all credit to them I think it's wonderful. They found a way to turn the violence of the neighborhood into a marketable commodity, but it was absolutely crawling with tourists and I sort of felt like, wow, I really don't like going to places that are too full of tourists. So for me, it fell a little bit flat to be. Quite honest. But maybe if I visited another time of year, I would have I would have liked more no I don't think so I mean I was there in the winter but to me, it was a former violence ridden gang ridden community that now is a kind of a tourist trap and it just like an amusement pier in San Francisco. Almost or something like that. And what was really fun was the street art I mean the street art was like it's like going through an art gallery and it's all this edgy colorful tropical street art and you've got it all together by escalators. I can imagine before those escalators came you know ten years ago you would have desperately poor people and You'd have the intimidation of the gangs and all of that and and the high murder rate and today there's there's not a hint of that and the escalators let people connect and I think you know the way Columbia has invested in its infrastructure has given poor barrios. The confidence and the feeling that this is progress and changes possible and and one thing great about going to Medine is you write these cable cars because the city is in a very mountainous area and the poorest communities are pushed way up the mountain sides. But these cable cars, they're just like cable cars at a ski resort they connect the people in the poor neighborhoods with the good jobs and the good shopping and the good entertainment down in the valley floor and writing these cable cars was just a kind of a celebration of community to me what was your experience on those cable cars? Well. I love the cable cars just like you know I took the cable cars up to the park RV, which is it's a long ride as interesting things that you take two different sets of cable cars. You can take one set of cable cars, which sort of goes through some of the rough hillside neighborhoods, and that one is actually fairly quite cheap to go through and actually when. You're on that first cable car. You're actually getting ordinary people who live in those neighborhoods coming on and off of your Gondola. But then to go on the second Gondola, which takes all the way up the mountain up to the park RV, which is just fantastic and I do recommend that that significantly more expensive so that that second cable you know Gondola is for tourists in its it. Would be too expensive for people who live in the humble neighborhoods. But as a traveler, it's worth it's worth it to

Pablo Escobar Columbia Cocaine Murder Rick Steves Medina United States Dave Seminar Medellin Writer America Advisor New Orleans Medine Louis Chicago San Francisco
Dutch Masters

Travel with Rick Steves

04:57 min | Last month

Dutch Masters

"Instead of being paid to glorify the church and nobility like so much of Europe, the art in the low countries was paid for by the wealth of the Protestant merchant class are guides are Nico Febrile who lives near Bruges in West Flanders and Jodi angles door than she lives in Harlem North Holland? Nicole Yoda. Thanks for being here. Thank you. Thank you for having us. So from your perspective as a guide in the Netherlands ca you see that divide in the art world? Well, of course, it's a lot about the culture of country and like you said, our culture is all about brought stations and we had thorough formation and that are really created a big difference between some art in other countries in us. So we have very basic churches. They're all stripped down from older statues but also are monster pieces re rarely. See. Any Christian. Seems but we always have the Merchan's and because we had a Dutch republic very soon after. Yeah. So that is of you. If you see a bread of his biblical theme, it'll be from the Bible but it won't be from some Pope or something like that. Yes. If you think about you, you mentioned the reformation you have a huge church on the main square in Harlem that was a Catholic Church and it was completely painted all the pillars were painted and everything now when you go in yeah. Washed away whitewashed. Yes. Whitewashed. Yeah So a reformation came we had iconoclast where all the distance took it down and the art was little gone, and how do you recognize what the Protestants really brought into the churches was music and that is how they really lived up churches. So in Harlem, you have this giant organ. which more than five thousand pipes you can still go in and listen to it every Thursday In the summer periods. Then you have a concert for free you can visit and you can hear his Oregon play you can just. How old's organised, we've come so a ten year old Mozart played in this. So it's a it's a very different experience and it's very beautiful. So maybe four or five hundred years ago it was Catholic and then you have the reformation it becomes Protestant partisans come in there and they were kind of sort of kind of mean her. Very extreme. Throughout. All the statues they busted lot of the windows they painted everything white and they put up this amazing organ that goes it's his tallest building. It goes way to the top of those arches. Wild, it is wild and that's something that when you know the story behind, it makes a little more sense when you have a good information, know every Thursday there's a free concert Nico when you think about the Great Dutch painters who comes to mind. Of course, he think about people like don't finance house to meet. My personal is Yon Stein. Johnston because he has these scenes of just people having fun at home and it's sometimes a bit double if what he wants to say with paintings. inning. Is it the warning that you shouldn't be so? Joyful maybe in life. Or they're just fun to watch because there is there's a lot of folk way stem. Yeah. It's like I'm like don't be wasteful or if you gossip things bad things will happen or there's all these little little lessons about life but not really preaching from the Church nobody you could interpret it that way and people could hang it in their houses and say, this is what we shouldn't be doing. Right but I look at them as okay. They're having fun to me. It's a little intimate look at life for hundred years ago or whenever he owns Dean was painting, but that's a good name to. Note Yawn Seen S. T. E. N. S. these when I go to a gallery in the Netherlands I, see a lot of small paintings by a lot of people whose names I don't know rather than a few big paintings by people who are superstars and highly paid, and you got to think it's a different sort of clientele. If you're painting a King or some bishop, you can paint something big and really expensive. But in the Netherlands when they got rid of the king and they got rid of the pope, they got to have the open market business people for their clientele and it needs to be affordable. So you have small appreciate art. Or. Not Actually N- definitely. But like you said it would be anonymous or from the same workshop or around that's what you would read. You see the values of the day there I, mean, above the dining room table, you might have a still life. Yes. Still lifes is not a personal favourite, but that's something that you will find a lot. Would you see in still life because of fruits, baskets, fish 'cause it's the Netherlands. So they would have a love of fish in there as well. Easy to catch

The Netherlands Harlem Yon Stein Johnston Nico Febrile Harlem North Holland Nicole Yoda Europe Jodi Catholic Church Bruges Merchan Oregon West Flanders Dean S. T. E. N.
Travel to Zagreb

Travel with Rick Steves

04:38 min | 2 months ago

Travel to Zagreb

"Let's start with a look at a European capital that's often overlooked by the beach crowd who enjoy Croatia's crystal clear coastline. But miss out on the scene in its capital city. It has a distinctively modern take on old world charm and it's just a few hours inland. To tell us about saga we're joined now by local guide Darya goateed. She's joined by Ben Curtis who writes about the Balkan regions elaborate history and thinks that Croatia's best period may be now Darya in Ben Welcome my pleasure. Same. Thank you for having. US Doria. You're from Zagreb your guide in Zagreb, a lot of Americans no Dubrovnik. Venice and a lot of Americans know the Anna Zagreb is right there in the middle. What should we know about Zagreb? Nanna. Saga is I would say the mix of. All these big capitals around and all these much better known cities around from historical perspective It was influenced by different cities and countries. So we have a little bit of all of that. What's an example? How is it a little bit of? How is it a little bit of Italy says it a little bit of the Slavic World So? obas part of the hops Burke monarchy later austro-hungary for few hundred. Years. And then architecture in town is very much what we would call out through nor Central European. So the mixture of Hungarian hungarian-austrian. We don't have much Dubrovnik textures that. Is Zog. Is completely different about the cuisine that scene is also very influenced by Austria but not only that we do eat struggles and. A lot of meat and potatoes and then on the other hand we also eat. A lot of Pasta beat some. We are very sensitive on coughing, and then we also have the Turkish influence because arguable also for few centuries, just about forty, five, fifty miles Sir north from the Ottoman Empire boarder okay. It's a crossroads release across through the s the Ben Curtis here in American who has a fascination and a deep interest in this part of Europe how would you say Zagreb is unique Zagreb is unique for being this gem of a central European capital. So everybody can measure saying they know Budapest, Vienna, they know Prague, but here's this. Gym of a historical city that hardly any American visits right and even though Zagreb stars rising on the Tourism Front these days but you can go there and it's not gonna be jammed with busloads of tourists from all over the place you're not gonNA hear a lot of other North American accents and you're going to be able to experience the city where the fabric of locals you're going to be sitting in a cafe with mostly other people from Zagreb, and that's great and it's hard to find that in Dubrovnik are in Vienna these days a year. Exactly. So if you had two nights in in one Danes, is there enough to keep you busy. Yeah. For sure I think, what would you do if you're gonNA show me around for a day the it's a great kind of one day stop if you're coming in and out for some of the coast. So Zagreb surprisingly has some of I think are the best museums of its kind in Europe now they're quirky right? You don't. Go desire grab for the Louvre or something like that. But you go to Zagreb for these unusual small museums like the Museum of naive art, which is great sort of not formally trained perhaps painters but really characteristic art with peasant themes. The famous one which is kind of made headlines around the world is a museum of broken relationships which is filled with these stories of couples who have broken up the objects that they have Meant something to them and they've given it this museum and so it's just a really interesting kind of poignant sometimes hilarious trip through people's relationships. So when we think of this naive art, I love this idea because you go to most art galleries in Europe Bennett, the opposite of naive arted this refined fully embraced high-society art but naive art is by definition just unschooled hasn't Sir Working People that just had a passion for painting. Exactly but are often very, very talented even if they didn't train at the academy or something like that but they're expressing the lives and cultures and artistic visions of people from the rural areas and it's genius really an undiscovered genius that happen to come out of the farm community or something absolutely. I love that museum by the way that that's really one of the unique things in Europe and it is in the capital of Croatia Zagreb.

