17 Burst results for "Richmond Public School"

"richmond public school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:05 min | Last month

"richmond public school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And by the listeners of KQED. It looks like we will see some rain, but not until the end of the weekend. Sunday night and on into well Sunday Day and on in tonight today, though, sunny skies with high temperatures from the low sixties to the low seventies date, 46. This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin and I've got death row school districts in the US are juggling a lot right now They're trying to figure out how and when to safely reopen how to spend covert relief funds that are on the way and they're looking for new ways to fill the learning gaps worsened by the pandemic. In Virginia. Jason cameras, the superintendent of Richmond public schools, has a plan. It could help about 20% of the district's most at need students. We feel like we have to start somewhere. If approved, it would bring big changes to the next to academic calendar years we have put forward a version of a year round calendar. Which really has at its core, the idea of equity, and when you boil down equity, it's about giving the kids who need the most the most, and we would have them in very small groups with our teachers. To provide intensive support. Enrichment on advancement. You know, pre pandemic. I feel like I would make a joke here about how the idea Summer school is pretty unpopular. But I wonder. I wonder if students are eager for something like this after the past year. What is the feedback been like? If you back actually has been fairly positive. Obviously, you know, not every student is excited about more weeks of school, but I have a high school student Advisory council and Was really happily surprised. They were very supportive of this in part because they do want to be back. They want to see their friends. They want to have an opportunity to Socialized be face to face with teachers. So I've actually seen a good amount of support. Families have been more supportive than I initially thought with something a zbig of a change like this and teachers as well, because when you work those extra days, they wouldn't be required. So if you volunteered to work, of course we could pay you and our teachers could earn. An additional $10,000 per year. By working these additional weeks. There is a lot of federal money on its way now to school district's through this, this latest cove, it 19 relief bill. Has your district decided on how to spend again. Yes. So we just finished up our spend plan for the last round of stimulus, and a lot of it is going to facility upgrades and technology support but also to Something like this calendar that we proposed, which is expensive. And so we have a once in a Generation, if not once in a lifetime opportunity to do something bold and different like this, and so we're hoping to spend a good chunk of that money on these kinds of extra time for our students. We also have Notoriously underfunded facilities here in Richmond. So we're also pouring a lot of that money into H back upgrades, bathroom upgrades, things of that nature. I wonder what your conversations are, like, right now. With superintendent around Virginia around the country, there are so many huge problems. You're trying to figure out how to get everyone back in person safely. How to make up for these gaps that have happened because of the past year. What are you focusing on? When you talk to your peers? You know, everybody is facing the same challenges. They just play out in different ways, depending on the politics of a particular state or particular city, And I think everybody is struggling with how do we do the very best for our students and our teachers. Um, knowing that there are just very strong and very different opinions about how to achieve that right now. I think everybody has the best intentions at heart. I think it's just a matter of Trying to bridge.

Virginia Rachel Martin Sunday night Jason tonight US $10,000 Sunday Day about 20% 19 relief bill Richmond today past year NPR news once 46 KQED sixties seventies
"richmond public school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:56 min | Last month

"richmond public school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's 37 degrees Sandra fell 41. San Jose 39 as well and in San Francisco. It's 45 degrees. This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Scott Tetro. School districts in the US are juggling a lot right now they're trying to figure out how and when to safely reopen how to spend covert relief funds that are on the way. And they're looking for new ways to fill the learning gaps worsened by the pandemic. In Virginia, Jason cameras, the superintendent of Richmond, public schools, has a plan. It could help about 20% of the district's most at need students. We feel like we have to start somewhere. If approved, it would bring big changes to the next to academic calendar years. We have put forward a version of a year round calendar, which really has at its core, the idea of equity and when you boil down equity, it's about Giving the kids who need the most the most, and we would have them in very small groups with our teachers to provide intensive support enrichment in advancement, You know, pre pandemic. I feel like I would make a joke here about how the idea Summer school is pretty unpopular. But I wonder. I wonder if students are eager for something like this after the past year, What is the feedback been like? If you back actually has been fairly positive. Obviously, you know, not every student is excited about more weeks of school, you know, but I have a high school student Advisory council and Was really happily surprised. They were very supportive of this in part because they do want to be back. They want to see their friends. They want to have an opportunity Tol Socialized be face to face with teachers. So I've actually seen a good amount of support. Families have been more supportive than I initially thought with something a zbig of a change like this and teachers as well, because when you work those extra days, they wouldn't be required. So if you volunteered to work, of course we could pay you and our teachers could earn. An additional $10,000 per year. By working these additional weeks. There is a lot of federal money on its way now to school district's through this, this latest cove, it 19 released Bill. Has your district decided on how to spend it yet. Yes. So we just finished up our spend plan for the last round of stimulus. And a lot of it is going to facility upgrades and technology support but also to something like this calendar that we proposed, which is expensive. And so we have a once in a Generation, if not once in a lifetime opportunity to do something bold and different like this, and so we're hoping to spend a good chunk of that money on these kinds of extra time for our students. We also have Notoriously underfunded facilities here in Richmond. So we're also pouring a lot of that money into H back upgrades, bathroom upgrades, things of that nature. I wonder what your conversations are, like. Right now. With superintendents around Virginia around the country there so many huge problems. You're trying to figure out how to get everyone back in person safely. How to make up for these gaps that have happened because of the past year. What do you focusing on? When you talk to your peers, you know, everybody is facing the same challenges. They just play out in different ways, depending on the politics of a particular state or particular city and I think everybody is struggling with how do we do the very best for our students and our teachers, knowing that there are just very strong. And very different opinions about how to achieve that right now. I think everybody has the best intentions at heart. I think it's just a matter of trying to bridge.

Rachel Martin San Francisco 37 degrees 45 degrees Scott Tetro Virginia San Jose US Jason 41 39 NPR News Sandra $10,000 Richmond about 20% once in a Generation past year once 19
"richmond public school" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:52 min | Last month

"richmond public school" Discussed on KCRW

"NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Scott Tetro. School districts in the US are juggling a lot right now they're trying to figure out how and when to safely reopen how to spend covert relief funds that are on the way. And they're looking for new ways to fill the learning gaps worsened by the pandemic. In Virginia. Jason cameras, the superintendent of Richmond public schools, has a plan. It could help about 20% of the district's most at need students. We I feel like we have to start somewhere. If approved, it would bring big changes to the next to academic calendar years We have put forward a version of a year round calendar. Which really has at its core, the idea of equity, and when you boil down equity, it's about giving the kids who need the most the most, and we would have them in very small groups with our teachers. To provide intensive support enrichment in advancement. You know, pre pandemic I feel like I would make a joke here about how the idea Summer school is pretty unpopular, But I wonder. I wonder if students are eager for something like this after the past year. What is the feedback been like? If you back actually has been fairly positive. Obviously, you know, not every distance is excited about more weeks of school, you know, but I have a high school student Advisory council and I was really happily surprised. They were very supportive of this in part because they do want to be back. They want to see their friends. They want to have an opportunity to Socialized to be face to face with teachers. So I've actually seen a good amount of support. Families have been more supportive than I initially thought with something a zbig of a change like this and teachers as well, because when you work those extra days, they wouldn't be required. So if you volunteered to work Of course, we could pay you and our teachers could earn an additional $10,000 per year. By working these additional weeks. There is a lot of federal money on its way now to school district's through this, this latest cove, it 19 relief bill. Has your district decided on how to spend it yet. Yes. So we just finished up our spend plan for the last round of stimulus, and a lot of it is going to facility upgrades and technology support but also to Something like this calendar that we proposed, which is expensive. And so we have a once in a Generation, if not once in a lifetime opportunity to do something bold and different like this, and so we're hoping to spend a good chunk of that money on these kinds of extra Time for our students. We also have Notoriously underfunded facilities here in Richmond. So we're also pouring a lot of that money into H back upgrades, bathroom upgrades, things of that nature. I wonder what your conversations are, like. Right now. With superintendents around Virginia around the country, there are so many huge problems. You're trying to figure out how to get everyone back in person safely. How to make up for these gaps that have happened because of the past year. What do you focusing on when you talk to your peers? You know, everybody is facing the same challenges. They just play out in different ways, depending on the politics of a particular state or particular city, And I think everybody is struggling with how do we do the very best for our students and our teachers. Um, knowing that there are just very strong and very different opinions about how to achieve that right now. I think everybody has the best intentions at heart. I think it's just a matter of Trying to bridge these very strong feelings. Jason cameras, the superintendent of the Richmond school district. Thank you so much. My pleasure. Thank you..

