17 Burst results for "Rick Mercer"

"rick mercer" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"rick mercer" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Have you lived in new orleans i grew up about an hour from new orleans just north of the city across lake pontchartrain you've you've known it and loved it all your life it sounds so i have i love new orleans like a person is it as loveable after katrina as it was before how has it changed is the sole any different that is a complex question that i will do my best to answer in a few sentences christina wrought a lot of change and some of that change involved a lot of people coming here some to help with recovery who then fell in love with the city and stayed and brought with them their ideas about what a city can be they brought those ideas from afar new orleans has not historically been a city that has looked outside for ideas about how to be and so that is something that has transformed the landscape both professionally we have a tremendous amount of entrepreneurship that's happening in the city education wise and for some people the changes that happened with katrina did not go well there are people who are left out of the benefits but there are also a lot of changes that have been good for the city and i think that bringing the city into the spotlight of the nation frankly the country was forced to confront that this is a very special unusual particular place that is worth not only saving i think we're we're kind of past the the saving part but definitely worth savoring and i think that a lot of people who may still believe that i don't know there's water in the streets or something that was a long time ago should come down and discover that we aren't just bourbon street we aren't just people having way way way too much to drink endlessly that there is a rich culture here at stands apart from anywhere else in the united states but we are still part of you and you should come here it's a as our convention visitors bureau might argue you know it's cheaper than paris okay and now katrina struck back in two thousand five and i know it might not be the spin of the tourist board but if somebody was to complain that the soul of new orleans was just devastated by this knits never recovered what would you say to that well i would say the city's burned twice been through war carbon agar's we've had other hurricanes other disasters and i would argue the core of what new orleans is which is a place that values the interaction between people between friends and family a city that encourages its residents to just step outside feet on the street to literally dance in the street that does not look scans at that a place where people spend weeks planning their costumes for carnival where the sound of the city is being supported in this really tremendous organization called the roots of music where elementary and middle school children are being schooled in new orleans brass band traditional sound there is a a lot that is vibrant and present and that the soul of the city from the city is still very very alive this is travel with rick steves we're talking elizabeth pierce for book is drink that new orleans guide to the best cocktail bars neighborhood pubs and allnight dives boy researching this guidebook must've been just brutal you had to go to all these bars and get to know him of course you've been doing this for many years in your tour guide that takes people on drink can learn tours you decided to eliminate music spots and strip clubs and focused on drinking atmosphere to find your favorite bars and watering holes and.

new orleans
"rick mercer" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"rick mercer" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"And just so our listeners know that's on the rugged pacific coast of vancouver island which is it's high on my list everybody you know we do rugged well to pheno on the west coast and then on the east coast in my province newfoundland labrador if you look up fogo island which is a place that i used to visit growing up and i never ever told anyone to fogo island when they visited newfoundland because it was just so far to get to i would think who would ever go there as tourist it's just so far even though i knew it was beautiful now there's like a sixty million dollar beautiful in that's built there it's just look up fogo island f o g oh it's a tremendous destination and like i say you'll see that canada does rugged and we do it well he tony you were gonna ask about prince edward island or island the only province of ten provinces that we had not visited so i know how are a little island of prince edward island joined confederation but i have never been able to figure out why it is one of the provinces there is only one hundred and forty thousand people in the whole province the whole two percent of our seats in the house of commons and four percent of seats in the senate so they're they're just over represented over represented at that situation with our senate which is becoming more clear to people lately is just this notion that every state or every province should have this what a similar representation regardless of population it might be an interesting question i i'm not sure about the origins but i've never heard it's not like in canada there's anyone who's ever there's no movement to you know reduce the political influence of prince edward island because yes while they are a very small province or smallest province i've never really heard anyone feel like they're over represented you know they're a province and always have been and always will in fact it was in prince edward island where the fathers of confederation sat down and hammered out canada well that's right and then our confederation was eighteen sixty seven but prince edward island did not join for another six years so i think that they just made carved out a tough deal with the other provinces instead if you want us to join we're going to be a separate province and we only have one hundred and forty thousand people my my hat's off to them we can travel there and ask them themselves and i should say if you do travel there we're talking about the atlantic coast now it is a small island it is joined to the mainland so you can drive there no fairy necessary and it's golf for days and beautiful beaches it's very much a great family is the perfect family friendly vacation wonderful people and make nificant seafood oh if you like lobster it's the man to go i'm just my travel dreams are percolating here hey tony.