Zagreb Croatia Zagreb Anna Zagreb Europe Darya Goateed Croatia Museum Of Naive Art Ben Curtis Dubrovnik Central European United States Austria Ottoman Empire Venice Doria Bennett Pasta Italy Budapest Vienna
Places to Fly Fish

Travel with Rick Steves

03:51 min | 2 months ago

Places to Fly Fish

"Desportivo fly-fishing has become a favorite way for many urbanites to decompress. And that's how Chris Santillo started his fifty places recreation guides. He now also writes about places to paddle bicycle golf end snowboard, but his number one passion is fly fishing Chris thanks for joining US great to be here, Rick. Thanks what is it about fly fishing that those who know it and love it or so passionate about I've thought about this a lot oftentimes when I'm out on the river and I think that people come at it from a lot of different directions I. I think there's the chance to be out in nature in a quiet and beautiful place. There's an old saying that's trout don't live in ugly places and neither do bone Fisher Tarp in Atlantic Salmon. So you're usually in pretty pristine places that can support these fish species. About especially, if you're river fishing about being in the water, I don't mean to sound cliche but there is something about the oneness of being with the river in that sense of flow I drive a lot over mountains and past beautiful rivers in Europe and the United States and I see a lot of people with hip Bhutan standing deepen in the river and there is something. Special about that I would imagine you have there is a feeling of being. In the moment and in the flow of life of the rivers as a metaphor for flow of life and time passing, and it's never the same water that you're standing in and I think there is something profound rap subliminal about that that has an appeal There is an analytic. A fly fishing I think it has appealed to people the whole idea of trying to determine what the Fisher eating at a given time, and then trying to either look in your fly box and find the the right fly that seems to match the kind of bugs at the trout might eating or I know some friends will bring a fly tying vice in some feathers and hair and hooks to the side of a stream, and if they don't have what the right bug is at the time or the right fly, they will go and tie it. Up on the spot and hope that they're going to make that match matching the hatches, the term that writer named Ernie Schreiber came up with years ago the hatch being the kind of insect that is occurring on the river at that time but just having the arsenal and matching the flame with the others that are being eaten that's probably integral to being successful fly, Fisher and very important, and you'll find some anglers that are you know better equipped than others I've been out with some friends who will have literally five hundred or a thousand flies. I usually have one or two boxes and and hope that what I have. Oh, cover things ninety percent of the time, but there's always ten percent that doesn't work and one blanket work. Great. This morning in another flight would work great in the same hole this afternoon exactly because what happens on many river systems as you will have different sorts of insects emerging coming out of river or settling down upon the river at different times of the day you might have may flies that are. Popping up from the bottom of the river as Nymphs, and then turning into adult bugs and being on the surface in the morning, and that might be a white insect, the size of your Pinky Nail, and then in the afternoon as it gets warmer, the grasshoppers might become active and the wind may be him into the river and they are green and yellow, and they're the size of your thumb. It's sort of a a battle going on what are the it is it's man versus nature. Chris and Taylor has written a dozen best selling books about outdoor adventures in his fifty places series. One of his titles collects the thoughts of Passionate Anglers Y. I, fly fish and their favorite fishing places are covered in fifty more places to fly fish before you die you'll also see Chris's byline and major sport fishing publications.

Chris Santillo United States Desportivo Atlantic Salmon Europe Ernie Schreiber Bhutan Fisher Writer Rick Taylor
Travel To Bulgaria

Travel with Rick Steves

04:30 min | 2 months ago

Travel To Bulgaria

"Bulgaria is a small and mysterious country. It's one of those lands that Americans just don't visit very much. It's long faced east impact in communist times it was famously subservient to the USSR. But. Of course, there's lots more to see in Bulgaria and you can learn about a fascinating culture. When you go there to Bulgarian guides, joined us in our studio to help give us a better insight and a little better appreciation of the cultural. Bulgaria. We're joined by Stephan Bush job and you're. Stephanie thanks for being here. Thank you our pleasure now. Americans we don't know as much about Bulgaria as we know about Poland or Germany or Italy, or Greece that. It's not in the news it's signing country of about seven million people probably, not not a lot of Bulgarians have emigrated to the United States like Polish people. So many know when I think of Bulgaria I think of a back in the communist times a little country that was more friendly with Moscow, than the other countries in eastern Europe in fact, your leader little sort of an communist dictator two-door shifts of Shipka He. Actually proposed that Bulgaria joined the USSR and become the Sixteenth Republic. Is that true that? Yes that's still in the early nineteen sixties shifts for wanted us to be so close to the Soviets. So he proposed to become the sixteen republic. Why so subservient? The USSR you know because as a small country, we have always tried to find our big brother because you're right there in the middle of the Habsburgs and Russia and and. The meat of all those crossroads and your. Little so easy to gobble up if you're a big giant country absolutely, but fortunately, the Soviets were in the middle of the Cuban missile crisis saw they were busy and they were not interested in having trouble themselves Khrushchev or whoever was the dictator say There's a joke in becan communist time. The biggest animal in the world was the Bulgarian pig because the head was in Bulgarian. The body was in Moscow I. Was that funny. So many years ago he mentioned the pick when you have the body of the pick of the good meat is there. So we produced Oh the good stuff food and it was expected to the Soviet. Union. So practically, this is the reason why still nowadays in Russia they remember all those fruits and very funds legal, Gary, all good stuff that came from Bulgaria. So the big shot in Moscow and wind as well. Of course, all the Bulgarian wine. Oh, the best bogere in one when Russia. Well today you don't have that problem. You've got wonderful traditional food and drink and and Yuri. What is one thing we should remember about the food of Bulgaria when we visit incredibly fresh everything is fresh. What's been out of the garden? What's IT traditional? A traditional meal I I remember some beautiful soups. You must have a salad. You must argue with Salads and a little bit of Brandy. As world it goes with the Salads. We always have the strong alcohol first, and then we go to the wine and then we go to the beer you start with the strong alcohol yes, we do. We do. Why is that Stephan? It is deep tradition. What my parents belief is that when we have a trunk alcohol to open your perceptions the food, this is the best way to taste it when you have a few sips of follow traditional. Brandy. Code. Of Akia. So when I'm cooking, if people have the strong alcohol, I can actually eat my food. It helps it helps a lot. Gary is the only country in the European Union that has this surreal alphabet I was in Bulgaria when you're on May twenty fourth, that's big celebration. Why does Bulgaria have this unique alphabet and what's the cultural background of that? I remember that day because we were actually fuming Bulgaria episode into our in my hometown. So it is really important to understand these different alphabet because this is an alphabet which helped to spread the Christianity because it's surreal religious named after Saint. And who was his side and his brother Metallica's Methodius and Cyril. So they innovated this alphabet so they could write down the holies holy scripture scriptures and people could read them exactly in idea to have the Christianity. Kuo's to the heart close the. So to understand the holy wisdom to understand the words written, what century was that this was in the eight, hundred, eight, hundred, fifty, five,

Bulgaria Ussr Moscow Poland Stephan Bush Gary Stephanie Khrushchev United States Sixteenth Republic KUO Metallica Yuri Habsburgs European Union Europe Italy Greece Germany
How about a language vacation

Travel with Rick Steves

03:02 min | 2 months ago

How about a language vacation

"Tour Guide Kerry Walker is an American language, but she's worked on her language goes in Central America and was immersing herself in Italian lessons when we last checked in with her Kerry, where have you gone in Italy to study the language I? So I started off in a school at Monte Pacino School in town so I Did that for about a week, which was a great start but then left I really needed more so I quickly learned that private lessons for me were the way to go really get the most being my book I said my last two studies have been in home stays with my teacher. So private is better than group for you for me, but is it more expensive because it's one on one? It is more expensive. But my goal is to really learn the language and order to do that. I realized that I really need that one on one, which is focused exactly on where I am where my misconceptions are the things that I want fine tune, and also that the places that I want to go may teacher can take me there much more quickly they can tailor the teaching to your exact interests you know all over the. World there's a lot of people earning their living despite teaching. English. As a second language is it can flip flop it. Are there a lot of people in Italy that earned their living or supplement their income by teaching foreigners Italian without question it's a big business. How you learn about that you know there's a lot of different ways. There's not one place to go to I. Really do it a lot of different ways I. Just asking people, where did you study? So I, got my last home state through my Italian tutor back home had another student that I spoke to I. So I think really getting those references from other people. Also some research, there's a lot of people now that have contacts with teachers all over Italy, and then you move in and you just how many hours a day or a week where he works. So I did I did about four to six hours a day, but I ate breakfast lunch and dinner with that family our table with ALFRESCO. Semi my classroom was Tuscany alfresco outside as living it. I was I was all those things that I needed to learn. My teacher was right there. So so it's it's a lot of work I I've never bothered I I have. A great time in Italy why would you spend all the time and money learning the language I'd love connecting with the culture I mean I think just to be able to move in and really not only did I. Learn the language I learned the culture I said at that table every day and for me that makes travel so much more real. So that is it. If the bottom line, the bottom line is not speaking the language, but it's connecting with the culture and with the language it's like you've got better vision. Exactly. You've done this also in Costa Rica and. Those are two different. Spanish. Speaking Countries. How does your choice of a destination? Impact, the learning that you have and what you come away with because Costa Rica and Nicaragua you went to both of them and you were trying to learn Spanish Why would you go to one rather than the other for me? It was based on what I wanted to see as well. I had some travel goals to for people. I. Think it's often going to depend on what part of the world you WANNA. See a said oftentimes that's the case also, you have to think about what kind of language you WanNa come away with if you went. Back to learn French and then you go to France, they're gonNA look at you like where are you from? Exactly so that's one of the reasons I chose not to study in Sicily obviously Naples I want to for me 'cause you don't WanNa, go around the world speaking. In, Tuscany, the kind of Italian. That I want to come away with what they're speaking there.