Rachel Martin Virginia Jason $10,000 US Scott Tetro NPR News Richmond Richmond school district 20% 19 relief bill past year once once in
"richmond public school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:42 min | Last month

"richmond public school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Tonight it is getting colder once again, down to 35 degrees. With clear skies and it will be windy as well. We could see gusts up to 45 MPH still breezy tomorrow Sunday with a high near 50 degrees and sunny on Sunday as well with a high of 55. Don't forget that way, Sami people. Yeah. This is morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Scott Tetro. School districts in the US are juggling a lot right now They're trying to figure out how and when to safely reopen how to spend covert relief funds that are on the way and they're looking for new ways to fill the learning gaps worsened by the pandemic. In Virginia. Jason cameras, the superintendent of Richmond public schools, has a plan. It could help about 20% of the district's most at need students. We feel like we have to start somewhere. If approved, it would bring big changes to the next to academic calendar years we have put forward a version of a year round calendar. Which really has at its core, the idea of equity, and when you boil down equity, it's about giving the kids who need the most the most, and we would have them in very small groups with our teachers. To provide intensive support enrichment in advancement. You know, pre pandemic I feel like I would make a joke here about how the idea Summer school is pretty unpopular, But I wonder. I wonder if students are eager for something like this after the past year. What is the feedback been like? Feedback actually has been fairly positive. Obviously, you know, not every student is excited about more weeks of school, but I have a high school student Advisory council and Was really happily surprised. They were very supportive of this in part because they do want to be back. They want to see their friends. They want to have an opportunity to Socialized be face to face with teachers. So I've actually seen a good amount of support. Families have been more supportive than I initially thought with something a zbig of a change like this and teachers as well, because when you work those extra days, they wouldn't be required. So if you volunteered to work Of course, we could pay you and our teachers could earn an additional $10,000 per year. By working these additional weeks. There is a lot of federal money on its way now to school district's through this, this latest cove, it 19 relief bill. Has your district decided on how to spend it yet. Yes. So we just finished up our spend plan for the last round of stimulus, and a lot of it is going to facility upgrades and technology support but also to Something like this calendar that we proposed, which is expensive. And so we have a once in a Generation, if not once in a lifetime opportunity to do something bold and different like this, and so we're hoping to spend a good chunk of that money on these kinds of extra time for our students. We also have Notoriously underfunded facilities here in Richmond. So we're also pouring a lot of that money into H back upgrades, bathroom upgrades, things of that nature. I wonder what your conversations are, like. Right now. With superintendents around Virginia around the country, there are so many huge problems. You're trying to figure out how to get everyone back in person safely. How to make up for these gaps that have happened because of the past year. What do you focusing on when you talk to your peers? You know, everybody is facing the same challenges. They just play out in different ways, depending on the politics of a particular state or particular city, And I think everybody is struggling with how do we do the very best for our students and our teachers. Um, knowing that there are just very strong and very different opinions about how to achieve that right now. I think everybody Has the best intentions at heart. I think it's just a matter of trying to bridge these very strong feelings. Jason cameras the superintendent of the Richmond school district, thank you so much. My pleasure. Thank you. This'll is NPR news. Still ahead on morning edition here on W. N. Y C as sexual misconduct allegations Mount against New York Governor Andrew Cuomo. He also faces the continuing investigation into his handling of covert deaths in nursing homes. Coming up. New York Democratic Assembly member Ron Kim discusses the legislative push for nursing home reform and the political headwinds from within his own party. That story still to come. In about 15 minutes here on totally on my C. 62 degrees. Now we're just gonna be going up a few degrees today to a high in the mid sixties with some clouds this morning. And mostly clear skies later in the day today, Tonight, skies remain clear, but it will be significantly colder this evening a low around 35 degrees,.

Rachel Martin Virginia Jason Sunday Ron Kim Scott Tetro today $10,000 US NPR 35 degrees New York Democratic Assembly this morning tomorrow Sunday this evening 55 around 35 degrees 19 relief bill Andrew Cuomo Jason cameras
"richmond public school" Discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

The Steve Warne Project - Sports

04:11 min | 6 months ago

"richmond public school" Discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

"It's like, okay what you're going to their finishing sentences for guys on twitter st before he finished the sentence. An incredible. Incredible. Input from people but I read a bit of it. You know I started reading ago this things obviously happening and the first four or five things I read from the first four or five different people I went this ain't worth turn it on. Sound like sound like a she chill. Out, that it was it was it was learned anything I don't. You know if there's any opportunity to find out more about either man and what they stand for it was just a an immature little pissing matches, what it was, and you don't need it anymore Steve you don't need them what you don't need the debates anymore. Okay. In the old days you did OK before social media before streaming. Before. Whatever else you can get? People on now, they don't need weighing in every freaking ten minutes on issues and sides, and the news is laced with what they're what they stand for what they're what they're promoting, what they're lobbying for what they're looking for votes for the debate especially with these two. Guys. Has Dementia and near the guy's. Insane. All right I don't know what Joe Biden situation is, but I'll agree with any name you WANNA call Donald Trump because he really does remind me of. Bullies on the schoolyard Richmond Public School back in the day. When we have arguments, it would just be yelling at each other and it would just be insane. It would be things like I know you are but what am I or or clever gems like you're a big fat stupid head right now that's what that's what that thing last night was like is if I could be more embarrassed if I were an American I sure as hell even more embarrassed today after seeing that there's this absolutely zero dignity in that entire thing right as you know, my father was a member of parliament. Federal, member of parliament for Sudbury.

Steve Joe Biden Donald Trump Sudbury Richmond Public School Dementia
"richmond public school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:03 min | 9 months ago

