28 Burst results for "Richman"

"richman" Discussed on Mindfulness Mode

Mindfulness Mode

03:21 min | 6 months ago

"richman" Discussed on Mindfulness Mode

"What it is and if we can come to terms with those things right on the positives but you can't focus on the positives if all you're doing is thinking about the negative in your hand. Yeah it's true cycle of lives dot org mindful tribes cycle of lives dot org. Check it out. You really need to read this book. It's powerful it's gripping it's well written. I really appreciate it. And i think you will too. It really pulled me in as a reader it's immedi it's not fluff. It's well written. I think you should check it out so david for anyone listening to this today. Who is just dabbling in mindfulness. Just kind of checking it out. What advice would you give them so that they can move forward and feel more grounded. I would say bruce. And thank you for those kind words. By the way i would say that. They're the truly greatest thing in life is becoming more in touch with yourself and we oftentimes. Don't give the right amount of attention to ourselves. And i'm not saying be selfish all the time or don't care about others but i'm saying if we can look inside and realize what's important to us in in in take care of ourselves i Wonderful wonderful thing. In growth great growth can come from that. And i know that i'm a better person a better husband a better father because i'm more comfortable with who i and that takes time and you have to be. You have to become familiar with yourself and you have to be heart centered in mindful of who you are and you become a better person there the what you get back from being in tune with who you are just so much more. I'd say although it's difficult to focus on ourselves sometimes it's such an important thing. Yeah it's definitely an important thing david. Thanks again for being on the show today. Thank you bruce. All by the way. Tell your wife thank you for being such a great caregiver to others as a nurse. I love to hear what her thoughts are. Make sure a better nurture made sure hater patients more. Yeah i'll let you know. Well thanks again. Bye now by. Hey mindful tribe. Thanks for listening to the episode. Are you as inspired by david. Richmond is i. Am i mean wow wow. He came to that that pivotal point in his life and he said hey man i am going to change. I am definitely going to change. And then did he ever change. Wow wow so determined to quit smoking and to become active and be a runner a swimmer. Wow i just am incredibly impressed. It's not an easy thing to do and I love how. He explained his steps along the way about how he did it. And i like. I said the episode. I really enjoy his book as well. But if you are having a challenge if you see a little bit of yourself in this story may be. Hypnosis is something that can help you. Well i say maybe..

david bruce Richmond
"richman" Discussed on Mindfulness Mode

Mindfulness Mode

09:03 min | 6 months ago

"richman" Discussed on Mindfulness Mode

"So grateful. Yeah i think so. You know i i know for sure bruce that if nobody read the book in a people have in hopefully plenty of people will but but when when i was done with the book in apologies. The sounds self serving. But the i know the stories were good. I i know they were. They were my stores. There were their stories. I just have to know the stories were good. And if only i got out of the maybe half. The people were profoundly affected in a positive way some who was like a good exercise in their day forgot about it moved on but with some of it was a profound experience in their life in if it only affected them very positive way it was enough and the fact. That is more than that as that. But honestly there's a is that part of it's been been so rewarding because They allowed me to go on this journey of of transformation of awareness of metamorphosised. Do you know. And and i was wrong for that right. It's very rewarding. David as we move forward in the interview i wanna ask you five. Quick answered questions so just thirty. Second answers are perfect. Here's the first one is one person who has been a powerful. Mindfulness influence in your life fraud. Most mindfulness person in my life. I would say it's my sister june. Even though she passed away a longtime bill. I think the thought of her in thought that she's looking at me and the thought of you know determine what's important to you i think she's probably the thought of her Has probably given me the most the most comforting direction to worry about myself. I'm not surprised to hear you say that because you shared that in your book and it really seemed real number to tell us about emotions. Tell us how your emotions have kind of helped you stay in touch with who you are and how you relate to your emotions now as a result of mindfulness. Yeah you now Tough to answer thirty seconds Do my best. You know the only thing that connects us all really is our emotions and we we we all point to so many things in our life and so many people in our life where you could say. Just be real. Just be real like just telling me what you're feeling you say one thing. You're you're acting different way. I think the connection to our emotion and connects to other people through our emotions is is really the most powerful thing we have between us as humans. And so for me. I think being mindful of my emotions and being comfortable with them and allowing myself to have some compassion. Self self compassion. For when i'm not the best emotional person can be. But i'll continue to work to try to be better that those are the to me that that's that's everything in life. It just is every if you could recommend a book related to mindfulness. What would that be i. I say the power now is is good. Because i think it's it's it's also not just a book could affect you but it's a book that so many people read that you can talk to others about a lot of times When you read a book that others haven't read and you can't talk about it. I think that may be limits. The effect i like. I like having books other. People have read like when i do a book club. Love love it because everybody's read the book and you could talk about their things. So i'd say the power now only because it does touch you. You're going to be able to find plenty of people the head read it and can help you through some of those issues. Well that's definitely true without book. That's for sure. Tell us how breathing is part of your mindfulness. Try reading. that'll do it all about kids. All about controlling your breasts and to I think a breath work is is important. Scenario bruce that. I'm exploring right now in my life. Is breath work and i'm being very Directing and l- deliberate about your breathing. So i'd say it's way more important than i even know 'cause i'm just getting into breath work in but but i've always been mindful of it in that i try to keep by. I try to be aware of rate which is directly related to your breathing. And so i think having a focus on your physiological state which obviously is really determined by your your breath i is is is a great starting place so i'm very aware of it and i'm barely aware david. Can you share an app. Which can help with mindfulness high. Should have come prepared for that. I would say inside. I don't have a direct answer. On that bruce. But i would say that i use. I have a garmin connect watch right garment watch and there doesn't a day go by where i don't look at. How much sleep i have. What my stress level is what my resting heart rate is I think that that's important because it lets you know when you're stressed out. Let's know are getting my sleep. What's my resting. Ira what's my stress rate. So i would say any type of app that allows you to at least start to understand your physiology and how those things will affect your moods. Your biorhythms your your ability to stay healthy Your ability to be present and calm. All of those things will start with at least looking at a scoreboard. And i think that that that any app that allows you to do that is is useful. I used garment. Connect for that. But i i don't actually have an app for any meditative worker breath work or anything like that. Well you told a lot of stories of people experiencing trauma in your book. And when i got to the end of the book there was one thing i really thought a lot about and that was as much as you love june and you shared a lot about your sister june in the book. Well by the time it got to the end of the book we found out from you that you know. There's such a disconnect that that the family is not willing to connect with you that really hit me because a lot of people have problems with disconnect within families and you were so vulnerable to be you know open and share about this situation with you so has that changed at all or is it still exactly the same as you described it. It is a the biggest scratch my head the big issues that i need to scratch rather it's i don't understand it. It's something that. I don't think i ever will understand i. Yeah i wish. I could say that i wish i could say would come out rosie on that side but it's not you know i'm sometimes right we see this in. It's a hard thing to realize but sometimes bad things happen to good people eight. Some sometimes situations don't make any sense and they're the end that's the way they are and i think it's important to try to change things into hope that you can better some situations and other times. It's better to learn how to come to grips with the fact that it is the way it is and i think that we can become jaded and we become cynical and we can become close minded if we let the things define us that we can't change and i although i would love for it to be different i mean it's it's you saw from the book that it's something that's still was was in my head. It's still is a little bit in my head. But i'm getting more and more okay with the fact that i just i'm not gonna be able to change. I'm not going to be cynical about it. Not going to be minded about my life. It's just origin. But you know what. I don't have that connection. I don't i don't have it. They don't want it. I've reached out to them. A time. You know she Never will be. It's a shame. But i can't wait. Buy time beating myself up over something. I can't change. Was it a hard decision for you to make as to whether you would include that part of the story in the book because you obviously could have left that out. Yeah not only. Was it a hard decision..