Italy Kerry Walker Costa Rica Monte Pacino School Sicily Central America Nicaragua France
Lockdown in Honolulu

Travel with Rick Steves

05:06 min | 3 months ago

Lockdown in Honolulu

"Don Wallace is on the line from Honolulu. He tells US authorities they're put in a new set of restrictions because of a recent surge in Cova cases on Oahu justice they were hoping they could start reopening. It's crucial tourism industry. Don's a contributing editor at Honolulu magazine and he's updated us on Hawaii tourism in the past and done you're you're out there about twenty five, hundred miles away from anywhere else in the middle of the Pacific. Hawaii depends so much on tourism and I would imagine it's been quite a stressful time with the coronavirus continuing to spread. What's it like in Hawaii right now. Well the whiny started out as soon as thirty thousand tourists stopped coming way did very well on the virus were the lowest in the nation for states. Now we've had a spike starting at the fourth of July and August it began to get up to two hundred cases a day. I know that doesn't sound like much but. you don't have that many hospital facilities. That, we had to do a banning perks, beaches hiking trails and gatherings over ten So is the response and the impact of the corona virus different from different islands. who gets most of it in fact, it's almost miniscule on now big island, the ninety MILICI, those islands, the people can pretty much go cleese they. You wear masks you're allowed to fly into a walk who without according to you. But people who can't find their without of quarantine. What about people in the tourism industry? Are they impatient or they realizing that haste makes waste when it comes to getting over the so they can start making money again. It's a very interesting case people very concerned. There's no voice irresponsibly pushing for white opener light opening deal like Texas, did for instance. And I think that's because the workers sixty seventy percent of the are. No a minimum wage workers they don't have good health plans. They carry the burden of this, and the other part is the Theresa Stop Coming. Can Americans from the mainland fly into Hawaiian vacation if they want to yeah, you can come We get about three thousand a day. And I think the hitch there is you do a fourteen day quarantine and you check into your hotel and you can't leave your hotel room. The impact on tourism would be you're probably wondering around the beaches thinking this is like it was back in the old days. You're very much in nineteen threes, Hawaii. Waikiki is a ghost town. That's not entirely a bad thing We think tasteful Hawaii empty beaches, very clean water clean here you feel like being caress be hanging out with the beach boys. Old School Beach Boys. And if you do go out to dinner, for instance, you may have the restaurant to yourself just one or two people. Magic. So That's interesting. I mean, of course the you've lost the revenue, but you've regained your beaches as far as the locals go there was something in the news and I think you wrote about it about gun toting extremists who are wearing Hawaii shirts. It doesn't seem like the Aloha spirit to me what's Really thought it. Up in the news, there's one of these Gun Group extremists start showing up at the black lives, matter protests and other places. Instead of what they weren't Loescher it's Kinda create a sort of scary dissidence. Then people here reacted really strongly. Ensured is about Aloha Aloha is welcoming. It's inclusive. And it's actually something. I wrote an article about how Hawaiian shirts fight extremism. Hungary magazines. It's a love story about two sisters from Portland. Hawaii's eighteen twenty. Married South Asian immigrants helped create yellow her shirt industry. It's a beautiful beautiful story and it's that Louis Spirit that sort of loved that easygoing nece that caring for others. What a what a dissonance by these? What do they call? Boo Goo Boo Voice Blue Boys. Okay. Well I hope you have to handle and then we can read about that in your article and then very quickly what's open now if you are in Hawaii, museums, clubs, restaurants what's The dishes and Him after limited reopening had to close again. We hooked to get them back up in a couple of weeks neither good their little outdoor cafes and restaurants they've shifted to putting cafe tables out on the sidewalks and even the streets in some cases. So Madonna. Of Lua. And you know, thankfully, why is a very outdoor culture? So eating outdoors is. No big concession. So that lends itself to social distancing done. It's so great to have you on. We'll talk again soon I hope everything goes well with Hawaii and tourism, and your work there done Wallace's a contributing editor at Honolulu magazine. He's written the French house about buying a fixer upper on the island and Brittany and he's written articles about what's going on. In Hawaii these days

Hawaii Don Wallace Honolulu Magazine Contributing Editor Aloha Aloha Honolulu United States Old School Beach Boys Cova Oahu Hungary Portland Waikiki Texas Louis Spirit Brittany
Inland West Coast Roadtrips

Travel with Rick Steves

04:17 min | 3 months ago

Inland West Coast Roadtrips

"If, you're ready for a memorable road trip where there's more to explore the freeway rest stops Chandler O'Leary wants to take you up the US west coast. She joined us a few months ago with tips for driving the Pacific. Coast highway from San Diego to big Sur, the redwoods and the Pacific northwest rainforest. She's back to recommend a few of the inland highlights from the desert playground palm springs through the orchards. California's Central Valley, old western Sacramento, and all the way up to my home turf around Seattle the detailed in her book the Best Post, a road trip Alice Chandler welcome back. Thank you for having me. So we talked about the coastal route before now we're GonNa talk about the inland. Route make a case for not taking the coastal route because I would think everybody wants to go up the coast, but you make the inland sound pretty good. I feel like if you like your vintage, Americana this the road trip for you and yeah, you're not gonna see the coasts until you get all the way up to Washington but if you're really into things like palm springs and mid, century architecture old neon signs, a roadside attractions, you're going to get tons of that on this route. I love roadside attractions, publicity stunts from fifty of your. What are few of those that come to mind because I just think they're so funky. The giant oranges that used to be Oliver California and there's a couple of them left and they were they to be drink stands for you know when you were thirsty on the road, you get fresh California orange juice right and they're still a couple of them left along old either farm. There's farm country all the way along the way absolutely all three states. So we're going sixteen hundred miles and apparently it's the old isn't isn't like the highway ninety nine is of it is yeah and in California highway. Ninety nine mostly is still intact and it's even a freeway in some places, but once you get into Oregon and Washington because of the mountains, it starts getting a little bit tricky kind of pick. Cherry pick sections of the old road and then connect with I five. Yes. It's just like route sixty six how it's kind of been swallowed up by interstate in places like five is it's sort of the enemy on the other hand. It's practical because he gets you from A to B in a hurry. Yeah. What's your philosophy you're gonna go from going basically from San Diego to Bellingham Right What's your philosophy on the balance between I five in the old roads I think you wanna use I five when you WanNa, make good time and take the old rose if you wanna have a good time. That's kind of how I look at it good time or have a good time. That's good. So let's talk about California first of all New Mexico on one side of the border and collection collects. It collects co is on the or is on the California side and Mexico on the Mexico side. So that's where a route starts are these kind of sister towns in away or are unfortunately there's a big old wall separate him so you Or now you have to go through the big international the big national checkpoint because I did that between San Diego and Tijuana was easy just walk across I think right now that's not the same as it used to be, but it may be again I mean who who knows what we're starting in Calexico then What's the flavor of collects goes? That's just a springboard or anything to do there. It's a sleepy small town and but it's kind of you kind of get the flavor of where you're starting and you're going to start out in the low desert. You're below sea level here that's below civil come into palm springs. A waste. It is palm springs to us. Palm Springs is is kind of Wacky. It got big in the nineteen fifties. So there's a lot of great mid century architecture there, but it's very glamorous. It's very glitzy. There's a lot of designers their fashion show was movie stars that doesn't retirement communities to. snowbirds it's kind of this weird mix of college spring breakers and snowbirds. Okay. So you put that in your checklist and then some I know in your book, you talk about a lot of worthy detours you know in one of your favorites would be Joshua Tree National Park. Yes. Joshua tree is stunning and Joshua tree trees actually the high desert. So it's above palm springs at altitude. So it has a completely different desert climate different plants, different animals. So Joshua Tree is one of these cartoon book yeah. Of Justice Joshua Tree is these classic kind of quintessential cactus Yes. Yes. So what do you do in Joshua Tree National Park Jessica cactus there's a great hikes. There's actually only those cactus in one small part of the park is an enormous park. So there's different bombs great rock formations they are beautiful scenery and

Palm Springs Joshua Tree Oliver California San Diego Joshua Tree National Park California Joshua Tree National Park Jess Washington Big Sur Chandler O'leary United States Alice Chandler Sacramento Seattle Central Valley Mexico Oregon New Mexico Calexico
Urban Australia