"richmond public school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And the listeners of cake. Good morning empathizing at the time now 9 21 This is weekend edition from NPR News. I'm Lu Garcia Navarro. For the past month. As protests have swelled over racist violence. Many eyes have focused on Richmond, Virginia, the former capital of the Confederacy, is home to Monument Avenue, a long stretch with towering statues. Dedicated to figures like Jefferson Davis, Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee. Some of those monuments have been toppled by protesters. Others have been taken down now by the city. All this action as well as violent standoffs between police and protesters has been captured by the camera of Regina Boone. She's a staff photographer for the Richmond Free Press, a black newspaper in the city. Her parents started in the 19 nineties and she joins us now. Good morning. Hi. Good morning. Thanks for having me Lou. It's great to have you from your time in and around Richmond these days. What's the mood? It's intense. It has an exhaustive sort of feel to it. But then there's empowerment. There's exhilaration, then mixed, also with anger mixed with determination, so I can't just say one word. It's a mixed bag of emotions. I can say that It's fully alive and ready, Thes monuments coming down. Could you tell me what that signifies in your view? As a person who was raised in a household with my mom and my dad, Raymond Boone and Jean Boone, who started the paper that I work for the Richmond free Press. Monuments have always been a part of our conversation since I was a child growing up the early part of my life in Richmond and that they were symbols of hate and symbols of white supremacy. So I've always looked at these statues as being quite evil on DH always heard in my household that they needed to come down. You have been out Documenting these protests seeing this moment can you tell me about some of the people that you've been photographing and what you've experienced while you've been doing that Sure. I also just want to be clear that it's not just me photographing for our newspaper. I'm doing it along with my colleague Sandra Sellers who's been at the Richmond free Press for more than 20 years. And what we see are people who are angry for feta wanting change. Right now we're seeing Children come out. And we love to photograph Children because we hope that when they see themselves whether it's on social media or in our newspaper that they see where they are in history, and one day later in life, they can see that they were a part of this change. So we're seeing a mixed group of people black white Latino next Asian Americans out on the streets together, and this kind of is a rare scene in Richmond. But I'm meeting people like I met Richmond public school music teacher and she had her cello out in front of the Robert E. Lee statue, and she's out there playing this classical music that just springs Tills to your bones, and she has a slide show of words explaining the pain that she has felt as a black woman. And so as we see her as I saw her, and I locked her in with my camera, I felt her pain I could identify with it. Is there a different kind of responsibility? Or is there a different lens that you look at this through? Because you are working for a black newspaper in the city and because you are a black woman? So, Yeah, I definitely think so. I think there is a responsibility that we have as black women document in this movement because you know, oftentimes. Our stories are told by other people. Other people who don't look like us. Other people who are not breathing this story every day. Our narrative is oftentimes controlled by people. Who just don't get it and I get it. Sandra gets it. Our newsroom gets it. This is not a new story for us. People are finally catching up to what my dad was always preaching and always fighting for. You know, we've been saying this all along. It's our history. You return to Richmond from a very impressive career to work at the paper he founded serving the black community. You were gone for 17 years. What is being able to document this mean for you? I mean, it's really personal. You know, some days I'm out there and I'm actually brought to tears because I'm thinking about my father and I'm thinking about what he fought for every day. And I'm thinking how as a child as a teenager, sometimes I didn't fully get his anger. He just wanted a better world for blacks, but for everyone On DH. It breaks my heart that he's not here. But on the other hand, he prepared me for this moment, and I believe there are no coincidences that the timing for me coming home. This was meant to be, and he's what keeps me going. He's what keeps so many in Richmond going, I think because they knew his passion. He taught me everything that I know in terms of how to stand strong and how to document these moments and why it's so important to be on the front lines. Regina Boone is a staff photographer for the Richmond Free Press. Thank you very much. Thank you so much. It's been five months since the debacle that Wass the Iowa caucuses, that first contest in the Democratic presidential race went horribly wrong, thanks to a faulty smartphone app. But don't write Iowa off so fast. Both Republicans and Democrats are giving the state a lot of attention and money heading into November. Io Public Radio's Clay Masters explains why the state is getting labeled now a toss up bringing up the Iowa caucuses should come with a trigger warning for Iowa Democrats like Pac Copely. I was in shock. I think I was really in shock, and then it just Went on and on, and Ah Copely, who is a retired medical technician lives in Marshalltown. She volunteered and caucused for Bernie Sanders, who won this county. Hopefully is not excited to vote for Joe Biden. Although she is eager to make Donald Trump a one term president. It's a similar situation she found herself in four years ago when voting for Hillary Clinton. She says Back then she could sympathize with Trump voters. So your basic poor or working, poor or even middle class people were disgusted and wanted just to shake it up. This is one of the many rural counties in Iowa that flipped from voting for Barack Obama twice to Trump in 2016. But this year, the local pork plant and veterans Hospital have both had Cove in 19 outbreaks. Mark Smith represents Marshalltown in the state legislature and took over his chair of the Iowa Democratic Party right after the caucus meltdown. He says. Voters here are energized because of President Trump's record. The trade wars have heard agriculture, which is so significant to our state is selling up to big oil has caused US problems with ethanol. Rural Iowa went big for Trump in 2016. He carried the state by nearly 10 points. Two years later, a Republican won the governor's race here, while Democrats flipped two House seats. Jeff Kaufman is the chairman of the Republican Party of Iowa. We are purple and, you know, Whoa! Any chair that misses that point? That Iowa is a swing state polls here show President Trump and Republican Senator Joni Ernst's approval rating are falling..

Richmond Richmond Free Press Iowa President Trump Regina Boone Trump Sandra Sellers Robert E. Lee NPR News Marshalltown Iowa Democratic Party Pac Copely Lu Garcia Navarro president Raymond Boone Jefferson Davis US Virginia Republican Party Senator Joni Ernst
"richmond public school" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

09:00 min | 9 months ago

"richmond public school" Discussed on KCRW

"Jefferson Davis, Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee. Some of those monuments have been toppled by protesters. Others have been taken down now by the city. All this action as well as violent standoffs between police and protesters has been captured by the camera of Regina Boone. She's a staff photographer for the Richmond Free Press, a black newspaper in the city. Her parents started in the 19 nineties and she joins us now. Good morning. Hi. Good morning. Thanks for having me Lulu. It's great to have you from your time in and around Richmond these days. What's the mood? It's intense. It has an exhaustive sort of feel to it. But then there's empowerment. There's exhilaration, then mixed, also with anger mixed with determination, so I can't just say one word. It's a mixed bag of emotions. I can say that it's fully alive and ready. The's monuments coming down. Could you tell me what that signifies in your view? As a person who was raised in a household with my mom and my dad, Raymond Boone and Jean Boone, who started the paper that I work for the Richmond free Press. Monuments have always been a part of our conversations since I was a child, growing up the early part of my life in Richmond that they were symbols of hate and symbols of white supremacy. So I've always looked at these statues as being quite evil on DH always heard in my household that they needed to come down. You have been out documenting these protests seeing this moment? Can you tell me about some of the people that you've been photographing and what you've experienced while you've been doing that Sure. I also just want to be clear that it's not just me photographing for our newspaper. I'm doing it along with my colleague Sandra Sellers who's been at the Richmond free press for more than 20 years, and what we see are people who are angry who are fed up wanting change right now. Seeing Children come out, and we love to photograph Children because we hope that when they see themselves whether it's on social media or in our newspaper that They see where they are in history. And one day later in life, they can see that they were a part of this change. So we're seeing a mixed group of people black white Latino next Asian Americans out on the streets together, and this kind of is a rare scene in Richmond. But I'm meeting people like I met a Richmond public school music teacher, and she had her cello out in front of the Robert E. Lee statue, and she's out there playing this classical music that just springs Chills to your bones, and she has a slide show of words explaining the pain that she has felt as a black woman. And so as we see her as I saw her, and I locked her in with my camera I felt her pain. I could identify with it, Richie. No. Is there a different kind of responsibility? Or is there a different lens that you look at this through? Because you are working for a black newspaper in the city and because you are a black woman? So, Yeah, I definitely think so. I think there is a responsibility that we have as black women document in this movement because you know, oftentimes. Our stories are told by other people. Other people who don't look like us. Other people who are not breathing this story every day. Our narrative is oftentimes controlled by people. Who just don't get it and I get it. Sandra gets it. Our newsroom gets it. This is not a new story for us. People are finally catching up to what my dad was always preaching and always fighting for. You know, we've been saying this all along. It's our history. You return to Richmond from a very impressive career to work at the paper he founded serving the black community. You were gone for 17 years. What is being able to document this mean for you? I mean, it's really personal. You know, some days I'm out there and I'm actually brought to tears because I'm thinking about my father and I'm thinking about what he fought for every day. And I'm thinking how as a child as a teenager, sometimes I didn't fully get his anger. He just wanted a better world for blacks, but for everyone On DH. It breaks my heart that he's not here. But on the other hand, he prepared me for this moment. And I believe there are no coincidences that the timing for me coming home. This was meant to be And he's what keeps me going. He's what keeps so many in Richmond going, I think because they knew his passion. He taught me everything that I know in terms of How to stand strong and how to document these moments and why it's so important to be on the front lines. Regina Boone is a staff photographer for the Richmond Free Press. Thank you very much. Thank you so much. It's been five months since the debacle that Wass the Iowa caucuses, that first contest in the Democratic presidential race went horribly wrong, thanks to a faulty smartphone app. But don't write Iowa off so fast. Both Republicans and Democrats are giving the state a lot of attention and money heading into November. Io Public Radio's Clay Masters explains why the state is getting labeled now a toss up bringing up the Iowa caucuses should come with a trigger warning for Iowa Democrats like Pat Copely. I was in shock. I think I was really in shock, and then it just Went on and on and on. Copely, who is a retired medical technician lives in Marshalltown. She volunteered and caucused for Bernie Sanders, who won this county. Hopefully is not excited to vote for Joe Biden. Although she is eager to make Donald Trump a one term president. It's a similar situation she found herself in four years ago when voting for Hillary Clinton. She says Back then she could sympathize with Trump voters. So your basic poor or working, poor or even middle class people were disgusted and wanted just to shake it up. This is one of the many rural counties in Iowa that flipped from voting for Barack Obama twice to Trump in 2016. But this year, the local pork plant and veterans Hospital have both had Cove in 19 outbreaks. Mark Smith represents Marshalltown in the state legislature and took over his chair of the Iowa Democratic Party right after the caucus meltdown. He says. Voters here are energized because of President Trump's record. The trade wars have heard agriculture which is so significant to our state. His selling up to big oil has caused US problems with ethanol. Rural Iowa went big for Trump in 2016. He carried the state by nearly 10 points. Two years later, a Republican won the governor's race here, while Democrats flipped two House seats. Jeff Kaufman is the chairman of the Republican Party of Iowa. We are purple and you know, whoa to any chair that misses that point. That Iowa is a swing state polls here show President Trump and Republican Senator Joni Ernst's approval rating are falling. That may be why last month Ernst Tweeted this video of herself standing next to her Harley, So I'm challenging this grain field to six debates to each month starting in August. Let's let Iowans here what we have to say She's talking about her Democratic challenger, Theresa Greenfield, the real estate executive. One her four way primary last month with a record number of ballots cast mostly by absentee, but campaigning during a pandemic looks a lot different. There are fewer picnics and parades, the Iowa State Fair was canceled. Instead. And everybody. This is our first zoom event, so introduce his link to work correctly. That was a Democratic fundraiser earlier this week, those watching from home where munching on meals delivered to them from a local restaurant again on Treece agree sealed. I'm a businesswoman. I am a mother of four and a farm kid, with or without the usual campaigning. There's a more favorable mood for Democrats in Iowa, says pollster Jan Selzer. There has been a heavy burden that the state has carried. It included issues with trade with tariffs, and then with the vulnerable industries like meat processing plants during covert 19 I was just in a position to be Maybe more ready than some other states to make a change. And while Joe Biden came in fourth during the caucuses, his campaign has announced a senior team here and he'll be back in Iowa later this month. In the form of a virtual.