bruce David david rosie
"richman" Discussed on Mindfulness Mode

Mindfulness Mode

08:57 min | 6 months ago

"richman" Discussed on Mindfulness Mode

"Love love love music listening to music. I love being busy. There's very few things i enjoy doing. Tell me more about this. mosaic tile. Worked how that sounds interesting. It's the same kind of thing right When i fine when i'm doing the mosaic tile work that i'm act it actually freeze my brain. It's like doing a puzzle. People do a puzzle. They can think or some people So some people knit or people do other things and it's like that activity looks like it takes concentration but it actually just freeze all the noise out of your head. And maybe doing puzzling thinking about the puzzle. But you're not thinking about the twenty other things that your brain normally try to think about. And so i feel that any you delve yourself into a senior focus actually unclutter the brain and so i like doing artistic things like writing doing mosaics cooking i think renting in biking is artistic in that way because focusing or not focusing on so many things allows you to really really get some clarity on on stuff. You have some pretty incredible reviews of your book. Tell me about one. That really impressed you or maybe one of the first ones that came in that that you are thrilled by So i review. I think we're i. I was really touched. Was i got a review from a critical care nurse and was very simple a message. She sent me an email. She said i've been a critical care. Nurse for fifteen years. Just finish your book. It's going to make me a better nurse while and i were all my god. That's great and i responded to said that's incredible wise that she said because i think i thought i knew what might be going through my patients. Head what things they might have gone in light. But i realized i had no idea. And so it's a make me relate to them better is gonna make me be more patient with them and i thought to myself. How wonderful is that that that happened. Any good review feels good. But i think the reviews that that made me really sit back is when somebody says it affected them. It made them have a conversation. They wouldn't have had. It reiterated their face or whatever story they identify entrusting bruce one of the Thanks for me because it's fifteen different stories. in fifteen. Different people is to ask people what their favorite stories and it's shocking like the range. Yeah so it's wonderful to know that people can get different things from but with reviews that come come through where where somebody says it. It reaffirmed a belief or changed belief. That's that's powerful. Well my wife is a critical care nurse. So i look forward to hearing some of her feedback in response to reading some of these stories. She hasn't read it yet. I want to ask you a questionable bullying david because in my show i always ask a question about this topic. Do you have a story about bullying. We're mindfulness would have made a difference. yeah so knowing that was coming i thought to myself bruce doue do i tell you a story or do i open up the book in i. It was a hard hard decision but they just settled. Cal opened up to but i had a bit of a rough childhood. Who doesn't right one of the things. That i went through and how i dealt with some of my issues was actually was to be a bully and Yeah sure i was bullied. Of course right. I remember vividly some instances that dead still scarred me to these days but i also know that i did the same to other people and i can be very specific about a bottom need to but i i know when i've learned so much about myself you know for many many many years. It's not like i just recently came to terms with it but in in so i can say that yes. I can understand how being more mindful while being bullied is important. But i think it is just as it hit me more bruce that to be. How would if i was more mindful at the time how that would have prevented me from being and i think that if i have understood if somebody would have would have said to me that you can deal with the difficult time that you're going through a different way if i had a space with which to myself or to have somebody give me some guidance on how to come to terms with issues weren't perfect than maybe. I wouldn't have lashed out with others. And and honestly we see it all the time Even as adults bullying in the workplace bullying amongst friends. it's a different level of bullying. But you can tell that most of those come from security and most of it comes from people that don't have the process and deal with their own issues and maybe they're not safe to. Maybe they give been given the tools to. But i think when you can come to terms with who you are and what's important to you and how you can have an effect on other people that is lasting on. I think most of us would to have a lasting effect. Its positives rate. I think so david. Have you ever reconnected. Made amends with any of those people. I haven't. I have to really think hard about that. I don't think that. I have only because pre young on contact relentless people. I think it'd be very difficult to find them. Even so i'd have to say no i i do. I do know that being aware of those issues from probably late teens on is realizing how you know. When i was a grade schooler. In i was i used to pick on people and start fights. Mba bullying. I think i learned from very early on not to be that. And so if i didn't make amends with them and probably haven't thought this through but i'm glad you asked me the question. I know for certain that. Because i became aware of in dealt with it and didn't hide behind it i know for decades decades now. It's it's made me be more aware of the impact. I might have on other people especially like if your if your boss or manager. You have pleaded with your kids or whatever and so. I have gone out of my way in my life to create a safe place for people so that So that they can work through issues that they have virtuous use that that happened in their lives. Work issues that they're having with you. And i'm very much the antithesis of bully for many many years right and it says in your bio europe philanthropist. Tell us about that. Well so you know i. I don't know why. Continue to stop making his focus. 'cause i think it's kind of important. It's probably 'cause books owning a lot of money but one hundred percent of the proceeds from the booker going to the cancer focused another charities all nonprofits that the book participants each picked so each one had an organization that was important to them and my wife and i decided that one hundred percent of anything that comes to us through amazon direct sales or audible. Whatever how that's going to be given to the book participants on the terry's they chose. I done a tons. Of five razors. I sit on. I serve on the board of a stupid cancer of big a organization that caters to the a cancer And numbers other things that i find. It's it's to feed. If you know. I do find that doing for others is way way more rewarding for yourself on mosaics. I spent plenty of time focused on me. But i like i like focusing on other people in doing good for the people because it really is rewarding. Oh yeah and it's very impressive that the proceeds from the book are going to all of those charities. that's fantastic. Wow the people who stories are in that book..

bruce doue bruce david Cal cancer europe amazon terry
"richman" Discussed on Mindfulness Mode