Travel with Rick Steves

03:53 min | 3 months ago

Urban Australia

"David. Because Australia's so far away from the other continents. It's easy for the rest of the world to not really have a clear image of what it's like. The stereotype made include kangaroos on every corner and Paul Hogan Wrestling Crocodiles, in the outback. Do you find that a lot of visitors you meet in Australia come armed with a lot of misperceptions about what they'll find preconceptions invariably wrong. Suddenly it's the case in Australia where as you saw the introduction, the business about Kangaroos hopping down the main street with nothing could be further divorced from reality that image and a Crocodile Dundee. Well, he came from the northern territory and he actually lives in America now, and he's one of our favorite experts. So, there you go. Australia's quite urbanized then. It's very of an is and it's a huge landmass. It's only a fraction smaller than the United States and everyone will the vast majority of people live within twenty kilometers of the coast say fifteen miles of the coast. So you have a huge concentration of people have been buried narrowband typically stretching from Cy Melvyn in the south up to Brisbane that halls probably seventy five percent of Australia's population right there. Yes. Okay. Now, the two dominant cities would be Sydney and Melbourne where where do you go for the best urban thrills? What would you recommend? How do they compare comparing? Them is very difficult and the answer you get when you ask that question will dependent tally on where that person was from. They are Mel Benon. Sevan for Melvin or Sydney Saad and the endless rivalry between the two. People from Sydney Regard Melburnians as easy as boring or as people for Melvin C Sydneysiders as frivolous where you fun loving I come from northern New South Wales I'm a country boy. Oh so you can get unbiased I i. have a Sydney Wife. Sybil on wife. So my leanings now with Sydney, but the only city I've lived in Australia in Melvin. Okay how do you characterize the two times? Is there a different culture for the people in the United States you know we got the coast and the West Coast I think there's a big difference between the two and the difference is really driven by climate. And that Melvin. Has further south and thus it has quite cold winters Sydney's lot warmer and therefore the accident is more on outdoor activities and as a coastal city, you have wonderful beaches what the bond I beach is. One of the world's iconic beaches now is their rivalry between the two cities naturally. So arrival of everything, which is why the capital of Australia is halfway between the two because they could not decide where to put it to avoid a civil war related had to had to avoid. That's great. Now you live in Melbourne and understand there's a lot of Greeks living in Melbourne maybe that's why you do tours degrees. Is there some connection there what's with the Greeks and Melbourne while the Greeks came to Melbourne after World War Two an after the Greek civil war which fetch -ly trashed all the great infrastructure and at the time. Metro will populate or perish, and they wanted to populate with Europeans and so the offer went out to Italians. Of various descriptions as populate Oh perished, I was the manager they were afraid that they would be swept away by the Asians from the north. So perish sort of a almost a racist thing populate with white people or we're going to be bowled over by this rising Asian hord. I. Think at the time that the policy was put in place. It was very overtly racist right and they will also terms that we use which totally unacceptable today and I can't use them already now either. So the the word went out and maybe perhaps the more poor countries in white Europe per day call and let Greeks went on there absolutely, and the time they were considered a little bit too small the. They really wanted white northern Europeans say Germans. Rather, than southern Europeans

Australia Sydney Melbourne Melvin C Sydneysiders Mel Benon United States Paul Hogan Melvin America Sydney Saad Crocodile Dundee Cy Melvyn David. Europe Sybil Brisbane Sevan New South Wales
Pico in Lockdown

Travel with Rick Steves

04:35 min | 3 months ago

Pico in Lockdown

"Start by checking in with friend of the show author Pico to hear how he's faring during this pandemic summer Pico was raised in England in southern California by parents who were both philosophers and religious scholars we caught up with him in Santa Barbara Pico welcome back travel with Rick Steves Real Delight. It's always. Highlight, to talk to you. Thank you know people used your life between California and Japan tell us how you are dealing with this crisis. Well I spent the first half of the pandemic in Japan and I'm almost embarrassed to say that things are quite beautiful and the sense that things look very much the same as normal as you know from your many trips, the people wear masks much of the time in. Japan anyway literally and figuratively to protect others. If you were in a bus in Japan in November, usually, there'll be forty percents of the people wearing masks. So that part was not different and as you also know, Japan has managed to avoid the west of the virus. So even in the middle of April I was playing Ping Pong every day with my neighbors eight year old men were diving across the hard floor of the wooden Jim to hit back at forehands and really looking around everything seems same as usual except, of course, no foreign tourists. And I think the other thing about Japan which is one reason I moved. There is as you know, they're very STOIC uncomplaining and resilient, and so they've been dealing with challenges for fourteen hundred years there, and they don't see these kind of crises is shocked sore in the south. So aberrations they think of them almost as the way life always is they used to earthquakes some Salamis forest five. So in that way to it was quite a complex to be. and. Then I flew back in the middle of the pandemic to Santa Barbara where I am now because my mother who's now eighty nine just come out of the hospital and I knew I had to have and California did look very different from usual but in certain ways, people seem thoughtful and focused and reflective kind and. In some ways. Conversations I had with people here on the telephone if I in is in the supermarket with Michio the they might be otherwise I'm lucky again in both places because I'm in. The small town of not as affected as big cities and. Towns of privileged. So everybody was most concerned about those without a roof over the heads with family nearby jobs I had a pretty lucky I. Think you know, Pico, you mentioned in Japan people are to wearing masks both literally and figuratively and I cringed at that because I don't want to have a world where we wear literal masks I would want even less to have where we all have figurative masks and maybe we'll have more literal masks in our future. But what you're saying is when you got back to California, people might have been wearing masks but they were being a little more honest and open with each other's is that right? Yes. That is right. I'm I think in Japan the FIGURATIVE MOSQUES Seen as a form of social duty I think you know as you know, the Japanese define themselves by the the whole unit, the neighborhood or the country or the company, and they feel everybody around me is suffering, and so my job is to make people feel better. I don't want to inflict my own suffering on people who already going through a lot. I want to offer them what I can in the way of help Williamson. And support, and so actually I like that quality about Japan essentially positive and and also they're not rattled by things sometimes very small things will come along and and other places. I'll see people get very shocked and caught up in the fight of the moment and Japan has much more level suffix, which makes it in some ways a calm place you're right that they're not good at facing up to some of the DACA places. The, dogs spots in history. But as a win a sort of social lubricant, I think it makes for at least a cheerful atmosphere and it's sort of related to being considered socially. Exactly, it's. It's. It's. It's a matter of thinking about the other person before yourself and then recalling if remember in the Nami two, thousand eleven, eighteen, thousand, five, hundred people died and when people watch the footage on TV they were surprised the Japanese was so quiet uncomplaining and I think that's because even though one person that loves to people right here at the house, she knew that everybody around her had losses also and so she didn't want to compound that. Grief

Japan California Pico Santa Barbara Pico Rick Steves Santa Barbara Daca Michio England JIM Forehands Williamson
Traveling To London

Travel with Rick Steves

03:20 min | 4 months ago

Traveling To London

"If you're planning a trip to Europe, you may have noticed that a lot of flights in the United States connect through London through. Heathrow airport, and sometimes you're left with an awfully long layover instead of wasting hours hanging out at the airport. Why not head into Lemon for the day we've invited. London guides, Steven Beck and Debra to join us and share their tips about getting into the city to make a damn it, and then getting back to the airport in time for your flight. Stephen, Deborah. Thanks for joining us here in our studio. So. Is it realistic to have a long layover? Let's see. You got a eight hour layover in Heathrow Deborah. Is it realistic to actually check your bag and go into town? Very easy. It's fifty minutes on the P- me underground. To get into central London and it's soon. You've got the the express. Heathrow express goes into. Paddington. Depending. And from there you've got the time outs, fifteen minutes, every fifteen minutes. So four times in our and you're downtown and less than half an hour. And, and when you can go into town, you can go out back the same way and just as reliable convenient. Yes. So Stephen most people would go through Heathrow, but it's also conceivable. You could land in Gatwick, London's second airport and yet because a good connection into London, a similar thing, the Gabrielle Express and that heads into Victoria in some ways if it depends where you want to be in London, but if you wanted to go to Buckingham Palace or Westminster that's even closer. So it takes thirty minutes. Okay. On the fast train and Deborah. No, we were discussing about leaving luggage. And building some time for perhaps maybe a delay. But you know an hour and a half, maybe a couple of hours. If it's got workings, if you allow that on either side and you've got eight hours. Yeah, you could afford in. London. When when you are going back to the airport as an American, especially, you should give a little extra time. I. Know The from the Airports in Europe, you have to go through security hoops to fly to the United States. Yes. Yes. You have to allow time also to get into, there's Gatwick Express but southern rail. One of the other train companies, they run a service into Victoria, which is about every thirty minutes. It's a lot cheaper than the guy he expressing takes about the same time. Okay. So there are ways to get quickly efficiently and economically into London a lot of people are stressed out by Heathrow because it is five terminals I. think generally when you go to and from the United States, use terminal five, is that right? Depending on the airline? Terminal to terminal five or. Four. Okay. So I've been trying from seminal three with virgin in Delta. Okay. If you're flying in and out of different terminals, how tough is it to connect the terminal? It's very easy. Follow the signs. It's really well signposted what about the practicality of your bags if you have a chance to check your bags through, that's the best thing. But if you're picking up your bag, is there a way to lock it up or do you check it onto the flight You can't even check on that early to a flat out. I, don't think they have those baggage storage facilities Bernardo. We're thinking about this and talk about this. Heathrow, at sint pancras up Paddington. South. At. The airport. Don't take it into town. Yes. Yes. Yes. You can pre book as well. Online. You can pre book to leave your luggage. Should save time good tip

London Heathrow Deborah United States Debra Stephen Europe Paddington Victoria Gabrielle Express Steven Beck Buckingham Palace Gatwick Sint Pancras Delta
"rick steves" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