Iowa Richmond Richmond Free Press President Trump Regina Boone Joe Biden Trump Sandra Sellers Robert E. Lee Iowa Democratic Party Marshalltown Pat Copely Jefferson Davis Raymond Boone president US Senator Joni Ernst Bernie Sanders Hillary Clinton Treece
"richmond public school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:00 min | 9 months ago

"richmond public school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Jefferson Davis, Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee. Some of those monuments have been toppled by protesters. Others have been taken down now by the city. All this action as well as violent standoffs between police and protesters has been captured by the camera of Regina Boone. She's a staff photographer for the Richmond Free Press, a black newspaper in the city. Her parents started in the 19 nineties and she joins us now. Good morning. Hi. Good morning. Thanks for having me Lou. It's great to have you from your time in and around Richmond these days. What's the mood? It's intense. It has an exhaustive sort of feel to it. But then there's empowerment. There's exhilaration, then mixed, also with anger mixed with determination, so I can't just say one word. It's a mixed bag of emotions. I can say that it's fully alive and ready. Thes monuments coming down. Could you tell me what that signifies? In your view? As a person who was raised in a household with my mom and my dad, Raymond Boone and Jean Boone, who started the paper that I work for the Richmond free Press. The monuments have always been a part of our conversation since I was a child, growing up the early part of my life in Richmond that they were symbols of hate and symbols of white supremacy. So I've always looked at these statues as being quite evil on DH always heard in my household that they needed to come down. You have been out Documenting these protests seeing this moment can you tell me about some of the people that you've been photographing and what you've experienced while you've been doing that Sure. I also just want to be clear that it's not just me photographing for our newspaper. I'm doing it along with my colleague Sandra Sellers who's been at the Richmond free Press for more than 20 years, and what we see are people who are angry for feta wanting change right now. Seeing Children come out, and we love to photograph Children because we hope that when they see themselves whether it's on social media or in our newspaper that they see where they are in history, and one day later in life, they can see that they were a part of this change. So we're seeing a mixed group of people black white Latino next Asian Americans out on the streets together, and this kind of is a rare scene in Richmond. But I'm meeting people like I met Richmond public school music teacher and she had her cello out in front of the Robert E. Lee statue, and she's out there playing this classical music that just springs Chills to your bones, and she has a slideshow of words explaining the pain she has felt as a black woman. And so as we see her as I saw her, and I locked her in with my camera, I felt her pain I could identify with it. Is there a different kind of responsibility? Or is there a different lens that you look at this through? Because you are working for a black newspaper in the city and because you are a black woman? So, Yeah, I definitely think so. I think there is a responsibility that we have as black women document in this movement because, you know, oftentimes our stories are told by other people, other people who don't look like us. Other people who are not breathing this story every day. Our narrative is oftentimes controlled by people who just don't get it and I get it. Sandra gets it. Our newsroom gets it. This is not a new story for us. People are finally catching up to what my dad was always preaching and always fighting for, you know, we've been saying this all along. It's our history. You return to Richmond from a very impressive career to work at the paper he founded serving the black community. You were gone for 17 years. What is being able to document this mean for you? I mean, it's really personal. You know, some days I'm out there and I'm actually brought to tears because I'm thinking about my father and I'm thinking about what he fought for every day. And I'm thinking how as a child as a teenager, sometimes I didn't fully get his anger. He just wanted a better world for blacks, but for everyone On DH. It breaks my heart that he's not here. But on the other hand, he prepared me for this moment, and I believe there are no coincidences that the timing for me coming home. This was meant to be, and he's what keeps me going. He's what keeps so many in Richmond going, I think because they knew his passion. He taught me everything that I know in terms of How to stand strong and how to document these moments and why it's so important to be on the front lines. Regina Boone is a staff photographer for the Richmond Free Press. Thank you very much. Thank you so much. It's been five months since the debacle that Wass the Iowa caucuses, that first contest in the Democratic presidential race went horribly wrong, thanks to a faulty smartphone app. You don't write Iowa off so fast. Both Republicans and Democrats are giving the state a lot of attention and money heading into November. Io Public Radio's Clay Masters explains why the state is getting labeled now a toss up bringing up the Iowa caucuses should come with a trigger warning for Iowa Democrats like Pat Copely. I was in shock. I think I was really in shock, and then it just Went on and on and on. Copely, who is a retired medical technician lives in Marshalltown. She volunteered and caucused for Bernie Sanders, who won this county. Hopefully is not excited to vote for Joe Biden. Although she is eager to make Donald Trump a one term president. It's a similar situation she found herself in four years ago when voting for Hillary Clinton. She says Back then she could sympathize with Trump voters. So your basic poor or working, poor or even middle class people were disgusted and wanted just to shake it up. This is one of the many rural counties in Iowa that flipped from voting for Barack Obama twice to Trump in 2016. But this year, the local pork plant and veterans Hospital have both had Cove in 19 outbreaks. Mark Smith represents Marshalltown in the state legislature and took over his chair of the Iowa Democratic Party right after the caucus meltdown. He says. Voters here are energized because of President Trump's record. The trade wars have heard agriculture which is so significant to our state. His selling up to big oil has caused US problems with ethanol. Rural Iowa went big for Trump in 2016. He carried the state by nearly 10 points. Two years later, a Republican won the governor's race here, while Democrats flipped two House seats. Jeff Kaufman is the chairman of the Republican Party of Iowa. We are purple and, you know, Whoa! Any chair that misses that point? That Iowa is a swing state polls here show President Trump and Republican Senator Joni Ernst's approval rating are falling. That may be why last month Ernst Tweeted this video of herself standing next to her Harley, So I'm challenging this grain field to six debates to each month, starting in August. Let's let Iowans here what we have to say she's talking about her Democratic challenger, Theresa Greenfield. A real estate executive one her four way primary last month with a record number of ballots cast mostly by absentee, but campaigning during a pandemic looks a lot different. There are fewer picnics and parades, the Iowa State Fair was canceled. Instead. And everybody. This is our first zoom event so series link to work correctly. That was a Democratic fundraiser earlier this week, those watching from home were munching on meals delivered to them from a local restaurant again on Treece agrees, feels I'm a businesswoman. I'm a mother of four and a farm kid, with or without the usual campaigning. There's a more favorable mood for Democrats in Iowa, says pollster Jan Selzer. There's been a heavy burden that the state has carried. That included issues with trade with tariffs, and then with the vulnerable industries like meat processing plants during covert 19 I was just in a position to be Maybe more ready than some other states to make a change. And while Joe Biden came in fourth during the caucuses, his campaign has announced a senior team here and he'll be back in Iowa later this month. In the form of a virtual.