Mindfulness Mode

07:47 min | 6 months ago

"richman" Discussed on Mindfulness Mode

"What does mindfulness mean to you well. Mindfulness is Of course it's just being aware right. I kind of getting the no laze around us to settle down and not not a give our attention to the things that are outside of us but kind of be more present. Be immersed in the moment and be aware of what's going on inside of you in how you're relating to the outside world in how the outside world is related to you rather than just being a reactionary force. It's it's being mindful about the way in which you reacting to your choose your true self being heart center in the way you're reacting to outside forces. That's that's what i think. Mindfulness is yeah. And i agree with you on that. David yeah it is about being heart centered. It's about being present. So david let's go back. Let's go back to some of the darker times in your life and some of the struggles. Could you share some of that with us. Yes so. I was in a bad spot in my life. I i had Kind of done the exact opposite of mindfulness. My whole life where i i. I had lived my life based on what i thought others needed from me. Or what i thought would make me a better person in other people's eyes or would get me a better jobber better relationship or make me give me more value. Based on the way that i felt i would be perceived by others and i was in a bad relationship. It was just a very bad time of my life. I just realized. Just throw a couple of unfortunate events that i realized that i had been doing this my whole life and that gets the greatest thing about life. Is you only know what you know in you know it and at that moment when when this conjunction bunch of different bad events came about. I realized i knew at that. Point is the first time. I knew that i had to start looking inside as to what would be happy and not what i need to do to make others happy. And and that's where it started the journey so tell us what started the shift. Tell us that that day or that moment where things really started to change for you. What you're going appreciate this. Because i didn't do this on purpose as a part of an exercise but you some of your experts that you talked. You would agree that this is a good thing to do. I literally. Bruce sat in front or stood in front of the mirror. And i looked at myself. It was quiet calm night. And i just said you know. Stop stop being whatever you think he should be at. What do you wanna be like. What what do you want to be. What what what is it like. Who are you what are you wanna be and just i tried a vocalise it so that i could A tell myself that what was inside me was important so for me. I wanted to be a non-smoker. I wanted to be healthy. I wanted to be active. I wanted to start relying on. What would make me happy. Because and then i said i'll be happier for other people important things in my life. So so that's what i did so yeah i did it all at the same time i just said i'm going to start being mean. And what is that vocalized. I wanna be a non-smoker. I want to be healthy. I want to be active. That's where started and now you've run all kinds of marathons david. What was it like running that first. Marathon own guys. I could have for like three days. I literally bers ran like two minutes. Couldn't because i'd smoking our smoking a pack a day at least for twenty years and and i was probably at that point maybe fortyish to fiftyish pounds overweight which is a lot overweight to carry on a on athletic frame with smoker's lungs and so when i ran that first two minutes kala running i don't know which college stumbling and then i couldn't walk for a couple of days. My legs were sore. I'm like what the hell am. I do enjoy myself. What did i do to myself so it was ridiculous but i also knew from some of the bad things in my life that i could dig myself a big hole in climate for your way to climb out of it and i said well why not dig yourself a big hole. Why don't you just trying to go for a run. Why don't you for a long run in a longer run in a longer. Run and heck bruce after like four weeks after stop smoking. I ran a five k. Than i ran a ten k. The following week and by by inside of a year finished my first ironman triathlon. Wow that's amazing. That must have been incredible. Feeling describe that for us. It was amazing because again. If if you asked me bruce at that time in my life anytime before that light hey if you make it from point eight appointed be i will give you this or i would assume that i might be entitled to get this from you if i go from point. Eight point b. But when you do something like that's the so relying on yourself to get from point. Which is i want to be healthy. I wanna be a non-smoker. I wanna be athletic to crossing the finish line at you know. Twelve hour endurance athletic event. It was very very empowering. It was calming It it it was. It was refreshing. It just allowed me to realized. This is who i was in what i was getting out of. It was only what mattered to me. And what was inside of me. I was getting anything from it from anybody else and my motivation was not to impress anybody to to win anything to have anybody say good job. I just wanted to prove that. I could do something. That's very empowering thing. Yeah it sure is well this book. You've put together david cycle of lives. It's so powerful. Where did you get the idea together. People's stories together about cancer. So during that time that i spoke about where i had a couple of really traumatic events going on one of those traumatic events was my sister. June had told me that she was diagnosed with what would be terminal brain cancer. I married young kids fighting career a wonderful group of friends. Just just wonderful lady with a lot of wonderful things going on. And i was really tough right. It was really tough for her to know the that was it that her life was going to end and even imagine the trauma that comes with any type of horrible event especially around death but it. I think there's another level of trauma. Bruce when when it's impending win you know it's coming when you have to wrap your brain around it and interact with people and determine. How am i gonna the finish out my legacy. How am i going to communicate to my loved ones. These are these are things that are so hard to deal with because the human brains not wired to understand our our our mortality and so in doing events for her and a both when she was alive and after she passed i came across this recurring theme. Bruce was that people don't know how to deal with the emotional side of this trauma of cancer and all the other traumas..

bers david Bruce bruce David brain cancer cancer
"richman" Discussed on Mindfulness Mode

Mindfulness Mode

02:35 min | 6 months ago

"richman" Discussed on Mindfulness Mode

"Let's go back. Let's go back to some of the darker times in your life and some of the struggles. Could you share some of that with us. Yes so. I was in a bad spot in my life. I i had Kind of done the exact opposite of mindfulness. My whole life where i i. I had lived my life based on what i thought others needed from me. Or what i thought would make me a better person in other people's eyes or would get me a better jobber better relationship or make me give me more value. Based on the way that i felt i would be perceived by others and i was in a bad relationship. It was just a very bad time of my life. I just realized. Just throw a couple of unfortunate events that i realized that i had been doing this my whole life and that gets the greatest thing about life. Is you only know what you know in you know it and at that moment when when this conjunction bunch of different bad events came about. I realized i knew at that. Point is the first time. I knew that i had to start looking inside as to what would be happy and not what i need to do to make others happy. And and that's where it started the journey so tell us what started the shift. Tell us that that day or that moment where things really started to change for you. What you're going appreciate this. Because i didn't do this on purpose as a part of an exercise but you some of your experts that you talked. You would agree that this is a good thing to do. I literally. Bruce sat in front or stood in front of the mirror. And i looked at myself. It was quiet calm night. And i just said you know. Stop stop being whatever you think he should be at. What do you wanna be like. What what do you want to be. What what what is it like. Who are you what are you wanna be and just i tried a vocalise it so that i could A tell myself that what was inside me was important so for me. I wanted to be a non-smoker. I wanted to be healthy. I wanted to be active. I wanted to start relying on. What would make me happy. Because and then i said i'll be happier for other people important things in my life. So so that's what i did so yeah i did it all at the same time i just said i'm going to start being mean. And what is that vocalized. I wanna be a non-smoker. I want to be healthy. I want to be active. That's where started

bers david Bruce bruce David brain cancer cancer
Author, Philanthropist David Richman on His Journey to Happiness Through Mindfulness

Mindfulness Mode

02:35 min | 6 months ago

Author, Philanthropist David Richman on His Journey to Happiness Through Mindfulness

"Let's go back. Let's go back to some of the darker times in your life and some of the struggles. Could you share some of that with us. Yes so. I was in a bad spot in my life. I i had Kind of done the exact opposite of mindfulness. My whole life where i i. I had lived my life based on what i thought others needed from me. Or what i thought would make me a better person in other people's eyes or would get me a better jobber better relationship or make me give me more value. Based on the way that i felt i would be perceived by others and i was in a bad relationship. It was just a very bad time of my life. I just realized. Just throw a couple of unfortunate events that i realized that i had been doing this my whole life and that gets the greatest thing about life. Is you only know what you know in you know it and at that moment when when this conjunction bunch of different bad events came about. I realized i knew at that. Point is the first time. I knew that i had to start looking inside as to what would be happy and not what i need to do to make others happy. And and that's where it started the journey so tell us what started the shift. Tell us that that day or that moment where things really started to change for you. What you're going appreciate this. Because i didn't do this on purpose as a part of an exercise but you some of your experts that you talked. You would agree that this is a good thing to do. I literally. Bruce sat in front or stood in front of the mirror. And i looked at myself. It was quiet calm night. And i just said you know. Stop stop being whatever you think he should be at. What do you wanna be like. What what do you want to be. What what what is it like. Who are you what are you wanna be and just i tried a vocalise it so that i could A tell myself that what was inside me was important so for me. I wanted to be a non-smoker. I wanted to be healthy. I wanted to be active. I wanted to start relying on. What would make me happy. Because and then i said i'll be happier for other people important things in my life. So so that's what i did so yeah i did it all at the same time i just said i'm going to start being mean. And what is that vocalized. I wanna be a non-smoker. I want to be healthy. I want to be active. That's where started

Bruce
"richman" Discussed on Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

02:36 min | 7 months ago

"richman" Discussed on Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

"A link. That's unique link you download for free Nobody shares information. It's nothing like that You can go to my website. My website is cycle of lives dot org cycle of livestock or Vibe loose five zero. One c three nonprofit so there kinda percent of proceeds go to cancer focused organizations that that they chose. There's a couple of charities that aren't cancer focus but they were still by the book participants and then there's links to buy it on amazon or wherever books are sold. I can't give those free amazon. Doesn't let my publisher is no problem with me selling books for free. So just the orderbook Just put a note. Her join dr v. And and and and then you can you can pay zero for it Or send me a note at the contact on.