11:27 min | 7 months ago

"rick steves" Discussed on The Daily

"We are recording. Okay Iraq Sam. Nice to see. Rick Steves one of my favorite people on the planet. Sam Nice to hear from you again and we had a good conversation a while ago. Now it's all different world yes I profiled you. My profile view came out in the New York Times magazine last year and part of the reason I wanted to call and talk to you was you and I are supposed to be hanging out. That's right it was one of the last things I deleted from waking up. I'm Sam Anderson and I'm a staff writer for the New York Times magazine and last year. I wrote a profile of Travel Guru. Rick Steves Hi. I'm Rick Steves. For many travelers quintessence have. Spain is found here and Lucia. Rick Steves for anyone. Who doesn't know he's really an evangelist of travel today like Turkey. In general. Gazillion is Muslim. The power of Rick Steves is that this is not just a business for him. It's a whole life. Philosophy set me means the ball tough life tastes like that when it goes from the herring. Okay well this is the learners dose here. But I'll give it a go. He wants to empower average everyday Americans. Who MIGHT NOT OTHERWISE? Leave the country to get out of their comfort zone and go explore the world they give an insight into a people who in a thousand years have evolved from fearsome some marauding vikings tap people like me and. I've been thinking about them a lot since. We'VE ALL BEEN HUNKERED DOWN. Because here's a guy who's in constant motion he just thrives on moving from one place to the next he's always travelling and suddenly the entire world is shut down. It's like a switch was flipped and his whole life mission is just cancelled. All these dreams that have been dashed are actually put on hold and so I was wondering what does Rick Steves Time. And maybe an even bigger question. If Rick Steves can't travel then who is Rick Steves? It was nothing on. My calendar is just a blank slate for my future. Wow so what? Have you been doing day by day instead of hanging around with me? Well the big part of my life is a part. That was always squeezed away by workaholic. And that's just enjoying being alive in this privileged little world. I've got a nice place in Edmonds. Half are north of Seattle. I've got a view of the mountains. it seems like the the volume of the birds have been cranked up. When I step out of the morning there's less traffic and more more bird sound and I've been thinking about dusting off old. Passions got out my trumpet and the Valves Heddon wiggled for literally decades and I could still play the trumpet. Which is fun. I didn't even know you played the trumpet. I thought I knew everything like to keep a few things to pull out later. One other elements of life. Have you been finding yourself enjoying? I mean it sounds ridiculous but I have never cooked in my whole have never cut into an onion in my entire life. What I had never really made pasta until now and my gosh. I've had a bad attitude about it. I've always been at parties and people put on a on a on. A what do you call it a bib. Or what was that you aprons Nathan Apron? They put it on an apron and everybody having a good time convivial. Lisin you know mushrooms in the kitchen and and just was awkward and I would just go to the living room and I'd sit there alone with my gypsum dip and now realizing what I've missed. Wow it's like somebody just told me there's a whole new world out there you can do something more than go out to eat. Bring home leftovers and make picnics. So I mean that's that's just a delight so you really expanding your horizons. Yeah well you know. I'm learning to travel without without an airplane tickets. Wow you know so a huge change. It's a great thing but I have to be mine. Mindful that I'm really privileged and when people think about this they think about it mindful of the fact that it hits a lot of people who don't have the ability to weather as well as we do pretty brutally But one way or another. We'll get through this. I guess. What am I big hopes? Sam Is that Sofa. Distancing doesn't become the norm. I just love the way the French kiss each other on the cheek I love a a nice high five when I get to the top of a little peek in Switzerland. And you WANNA sit next to a stranger and share your French fries in an English pub I think one of the great pleasures that you provide people all the time is the fun of traveling vicariously and I. I remember people telling me That you often get letters from prisoners saying that even in prison people watch your show and feel like they're out in the world and so I wonder if that aspect of your of your teaching Is even more powerful now. If anything from people about that I actually have because one of my themes lately is this virus can stop our travel plans but it cannot stop our travel dreams. We're not in business to make money right now. We're our mission is to keep people's travel dreams alive and to give people something positive we just a couple days ago designed Big Steve's your Bingo where the cards have all of the goofy cliches that show up in almost every one of my shows and we've got we've made that available and people can drinking game if you want but it says okay. Hold on wait. What are the? What are the key triggers in the Rick Steves Travelled Drinking well it's a BINGO board. They've got all of your If I use alliteration both stirs saw and stokes the appetite nor if I have a thinly-veiled guidebook plug I've been recommending that Kaskel farm and my Britain guidebook now for over twenty years Dorky. Joker if I use the word for convivial you'll enjoy CONVIVIAL CAMARADERIE. That convivial had loonier charming convivial. If I enjoy a drink locally homeboy here comes another wine if old baby. Oh baby if I have. Innuendo towering high above is a skyscraper built in the nineteen seventies in erection. Like this was a big deal in communist times. I can't say anything explicit but I can have plenty of Innuendo. The lady strokes the UNICORNS Horn in the Lyon looks out at us to be sure we get the double overtime. That's kind of what I do almost almost every show. So you can certainly get Bingo if you watch the show and keep on travelling child. I'm developing this. This notion that you can. You can play a little game of bringing Europe into your home. Oh okay which might be kind of. Maybe it's not to tell me about that. What's well people who are addicted to European travel? This is kind of frustrating time for them. So I've been thinking about a few ways that you can bring a little bit of Europe into your home and I don't know how workable it is for everybody but you can wash your socks and sing. You can actually Serve Coffee to your quarantine mates in tiny cups and charged for refills. When you get real desperate you can eat a slug with lots of garlic and color. Desk are go And I actually made a little table with the dish for coins. Upside of my The toilet in my house and you can charge family members for a few sheets of toilet paper over desert for Europe. Always an entrepreneur. Even in your own home so I make Europe my beat. That's I do For Me Europe is the wading pool for world exploration. Even my favorite country might be India so know that your favourite countries India. Yeah I love India. When did you first go to India? I've been to India. My best trip was in seventy eight after I graduated college These are from the days of. That's great that's great photos of you with the long hair and the beard and always the classic traveller in the first time ever smoked. Marijuana was in Afghanistan. I knew that. Yeah Yeah and I think the one of the happiest days of my life was hanging out in Katmandu with a bunch of people who did not depend on to get high you the the straight laced repressed. Protestant kid right you know. They were selling marijuana. The market as a medicinal herb and it just seemed quite natural there so okay I'll be like do as the locals do temporary local. There's place in Katmandu called. Pien Chai and the famous all the travelers for their fresh out of the Oven Apple Pie in the Himalayas. Be surrounded by all this new wonder and people that clasp their hands together and say Nama Stay. I salute your virtues. Feels like a Tabet in dreaming and I just thought life is so good and that was I mean I hate to say one of the happiest days of my life and must have been smoking pot in the same breath but you know it was a beautiful thing and you. You became a real powerhouse in that battle for Leo's Ation in Washington your home state and then travelled around to other states on these of barnstorming tours to get it legalized. And that's my big. I see that as a contribution to our democracy in our society not that it's pro marijuana. It's pro civil liberties you know I'm a traveler and for me high is a place in sometimes. Sometimes I want to go there One of my favorite things that I learned about you when I was at your house was the existence of this journal. That you've been keeping for most of your life now and you write in only when you're high that not many people know about that until you wrote about that in our magazine and Yeah. That's a treasure in someday. I'M GONNA continue adding to it but it is. It's forty what is it. It's probably forty years of Brilliant that came to me absolutely. Actually this is what I do. When I'm traveling anyways is I always have a little more skinny book? A little note pen in my pocket. And you grab whatever flutters by. It's like butterflies grab it. It's gone.

Rick Steves Europe India Sam Nice Iraq the New York Times magazine Katmandu Spain Sam Anderson Turkey Edmonds staff writer Seattle Lucia Nathan Apron Switzerland marijuana Marijuana
"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

06:37 min | 11 months ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"They call the feeling Saddad and have a music tradition. They called Fido that I think expresses it beautifully here to help us understand this core character of Portuguese culture on travel with Rick Steves are tour guides. Raphael Pereira and Christina Duarte Christina Raphael. Welcome thanks very much. So sowed how would you. I'm Christina define how this is a part of the Portuguese soul sowed. It's a very very difficult word to translate in just one word. I think that we are the only country country in the world that defines all these feelings deep feelings in just one word Soda if you really want to relate that I think that the best translation is the presence of the absence. The presence of the absence of the absence exactly is that is a longing of of something that is constantly with you in your mind in your soul in your deep feelings but physically is not there so to wear of something you do not. Hello yes you have on your thoughts you have it on your heart. You have it on your on your way of looking to things when we look took to the sea for instance is something that the Portuguese have very much rooted in our culture is that we have this kind of look and I- faraway Raphael Y Y Portugal and Sao Dodd. Let me introduce an idea that my help our listeners. To understand this idea of so that you cannot understand so that rationally and that's my problem to be rational cannot understand it with your mind something that you understand which your heart. There was a Portuguese. This king from the fourteen hundreds called don't want us known has the philosopher and he wrote Soledad is the sense of the heart. So it's the the brain of your heart are Thomas or the thinking of the feeling of your heart again I I again. You're you're coming back to the logical you're going the brain of the heart of the heart not just the heart and I think it's so that it's paradoxical because it is at the same time the longing for a lost best and wanting wanting this last past two back in the future but is never gonNA come back and all do you know is never gonNA come back. You don't let go you keep loving that which you have lost and that is so that that's why the presence of the absence is constantly there do you cry. Is it a sadness or is it a kind of a love or is it a awareness of your culture and losses of the past. It's all of that. It's happy you long for something that happened in the when you reap you think about that again you are leaving again. Okay okay so now both of you. It's just like it is who you are. It's woven into your DNA and blood and for me as a tourist coming to Portugal. I want to to connect with this and I don't have the heritage and I don't quite understand how to not make it logical. How would I experience it? Where would I go to find sowed in my travels I would say go to a place where you feel comfortable alone and with yourself just to my favorite place will be by the water by the water where my eyes can look along with the line of the horizon without seeing anything really is just with the line? Just leave your is to go in your thoughts probably is just being with yourself being comfortable with silence silence. Yes with silence refuse to let me continue on this idea of Christina of the ocean because if you look at the geographic position of Portugal we are an Atlantic country. Return to the ocean and and today We know a little bit of the mysteries of the Atlantic Ocean but in the past it was not like that the ocean was mysterious. Was the unknown case. Okay so when you're looking at their arise and you're in deep relationship with the mystery of life and that is so that you cannot understand the mystery of life to reason through your mind definition Asian it is unknown. The relationship to the ocean is a key element to understand Portuguese culture and also we can connect it of course the Portuguese explorations to the ocean. Was it sustenance. Did Bring Food and did it pay for life or was it. Death was it Happy was it sad. Is that the enemy or a friend. It's the paradox again. The the ocean is something that gives you a way of life but can take away from you what you love in one second. So it's the paradox. At the same time is your second chance life. Second chance again with our geographic situation. We are pretty there. We are the less country of continent of Europe Europe and the the nose to the Western stock between Spain and the ocean so looking to the ocean is looking to our opportunities in life through. It's the past and the future together. I was talking with a very old man in Salima on the Algarve in the south coast on and I was just asking him about his childhood and today the tourism bed and breakfast and there's very little restaurants and he said when he was a little boy sitting on the same little town a port town with the colorful fishing boats dragged up on the sand he said for him. Life was only sardines and the sea in the air and the sea the sea spreading our culture culture. This is travel with Rick Steves. We're talking about Portugal and something fundamental Portugal. It's this nostalgia feeling feeling of Saddad. I'm talking with Christina Dorte and Raphael Pereira and we're talking with Lisbon guides about how as travelers we can connect we can do more than just seek cliches on stage. We can connect with the culture now. The logical thought for a traveler. Portugal Christine Raphael is to connect necked. This feeling of Sao Dot with the wonderful fodda music tradition. First of all. What is photo so father is? Our is our unique traditional music. Style that you'll only find in Portugal. It is part of what is defined the country and in our cultural DNA and expresses Portuguese soul. It expresses Portuguese uniqueness and in my opinion it is the most beautiful expression of the feeling. Soledad I can be alone in a restaurant enjoying enjoying my sardines and my wine and that can be looking into the face of the photo singer.