Iowa Richmond Richmond Free Press President Trump Regina Boone Joe Biden Trump Sandra Sellers Robert E. Lee Iowa Democratic Party Marshalltown Pat Copely Jefferson Davis Raymond Boone Lou president US Senator Joni Ernst Bernie Sanders Hillary Clinton
"richmond public school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:19 min | 9 months ago

"richmond public school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Jefferson Davis, Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee. Some of those monuments have been toppled by protesters. Others have been taken down now by the city. All this action as well as violent standoffs between police and protesters has been captured by the camera of Regina Boone. She's a staff photographer for the Richmond Free Press, a black newspaper in the city. Her parents started in the 19 nineties and she joins us now. Good morning. Hi. Good morning. Thanks for having me Lulu. It's great to have you from your time in and around Richmond these days. What's the mood? It's intense. It has an exhaustive sort of feel to it. But then there's empowerment. There's exhilaration, then mixed, also with anger mixed with determination, so I can't just say one word. It's a mixed bad of emotions. I can say that it's fully alive and ready. These monuments coming down. Could you tell me what that signifies in your view? As a person who was raised in a household with my mom and my dad, Raymond Boone and Jean Boone, who Started the paper that I work for the Richmond free Press. Monuments have always been a part of our conversations since I was a child, growing up the early part of my life in Richmond that they were symbols of hate and symbols of white supremacy. So I've always looked at these statues as being quite evil on DH always heard in my household that they needed to come down. You have been out documenting these protests seeing this moment? Can you tell me about some of the people that you've been photographing and what you've experienced while you've been doing that Sure. I also just want to be clear that it's not just me photographing for our newspaper. I'm doing it along with my colleague Sandra Sellers who's been at the Richmond free Press for more than 20 years, and what we see are people who are angry for feta wanting change right now. Missing Children come out, and we love to photograph Children because we hope that when they see themselves whether it's on social media or in our newspaper that They see where they are in history. And one day later in life, they can see that they were a part of this change. So we're seeing a mixed group of people black white Latino next Asian Americans out on the streets together, and this kind of is a rare scene in Richmond. But I'm meeting people like I met a Richmond public school music teacher, and she had her cello out in front of the Robert E. Lee statue, and she's out there playing this classical music that just springs Chills to your bones, and she has a slide show of words explaining the pain she has felt as a black woman. And so as we see her as I saw her, and I locked her in with my camera I felt her pain. I could identify with it, Richie now Yeah. Is there a different kind of responsibility? Or is there a different Karan's that you look at this through Because you are working for a black newspaper in the city and because you are a black woman? So, Yeah, I definitely think so. I think there is a responsibility that we have as black women document in this movement because you know, oftentimes. Our stories are told by other people. Other people who don't look like us. Other people who are not breathing this story every day. Our narrative is oftentimes controlled by people. Who just don't get it and I get it. Sandra gets it. Our newsroom gets it. This is not a new story for us. People are finally catching up to what my dad was always preaching and always fighting for. You know, we've been saying this all along. It's our history. You return to Richmond from a very impressive career to work at the paper he founded serving the black community. You were gone for 17 years. What is being able to document this mean for you? I mean, it's really personal. You know, some days I'm out there and I'm actually brought to tears because I'm thinking about my father and I'm thinking about What he fought for every day, and I'm thinking how as a child as a teenager, sometimes I didn't fully get his anger. He just wanted a better world for blacks, but for everyone On DH. It breaks my heart that he's not here. But on the other hand, he prepared me for this moment. And I believe there are no coincidences that the timing for me coming thiss was meant to be. And he's what keeps me going. He's what keeps so many in Richmond going, I think because they knew his passion. He taught me everything that I know in terms of How to stand strong and how to document these moments and why it's so important to be on the front lines. Regina Boone is a staff photographer for the Richmond Free Press. Thank you very much. Thank you so much..

Richmond Richmond Free Press Regina Boone Sandra Sellers Robert E. Lee Raymond Boone Jefferson Davis black community Jean Boone Karan Richie Stonewall Jackson
"richmond public school" Discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

The Steve Warne Project - Sports

12:28 min | 1 year ago

"richmond public school" Discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