"richman" Discussed on Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

03:40 min | 7 months ago

"richman" Discussed on Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

"That didn't tell me this really hit home. Because you know when i was kid i had an uncle that killed himself at just added. This really hit home. Because when i was younger a family member here or there or home. Gosh you know just a couple of years ago. My daughter's friend at school and every single person and they went to myself. How how my. I just binding this out like right now like why because we don't want to talk about trauma lashley things that are so so emotional and i just finished the day going. Only god i literally. Every single person was dealing off with the emotional effects of this not just because of what they felt for him for his wife and kids and just for humanity in general but because it had brought up traumas that they had all each gone through but yet had dealt with. It was shocking to me. Yeah we're all really good Right we that thing. And dr lisa rank wrote this book called mind over medicine and she said if you don grow. You grow tumor and that's what happened. We keep stopping and all that energy inside. Our bodies just as chaotic energy. And next thing you know you grow tumor right so yeah stress definitely a killer. But i think that There is a wound weight. Lifted when you're able to realize that it's okay to deal with crap even if you don't know what's in there even if you don't know how important it is just you now if you if you just allow yourself that safe place to save it's important to me i'm gonna deal with. Who cares what anybody else thinks. If it's stupid. Not stupid. If i should get over to not get over it. I'm not gonna listen to them. I'm just gonna vocalise. Listen to me. You'll find people that support. You wanna talk you through it and maybe it'll be over a day and maybe you'll be over in ten years or at least right like you said..

ten years couple of years ago each dr lisa rank every single person single person
"richman" Discussed on Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

03:56 min | 7 months ago

"richman" Discussed on Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

"Which is you know part of what why we do what we do you not to provide community women who who need support so but it's an and i believe that study And it's not hard to because you've been involved in in a way more in a deeper level than i have been but it's easy to see how that community involvement. Sometimes i talked to debra one of the participants and who had breast cancer and now as part of a wellness community and has been for many many years and she said some people are quick to open up and others are. They're just very difficult to open up because when a lot of people don't want to be a part of that community nobody wants to be a part of that community and then when you're there you're kind of forced to deal with that reality and then if you can open up and you can you know. Make it part of yourself and just allow yourself to give and find a safe space to to give Then you can see how it's just something you don't wanna let go so Yeah i'm i'm glad you asked that question. I think about that some more. Yeah yeah healing. The emotional wounds is just so key. I mean i. I've seen women who may have similar diagnosis. Starting the same program runs same time and you know why does every they all both do everything right. One does not go down the path of you know. Healing her heart and healing or emotions still stays in the type a personality driven workaholic whereas the other one will take the time to nurture call her body. Call her mind. he'll forgive yourself. Forgive others been really those relationships and you know the one over here doesn't survive in the other one does so i. I really see a huge huge connection. Were healing your emotions and and survival long-term so allow that yes. Input hardest thing about healing emotions is to admit that there there in the first place to yourself. Once you admit that there there then you gotta go My safe to explore them you now and then you've got to go on my safe tips for them with other people. It's really tough. Tough thing to do If i could get off topic for one second just to say just to show up most people. Maybe a lot of people wouldn't find this so fascinating interesting. But i did i. I wished running an office with about one hundred people in it and it was during the financial crisis. And unfortunately i'm one of my employees is in the.

one second both one hundred people one first place One one of my employees years
"richman" Discussed on Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

05:02 min | 7 months ago

"richman" Discussed on Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

"How to be a better person and had taught him how to be loved and taught him how to be comfortable with. We is in effect. You know she said to him nearer. She was dying. She's like the only thing. I'm pissed off about dying is that somebody's gonna get better version of you than i got. I fixed you. i made you. You'll be somebody that could be loud too. I wanna be in love and and that's just so touching to me. That's the way it was and so when you talk to bobby he says you know i love my life. I'm not gonna. I'm not gonna say i don't have a perfect life. You know but i would have had a perfect life with brandy. But it didn't work out that way. Do you know and Just from the point of such turmoil and such isolation from new that type of being heart centered grounded fulfilled comfortable with who you are and and then have that stripped away and then to find it again to me is just. It's indicative of the human experience. Yeah human stare totally. Not you still still in touch with all these people. I'm in touch with some some have become very close friends. Very close friends Some of my closest friends a few of them a few of them now. They moved on and it was a little experience in their life. And that was that One of the guys. That was such a such a cool cat really. He became a pretty close friend he he unfortunately passed away But yeah. I'd say i'd say him in touch with them but i'm close to few of them and They've i think. Been this impactful in my life. Is i think this project wasn't there so It's it's been a good give and take. Was there anybody that you interviewed. Sign having read the book yet. But certainly i'm going to read it now. That had breast cancer all. Yeah like four five four five. Yeah it was quite a bit You see a problem with the breast answer. The national trauma..

One of the guys bobby five four
"richman" Discussed on Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

05:47 min | 7 months ago

"richman" Discussed on Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

"Sofa for coins to put together the right amount of money to go to the store to buy a meal for his kids. I think we can all relate to that right and he developed a passion for taking care of people that were less fortunate because you always carry that trauma with him and so the answer is yes everybody had a trauma but or traumas that kind of affected their emotional journey. But to and and crazy. Enough is that The only constant in all the fifteen story. The only constant was two things one. Everybody thought their story was an interesting. I it's just my just my story which i found fascinating but you know as you know and people. They're they're listening to is. You just live your life. You don't think it's anything spectacular. You're just like whatever right. I'm just trying to get through it. And so everybody thought that their that their story wasn't wasn't interesting. That was the one constant and the second constant was nobody had him. Nobody had processed that emotional side. Nobody had come to terms with it. Maybe internally they might maybe they didn't have to come to terms with a lot but they still hadn't vocalized still hadn't processed that they still hadn't found a some type of peace or resolution or some type of acceptance or comfort with those traumas in with that whole emotional side and that was the other constant which was which was wonderful for me. Because i got to be a witness to that journey for those people and so i'm not gonna say that everybody walked away. You know Dancing on rainbow and and putting on butterfly wings and flying through the air. It's not like everybody. Not every story turned out happy. But the story is very inspiring. A very transformational very relatable. And so that when i went when i went into it hoping that give three sixty view of that spent that particular View of the spectrum that emotional side Because of those two things the fact that nobody thought they were spectacular and the fact that nobody had really dealt with..

fifteen story second constant two things one constant one three sixty
"richman" Discussed on Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

02:11 min | 7 months ago

"richman" Discussed on Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

"Each step covers a certain topic one Awesome number four is to heal the emotional wounds because as you learn Diving into the motions is such an important part of healing Because i mean research and studies have shown us that cancer is very emotionally induced disease to involve as some sort of major trauma and the trump was not not resolved. It could be something that happened in childhood To something that happened last year that really triggered answer so when you talk to all of these people you'd find like a common thread as far as the emotional wounds that that led to the development of cancer. That's a great question. And i was very fortunate that might vision for going into it. Ended up providing me with the answer to that question to my vision. Going into it was to get this kind of non disease. Specific non age specific non trauma specific. That's a concept that makes sense View of the emotional side of this and so Yes each person had traumas in their childhood at greatly affected and we dealt with things like suicide of apparent abuse. Abandonment drug addiction Making bad decisions of being dealt bad hands in life Just all kinds of crazy trauma that i think we could all if we don't understand it. We have empathy for that. We might be able to relate to it but you know like for example One guy who is a very very successful physician very successful executive and historian literally. I don't want to.

last year Each step each person One guy one trump four
"richman" Discussed on Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