Portugal Rick Steves Raphael Pereira Christina Atlantic Ocean Christina Raphael Soledad Saddad Christina Duarte Sao Dodd Christine Raphael Sao Dot Europe Christina Dorte Salima Thomas Spain Algarve Lisbon
"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Have if you were designing a big landscape and i wrote about that and i found that fascinating that trying to changed the shape of a really tiny space is extraordinary difficult and i think kerry has done extraordinarily successful job in doing doing so you know reading your book garden list and i just want to remind people. This is garden less technical tour of the world's best new gardens by christopher woods. I'm inspired to make make a point to get more out of the gardens that you encounter when you travel. Let's close out with just take me on a stroll for a moment through a bit of a garden that really really resonated with you and tell me what you're experiencing you mentioned it's like a favorite sweater sometimes walk me through this garden and give me a sense the wonder essentially one in america and it's the naples botanical garden in florida and it was a parking lot and nothing before it was created and it was designed by five landscape architects and to have five landscape architects in room is a very dangerous thing in terms of temperament and so forth but extraordinarily they got on very well now it's in naples florida so it's tropical and therefore has everything has grown extraordinarily fast but it's a series these are experiences and while they have labels like this is the brazilian garden or the caribbean garden or the javanese garden if you you change the metaphor and away and take it as a musical piece when you enter the music starts to unfold and it's adagio oh and so forth i mean it's just classical concerto of botany added to that of course you're hearing that but you're seeing it but you're also smelling it so because it's in the tropics you get the sweet scent of frangipani that just comes down one avenue into your nose. Listen and heightens your senses and then you move on and there's another fragrance and then then the sounds of birds various birds and you walk out to a natural area this is on the edge of the everglades and it's the preserve sixty acres of natural area and all of a sudden things quieten down. I don't know who composed this. Could it be beethoven because after you come away from the quiet of the preserve is a riot in a crescendo of flowers hours noisy and loud and so forth and it's just this continuing experience that rises and falls for your senses but inside side you to there's the reisen full of excitement and quiet and peace and curiosity and this whole range of experiences this is and it applies to music or if you go to an art museum and you see three or four different paintings and the emotions those those paintings you've oh can you any of the expressions of humankind and gardening is no different from that while that is a new frontier tear in pleasure to unleash your sensuality and it all comes across in this book christopher woods. Thanks for writing garden last. Thank thank you so much travel with rick. Steves is produced add rick steves europe in edmonds washington by yours truly tim tapping with isaac kaplan wilner and casimiro mahal special. Thanks to our colleagues at the u._c..

rick steves christopher woods naples botanical garden florida kerry naples isaac kaplan edmonds washington america sixty acres
"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"I can't remember the name of the bread that everyone <music> you get from street vendors everywhere that this is the quarry the pretzel that's where they make it. You know we tried to more than just the traditional tourist spots and edry that wonderful. What's interesting here. You talk edry is. It's not that tough to do. I mean athens is a huge city. I don't know four million people. I mean nearly half of all the greeks live in athens these days. They saved from the top of the acropolis. You can see half of all the people in greece much of the city is just nondescript sprawl that wouldn't be of a lot of interest to a tourist but in the centre with a half an hour walk walk you can go from syntagma square in the capital behind that are some wonderful museums. Just to the left you've got the kissed in circa and then you can hike up up to the acropolis and you've got the old clock at the base of that and then siri that maria was talking about for the trendy sort of artsy area and the marketplace that you're talking about really is just a few blocks from there and locals will know just where to go for their favorite souvlaki stand. Frankly i used to just try to see the famous sites and get out. I like athens a lot more these days. It's got personality. It's got a pride. It feels like it's come through different crises in the last decade and there's a confidence in athens. There's a celebration athens. I like it. That's what we found in in athens and that you know i could look and see that for some people who maybe haven't traveled outside the united states often <hes> mhm. Maybe they only gone to london or something like that actually well. It has a tough exterior in some places but well. That's nice to hear the the people in the big. City are sweethearts and <hes> you said it has kind of tough exterior. It used to be just so overrun run with traffic. I just remember when i went to athens. My kleenex would turn black so city and now they've controlled the traffic. There's more pedestrian areas. It's remarkable. What happens has done edry. Thanks for your call. This is travel with rick steves. We've been talking with maria sioulas and phillipus curse and i would love to get your take on our feelings that athens is changing how you know athens has dealt with the crisis. Athens has dealt with their refugees. Economic challenges right now for travelers is a positive feeling maria. How do you see the changes happening in athens. Oh it's phenomenal. I mean it really has changed in the last five years. So small things really far more pedestrianised areas for tourist friendly. We have a great infrastructure as far as getting around in the city so people can leave their cars behind us. I used the metro systems. The olympics were turning point for infrastructure and you found yourself in a big economic whole from a debt point of view but you certainly have good infrastructure now moving around and <hes> relatively good governance sounds like yeah you can sense in athens now. This is a feeling of pride yes. We've really gone through some tough times and continue to go through through tough times as far as the economy is concerned but as i say there's the sense in in athens with the people that they're taking back control of their city..

athens maria sioulas rick steves syntagma square greece olympics siri united states london five years
"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Bones but if you're somewhere like france or germany this is basically a comfortable guest house that just happens to be situated in the mountains where you'll be cooked some of the best comfort food of your entire life life. You can purchase wine or beer. You're surrounded by all this gorgeous scenery and you can either have a private room or you can share a dorm room with other walkers and when it comes to eating you are exercising exercising. You're hungry. You've got high altitude. This food's going to taste better than ever and you can eat all of the hugh want your burning so many calories that there is nothing that you will want to say no when you you set out on a four day hike. Do you generally have your mountain huts reserved before you leave or do you just play by ear so i almost always reserve mountain hudson advanced because a lot the times they're situated one day apart and so you know everybody wants to stay in the same place each night so it can be good to just get those reservoir the best the most most characteristic and well run huts and they're the ones that will probably book. I and it's pretty straightforward to make a reservation and it's reliable and then you get to see the same people all along your eggs exit. Make friends along the way yeah. This is travel with rick steves. We've been talking with cassandra overby about exploring europe on foot. That's the book and <hes> it's an inspiration. I'm going to plug a little bit of that dimension of europe into my next trip. Thanks cassandra. Thank you next office athens to see what's new in greece and christopher woods recommends the most interesting contemporary gardens you can experience around the world. We're at eight seven seven three three three rick on travel with rick steves. It's been a while since the news from greece has had much of a positive ring to it. Come to think of it. It seems like they've always had squabbles among their politicians.

rick steves cassandra overby europe greece france hugh germany christopher woods four day one day
"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"I. I love that because then to people don't have to risk having one person scuttle the whole mission yes. I think that's pretty important. Cassandra overby is our guest on travel with rick steves ebbs. She recommends fifteen favorite hiking trails and she's mapped them out for a walking vacation in her book. Explore europe on foot. Her website is cassandra cassandra overby dot com now when you go. Do you like to have companionship or have you gone alone to see that you'll just meet people as you go or are. We just appreciate this time alone with nature. What thinking do you go through before you determined that so i like to mix it up on all of my trips so i did a lot of research trips for my book and and sometimes i had people join me and that was really wonderful. Sometimes i did the hikes alone which was great for really getting into an area and kind of losing my identity and losing myself and just kind kind of soaking everything in like a local and then it was also really nice to reach out and actually make some new friends so i wanted to hike the thirty four and france. I didn't know anyone who wanted to go and i felt like i really wanted people to join me on that section because it's on cliffs so i reached out to appreciate hiking group and i said hey i'm coming to hike this trail. I'm an american author. Do you have anyone who would be interested in hiking it with me and i found a couple parisians couple who came out to mont saint michel and met me for two days together her and it was amazing. That's a great idea talk about a nice initiative and i would think on the trail. People are inclined to be friends. I mean it's like minded people. Everybody's in a in a positive spirit and so on. I wanna talk a bit about the gear because i'm always looking at german and germans are sort of famous for their walking sticks with those walking sticks anyways so they really help if you have creaky knees <hes> or you know if you've just been hiking for a long time and you'd like to extend your hiking life because they make the little easier on your body. Yeah i would think a little it's a little safer if you have four legs instead of two when you're going down a rocky slope or something yes especially for balance by no means you have to have those something aerobic also or something getting for exercise when you're just walking straight on a paved trail to have that our motion going because i see germans like germans are famous for this. I mean it's just like there's people almost kind of think. It's kinda funny. 'cause okay six germans. They've all got their walking sticks. Look like a little animation almost yet. What about <hes> boots. I grew up thinking you've gotta have boots but i know there's options. There are options so my favorite option is called the european walking shoe..