"Fight it out there about. What the most embarrassing thing that's ever happened to you was you. Don't have to varying James. You don't have to get into it and give you mind off. The top of my head was and I still remember it because I was at the age of kids becoming a teenager in that. Sort of tween irs own. I was like this girl. I really like we had this church event and it was a two block. Walk going from Richmond Public School to the church. The United Church in Richmond and I was kind of being in playful teasing mode with a girl I liked and beating her in a running race. The teacher saying slowdown catch. Slow down and I was like beating the crap out of her in terms of speed. I was way in front of her and so I'm toying with her. I'm a mocking her in. All my friends are kind of sort of jogging behind and stuff and I'm out in front of everybody running and then looking backward and I immediately turned around as I'm just mocking everybody turned around and ran right into a parking sign right in the face down in a heap bleeding like a stuck pig but still conscious and send them some of my friends were pointing and laughing and you know that's a fast now that kind of thing that pops to mind about which you what can you. Imagine Steve. All the years that I've worked together and I would tell something that happened to me on radio and I just remember you. You would look at me and and sort of look with a blank stare going. Don't you find that too embarrassing to tell them the radio right you go? It's fine stevie fine yeah I shit my pants in front of my mother-in-law to saga game like really. What about your dignity? Jim Fuck the dignity off ago. So all those things Steve. That were totally embarrassing. Okay completely embarrassing. Imagine imagine how embarrassed when I got to pick one Steve I. I wish I hadn't asked now imagine how embarrassed I was. Okay imagine how embarrassing this actually is. When I've got to pick my most embarrassing mind. Well there is one. Yeah and it just I still break out in a rash and a half to tell it but before that speaking to the station to your member. I told you about this but I was there when it happened to make a long story short the check the receptionist was their their mother had died and the three sisters. We're talking about the you know what they're gonNA do. What the estate split stuff up and the two sisters absolutely despised the other one okay. They've absolutely hated her right. Like like full on hate. Okay full on hate. Wish she wasn't my sister is like whoa really. Wow anyway they're having this back and forth and the one girl the WHO's emailing her sister that she likes those two types this typing this ripping email of their sister and she hits send but actually sent it to the sister. She was talking about. Oh I was there for that. I like was walking out of the show like shortly after nine. You know I stopped. Say Hi and she's just like white. I'm almost calling nine one one year. I'm like Oh my God are you okay. I thought she was going down and then she explains that to me and I read the email. I'm like Oh my God that's what you just soon. I hope she wished she was dead. Oh my God. That was that was horrendous. But as a kid I ran headlong into a radiator at a basketball game in grade seven playing with Eli Pasquali Steve. On the same team and I was. I was no good but to coach said okay. All I was always that Guy Steve. Okay I won't cut you but but I'm not gonNA play right right and of course you would accept any deal not to be cut. You know what I mean. Yeah Okay so anyway. I never played. And then he called we. We have really good basketball. Team won every game. Saint Joe's football. We want every they were undefeated for like fucking fifteen years or something anyway. The coach put me in an. I run full steam onto the court. You know it was an imbalance and I trip and fall and knock knock myself out falling into one of these big cast-iron Rad's that was in the on the gym floor like fuck. Yeah Day Our Lady of Fatima School Stevie but my all time were Steve. Okay my girlfriend later on to be. My Wife. Allison was finished finished school. Before she came a doctor she had a degree in nursing and then took off with a few friends over to Europe. And we're hot and heavy Steve at the time but she had this trip planned can then I was? I plan to go over there later like six weeks later. I got the scratch together and I'm going to meet her in Greece and so she went over on this trip with one of one of the friends said okay. I'll go but but can I travel with you you don't. Those are the days when kids went over there and hit Italy and Spain and Greece. And all that shit you know and so she allison says okay. Yeah for sure. We'll hang out together. You know on this trip and shortly after that we're back in those days you had to go to a phone bank Steve to make telephone calls from Europe and so she phones me he was going to be every Sunday night at six. She's going to phone me and I'll be at home. No one had cells right and it was. It was in the years early ninety s and she calls me and immediately is going bananas with this girl that she's traveling with right he's going. I'm sick ver- she's needy fuck. She's never never never plans anything. She's like what do you WanNa do today right all this shit so by the time I get there two weeks later Steve. She's going beserk. Okay that's chant. She's had it with this girl and I can't be that bad. You know so much so that the girls stayed with us when I got there. We just wanted to stay in a hotel room. Steve Know Boom by the bane hadn't seen each other in a and this girl is still stayed there and like isn't she going to go travel. Is someone else for a while and you can help them know and in about one day. Steve. I was completely annoyed with this girl. Okay completely annoyed you know. What do you guys want to do now? You know well if you really WanNa know what we're GONNA DO. It doesn't include you okay. And why don't you run along? Go go grab a fucking sandwich or something you know. She would never leave us alone. She only talks Steve when she had food in their mouth. Okay that's the only time some go Nagai's you couldn't have waited till you tell you stuff the gyro into your mouth you could get. Could he just wait till you're finished? Or maybe bring that up. Always see the food and just like pat from Saturday night live and so what we go to Greece. Dvd's jump on boats and there's a million islands there this ACC ladies and he's traveled from out. And whenever you want and I said let's get Outta here. Let's go to another island and I made the suggestion that maybe she wants. No I'll stay with you guys if that's okay a fuck okay. Anyway we get to another island Steve. That day and then we spread out to find a place to stay. You know you guys at the at the dock when you get there and they're dragging the state them so we gotta find this place Steve. Where all three of us can stay. There's thought she was going to get her own. We do. We find this thing and we're sitting on the balcony and and she's sitting with us and I'm just saying to myself. Would you fuck off like twenty minutes or something and she goes? What do you guys WanNa do? I said I don't know what what did you run to town and bring us back some ice cream okay. And she's like okay. We'll still be here when I get back. Yeah Yeah Yeah. So anyway. She takes off and sitting there and I'm gone. She is too much man. Alison she's I'll tell you what this evening with the food. She never watches her fricking hair. She's got no personality I write and she's just she wears shitty clothes. She's the most uninteresting person the work she's never going to get laid. She will never find a boyfriend you know she's like the most the most the DULLEST fucking slug. I've seen in my life. Okay and on and on Steve. She never left and she was standing four feet behind me. Yeah you giving you a heads up. There were no. She didn't know either right. My wife and I are sitting looking out over the water. You know. And and she got up and walked out behind us but but as soon as that happened. I just assume he'd left Stephen. I'm putting a filter on it right now of what I actually said about her. And and so I'm I'm fucking killing her. Okay I'm absolutely laying her out. And Allison sitting there listening to laugh and laughing and adding shipped to it as well. Another thing you know this and then I I sort of stopped and then I hear. Oh that's nice and I thought it was Allison imitating her and I look over and also just completely red in the face and I looked behind me and the girls heard it all Steve Word. She took off and then two days later. I'm like well at least I worked. I guess mission the Cobbler I it was. It was a high school. Friend of Allison's like a university friend you know that'd be the kind of the way. Dan just mentally speaking. You would make you feel like your whole body was shrinking to about a third. It's normal size. You just feel no matter how obnoxious this person was. No one deserves to hear that kind of stuff that sucks. That's that's an embarrassing awful. It was absolutely I didn't know what to do and then I weighed in on some of this too. And it's like you're dead in the water here. You got nowhere to go. You know. It's like it's a little different. You know it's a little different if you overheard me go you know what Steve Either I. Don't I don't know if he's ever going to get a broad right. You heard it go in your heard it right. I'd be embarrassed. Go with zapped me. I'll have some. I've just making fundamental problem but you could blow it off but this one okay. Now I didn't mean that. Okay well I made a list of eighty one thing is when you took me down. What about the second one that stuff after you've done the war and peace thing in terms of destroying someone that is that's difficult so that's a good lesson. I learned my lesson back to your thought about The gymnasium radiator. Like what is a radiator doing anywhere close to a basketball court? Got Me to thinking that maybe a fun thing to do more would be stuff from back in the day that would never pass the safety standards of today. Things like that things like Lawn darts or no seat belts in cars heavy usage of asbestos here and there maybe that'd be a bit of fun topic to Shark about stuff that was that was okay and nobody gave it a second dot back in the day even though it could have killed us any second. Yeah the one. I always go back to his parents. Sending you out the door okay. In Ninety degree heat with with no sunblock remember there was absolutely and then leaving the whole day. I don't even know where you're going. Not GonNa keep tabs on you just GonNa Free Range. Free Range Child rearing its like you come back in the house right in your parents and look. Oh my God what happened to your completely sunburnt loved..

Eli Pasquali Steve Allison basketball Europe Greece Jim Fuck Richmond Public School irs James Richmond United Church Steve Word Stephen Stevie Italy Saint Joe Alison football Dan
"richmond public school" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"richmond public school" Discussed on WTOP

"After yesterday's big gun rights rally guns are not the only issue as the Virginia legislature gets into recession gun rally was the biggest in recent memory next week teachers hope to say the same about their rally for education funding Monday Richmond public schools have already closed because so many teachers are joining P. T. A.'s here at the capitol for a rally similar to others at state capitals nationwide over the last few years there's also a big push for a minimum wage hike and worker protections in big changes to transportation taxes funding in safety including a ban on hand held cell phone use behind the wheel the crossover deadline when a bill must pass at least one chamber have a chance of becoming law this year it's just three weeks away the entire sixty day session including a two year budget has to be wrapped up just three and a half weeks later by March seventh in Richmond mixed with WTOP news eleven oh six years history you're hearing first on WTOP the woman who allegedly trust past three days in a row at CIA headquarters and later showed up at the home of former president Barack Obama has been charged again this time by the secret service court records show Jennifer Hernandez was charged by the secret service with unlawful entry on December ninth the specifics of the incident are under seal but in November Hernandez admitted showing up at the Obama home and promised she wouldn't do it again and despite the judge's warning to not go back to the CIA a probation officer said that she did in late December Hernandez will now have to explain why the judge shouldn't revoke her pre trial freedom during her next court hearing in February the log in staying WTO Pinos coming up here on WTOP it's not always obvious when someone is in an abusive relationship we're gonna learn some of the key signs to look for Leslie Morgenstein joins us in the studio next right after traffic and weather eleven oh seven do you check your Google search results regularly you should people often get their first impression.