vancouver island sixty million dollar four percent two percent six years
"rick mercer" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"rick mercer" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"Thanks for your call rick and rick i appreciate that and ravers are how are you wreck i'm great thank you very good i wanted to follow up on the conversation you were just having an particular your discussions about or your discussion about montreal quebec and vancouver my question was what would you consider the top five or ten places in canada a person from the us should visit to get a true flavor of canada well that's a tough one because again i think merican often don't realize how vast we are so i think you know american understands like oh and visiting the united states where should i go no one would say well oh you got a week well you'd absolutely want to check out southern california and you want to go to maine and you absolutely want to check out new orleans you know they realize that that's impossible to do it's it's just too big and candidate is exactly the same way i would absolutely encourage everyone to visit my home province of newfoundland and labrador i think it's incredible unique and stunning i think toronto a capital as a provincial capital is that you know it's a major city absolutely it's a great city i love our nation's capital auto are albert is a stunning province i mean i could just go on and on so i'll just keep going till i hit five or ten minute albert absolutely and plus i'm going to get in so much trouble because if you're ever you're sometimes that's what's your favorite place if you know if you say your hometown get away with it but anything other than your hometown you start alienating people the west coast of canada british columbia is absolutely stunning and i would absolutely encourage everyone in canada and the united states to visit the canadian north i mean the arctic the north is it's life altering how stunning it is and it's like nowhere else i mean you can go up there you're in our nation's capital and a couple of hours on a plane and you're in you know a territory that you will never forget it's just absolutely stunning and it's like living and then you can go above the treeline where the trees don't grow it's just amazing hey steve wchs for your call absolutely thank you guys appreciate it thank you tony's calling from victoria in beautiful british columbia tony thanks for your call thank you very much rick in high to both rix i love i love rick mercer's program i and i love rick steves program so and just to put myself in the right frame of mind i'm standing on my deck i'm looking at cross harrow street at san juan island which is just ten miles of across the street and of course beautiful san juan island in the united states i grew up in the canadian san juan's that was our vacations on every summer we go up there and it's canadian and one i guess you call it the gulf islands no centric thing to say isn't it no i've never heard of that before wow i it it the oh my god those gulf islands those are spectacular what are we started out as a oh and then i started out as a young guy in comedy and i had a one man show that was one of my first big gigs i i went to hornby island british columbia and and i did a show in a small community center and the door you enter the door and it was the inside of a massive tree and you had to walk through this tree to go into this like hobbits house which was that the and i'll never forget it you only thing i would take issue with the rick mercer is the dang couvert is a gorgeous city victoria is magnificent see i knew the minute anyone like where's your favorite place where should i go it's just it's yeah it's a hornet's nest now on fire from where this gentleman is calling well a couple of hours i guess to pheno which is one of my favourite beaches in the world and a beautiful neck of the woods which has tremendous ends and amazing food and my god is just gorgeous time to be there of course is in the winter with wonderful storms that storm watching in the cost of accommodation in the winter months into pheno is about twice what it is in the summer months.