Cassandra overby rick steves mont saint michel europe france two days
"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

11:07 min | 1 year ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Rick Steves Hi. My name is Dave Fox. I live in Ho Chi Minh City and I travel with Rick Steves then Dave Fox toys on human the Hewlett the Rick Steves it started with a failed military very cool against Turkey's president air to one back in two thousand sixteen that plus a couple of terrorism incident scared away a lot of tourists from Turkey for a couple of years but with with a bargain exchange rate on the Turkish Lira and the process of democracy working itself out in Istanbul Turkey's back among the top destinations in world travel. We've invited tour guides agr in blue and lollies sermon to update us on how things are going in their city. Lawley runs S._R._M.. Travel in Istanbul and yarn is an art historian archaeologist logist and also guides American visitors around Turkey. They'll take your calls eight seven seven three three three seven four to five about travel to Turkey lawley eighteen yard. Thanks for being here thank you. Thank.

Rick Steves Turkey Dave Fox Turkey lawley Istanbul Turkey Ho Chi Minh City Lawley Istanbul archaeologist logist Turkish Lira president eighteen yard
"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"This is travel with Rick Steves. We're talking with George Farkas and Monica Push about hungry George. I mentioned earlier that the Hungarian language is sort of unique UNICO. It's different from the Slavic languages around it could could you talk just very clear and slow like a teacher count one to ten in Hungarian so we can get a little dose of your language Okay H.. Kathy had them need hot thought he knew what's key lands these. There's no no dose or Einstein tray of it. We're we're we're in no mislead challenged. Oh my goodness and Monica. Is there any fun. Little tongue twisters fund well. Would you like to really hear a melody or some really tongue twister in Hungarian like for example Charlie Bunch Richer Water Metro Vancouver Chaka check check is few troubled Shag. Oh my goodness I want to hear tongue-twister say that again slowly slowly and Hungarian and then tell us what you said so Charlie Bungee Chug is Chato Gash trouble charitable Gash csonka Chad fan to torture Rag Cherokees Few troppled achieve egg and it says <hes> that <hes> in the Lilla forests the Lilla birds are singing and Lilla Lake is can be seen so practically it is just an interestingly porter attacked listener little birds actually since <hes> Hungary had just received the title that Hungary is considered to be one of the most difficult language in a word and you may wonder why you know I mean there are grammatical rules. <hes> there are exceptions read the Rose and then you learn the language so what could be so difficult well the problem is that <hes> we have more exceptions from the rules then Roussy itself so that really frustrates me when I'm trying to learn a foreign language is is this way except when it's not this way you are not the only one who is frustrated. I'm trying to find find the solution. <hes> how come that the Hungarian society is still even in two thousand eighteen is completely Hama gene probably because everybody else <hes> who had not learned the language of in the language environment. It's almost impossible to learn so they find other areas so that it has a actual impact on the budget Nadya on the demographic makeup of because your language is harder to learn than German absolutely harder to learn than any any other languages actually in the European environment. What can we learn from the Hungarian language about the Hungarian people? Does it give us any insight into the culture language sets the mind and so if we have a language which has so many unexpected twists then please don't be surprised if you feel things which are unexpected in our culture in our history in our everyday life as well if you come to our Roman Catholic coronation church and the interior area of the church is decorated Pagans Tribal Hungarian motifs and so on in other words Monica. You're saying <hes> when you walk into a Roman Catholic church it has a deeper heritage than Christianity. There is a religious undertones that survived to this day that are actually the Pagan Magyar routes. Yes and the makers just came a thousand years ago right. The Magyars are the Hungarians seven Hungarian tribes arrived in eight hundred ninety six in the ninth centuries came about twelve hundred years ago from way over by Mongolia or something like actually a whole bunch of commerce rivers area therefore we have this language sitting in the middle of all these <hes> more Western languages and it's <hes> it's part of the Finnish Hugo Rick language grew house need three <hes> there are in Finland Estonia and Hungary. It reminds me of the independent spirit. It's just hard to defeat the Hungarian spirit for the Soviet Union. The Hungarians were just the biggest problem and you actually we had to be able to have your own Goulash version of communism and so on what is it about the Hungarian independent spirit. I think the Hungarians would really want to express themselves and they don't want to be compressed one of the examples if you're bringing <hes> something unique up is how we do our bads <hes> your bed yeah so working your bid and how our bedsheets are prepared and I I'd like to share a personal experience very first time we came over to the United States of America and we went into. I don't know if it was a hotel. Someone's house we were introduced to our bedrooms and we went in and then it took us time to actually decide where we go like we lifted one layer another layer and another layer. We couldn't decide between where we go because we have where you put your body fantasies. Where do we fit in his bat setting? They're all tucked into tight exactly and then you had these sheets and then all we have is basically a cover sheet which sits on the mattress and then we have a single engle do which is top to bottom sites basically a standalone unit and it's not tax in so we can easy lift it up and then go under and then our feats are are free. We can't have our feeds compress down at the end and still still today when we go to a hotel and get up in the middle of the night. I have hard time to pull the sheet out from the bottom to freer exactly to have a Georgia practically even today even I'm putting off the don't disturb sign because <hes> the housekeeping ladies are talking beautifully my bad and every single day I'm struggling it out because I need freedom during the night so I can't be oppressed underneath the in bed sheets story sorry he does this. All the comforter.

Monica Push Hungary Rick Steves George Farkas Chato Gash UNICO Lilla forests Lilla Lake Roman Catholic coronation chur Soviet Union Roussy Roman Catholic church Kathy Nadya Georgia Mongolia United States Hugo Rick Chad porter
"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"In Irish comedian one you might be starting to hear about tells us how much fun she's been having starting over in New York. That's coming up in just a bit on today's travel with Rick steves. Let's start the hour with a look at what it's like to reinvent yourself in a new country with the stories of two Americans who've made a life for themselves in Italy. Have you ever liked what you saw in Italy so much that you dreamed of actually moving there? I have to admit I've been tempted myself we're joined now on travel with Rick steves by two people who gave into that temptation and now they're living. They're -talian dreams and pip rata left her job in two thousand fourteen and moved to CNN and long so for him to Mataya and settled down within near Sorrento above the scenic amalfi coast Anna in and join us now to tell us their story. Thanks for joining us. So Anna, how did you end up in Sienna? I studied Italian in college fell in love with it decided to move to Italy after college moved to terrain, then ended up doing graduate work in Manchester became professor, and then realized that I needed to get to Sienna because I did my thesis on Saint Catherine of Sienna and every summer I went and every summer got harder to come back to the states. So I just decided to move there and that was a few years ago, and you must like it because you're still there. I do I love it Feren, by the way, big industrial city in the north no nonsense fantastic city, though, the best food really entering people. Think about that. But you ended up in sort of the fairytale medieval town, no an end lung. What's your story? I changed my major twice in university. And so decided to take a six months break to go to Italy to try to learn the language because I'd been there on vacation before. And then after six months decided to stay in ended up marrying an Italian and been thirty eight years living in Sorrento thirty eight years in beautiful lemon cellos. Ice cream and lemon cellos with those nothing better. I can't think of a more dull cheetah rental. So now you've been there. Thirty eight years in a small town, a small community and his community above Sorrento. You always the foreigner. You don't look at talion. I'm the foreigner. I definitely have strange ways the way I do things it's foreign, but I've been absorbed into the community. They think of me as a local because I've withstood thirty eight and you respect to the respect them. And there's a lot of my friends that were foreigners that have left sense. And they get no respect, I respect. So are you accepted in the community? Are you taking seriously at community meetings or parent teacher meetings, or whatever you might be into you sit there at the table, and and you're part of the community, and they'll ask me about my opinion about local ideas and things and I'm raising family in the community as well. So it touches my life. Yeah. Now, Anna, I I always think of Americans who settled down in Europe is ex pats. Yes. But you're also just flat out immigrants. Magritte's exactly it which my friends in CNN always remind me of oh here comes the immigrants. What's the difference between an ex Pat and immigrant, well, if we're going to be blunt, the color of your skin, isn't that something? Yeah. I know in Italy relationships seem to be really important to get things done personally. And in your in your work life talk about the importance of relationships in Italy, the hugely important. And I think that had I not found myself in a contralto in Sienna. I don't think I would have stayed because it's so important to be a part of a community..