04:34 min | 7 months ago

"richman" Discussed on Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

"Nobody that i saw was. So i thought to myself over the years and i would do a number of these different type events and that people just didn't talk about the emotional side and so i said well what if i did a book and i took like i don't say the cancer out of it but let's just say the medical side of the cancer out of it And just talk about gay people from a wide range of ages types of cancer. Severity of cancer Whether cancer was a one time event or the dealt with it their whole life and then also the emotional responses they might have had in relation to traumas in their life before they encountered cancer. I wanted to see like like how. What is that emotional journey but but seen as through from a ton of different perspectives are paying so then i asked around friends. I called cancer centers. I leaned on doctor friends. And i just said you know interesting people you know people might wanna talk and it took me a long long time. Dr v found some great people who had unbelievably interesting stories. Some of them. I found on purpose semi found by accident. But i found finally found fifteen people had a combination of a few things. One phenomenally interesting Emotional stories to they had traumas in their life that affected the emotional journey of cancer three. They were willing to really talk about the emotional side which a lot of people just weren't prepared to do In four they had to be in it for the long haul. Because i didn't wanna do a surface interview. I wanted to go deep. So i interview these people. Dr v literally like two three years and got super deep into their journey Some people was in the rear view mirror so time had stood still but some people they were going through their cancer experience as i was talking to them about their emotional journey I also talked to professionals like you talk to a chief medical officer of a california health plan. I talked to oncologist at nyu. I talked to pediatric oncology. Nurse talked so all different perspectives. And then i thought to myself well if my mission in life my goal is to connect people through storytelling. What better way to connect people than to take my bike in. Draw line and connect all these people so i had talked most of these people for two three years. I hadn't met most of them in person. So i said well what the heck get on your bike Zigzag around the country. I went basically l. A. to middle of florida cross up to new york In only six weeks annexed eames house booking everyday like twelve. Fourteen sometimes sixteen hours a day. It was insane. And i would stop and see a a book participant. You know depending on where. I was on my route and Visited hospitals in some cancer centers. Some other things along the way and then kinda was able to write this book. That was fifteen. Individual stories in these stories are taking with me out of the story so it's their story and then The thread it ties of stories. Together is the story of the bike. Ride my emotional journey with re trying to reconcile the emotions around you know my situation and then short little discussions about all the people that i met not all the people but many of the people i met along the way and because i I wanted to make this connection thing right in a better way to connect through storytelling on a bike ride in the brow and just connecting the whole thing and so that was the genesis. I know that's a bit wordy. But that's what that's a great great story. Now i've got a seventy central system registered program registered trademark program and.

new york fifteen people six weeks Fourteen fifteen eames house l. A. One florida twelve california sixteen hours a day two three years one time event four nyu three seventy central system
"richman" Discussed on Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

05:46 min | 7 months ago

"richman" Discussed on Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

"Awesome my late thirties. Bad time to start. But i'll start so i quit smoking. I literally went running for less than two minutes. I couldn't do it. And then a couple of weeks later i built it up to a mile and then identified k. And then a ten k. and then at half ironman by six eight months later. I was prepared to do an ironman. Which is you know is like a twelve hour bent to full marathon after one hundred twelve mile bike ride after two point four mile swim and it just really transformed my life. So i i i. I wrote this book. That was years in the making really. But this idea of the middle of the pack and it came kind of from that concept of new. I think most people grow up to be a better child to their parent a better parent to their child a better worker a better friend. Better this a better. That kind of never worried about themselves. Like i noticed that a lot and when i was running a very big businesses in the financial services arena. I kind of started to see the parallels between running a big business. The lessons learned of running a big business and running a hundred miles. 'cause i was doing like these fifty runs hundred mile runs and so forth and there's a lot of concepts that were very much shared ideas in so You know just for my own personal experience in some of those lessons learned in business in life I wrote this book in the middle of the pack which basically is just way. Dr be to explain to people what might be national them but wasn't to me. Which is you know. Look in the mirror. I worry about that person. Even if that person is taking care your dad or whatever you know. It's like the things that you wanna do. Do the things that are important to you. Do the things that are important to who you wanna be in life and everything else will follow. And it's it's not it. Sounds a little preachy. It's not preachy really. It's just I- relatable lessons that we can all that we can all. Yeah that makes sense. Why the middle of the pack. Not the front of the path. I here's what i thought. Dr view I'd have much in common with oprah winfrey or elon. Musk right. And i also don't have much in common with a with the guy who's living on his parents couch in the basement and those people..

oprah winfrey twelve hour four mile elon Musk less than two minutes hundred mile two point six eight months later a couple of weeks later one hundred twelve mile ten fifty runs a mile hundred miles late thirties to
"richman" Discussed on Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

05:51 min | 7 months ago

"richman" Discussed on Breast Cancer Conqueror Podcast

"Welcome to another amazing episode of while this warriors today have got an interesting warrior on our podcast. Name is david richman and david is an author. Public speaker philanthropist and and endurance athletes. Whose mission is to form more meaning bullock human connections through storytelling. So he's written a few books. The first one was winning in the middle of the pack and second one which really is was very intriguing to me was a cycles of lies. Which which he viewed fifteen people on a five thousand mile bike journey and you delve deeply into their emotional journeys with the cancer. Thank you so much for joining us. David thank you. Dr via mbare excited to be here. Yeah you've got an interesting story so we always started podcast with the pain to passion. What was it. What was your like life for poor and there was a turning point in your life where you really became. Astronauts your life again. Well yes you're right. you're exactly right. That painting passion is definitely unique. Reach person for me indicates actually both books and kinda a big transformation in my life came out of the pain of of seeing my sister. Get a brain cancer so I had. I was just going through a pretty bad divorce. Two very young kids like four year old twins. And i remember getting a call from her and her telling me that she had brain cancer. And you know. I until you know you just don't know so i was like that. Sounds pretty bad light. Still he adds kinda worse than pretty bad and The husband young kids for her. And you know what turned out to be pretty severe in terminal brain cancer. It was a it was a difficult thing but we bonded through that time and Got to talk about a lot of things and she definitely was the inspiration for me transformations in my life. And i'm pretty much driven that passion for me. You know ever since then. So what's that. Now been fifteen eighteen years. Something like that. So pretty lasting effect while yeah. There's nothing like the cancer.

David fifteen people david fifteen eighteen years david richman second one first one four year old five thousand mile both books today Two very young kids twins mbare books
"richman" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

04:12 min | 8 months ago

"richman" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Elsewhere. Travelling to different jurisdiction to thorndike's they needed to rely on each other to share information about crime and criminals. This became a huge problem with the mass production of cars and so tried to get together themselves to build a network of sharing information. And that's actually how i a. Cpa the international association of chiefs of police. Which is today still a a big lobbying and advocacy organization for law enforcement. That's how they got their start. In the late nineteenth century as a way to share information among big police departments they realized that their own networks were insufficient to the task. Because this was sharing information and building database based on voluntary efforts was not going to be enough and so they asked the federal government to step in and help them. This is this was the starting point of law enforcement officials realizing badge the problem of crime in federal federalist system of government in a large country where mobility was a given of required more coordinated efforts in the look to federal government to help them just to build on sarah's point what i found fascinating it might be be old hat for historians but what i found fascinating is is the role that wiped supremacy played in the growth of a federal role in law force. Clinton that sounds a widow on a sense that a lot of the resistance to federal authority particularly in the south in the latter part of the nineteenth century and early part of the twentieth been waiting harbor twentieth came from the fear that that feds would be dispatched to interfere with with local customs including jim crow. When ching and other norms that were being protected by southern legislators so so localism was really important guarantor of white supremacy but in an interesting development white supremacy became a vehicle for the extension of federal power. Not with respect. To anti-hunting norms there was no chance or widow chance for anti lynching legislation to pass. But if you look at prohibition the nanak would were as it was called them the white slavery act and other federal extinctions of authority they were ribbon at least in part by concern about african-american criminal conduct that extended beyond the control of the locality and rhetoric about white supremacy became important for for growing the federal enforcement bureaucracy as did commercial interests. I mean one of the things. We also found this. It's not just an interest in in protecting white supremacy that that grows federal power. It's a desire to help insures of cards. And in addition to developing an information platform at the behest of locals the feds ended up or at least. The fbi ended up spending about half. Its caseload doing car-thefts cases that pretty much were for the benefit of of local enforcers sometimes ended up even being prosecutor in county courts. So there is a fascinating history. Always offers multi causal explanations for why things Happened the way they did. And then just provided one a fascinating aspect of what the federal government to get involved in law enforcement so that was one factor The mass production of cars was another factor in all of that. I think it another distinct but overlapping issue. is mobility so a lot of.