rick ten minute
"rick mercer" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"rick mercer" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"That have been shot in newfoundland they'll see the landscape and the town of trinity and bonnevilles to such movies like the shipping news and then keep going east and eventually you'll make your way into the capital city which is saint john's is a kind of a circular tour is that what people do yeah that'd be a big one i mean one of the things you quickly realize when you start doing your planning is that newfoundland the island is really big michelle from detroit email and she writes i plan to hike the east coast trail this summer and i wanna do it right to be at saint john's for the folk festival what advice do you have for me about the east coast trail and the folk festival well both are fantastic i've played the folk festival many times when i don't play it i go to it it's writing the dead in the middle of saint john's it's right in the heart of the city in park oban republican it's fantastic and it's mostly local music local traditional music so you know lots of accordions fiddles and whistles nc shanties and songs and they're all awesome the trail is enormous and runs basically all along the coast of the province now and you could fly into saint john's and do day walks out of saint john's and do circles that would walk you out of the city and back into the city unbelievable that you could do it from an urban place like one of the great things about saint john's is that the city is surrounded by by coastline and wilderness really i mean you can walk from the busiest downtown street in saint john's and within twenty minutes you are completely surrounded by wilderness and ocean you know and like you can walk from the busiest hotel to nothingness and it's just very unusual to be able to do that and in north american city this is traveled through xt's who've been talking with allen doyle ellen rights where i belong small town two great big sea he also writes called a newfoundlander in canada always going somewhere always coming home allen's website is allen doyle dot ca allen let's just kept this discussion with music because you're well known in canada as a musician and when the canadians look at newfoundland they must marvel at how much creativity and musical culture comes out of that the little rock in the atlantic or we're very new and i think we're finally you know after fifty years of being a part of the country you know the rest of the country is finally looked east and gone like what is going on up there because we're so disproportionately represented in the national irt seem that it's impossible not the because you like two percent of the population that's right and yet we're i think we're twenty percent of national broadcaster what's what's in the water i mean how does that does that because you're the the irish sort of gift of gas so yeah yeah i think that's a part of it i think it's the biggest thing so i was i'll try to find the practical reason why people would learn to sing song you know and it's like maybe grow up in a small efficient town in newfoundland and you wanna some some william probably better gotta learn it and sing it because our even write it in single because there's nobody coming designed for you right and you know alice compared to america's sometimes like you know that whole sort of traditional kind of classic tale of you know being in say for example from the mid west in the united states and and being you know feeling kind of isolated and how but of course you know if you're from i don't know somewhere in kansas or whatever for example in the nineteen fifties you know there was a real good chance that one weekend during the summer a bus would pass through in dean martin would be on it you know they did that every summer they criss crossed the of course nobody did that newfoundland we're no roads and so the people from small fishing towns especially had to entertain themselves and they had to have their own stories and their own songs and their own dances and their own instruments and their own instrumental tunes because they needed them too to have dance you know knowns coming to do it you know so you got to do it yourself and so we ended up with this huge canon of what we call newfoundland traditional songs and music and.

newfoundland saint john twenty minutes twenty percent fifty years two percent
"rick mercer" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"rick mercer" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"The lead singer of the folk rock band great big sea and he's released a number of solo albums including a week at the warehouse his autobiography where i belong paints a vivid portrait growing up in a small fishing town and it's a bestseller in kent his follow up look is a newfoundlander in canada always going somewhere always coming home allen was also a worded the order of candidate twenty seventeen for his contributions to the culture of newfoundland his website is allen doyle duck see ellen in your book i was reading about how in your little town your little tiny pity harbor there's actually the same dynamic historically s you've had a lot of irish communities where you've got catholic this and protestant that when i grow up religion defined the actual footprint of the town and i think that's a traditional kind of irish and kind of way to do it there's a river that splits petty operate and half and on the side that i'm from the catholic side there was a church a school a fish plant and a convenience store crossed the bridge and petty harbour when i grow up and there was an anglican church and then over on that side there was another comedian store and another fish plant and again this is a town of five hundred people had an literally had duplicate on the other side would there be a kind of tribal loyalty where if you're a good protestant gem would keep it in the family i mean that was kind of long before my time a little bit in my parents time but certainly in my grandparents time would have been very if not unusual it would have been definitely talk about if somebody crossed the bridge would anybody married between the the tribes it would have been would have been like i say in my grandparents generation that would have been a notable thing but i mean when i was a kid the most practical thing that did for me was that we had two schools right right so it was a little catholic school that survived in pity harbor but all my protestant friends they all got boston saint john's hurting forty kilometers away yeah go to school as kindergartens is this ridiculous to think about it you know like those kids could have easily just come to our school you know they could have walked it would have been indoctrinated by the wrong religion had the wrong the wrong jesus when i was in scotland glasgow is a town with a with a catholic protestants always it ever and there's two soccer teams and rangers and celtic man you got to be in the short and scott toward there many times and and i always say the glasgow is the the only town i've ever been in my life that where a pungent the vases and that's supposed to ruin your night you know you've mentioned it the next day but you wouldn't go home or call the police surrending like that you know you probably end up drinking at the very people to punch to you if i had four or five days to drive around the island would i see any viking sites or anything goes away back would i come on any great trails take me on it just a quick run around the island what would i see if you flew into the west coast of newfoundland or arrived on the west coast news land by ferry from the mainland of canada very quickly make your way to gross more national park and that's one of the unesco world heritage site right now parts of that looked like norwegian fjords just a spectacular natural piece of jogger fee in when quickly up the northern param of newfoundland what we call the northern peninsula deriving lots and meadows and that's one of the oldest recorded viking settlements anywhere in the world and if you made your way back down and came to the central part of me from nine ninety be very inbetween gander and grand falls and that's of course where the famous hospitality happened your nine eleven when the airport in gander hosted so many that needed to get out of the sky nine eleven and the population of candor and the surrounding towns basically tripled and then if you made your way closer towards where i live towards saint john's and east coast you'd very quickly come to bonneville sta and trinity in the bottom vista peninsula which if people have seen few major motion pictures.