Italy Sorrento Rick steves Sienna Anna CNN New York Pat Mataya Magritte Europe professor Manchester thirty eight years six months Thirty eight years
"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Highest peak of the adirondacks and he he talks some guy some local into taking him down the mountain on a buck ford in the middle of the night so he's just careening down this mountain to get to the train station to go to buffalo where the president has been shot and then you can go into the house where he took the oath of office after mckinley guide servewell's our guest on travel with rick steves we're taking a closer look at her travels and discoveries that went into two thousand five book assassination vacation you can listen to sirius earlier appearances on travel with rick steves in which she discusses how french general lafayette helped to actually save the united states and the american colonization of hawaii looking this week show notes at rick steves dot com slash radio you mentioned that there's some sort of you know irreverent moneymaking and entertaining ways to turn these deaths into into funding profit what or something i'm not a communist rick what are some ways that they i mean the probably the dumbest one i saw at the aforementioned mckinley memorial is the mckinley i don't know if they still make this but the mckinley memorial yoyo which is a yoyo with a picture of a muslim on it that's pretty morbid those knows i mean there are some unsettling things like when i was in virginia you know after john mcstay shot lincoln he wasn't caught for a few days and he went through virginia on on horseback in near like one of the places where he stopped there's this weird memorial to him kind of on this highway median sort of shrouded by the shrubs and it's it's a memorial to john wilkes booth you know which is very unsettling a memorial to john wilkes booth it's kind of it's kind of a fly by night why some people find him heroic i mean have you ever heard the maryland my maryland of the maryland state song there's there's a whole section of it that's word says you know six emperor which is what booths yelled twenty jumped to the stage and route part of the song is about assassinating lincoln lincoln was very view it was a contentious guy he was not an entirely popular figure a lot of us forget that that when lincoln was assassinated he wasn't like everybody's favorite president yeah i mean one person who had the most to do with that change of fortune besides lincoln himself was booth because that dummy shot lincoln on good friday and then lincoln died saturday morning in so by sunday morning all the sermons were all of easter was turned into a lincoln memorial noah's all these comparisons between jesus and lincoln which we still kind of have those connotations i think in your book assassination vacation there was an interesting quote you wrote the eagle mania required to be a president or presidential assassin makes the two types brothers of sorts the way las vegas in salt lake city are brothers yeah because they're just kind of company towns devoted to one thing in the desert you know once in when is salvation yeah i mean the only thing crazier than wanting to kill the president is wanting to be president you know i mean just think about the amount of egomania takes to want that job and to think you could do that job so i mean it's you know sometimes we have these problematic presidents and that's what we see yeah for sure and that's what we get because we're only going to get people to run for that job who think they can do it and who think they should do it you know and that's insane same with the the assassins you know this is a democracy i mean the reason presidents weren't really protected before you know like after the third assassination they started getting protection but because they thought assassinations happened in monarchy's they thought interru a public that could never wasn't even a concern for protection because the people choose the president you know but these assassins they decide like said thing we're doesn't count yeah you know what when you think about the killer's tell us just where they all just nutcases that just wanted to kill somebody or did they have ideals where they doing something machiavellian way that they make ideals but yeah they are were on cases we go janis booth was a real racist.

"rick steves" Discussed on Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

"All these factors might change from time to time but eventually you kinda get a sense so i know that i love 25 milligrams i can totally do five milligrams if i'm talking to folks and two point five to five is generally fine for me but more than that i wanna be at home watching a funny movie or not really have any responsibilities beyond beyond that and everybody has to kind of figure that out for themselves and for example i know i i as a fellow i was working with who really never consumer wanna his whole life i think he's 45 probably ways hundred and fifty pounds a lean skinny guy uh hit he would have to three cookies to feel it thirty milligrams well aware that would just knocked me over so how do you incorporate the pot or thc into the food because anyone you know who's experimented before it would always going to the butter more moyal is what i understood so there's an various methods to extract thc or oil fr from the cannabis plant you could use ethanol extraction you could you co two you could use hard hydrocarbon which is butane hash oil or and we're all learning that's right this is all kind of newer technology that's now out in the light we actually by the oil we're not growing marijuana and extracting marijuana you're not throwing chunks of wheat into a a vat of butter we're letting the growers helped make that for us said it keeps it clean and green is a really important to us we don't want pesticides and so we have very stringent specs on what we're looking forward don't look for a very uh high chloroform tastes plant wheaty tastes we we distill it to kind of we'd that out literally al and that was rick steve's last meal emperor lucky that i found wearing it david murray paraffin my hobby of it by workers travelling the third edition of rick steve's book travel as a political act is out now you can find that book along with all of his guide books and.

"rick steves" Discussed on Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

"Listen you the podcast as well uh and she heard gill simmons say that she loves benassi pie so lauren was inspired to create eight benassi pie icecream flavor roasted banana ice cream homemade dolchai to let jake handed graham crackers and milk and dark chocolate flakes so she makes this ice cream she packages it up and then she sends six pints of it to gales simmons i think in new york city gale receives the ice cream tries it loves it ends up tweeting about it instagram me about it tells the world that she loves it lauren has the best day of her life i'm excited it's a good plan full circle experience so i thought that was pretty fun and if you want to follow the action on social media you can follow me at i am rachel belle that's on twitter and fell with any and that concludes your your less meal news all right let's get into the episode with rick steve's so your new book is called travel as a political act how to leave your baggage behind new explain the concept of your new book this is not your typical you know pick a city in europe guidebook yeah will people who know me know me from decades of teaching european travel and i've been teaching enthusiastically and tirelessly here in the seattle area since the eighties enough i look back on today i didn't have any grand plan but they've been sort of a logical evolution in the 80s i was talking about you know uh europe through the back door that was the book and and it was a budget skills how to use a train pass how to get a good hotel how to pack late and stay healthy and so on uh and then in the nineties that occurred to me okay you know we've cut the train we know how to pack and find a hotel that's the bottom rung of mass slows hierarchy of travel needs you could say uh the next step up would be enjoying the culture and the history and the arts and the cuisine and i i wrote a book called dearborn a one and i was enthusiastically teaching classes about appreciating the culture in the art and.

"rick steves" Discussed on Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Your Last Meal With Rachel Belle

"Your last meal is sponsored by heritage to company craft in small batch vodkas jin's and whiskies drink locally drink responsibly borrow seattle sure no i am rachel belle and this is your last meal a show about famous people and the stories behind the foods they love most today on the program the last meal of travel guru rick steve's rick steve's is put out more than fifty european travel guide books he hosts a public television show called brick steve's europe and a public radio show called travel with rick steve's boy oh boy this recollect to travel and despite being kind of a buttoned up detail oriented guy rick has been a proponent for legalizing marijuana for a very long time what is your favorite stone snack grech remote widow coming through okrec remote gordon durie a they look like little dog third pellets but i love in order to reduce our i love our minority to more retirement i was listening to my favorite music or whatever rick and i both left in washington state where pot has been legal for several years now and thc and cbd infused every time i save as thc in cbd i feel like vvd pvda what was is obviously yeah unlimited it was that motown fillers how philly uh such a good song anyway moving on we have edibles in the state they are infused with chc and cbd you can listen to abc nbc d while you eat them all but you can easily buy them at putt shops so i chat with jody hull she's the founder of seattle cupcake empire cupcakery al and she hasn't edibles company called good ship one of the things that we work on a good ship is to kind of eradicating the notion of edible relent a lot of us have experienced a an opportunity where we might have had a little bite or a rat's nibble or a whole.

"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"In the hour we'll hear what turned south korea into an economic powerhouse thanks for coming along its travel with rick steve's we're exploring fed plotkin six favorite cities in the world for people who like to eat treads reputation as an expert on italian cuisine is confirmed by his definitive guidebook italy for the gourmet travel as we've heard so far bologna is his top food city in the world when a series gets rave reviews court cosmopolitan pilot and right now we're exploring how its international character has boosted london's reputation as a culinary capital if you were to really make your point by taking me out to dinner in london would you find the best cuisine in example of english cuisine or would it be something more eccentric or from distant land some exotic as were speaking i was london about three weeks ago i try to eat local foods in every country go to and i happen to love fish and seafood and there are a few restaurants so they go to in london more i always have local british fish is beautifully prepare dover sole lives heaven marie example and the only to places that you can eat it really wells in england than in belgium and the dressed kravitz call which is really undressed kravitz taken out of his shell uh the pronounce that come from the ira the bay of ireland bay of dublin and all of this fantastic seafood from penns ends from cornwall means that you really can eat first class fish and seafood at london every day and then of course her fish and chips if you were in london and you wanted to go take meter nice uh fish restaurant what's your favorite fish.

south korea rick steve plotkin london england belgium kravitz ira ireland bay dublin cornwall three weeks
"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"rick steves" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"You can listen to ashley and tina's earlier appearance with tips for taking younger children on a european vacation at the travel with rick steve's show archives it's in the radio section of rick steve's dot com look for program number four ninety from june of 2017 this has been so much fun talking about traveling of teens in any can't talk about travel and teams without dealing with the challenge of cell phones ashley what's your wisdom on cell phones and teens on the road i think cellphones can make for a lot of fun you can give kids a lot of photo assignments with their cell phones also that will take us photo of something you need like the bus routes in and they can soumen scan and be the navigator the kids be the tech wizards absolutely and then you might want to limit they use for a social media to a certain time every night when they can have wi fi wherever you're staying and they're going to want to share their experience for their friends it's gonna make it more fun for so let's make that a positive thing but within parameters because they're gonna wanna share it on facebook but you don't want them to be at home all the time in europe tina from your experience as a tour guide with families which your wisdom on cell phones and social media yeah i would say just give them tasks um we usually do like a foot photo competition in to steer stereotypes about certain places and countries and they should be in the picture so it's like a competition for them and i always say that they should also focus on the fact that you know it's great that they have cell phones but just look outside look where your parents have brought you appreciate that and and coming from a person that's not their parent i think they take it for real and they appreciate it that the end and it's normal and you can tell them i always say with kids being honest as well is very important if there is wifi tell you'll have wifi tonight so that's why now you don't need to focus on that business it won't be working but do something else instead put your phone away and it's just wonderful it's such an exciting time to be traveling with teens it's more important than ever as there's a lot of fear and.

rick steve social media facebook wifi ashley tina europe