P. T. A. Richmond president Barack Obama Jennifer Hernandez CIA officer WTO Pinos Leslie Morgenstein Virginia WTOP Google
"richmond public school" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"richmond public school" Discussed on WTOP

"But guns are far from the only issue is the Virginia legislative session moves forward gun rally was the biggest in recent memory next week teachers hope to say the same about their rally for education funding Monday Richmond public schools have already closed because so many teachers are joining P. T. A.'s here at the capitol for a rally similar to others at state capitals nationwide over the last few years there's also a big push for a minimum wage hike and worker protections in big changes to transportation taxes funding and safety including a ban on hand held cell phone use behind the wheel the crossover deadline when a bill must pass at least one chamber have a chance of becoming law this year it's just three weeks away the entire sixty day session including a two year budget has to be wrapped up just three and a half weeks later by March seventh in Richmond Mike Smith WTOP news spirits of a teenager who was shot to death inside a school hallway in St Mary's county are suing the board of education the suit filed by lawyers for Daniel and Melissa Willie of Leonard town accuses the St Mary's county school board of negligence in failing to prevent the shooting death of their daughter sixteen year old Jaylen Willie the teenager was shot and killed at great mills high school in twenty eighteen the shooter seventeen year old Austin Rollins had dated Willie and attorney said he'd become abusive the suit alleges the school system was aware that Rollins had harassed Jaylen even grabbing pushing in yelling at her right outside school classrooms and that her parents had alerted Jaylen swim coach about Rollins's behavior but that the school system failed to act Kate Ryan WTOP news in a story you're hearing first here on WTOP the woman who allegedly tres past three days in a row at CIA headquarters and later showed up at the home of former president Obama has now been charged again this time by secret service WTOP has Lauren court records show Jennifer Hernandez was charged by the secret service with unlawful entry on December ninth the specifics of the incident are under seal but in November Hernandez admitted showing up at the Obama home and promised she wouldn't do it again and despite the judge's warning to not go back to the CIA a probation officer said that she did in late December Hernandez will now have to explain why the judge shouldn't revoke her pre trial freedom during her next court hearing in February the log in staying WTO Pinos up ahead the Senate impeachment trial is forcing some presidential candidates off the campaign trail we'll take a closer look at the impact was CNN's Ryan nobles next seven oh seven today's innovation in government report highlights the governments IT modernization opportunities Phoebe inner doll the public sector lead four Atlassian says every agency these days is a software company in order to deliver and.

Virginia
"richmond public school" Discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

The Steve Warne Project - Sports

09:36 min | 2 years ago

"richmond public school" Discussed on The Steve Warne Project - Sports

"Funny. Follies? Oh, yeah. Funny. Not bad. No. That was good. That was good. We need a speech. Give me a speech. He gave me the any given Sunday speech. The funny thing about it. And I'm gonna ruin that speech for you ever seen any given Sunday. I have not okay. Well, this is going to not make any sex is known as one of the better sports movies speeches of all time. And one of the things he says in there. The guy beside you, and you know, all that stuff standard stuff and. But at one at one point he goes. He goes it's that six inches in front of your face. Oh, no. And I kind of looked sideways at it. Like we still talking about football success. What are we talking about? Sixers in front of your face the difference between winning and losing. That's a new play. Okay. Herringbone split captain crunch. Right. Six inches in front of your face. Could be the new. Now, listen, Steve we've got I've got something. I wanted to think about this. I want you to think about Steve the best punishment. You've ever had not not or the or the if you got punished as a kid. I read a fantastic thing online the other day a mother was texting or kit. Obviously, she was out of the house, and she said. Take the garbage out to her son, Texas, take the garbage out and take a picture of it. And then walk the dog and take a picture that semi those. And then I will tell you where the court is for your XBox? Okay. Pretty strong, right? Pretty not bad, not bad. 'cause I I'm not a good disciplinarian with my children. What's the most? Well, like, what's the most severe punishment as a parent that you've doled out to your kids in the history of them? Let's just punishments changed, you know, changed when for example, it was you know, you're not going to. I'm not taking to McDonald's. Then now punishment for your kid. The only thing is like, hey, if you if you please do your homework we please do that. And then I'll take you to McDonald's. That's it. It gets these days. My mother my mother, God rest, her soul. Everyone knows my mother berry. She had the the smoking smoking punishments. The best was. I I had not for the first time, Steve, shattered curfew. I had a little bit of a curfew when I was growing, you know. Yeah. A little I had a curfew to be home because I have my mother's car. And she did a few of these things were just great. So I'm they lived in a house with a walkout, basement and soul. I would try and sneak home hammered hammered out of my tree was like four or five o'clock in the morning. I'd sneak down the back of the stairs. And my parents were generally sleepers, my my father slept like the dead, and I was trying to sneak in the house quietly open the sliding glass door at the back and as a entered the house staggering around the rec room, I could smell coffee brewing. And I went oh, no Ono. That means my mother's up. And she never got up this early and creeping across the Florida. Hear my mother's footsteps down. The stairs facing me. She goes. Okay. Good morning. The morning, and she goes you're a little late this evening where you said. Yes. Yes. I don't know the best way to describe my mother Steve was this is the best way to ever describe my mother is she she reserved. Her smiles for when she had the opportunity to correct someone on something. Oh, really? No, no, Steve that Vero you're wrong there. Okay. So my mother is at the bottom of this. There's good morning. He stayed a little later on. I'm just going to go to bed. She goes. No, no, no. You can you can stay up for a little while longer. I said, well, what's what's? And she hands me a garden hole and says this'll be a nice time to go out. And you can dig up these rose bushes or whatever she had. And I said, okay, I'll do it later on that Noel, otherwise what we could do is. Let's go upstairs in wake up your father and ask him what he thinks. And my dad was my that was busy, man. He liked on Saturdays. So I'm going off. I gotta go out and hung over doot, hot, humid. And I'm dragging my feet across the floor. And but only to walk by the laundry ru Steve and see my sister. Who was just as hammered ironing? She got home about five minutes. She got home of five minutes before. I did. You know what I close morning. Isis are so excellent punishment. Steve at boys. I gotta get home. You don't know the shift? I gotta go through. So that was good or she would if you didn't clean your room. Okay. If you did not clean up your room. If you forgotten went out, you'd come home and your room would be MAC Hewlett. It'd be immaculate and I go what's what's up here? She would gather up all your clothes, Steve and hide them. Put them in a green garbage bag one time, my mother, I couldn't find them at all ever. She stuffed them in behind the hot water heater or I would come the front door. And I'd bump into a huge garbage can one of these big garbage pails full of water with all my shit in they're filled up with water. So in theor- punishment was going to be walking around in a potato sack or something for your clothes? What do you think? Fred flintstone. No. Doesn't work anymore. Your room go to your room. Oh, baby. I got my internet. I got my devices got a TV it here. It's just no. But that's what they're going to do. Anyway. Yeah. The the the best one I guess is. Anyway, my mom had the excellent punish. They were. Good hilariously good. You gotta take take shit away from your kids. That's got do. I don't know. What do you do with yours? Just let them run amok. They run around like wild links. Like, I said, my my my kid looks at me and going are you seriously telling me to do that? I'm trying to. Well, that ain't gonna work. I your track records. No good dead that back in my day. Little teachers would grab your ear. Stephen twisted, bring out the ruler and smack you on the wrists till it was read when I went to the principal many times when I was in elementary school and put your hand and they have the that fricking weapon weapon that would give the strap. I never actually saw the strap. I heard of the strap everybody said you're gonna get the strap principles guy the believes in the strap on it never actually saw heard anybody never got the strap or anything like that. But wasn't an effective deterrent. Just even knowing the strap was thing. Totally was frightening. Was frightening. Yeah, they give it to you three or four times. Don't tell me you're the guy going, you know, what guys? That's that's not a good idea. We'll get in trouble for that. I got what makes you think that guy? We'll because you never got the strap. Because he never got the strap. I'm so I don't think I had like I I was at Richmond public school. And I don't think that the principle you actually used it. I just everybody heard about it. But I don't think anybody actually had it wasn't just me was the entire school. I never met anybody. And I, and I hung up hung up the tough crowd Jimmy as you. I'm Ned Flanders. I'll I'll be honest. I'm going to see your next month in town are going to be an auto. We're gonna get together. Okay. I'm gonna start. I'm gonna Cuffy on the side of the head are going to twist your ear, and I'm going to give you I'm going to go with my belt off and give you a strap. Why? Just just just so you can see what has like Steve on the dark side. I've been hit before I got a bucks in the years. I was easy to I was easy to discipline. If my dad put me to bed with hockey night in Canada. And I'd hear him listening. You know, hearing it through my bedroom door if I had to hear that. That was absolutely the worst. I know it's a mild punt mild punishment and everything but that was enough for me. I was good for the next six months. That's how that that was the worst thing that would happen to sheltered life, right? Oh my God. Oh my God. Yeah. Yeah. That's beyond sheltered life. You won't be able to watch TV to watch the hockey night. That's the punishment. Oh my God. Jesus. Why was you know, get behind the car? I'm going to run over you. I got a teach you a thing or two air. Okay. That'll smart up right there. Honey, I'd run over my I had to run over our son again, I he's dead. But he learned his lesson.