forty kilometers five days
"rick mercer" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"rick mercer" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"This is a cbc podcast discover what millions around the world already have audible has canada's largest library of audiobooks including exclusive content curated by and four canadians experience books in a whole new way we're stories are brought to life by powerful performances from renowned actors and narrators with the free audible app you can listen anytime anywhere whether you're at home in the car or out on a jog the first thirty days of the audible membership or free including a free book go to www dot audible dot ca slash cbc to learn more or this feels really weird to say tonight is the very last episode of the rick mercer report on cbc television wrapping a fifteen seasons one twelve canadian screen awards two hundred sixty two rants in one alley but tonight rick mercer report is this is so weird to say like i feel like i'm just kind of brushing past but it's the last one rix by the show a few times you know to look back at his career and politics and comedy the cbc those are all up on our on our web say he was even here when it was announced this would be the last season but right now i guess because the last show airs tonight on tv felt right to have rick stop by just for quick chat to say goodbye area i'm excellent nice i feel like you should be kathy lee man you're here all the time i'm feeling good though a big day and i'm feeling incredibly good are you really i was going to ask i'm you know what i'm very proud of this special we put together there was a lot riding on it because i'm really proud of this show and i think that with this special we've embodied everything that i believe is good about the show celebration of canada celebration of small towns people that you find in those small towns and lots of funny lots of stunts all the things that i think the show is good at all comes together one.

canada rick mercer cbc kathy lee thirty days
"rick mercer" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"rick mercer" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"So we asked him for production team a here at cdc a cue to try and find the earliest possible moments of nickel back that we could in there is probably earlier footage error somewhere putter popular heavens earlier this is a clip from 1997 boy take a lesson ars roundworm just in the morning so guess there i see the guy that were in syria av who just went only get his drumsticks and he's been on clay so go ahead we'll try all right we're gonna start off for the new saw another guy's you've heard is going to be on the new charles and david it's going down there is not functioning yeah lorde zou new yes sounds so it's pretty cool that's a very young nickelback back in 1987 and avid spray with no drummer playing one of their first singles leader of man before it had a name chad what do you think when you hear that felt like he was pretty good i told you acted saying those days the odds sweat like i remember i think at one point in time we didn't really know what to do um mitch are drummer the time yeah he was really like just deathly ill and could not make it over from the island and at one point i just took the microphone tonight i brought it over and i started playing the drums and we were and then we just can all started switching in taking turns with whatever we could you can get through because they know there was a lot of people there and we had the where we lag is very motivated yeah fear fear is a wonderful moderate but i think that what what what i'm hearing when i hear that is that like i only knew you guys famous i only knew you guys in a new flint especially owning you guys when you've got super famously grind when you hear that what what do you hear of your of yourselves um you know it was pretty innocent back then the even the ambition now it's sinister oas horley senator now enabling who has that we're like the big evil were found early but it was on no at that's what i think because i i remember i remember that vividly and and i liked the perspective of remembering noshows well i vividly remember that show because it was stressful win.

charles nickelback mitch oas senator syria david lorde zou chad
"rick mercer" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"rick mercer" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"That that's actually reflecting in people's skin riot and then the last thing i do as a use a polarise are to control the reflection a little bit and that's it helps a lot and rick is for you may i know i know very little about this but oftentimes you tried to retry reduced shine for people's faces is that right yeah i mean i it depends but yes for caucasian skin an and even for people of color depending on how how their faces take the light you're trying to reduce reflection but if you make a an even soft reflection or you and doesn't even have to be soft but something that complements the the structure of the person's face then you have some you have a reflection that's not just like a a shine of if i use a larger surface area to create the the reflection from i have a better chance of arm of being able to mould the reflection in such a way that people look on how to people of color often look i'm phil there are two ways that i've noticed that being done and that is um i i feel like a lot of cinematographers their film filmmakers have historically just thrown lots and lots of light so that you can see everybody and um and every and everything and that's just a that's one way to do it you know and it's appropriate in some situations and other ways are and this is the this is sort of an older school way but um especially on film because film and digital erred are very different in terms of how they handle um shadows and things on the darker side um.