Clinton late nineteenth century today african-american jim crow one factor white slavery act one twentieth about half nineteenth century fbi early part of the twentieth latter part of the sarah
Rapper DMX on life support after heart attack, lawyer says

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 10 months ago

Rapper DMX on life support after heart attack, lawyer says

"I'm I'm Julie Julie Walker Walker rapper rapper DMX's DMX's on on life life support support at at a a hospital hospital in in White White Plains Plains New New York York after after suffering suffering a a heart heart attack attack according according to to his his lawyer lawyer DMX's DMX's known known for for hits hits like like the the ruff ruff Ryders Ryders anthem anthem and and party party up up his his attorney attorney Murray Murray Richman Richman says says he he could could not not confirm confirm reports reports it it was was a a drug drug overdose overdose he he says says DMX's DMX's real real name name is is Earl Earl Simmons Simmons he's he's a a tremendous tremendous person person entertainer entertainer and and human human being being and and not not the the run run of of the the mill mill rapper rapper a a person person of of great great depth depth DMX DMX was was also also an an actor actor appearing appearing in in Romeo Romeo must must die die exit exit wounds wounds and and other other films films over over the the years years he he battled battled with with substance substance abuse abuse and and went went through through rehab rehab two two years years ago ago I'm I'm Julie Julie Walker Walker

Julie Julie Walker Walker White White Plains Plains New New York York Heart Heart Attack Attack Murray Murray Richman Richman Earl Earl Simmons Simmons DMX Romeo Romeo
Rapper DMX in 'grave condition' in hospital: Attorney

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:19 sec | 10 months ago

Rapper DMX in 'grave condition' in hospital: Attorney

"Rapper DMX is in grave condition after suffering a heart attack Friday night and also some unconfirmed reports. He may have overdosed his attorney, Murray Richman, He was taken by ambulance from his home to the White Plague Hospital. Richmond says his situation is quite

Murray Richman Heart Attack White Plague Hospital Richmond
DMX is removed from life support, breathing on his own: 'Still not out of the woods yet'

Page Publishing

00:22 sec | 10 months ago

DMX is removed from life support, breathing on his own: 'Still not out of the woods yet'

"Rapper DMX, who has battled substance abuse over many years is that White Plains Hospital the musician, real name, Earl Simmons reportedly suffered a heart attack in his home around 11 o'clock Friday night. Simmons, reportedly on life support. His attorney, Murray Richman, who is very close to this family spoke to WNBC TV. Pray for him Hell for him. I hope he's going to

White Plains Hospital Earl Simmons Murray Richman Heart Attack Simmons Wnbc Tv
"richman" Discussed on Premium Hoops

Premium Hoops

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"richman" Discussed on Premium Hoops

"Your Mark Schindler joined today by Mike Richmond. You probably know him he's the host of locked on Blazers was reported for NBC Sports North West. I'm really excited to bring him on because you know we're doing our off-season preview pause right now, and you probably aren't as in tune with the blazers as you think you are. So Mike is really to just you know kind of kick us off and get us ready to go Mike how you doing today man thanks for joining. I'm doing great I don't know if I've ever been introduced as you probably know him. So maybe. You might not know him, but you will soon. So I'll put it like this if you are trying to keep up with the blazers if you're trying to with a small market team, Mike Has Pretty much. The best will not pretty much me as the most consistent and best lasers podcast author..

Mike Richmond Blazers Mark Schindler NBC
Mailbox break-ins reported in Central Virginia

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:19 sec | 1 year ago

Mailbox break-ins reported in Central Virginia

"Mail boxes in Central Virginia and stolen the male that was inside the break ins happen in Richman and in hand Reichel and Chesterfield counties. State election officials say they don't know if any election male was inside those boxes. Theft of mail is a federal offense. You can get you up to five years in prison with just under

Theft Central Virginia Reichel Chesterfield Richman
What to Watch in the Final Debate Before the Iowa Caucus

WSJ What's News

06:58 min | 2 years ago

What to Watch in the Final Debate Before the Iowa Caucus

"Is the first Democratic presidential debate of the New Year and the last before next month's Iowa Caucus voters begin the process of picking a Democratic nominee dominy to take on president trump in November. Just six candidates will be on stage tonight a much smaller field than in previous debates joining me now with more on what to watch for for his Wall Street Journal reporter Emily Emily. I want to start with impeachment. We now know that the House has vote tomorrow. Wednesday on sending the articles of impeachment Richman over to the Senate and the schedule there in the Senate could cut down on campaign time during a crucial period for some of these candidates. What should we keep an eye on? Tonight tonight's going to be really interesting because we'll see some of these candidates likely bring up impeachment and what it means especially for the senator so let's not forget we've got Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren and Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar on the debate stage. We've also got Senator Michael Bennet of Colorado who didn't qualify for the debate. So they're still four senators running and trying to get the Democratic nomination for president and most all of them have said in prior events and reiterated again and again that they will fill their senatorial duties. You know that they would participate in any trial as a senator. You know there are juror and you know it really comes up where they'll have surrogates out on the trail and we don't know exactly how they'll plant split their time but we know that they will need to split their time. Okay let's shift gears to foreign policy. See there's a lot of talk about that here and it's likely the candidates will be asked to weigh in on. US policy specifically toward Iran after the strike that killed military leader. Kacem Sulejmani. Imani what will you be looking out for a have to imagine. This is gonNA come up during the debate. Stage after the trump administration ordered the strike that really unprompted rebukes not only from Democrats in Congress but especially on the campaign trail and a number of the Democratic contenders for president. Really said that they they thought that president trump had brought the US to the brink of war. We've got Senator Bernie Sanders who used the Iran. Tensions to highlight former vice president. Joe Biden's ends two thousand to vote. That was when he was a senator and he voted for the Iraq war and then Mr Sanders. At that time he was a member of the House voted against it and Mr Sure Sanders allies have argued that Joe Biden did not choke a judgment about engagement overseas whereas Joe Biden's allies on the other hand said the Bush administration misled Congress in the public ahead of the war and let's not forget former vice president. Joe Biden has repeatedly on the campaign trail stressed his experience in terms of foreign policy and how he was really a point person during the Obama administration on that end. And let's not forget http Buddha judge. He's the former South Bend Indiana mayor and he is going to be the only military veteran on the stage. And it's something that he is likely to bring up experience if any foreign policy discussion emerges Peter Judges thirty seven years old and he's really called for a new generation of leadership in the US. Let's turn to the candidates themselves this week. We saw a bit of a skirmish between Senator Sanders and Warren. Who said that her colleague had told her in two thousand eighteen? That at a woman couldn't win the presidency. Sanders says that was not true. How might this impact the dynamics on the debate stage tonight you know? The friendship between Senators Warren and Sanders is being tested. They've got people from all different sides saying what their version of. That story is from that that dinner. That has come up on a a lot of it. You know non animus sources and even earlier today we saw Bernie Sanders campaign manager had basically tweeted. Let's not forget what we're fighting for here so so but there's definitely a lot of tension between these two candidates who are both viewed as pretty far to the left and have a lot of overlap in supporter. So it's going GonNa be really interesting to see if they are engaging with each other if the tension is still there on the debate stage or if they're just going to try to brush it off and and focus on what. The campaigns have sat are their top priority. which is defeating president trump? A follow up on Sanders. He's doing pretty well in the polls lately and has so far avoided needed a lot of criticism on the debate stage. Seems like from what you're saying. That might change tonight. Indeed so for a while it was seemed like Bernie Sanders was really not going to critique anyone align and the few times that he did. It's come up a little bit. It was almost like I can believe it. You Know Sanders is going to go after someone whereas other candidates would be have a little that sharper elbows but we think that it's possible. A lot of candidates might pile on to Bernie Sanders because he read a lot of the headlines. Recently while a lot of them say Bernice Une- is back. That's based on a couple things. He's got some good polling results. Recently he was leading the field in a really closely watched Iowa poll that it just came out on Friday. And let's not forget Bernie Sanders had a massive fund raising haul. He brought in thirty four point. Five million dollars. which is the most of any Democratic presidential candidate so far this cycle emily one final question and that's on diversity which the candidates have been questioned about previously there? Will we six white candidates on the debate stage tonight. That's after New Jersey. Senator Corey Booker dropped. His Bid and entrepreneur. Andrew Yang failed to qualify. How do you think the candidates candidates will be addressing that tonight? It'll be really interesting to see how or if it comes up. The Democratic Party has to appeal to a massive base of black voters Latino voters and the growing Asian American Pacific islander population so even if the candidates on the debate stage are not diverse the Democratic Democrat Party. Very much as it's going to be really interesting to see if they bring it up on their own or if they're asked about it did come up in the Los Angeles US Democratic debate which was the last one just a couple of weeks ago and Andrew Yang who is the only diverse candidate on the stage then was asked about it and he said he was both honored privilege but also couldn't believe that he was the only diverse candidate on this stage so we still have former Massachusetts governor. Deval Patrick running in last minute bid. That really hasn't been able to gain a lot of traction and like you said entrepreneurial. Andrew Young didn't qualify for this debate and Cory Booker New Jersey senator. The judge dropped out earlier. This Week and California senator. Kamala Harris dropped out before the Los Angeles debate. So there's been a lot of changes recently and you you know. We'll just kinda see what happens. In terms of the candidates not necessarily representing the Democratic Party voter base. Tonight plenty to watch for this evening. Wall Wall Street Journal reporter Emily Glazer. Thank you so much for joining us. Thanks for having me the debate airs on CNN nine PM Eastern.