Steve McDonald Texas football hockey MAC Noel Florida Fred flintstone Richmond public school Canada Ned Flanders Stephen twisted Cuffy Jimmy principal five minutes Six inches six inches
"richmond public school" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"richmond public school" Discussed on Today, Explained

"All right. So we're all in agreement that the Lieutenant governor should be encouraged to step down Virginia had a bit of year last week. One more quick thing before we get outta here. As you all know earlier this week our governor admitted to wearing black face and college is part of a costume. It suffered embarrassments than later. The attorney general also admitted to wearing black face college as part of a costume after embarrassments. It's extremely embarrassing to the state became the laughing stock of the country, and as chair of the ethics committee. I have to ask has any body else. Glad face in college got its own SNL sketch. But what if the cost you wanna contests? The contents black face, but Christie Coleman says this isn't just a Virginia thing, this is a national problem menstrual C and all of that. It was something that the entire country participated in and we see the really the birth of popular black face as an entertainment form actually getting it started in New York City. She spoke to me from the American civil war museum in Richmond Virginia which she runs for Virginians. It is more painful perhaps simply because it is something that has come to the fore. When Virginia has worked been working so hard to be a tad more progressive in, oh, this is a state that has a very mixed economy. It has urban centers that are extraordinarily diverse. And so this slide backward from a figure or figures that people have presumed were. Part of that March forward is the jarring part. For the uninitiated from what exactly is Virginia moving forward. Virginia is preparing to commemorate three key events that happened in sixteen nineteen. The first of those being the first Representative government. The second of those being the arrival of women and the third, of course is the arrival of Africans in sixteen nineteen. They are brought here against their will. And they are sold to be put to work in the colony by the seventeen hundreds of course, slavery is very much entrenched in Virginia even into the eve of the American revolution Virginia at that point is forty percent people have African descent so the whole questions will idea that almoner created equal endowed by their creator all of that is born in Virginia and yet born in a place where even the man who writes those words isn't enslave her. But there are also been people who have resisted it from the beginning. And that's part of the story that often gets missed. We get into the eighteen hundreds it takes two votes for Virginia to determine whether or not it's actually going to succeed when they do. See the decision is made to move the confederate government to Virginia because she has this legacy of independence revolution. But it is also the second largest intrastate slave trading. Port in Richmond to the point where today about forty percent of African Americans. Could in fact, Trason ancestor that was sold from Virginia to points further south. So this is our this is our history our legacy what did things like for black Virginians during the civil rights era. They are doing the same thing that black people are doing throughout the south. They are boycotting. They are asserting their rights to vote the differences. You're not seeing the same level of violence that you saw in the deep south of Mississippi and Alabama and Georgia that well. Instead, you saw things that were tad more insidious rather than allowing for for example, the schools to be desegregated, we'll just shut down the schools, and then they'll transfer the money into private Christian schools. And that's what happens a lot of private schools that get started in the state are actually started as a form of massive resistance by whites who don't want to integrate their school. So that's part of Virginia's history elementary affective schools, which white colored children make and Pell job in to all seen any funds from the brighter while up, right? The transition. Gan in the seventies. With governor hope I love affair with Richmond public schools began when I was a twelve year old Niger had Linwood. Holton was elected governor of Virginia in nineteen seventy Hyun rules, who's young white daughter and into public schools..

Virginia Richmond Virginia Christie Coleman Richmond SNL New York City attorney Gan Representative Pell Niger Mississippi Hyun Holton Alabama
"richmond public school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"richmond public school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Wnyc this is weekend addition i'm shumita basu coming up this hour students who participated in yesterday's march for our lives are setting their sights on gun violence not just in the schools but in the streets to they talk about why they marched and what they want to come out of it also this hour it's been fifteen years exactly since the us invaded iraq will reflect on the anniversary and the work that lies ahead and college sports generate lots of money but the student athletes don't see a cut of that revenue race plays a role too we'll talk about that and much more it's sunday march twentyfifth first news headlines live from npr news in washington on trial snyder former president obama's praising the students who organized this weekend's rallies against gun violence obama spoke today in tokyo as part of his trip to asia these rallies were duplicated all around the world and this was all because of the courage and effort of a handful of fifteen and sixteen year olds also pope francis is urging young activists to keep shouting and not allow older generations to silence their voices he spoke during palm sunday services and saint peter's square today a day after the demonstrations in washington dc and elsewhere drew hundreds of thousands in richmond virginia community members walked over a mile to the steps of the state capital megan polly of member station w c being reports on the rally organized by richmond public schools at least six richmond students have been shot over the last couple of months in fourteen year old d asia read is no stranger to the cities gun violence she says she's lost so many friends and relatives she's lost count it's too easy to get their hands on a handgun or rifle or shotgun the local school board recently so signed a resolution urging congress to take action and earlier this month virginia's republican house speaker kirk cox announced a.

megan polly richmond richmond virginia pope francis president npr kirk cox virginia congress shumita basu saint peter asia tokyo obama snyder washington iraq us fifteen years
"richmond public school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"richmond public school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Thousands of american soldiers dead or wounded will look back at the iraq war past and present and the music of hayley kiyoko she started off as a disney child star but now she's called the lesbian jesus it sunday march twenty fifth two thousand eighteen the news is coming up next live from npr news in washington on trial snyder former president obama's praising the students who organized this weekend's rallies against gun violence obama spoke today in tokyo as part of his trip to asia these rallies were duplicated all around the world and this was all because of the courage and effort of a handful of fifteen sixteen year olds also pope francis is urging young activists to keep shouting and not allow older generations to silence their voices he spoke during palm sunday services and saint peter's square today a day after the demonstrations in washington dc elsewhere drew hundreds of thousands in richmond virginia community members walked over a mile to the steps of the state capital megan poly of member station w c v e reports on the rally organized by richmond public schools at least six richmond students have been shot over the last couple of months in fourteen year old asia read is no stranger the cities gun violence she says she's lost so many friends and relatives she's lost count it's too easy for people to get their hands on a handgun or rifle or shotgun the local school board recently so signed a resolution urging congress to take action and earlier this month virginia's republican house speaker kirk cox announced a new school safety committee to look into things like bulletproof windows and mental health services and schools just not gun reform for npr news and megan poly in richmond virginia demonstrations for orchestrated by students have marjory stoneman douglas high school.

megan poly marjory stoneman douglas high richmond richmond virginia pope francis president npr disney iraq hayley kiyoko kirk cox virginia congress saint peter asia tokyo obama
"richmond public school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"richmond public school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That was chris buckler reporting we'll meghan paulie is a reporter for richmond public radio w e in virginia where there have been demonstrations in favor of gun control and she gave me a sense of the rally they're the crowd in richmond was quite remarkable this morning upwards of five thousand students parents and teachers turned out to call for what they all say our common sense gun reforms they held up signs like enough is enough and how many more one fourteen year old high school student said she's lost many friends and relatives to gun violence in the community and one thing that was interesting about this rally in particular is that it was organized by a local school district richmond public schools this district along with many others across the country have really made a political statement by signing a resolution urging congress to enact reforms and that's actually been a sticking point for some pro gun groups few days ago a rightwing tea party group in south west virginia posted on facebook calling for people to make calls to their local school district urging them not to encourage students to walk out and make such political statements all the politicians in virginia worried about the scale of this at the moment it's hard to say there's definitely been a big shift in thinking in virginia's house of delegates in last november's election fifteen republican delegates lost their seats to democrats and since then some have said that the election has changed how they're thinking about big picture items so we'll see if some of these gun reform issues are considered big picture for them when they start campaigning for primaries this year in the general election next year but vo two degrees about the momentum of those who've chosen to take to the streets to demonstrate his did you get a sense that there is a determination to maintain this campaign i really feel like there is many students have said that they're going to keep walking out if there isn't change and virginia's us senator tim kaine actually was one of the speakers at the rally today and said that one of the significant things about this movement now is the student participation and even drawing a parallel till the civil rights movement and the student engagement that they're all the.

reporter richmond congress west virginia facebook tim kaine chris buckler meghan paulie virginia us senator one fourteen year two degrees