rick
"rick mercer" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"rick mercer" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"When these things are shared online rather than on your tv show uh it well it's completely new to me the mercer report works really well in that format and now i think when people create shows the create shows with that in mind like if we're going to do a segment candid go viral canopy put on on youtube or what have you but every everything i've ever done has always been short so it works perfectly in the rance you know really go over ninety seconds two minutes would be the absolute max so they're perfectly suited for that and sure i find that gratifying to a certain degree like i mentioned the the gore downey story i i was conflicted about that because i wanted to talk about it because it was really just it was pretty much the only thing on my mind that week and and i wanted to tell the story but at the same time i was a little worried about how it might be perceived because i didn't want to be seen as you know just talking about something because everyone is talking about it and and i did it anyway and i was very pleased to see that it did so well in social media yeah i certainly like that i understand that i think there's there's also a temptation when someone like that passes away who or someone who like that dies you have a connection to your always kind of worried about and i know i found this on the day of dick not making about myself you don't wanna make it about yourself yeah and i didn't want to make it like hey i'm a friend a gourds because the point was i wasn't i i mean we were both in show business and canada and and we had done business together on another tv show i did that were that tragically hip provided all the music but we were show biz france in that way that we'd but i didn't want to make like i.

youtube dick canada france gore downey social media ninety seconds two minutes
"rick mercer" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"rick mercer" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"You when these things are shared online rather than on your tv show uh well it's completely new to me the mercer report works really well in that format and now i think when people create shows the create shows with that in mind like if we're going to do a segment candid go viral canopy put on on youtube or what have you but every thing i've ever done has always been short so it works perfectly in the rance you know really go over ninety seconds two minutes would be the absolute max so they're perfectly suited for that and sure i find that gratifying to a certain degree like i mentioned the the gordon downey story i i was conflicted about that because i wanted to talk about it because it was really just it was pretty much the only thing on my mind that week and and i wanted to tell the story but at the same time i was a little worried about how it might be perceived because i didn't want to be seen as you know just talking about something because everyone was talking about it and and i did it anyway and i was very pleased to see that it did so well in social media yeah i certainly like that i understand that i think there's there's also a temptation when someone like that passes away who or someone who like that her dis the epa connection to your always kind of worried about and i know i found this on the day of dick not making about myself you don't wanna make it about yourself yeah and i didn't want to make it like hey i'm a friend a gourds because the point was i wasn't i i mean we were both in show business in canada and and we had done business together on another tv show i did that were that tragically hip provided all the music but we were show biz france in that way that we'd but i didn't wanna make like i knew him but he actually did have this connection with my father that you know i felt was very sweet spoke to the character of the man and which is why i talked about a new text me that day yeah since he sent he think your father that that be a deputy was a it was.

youtube dick france gordon downey social media epa canada ninety seconds two minutes
"rick mercer" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"rick mercer" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"This is a cbc podcast if you're marketing predictable it should be because results shouldn't be left to chance that's why smart male marketing is based on science in a digital world people responded the tactile nature of male more than ever they pick it up they read it what's more they act on it study show direct mail consistently drives customers online and in store that's predictability a marketer can get excited about smart meal marketing makes success predictable learn more at canada post dot c a smart male marketing hey i'm ali hassan sitting in for tom power this is q the podcast version of the cbc radio show q thanks for tuning in great show today some of the best of cue from the past year including tom's interview with rick mercer host of cbc's the rick mercer reports plus director of photography abor cop ski on what it takes to properly like the stars of the hit hbo series insecure and tom's interview with nickel back that's all coming up on the podcast which begins now enjoy after fifteen seasons one five seasons this season of the rick mercer report will be the last i did the matt welsh somebody to the math for me and it that's fifteen seasons is over two hundred and fifty episodes 250 rants in a lot of frequent flier miles if you watched the rick mercer report you know that one day he's he's he's traveling all over canada for that show one day he'll be bungee jumping rick hansen another day he's zip lining with jana janardan and a little while back he joined tom power here in the queue studio to look back on what he calls the best job ever take a listen.