What to Watch in the Final Debate Before the Iowa Caucus

WSJ What's News

06:58 min | 2 years ago

What to Watch in the Final Debate Before the Iowa Caucus

"Is the first Democratic presidential debate of the New Year and the last before next month's Iowa Caucus voters begin the process of picking a Democratic nominee dominy to take on president trump in November. Just six candidates will be on stage tonight a much smaller field than in previous debates joining me now with more on what to watch for for his Wall Street Journal reporter Emily Emily. I want to start with impeachment. We now know that the House has vote tomorrow. Wednesday on sending the articles of impeachment Richman over to the Senate and the schedule there in the Senate could cut down on campaign time during a crucial period for some of these candidates. What should we keep an eye on? Tonight tonight's going to be really interesting because we'll see some of these candidates likely bring up impeachment and what it means especially for the senator so let's not forget we've got Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren and Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar on the debate stage. We've also got Senator Michael Bennet of Colorado who didn't qualify for the debate. So they're still four senators running and trying to get the Democratic nomination for president and most all of them have said in prior events and reiterated again and again that they will fill their senatorial duties. You know that they would participate in any trial as a senator. You know there are juror and you know it really comes up where they'll have surrogates out on the trail and we don't know exactly how they'll plant split their time but we know that they will need to split their time. Okay let's shift gears to foreign policy. See there's a lot of talk about that here and it's likely the candidates will be asked to weigh in on. US policy specifically toward Iran after the strike that killed military leader. Kacem Sulejmani. Imani what will you be looking out for a have to imagine. This is gonNA come up during the debate. Stage after the trump administration ordered the strike that really unprompted rebukes not only from Democrats in Congress but especially on the campaign trail and a number of the Democratic contenders for president. Really said that they they thought that president trump had brought the US to the brink of war. We've got Senator Bernie Sanders who used the Iran. Tensions to highlight former vice president. Joe Biden's ends two thousand to vote. That was when he was a senator and he voted for the Iraq war and then Mr Sanders. At that time he was a member of the House voted against it and Mr Sure Sanders allies have argued that Joe Biden did not choke a judgment about engagement overseas whereas Joe Biden's allies on the other hand said the Bush administration misled Congress in the public ahead of the war and let's not forget former vice president. Joe Biden has repeatedly on the campaign trail stressed his experience in terms of foreign policy and how he was really a point person during the Obama administration on that end. And let's not forget http Buddha judge. He's the former South Bend Indiana mayor and he is going to be the only military veteran on the stage. And it's something that he is likely to bring up experience if any foreign policy discussion emerges Peter Judges thirty seven years old and he's really called for a new generation of leadership in the US. Let's turn to the candidates themselves this week. We saw a bit of a skirmish between Senator Sanders and Warren. Who said that her colleague had told her in two thousand eighteen? That at a woman couldn't win the presidency. Sanders says that was not true. How might this impact the dynamics on the debate stage tonight you know? The friendship between Senators Warren and Sanders is being tested. They've got people from all different sides saying what their version of. That story is from that that dinner. That has come up on a a lot of it. You know non animus sources and even earlier today we saw Bernie Sanders campaign manager had basically tweeted. Let's not forget what we're fighting for here so so but there's definitely a lot of tension between these two candidates who are both viewed as pretty far to the left and have a lot of overlap in supporter. So it's going GonNa be really interesting to see if they are engaging with each other if the tension is still there on the debate stage or if they're just going to try to brush it off and and focus on what. The campaigns have sat are their top priority. which is defeating president trump? A follow up on Sanders. He's doing pretty well in the polls lately and has so far avoided needed a lot of criticism on the debate stage. Seems like from what you're saying. That might change tonight. Indeed so for a while it was seemed like Bernie Sanders was really not going to critique anyone align and the few times that he did. It's come up a little bit. It was almost like I can believe it. You Know Sanders is going to go after someone whereas other candidates would be have a little that sharper elbows but we think that it's possible. A lot of candidates might pile on to Bernie Sanders because he read a lot of the headlines. Recently while a lot of them say Bernice Une- is back. That's based on a couple things. He's got some good polling results. Recently he was leading the field in a really closely watched Iowa poll that it just came out on Friday. And let's not forget Bernie Sanders had a massive fund raising haul. He brought in thirty four point. Five million dollars. which is the most of any Democratic presidential candidate so far this cycle emily one final question and that's on diversity which the candidates have been questioned about previously there? Will we six white candidates on the debate stage tonight. That's after New Jersey. Senator Corey Booker dropped. His Bid and entrepreneur. Andrew Yang failed to qualify. How do you think the candidates candidates will be addressing that tonight? It'll be really interesting to see how or if it comes up. The Democratic Party has to appeal to a massive base of black voters Latino voters and the growing Asian American Pacific islander population so even if the candidates on the debate stage are not diverse the Democratic Democrat Party. Very much as it's going to be really interesting to see if they bring it up on their own or if they're asked about it did come up in the Los Angeles US Democratic debate which was the last one just a couple of weeks ago and Andrew Yang who is the only diverse candidate on the stage then was asked about it and he said he was both honored privilege but also couldn't believe that he was the only diverse candidate on this stage so we still have former Massachusetts governor. Deval Patrick running in last minute bid. That really hasn't been able to gain a lot of traction and like you said entrepreneurial. Andrew Young didn't qualify for this debate and Cory Booker New Jersey senator. The judge dropped out earlier. This Week and California senator. Kamala Harris dropped out before the Los Angeles debate. So there's been a lot of changes recently and you you know. We'll just kinda see what happens. In terms of the candidates not necessarily representing the Democratic Party voter base. Tonight plenty to watch for this evening. Wall Wall Street Journal reporter Emily Glazer. Thank you so much for joining us. Thanks for having me the debate airs on CNN nine PM Eastern.

Senator Bernie Sanders Senator President Trump Senator Elizabeth Warren Senator Corey Booker Senator Michael Bennet Senator Amy Klobuchar United States Wall Street Journal Joe Biden Democratic Party Vice President Iowa Donald Trump Emily Emily Congress Iran Reporter
Spotify will use everything it knows about you to target podcast ads

Feedback with EarBuds

01:07 min | 2 years ago

Spotify will use everything it knows about you to target podcast ads

"This week. spotify launched a new advertising service called streaming ad insertion or Sai for short essay. I use customer data to target ads ads within its exclusive podcasts in a company blog post VP and head of global advertising business. Jay Richman said that this service is quote taking formats traditionally personally have been more of a static experience and making it a more personalized and attractive. One end quote that said in a story for the verge Ashleigh Carmen explains that while spotify's new technology algae breaks ground in the industry it also puts consumer privacy at risk quote. PODCASTS are sensitive listening data. The topics can be niche and revealing so users rightly might have privacy concerns about how what they consume. We'll be siphoned back into brands and quote says Carmen when Richmond was asked about these issues he responded that consumers members can opt out of data targeting. If you want more information on this topic head to the snacks daily podcast hosts Nick and Jack share some information about how the strategic added insertion will appear in your listening experience. You can find this information in there. Episode titled These Delivery Apps are like Mafia

Ashleigh Carmen Jay Richman Spotify VP SAI Richmond Nick Jack
What Are High Crimes and Misdemeanors? Here's the History

The Erick Erickson Show

02:55 min | 2 years ago

What Are High Crimes and Misdemeanors? Here's the History

"Let me give you some history here. Because one of the contentions by the president and by the president's supporters others is that the president of the United States is being charged with things that are not crimes it is true. Abusive Abusive Office is not a federal crime that the president can be charged with but more than two thirds of the sixty impeachments is that have proceeded through the House of Representatives. Were based on things that were not also crimes. Federal Judges are subject to removal under the impeachment provisions of the Constitution of the nineteen impeachments reaching the Senate fifteen have been directed at federal judges and an eight of those cases says the Senate voted to convict. Impeachment proceedings were initiated against a member of the president's cabinet in eighteen seventy six when impeachment richman charges were filed against William Belknap. who was secretary of war? The House and Senate debated the power impeachment at length and determined that the secretary remains susceptible to impeachment and trial even even after he resigned the House and Senate have the power to impeach and try and accused official. WHO has resigned? It was conceded a cabinet official can have that happen and and on the record. It was conceded that both could in the case of the impeachment proceedings against Richard Nixon and Judge Judge George English in one thousand nine hundred eighty six president. Nixon resigned following the committee of the judiciary to report to the House recommendations of his impeachment. Judge English resigned signed before commencement of a trial in the Senate and it was agreed by all sides that the impeachment could continue but they did abandon the matter anyway. The constitution defines the grounds for impeachment and conviction is treason. Bribery and other high crimes and misdemeanors when the house determines the grounds for impeachment. Peach Mint exists. The articles of impeachment are presented to the Senate. Any one of the articles may provide sufficient basis for graphic conviction. It's not an all or nothing thing. This House is going to pass out to articles articles of impeachment. They could convict him on either one. The phrase high crimes and misdemeanors has been interpreted by Congress. Broadly the framers of the constitution adopted the phrase rays from English practice at the time of the constitutional conviction convention. The phrase high crimes and misdemeanors had been used for four hundred years. There's your a little trivia fact. You're at your Sunday School Christmas party this weekend and impeachment comes up. Did you know that by the time. The constitution was adopted. The phrase high crimes and misdemeanors had been in use as for four hundred years in the British parliament. Here's what you need to do. Here's what she had to pay attention to over that four hundred year period in the British parliament with high crimes and misdemeanors was used some involved actual crimes but many did not

Senate President Trump Judge Judge George English House Of Representatives Richard Nixon British Parliament Secretary Official William Belknap. United States Bribery Congress Richman Four Hundred Years Four Hundred Year
"richman" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"richman" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Children youth opportunities in the summer to focus academically but many other Richman activities help prevent that summer slide so they can stay on track and even get ahead in their reading and that's a big part of a part of transmission provides but the kids that have now graduated as you said they've grown up in our program not because they just love the program they fall in love with these college age young adults who invest their entire summer sometimes entire year sometimes multiple years in the lives of these kids and they can't wait to come back to you gets connected with these young adults and having positive young adult role models in their lives just any adult role models in our lives is so critical for these kids and so when they come to our program actually our program began as elementary age serving only and over time kids went into middle school and they kept coming back but kept showing up in the parking lot of the searches and wanting something provided for them and so we started out in the middle school youth program they graduated their ninth grade and then they came back as high school students and they didn't want to say goodbye to product information so we started recently a high school leadership program for the tenth or twelfth graders and now we're seen the the fruit of those fifteen years of high school students who are probably the many times the first in their family to graduate high school and go to college often the main incentive is so they can return one day to be one of our college interns you have to have one year college and you're about forty can serve in that capacity and man what a remarkable thing it is for kids from the community now serving as mentors for the next generation in that neighborhood well gives them incentive also to go get that college education because then man you get him interested in learning and then they go to go to college something maybe before they even hit project transformation was not even in there okay military might be the first one of their family you know they went to college much was graduated from college so that's awesome we've talked over and over with organizations like volunteer center were Texas and others about the importance of volunteering in the community whether it's their church whether it's to the food bank whether it's food banks would talk to them as well about as well big getting involved somehow some way and not just the importance of it and what those that you're helping get from it whether it's the organization itself but the people in need whether you're helping at the food bank not just with the food bank is getting out of it or what those are coming to the food banks different areas to get the food now what they're getting by what the volunteer is getting and you have an interesting on the full peace paper of looking at here for the project transformation of those who graduated college more than eighty more than sixty percent of interns now work or volunteer in a ministry or service related field kind of talk about that stat because that stands out it does it so out of eight hundred more than a hundred fifty of these young adults and that's just one area of this you can call them volunteers who are giving so much of service hours to the communities in a big a big piece of the draw for them to be a part of this program is to have a hands on service experience mystery sprints working with these kids in these families in these neighborhoods but they're also coming to ask themselves a deeper question about why am I here one of my gonna use the few days that I have on this earth for in my life in one of the passions that I have with him I guess where my my interest in and then on the flip side one of the greatest challenges and needs I see in my community in the world around me and we often quota philosopher and theologian Frederick Bikaner who says your vocation or your call is that place where you're deep gladness intersects with the world's deep need we kind of with all that out there probably to the point where our interns kind of sick to hear about that quote but that we really challenging them with that anything C..

Richman fifteen years sixty percent one year one day
Dozens charged in Medicare fraud scheme

The California Report Magazine

01:25 min | 2 years ago

Dozens charged in Medicare fraud scheme

"The federal investigation called operation double helix targeted alleged schemes involving the payment of illegal kickbacks and bribes which cost the Medicare program more than two billion dollars in unnecessary charges Joe being Mr war with the department of justice the elderly or disabled are being preyed upon elderly are being asked at a call center would you want to know if you have cancer than the system can move very fast when you can reach out to hundreds and hundreds and thousands of patients very quickly what modern technology Shimon Richmond with the department of health and Human Services describes how it worked telemarketing companies trolled Medicare beneficiaries online or call them on the phone or even send people to approach them face to face two how fares to seniors centres to low income housing to religious institutions like churches and synagogues where they offered seniors genetic testing for cancer risk or how well certain drugs would work for them at no cost well they had to do was provide their Medicare information a copy of their driver's license Senate cheek swab to obtain their DNA and the sales pitch says Richman included lots of aggressive scare tactics essentially telling patients that if you don't have this test you could suffer from a variety of conditions are you could die you know and by the time you found out that you have something that needs to be treated it's

JOE Shimon Richmond Richman Medicare Department Of Health And Human Senate Two Billion Dollars
Watchdog: Comey violated FBI policies in handling of memos

Sean Hannity

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Watchdog: Comey violated FBI policies in handling of memos

"A justice department report finds that former FBI director James call me miss handled memos he wrote after a one on one conversations with president trump NBC correspondent Julie Ainsley says the DOJ's inspector general said call me violated official policy the inspector general finished its report found that DOT director co we should not have passed along information that they considered confidential they're not classified to a friend that be the law professor Daniel Richman who then leak that to the press call me is not expected to be

Director James Julie Ainsley DOJ Professor FBI President Trump NBC Official DOT Daniel Richman