ali hassan cbc director canada jana janardan tom power canada post rick mercer hbo one day
"rick mercer" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"rick mercer" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"This is a cbc podcast if you're marketing predictable it should be because results shouldn't be left to chance that's why smart male marketing is based on science in a digital world people responded the tactile nature of male more than ever they pick it up they read it what's more they act on it study show direct mail consistently drives customers online and in store that's predictability a marketer can get excited about smart meal marketing makes success predictable learn more at canada post dot c a smart male marketing after fifteen seasons one five seasons this season of the rick mercer report will be of the last did the matt well somebody to the math for me ended the looks fifteen seasons is over two hundred fifty episodes 250 rance in a lot of frequent flier miles if you watched the rick mercer report you know that one day his this is travelling all over canada for that show one day he'll be jumping lyric hansen another day he's zip lining with jana janardan and a little while back he joined tom power here in the queue studio to look back on what he calls the best job ever take a listen this season of the request a report will be the last i'm not sure you can believe it either i can't really now i was a decision i made and i certainly made it public so that would ensure that it was real i just left st john's just last week and i was at the airport now was insecurity in the guy had my laptop so i can really do get away from him and he said you're leaving the show i said yeah he's at worst mistake you've ever made nice well never noticed it all now you're going to regret this and then he kind of looked around strangers nodding zip they would agree and then there was a woman behind me and she was like yeah now he's right.

canada jana janardan tom power canada post rick mercer one day
"rick mercer" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"rick mercer" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Literally like entertainment news and political news and current affairs and international affairs men he's just taking all of the oxygen so if you cover political satire then you have to talk donald trump you're a rare a political comedian who's actually made a difference in that i mean we talked about this last time you're here i think often times about when stockwell day was can we was was running and he was gonna he was gonna started petition if if you've got a certain amount of fake news certain amount of canadians will voted on something or had a petition on something he had a had a policy platform that a policy that said if a certain percentage of canadian side petition there would be a binding referendum a binding referendum on it so yet so we we went on law well we created a website this was back in the twenty two minute days this was at a time when when i came up with this idea and i said people will go online and signed a petition 22 minutes didn't have a website that we didn't even owned the domain name shows didn't have domain names and so we got a million people to sign this petition and he dropped the policy and yeah had a lot of ramifications you were in stockwell day was was to his name two doors to doris so can under his policy would have been the first referendum all canadians would have spent geno thirty million dollars voting of whether or not to change its first name badoer's so is a little bad because it's kinda stuck to him i think he gets called doors about twice a week still the quote reason ask questions because i think he look at jimmy kimmel and stephen colbert right now and is a question as to whether comedy whether late my comedy whether political satire can actually make a difference.

donald trump badoer jimmy kimmel stephen colbert stockwell domain name thirty million dollars twenty two minute 22 minutes
"rick mercer" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"rick mercer" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"Literally like entertainment news and political news and current affairs and international fairs men he's just taking all of the oxygen so if you cover political satire then you have to talk donald trump you're a rare political comedian who's actually made a difference in that i mean we talked about this last time you're here i think often times about when stockwell day was he was was running and he was gonna he was to start a petition if if you've got a certain amount of fake news certain amount of canadians will voted on something or had a petition on something he eta had a policy platform that a policy that said if a certain percentage of canadian signed a petition there would be a binding referendum a binding referendum on it so yet so we we went on law well we created a website this is back in the twenty two minute days this is at a time when when i came up with this idea and i said people will go online and signed a petition 22 minutes didn't have a website that we didn't even owned the domain name shows didn't have domain names and so we got a million people to sign this petition and he dropped the policy and yeah had a lot of ramifications you were in stockwell day was was to change his name two doors to doris so can under his policy would have been the first referendum all canadians would have spent geno thirty million dollars voting on whether or not to change its first name badoer's that they see little bad because it's kinda stuck to him i think he gets called doors about twice a week still the quote reason ask questions because i think he look at jimmy kimmel and stephen colbert right now and is a question as to whether comedy whether late my comedy whether political satire can actually make a difference.

donald trump badoer jimmy kimmel stephen colbert stockwell domain name thirty million dollars twenty two minute 22 minutes
"rick mercer" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"rick mercer" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"To one of your and my favorite targets take listen to this when you will to toronto you realize pretty quick that when it comes to the weather there are two parallel universes there's lucky hear about is the media and then there's what you see on your window you can wake up in turn on the news you can see a lead story about a snowstorm that slammed the city fell there were three hundred accidents between five and ninety ends no flights took off and the reporter on the scene is so panicked he sounds like he's reporting live from the model of the collapsed line shah you think i have no idea those poor people but then you realize hang on i mean toronto's then you look out the window there's three centimetres of snow on the ground in the kid across the street his walking his dog in his teeshirts thin you realize to his those those storms there was no weather bomb dear wore zilly's that was a clipper rick mercer's rant about torontonians and the weather on the rick mercer report from back in two thousand eight how do you feel as linda that that much has changed quite frankly israeli into their winter season the great thing about the rant is really it is such a privilege because i have no mandate i don't have to rant about what's happening in ottawa this week i can rent about what's bugging me when i walked down the street were i can rent about the weather i can i can talk about something that's just effected me that i know is not a funny as subject at all amid two weeks ago i i didn't so much rant as i use that opportunity to just tell a story about gore downey and there was nothing randy about it it was just a simple story and that's something i'm going to miss for sure because it's in amazing privileged to be able to do that every single week can you do at thursday night's rain.

reporter shah toronto rick mercer linda ottawa gore downey zilly three centimetres two weeks
"rick mercer" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"rick mercer" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"To one of your and my favorite targets take listen to this when you will to toronto you realize pretty quick that when it comes to the weather there are two parallel universes there's lucky hear about his immediate and then there's what you see on your window you can wake up in turn on the news than you can see a lean story about a snowstorm that slammed the city fell there were three hundred accidents between five and ninety ends no flights took off and the reporter on the scene is so panicked he sounds like he's reporting live from the model of the collapsed mineshaft you think i had no idea those poor people but then you realize hang on i mean toronto's then you look out the window there's three centimetres of snow on the ground in the kid across the street his walking his dog in his teeshirts thin you realize to his those those storms there was no weather bomb there were police that was a clipper rick mercer's rant about torontonians and the weather on the rick mercer report from back in two thousand eight how do you feel as into that that much has changed quite frankly israeli handed a winter season the great thing about the rant is really it is such a privilege because i have no mandate i don't have to rant about what's happening in ottawa this week i can rent about what's bugging me when i walked down the street were i can rent about the weather i can i can talk about something that's just effected me that i know is not a funny subject at all men two weeks ago i i didn't so much rant as i use that opportunity to just tell a story about gore downey and there was nothing randy about it it was just a simple story and that's something i'm going to miss for sure because it's in amazing privileged to be able to do that every single week can you do at thursday night's rain.

reporter toronto rick mercer ottawa gore downey three centimetres two weeks
"rick mercer" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"rick mercer" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"I feel like that every week like i can count on one hand the number of times when i walk out on stage in front of my studio audience where i haven't been in the mood and that's after fifteen years like i i love the studio i love the live audience i love going out in the road i love it almost every part of my show i like doing so yes it's bittersweet in a way but it's also it's so all encompassing i haven't really thought about it may be because i'm a man i've decided not to think about these things and just just push it away gay could give out of the way wish that away and i'll deal with that some other time at some real newfoundland stuff illinois gotta sit around and wonder about the future that's real newfoundland that's realized laying down just a thing you people do b again on a wanted to sit around and contemplate you're going to have to sooner you you're right buddy at security now what are you gonna do not contemplate i'll tell me about the buddy insecurity it so like when era you love this country you travel this country an awful lot you you you must be constantly just packing and unpacking and on the road i have an on packed in about the 15 years i'm i'm in a you know there's like three different bags of various levels of winter because we shoot a lot in the winter so i've got the heavy arctic in there and i've got the just the medium winter and that i've got the balmy i've got yeah i'm just i've never really unpacked and i want you to tell me this story about being on a plane and you realizing that your life is a bucket list oh i was on a plane with a guy and i i'm actually.

newfoundland illinois fifteen years 15 years one hand