17 Burst results for "Richard pod"

"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

"Richard pod is sponsored by T. Rowe price. Are you looking to learn a thing or two about getting your finances in order saving and investing? Check out the confident wallet a personal finance podcast series by T. Rowe price and the Washington Post brand studio find it wherever you get your podcasts. Hey history lovers. I'm Mike Rosen walled with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered nowadays, you can get almost anything ship to you clothing groceries. Toilet paper, if it fits in the box travel by airplane or truck or even by drone it can problem ship. But there's one thing that you can't have delivered anymore. That was a totally normal thing to send in the mail in the early nineteen hundreds and he guesses. That's right. Kids. No, you couldn't wrap them up in bubble wrap and seal them in a box but back in the days when travel was expensive and posters, which cheap. It was perfectly legal for parents to mail their children. The children were carried to walked along by the mailman to their relatives. They could also be sent by train the service cost a few Nichols for postage though. The optional insurance was much more. The stories of these children turned freight are collected at the national postal museum. Though records are scarce the museums archives identified the first child ever sent through the mail as a ten pound infant boy whose parents mailed him a mile away to grandma's house in nineteen thirteen. Just a year later, the postmaster general ban humans in the mail, but some parents skirted the law in one thousand nine fifteen a six year old was mailed for her mother's home in Florida. Tur- father's home in Virginia. That was the longest recorded trip of a child sent through the mail. She made it safely. The most famous trial to travel by mail was a little girl named may pierced off. She was eight years old and her seventy three mile journey to grandma's house. Became the subject of a bestselling children's book called mailing may in the book may tells the story with excitement and a little dread. She said the big Clack. Steam engine was hitching and snorting like a boar hog may had never been on a train before. And certainly she had never been a package. Luckily for her parents, she was two pounds under the fifty pound weight limit. They attach fifty three cents in postage stamps to her coat. This must have been a moment. She remembered forever the train whistled, and then it was off the postal service successfully delivered its package May's grandmother was there waiting. I'm Mike Rosen will thanks for listening special. Thanks to Steve Hendrix, who reported the story for the Washington Post and for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com slash. Retro pod.

Mike Rosen Washington Post Richard pod T. Rowe national postal museum Washington Steve Hendrix Nichols Virginia Florida eight years fifty pound two pounds ten pound six year
"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

"Richard pod is sponsored by T. Rowe price. Are you looking to learn a thing or two about getting your finances in order saving and investing? Check out the confident wallet a personal finance podcast series by T. Rowe price and the Washington Post brain studio find it wherever you get your podcasts. Hey history lovers. I'm Mike Rosen walled with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered when we think of wildfires California is usually the first place that comes to mind tonight that series of fires scorching, southern California. You can see smoke and fire is still on the move across Bel Air. But the deadliest wildfire in US history wasn't in California. It might surprise you to learn that it was in Wisconsin. And even though some two thousand five hundred people died the fire is barely remembered today. In fact, even while it was happening. It was barely in the news at all. It was Tober as eighteen seventy one. And pistol a lumber town of the dirt road from Green Bay. Wisconsin brushfires had been popping up throughout the mid west. The result of a summer drought. That stretched to the first days of fall stock. Oh, townsfolk could smell smoke wafting through the pews one Sunday church outside ash-free cooled down like snowflakes at first nobody was all that work that morning residents went to church prayed for God to spare them from the flames and went about their days. But then around seven pm the sound of a train rumbled in only it wasn't the train was the roar of a fire about to engulf the town. Reverend Peter Pearn the parish priests of fish dog oh witnessed the fire. He wrote that he led the townspeople people into the river hoping that treading water. They would escape the flames. It didn't work in many died in that river, others who were trapped killed themselves in their children before the fire could get to them the next morning when the fire was done the survivors wandered through town. Like zombies the fire wiped out nearly the entire town on its path of hearing survivors looked for where their homes once stood for missing friends and families the heat of the fire had turned sand into glass bodies were charred beyond recognition. A thousand people died in the town the flames eventually engulfed one point five million acres of land in Wisconsin. And Michigan as many as twenty five hundred people died in total. It was the worst fire in North American history. And you've never heard of it. How can a tragedy that large be forgotten? The answer is the push dog. Afire simply got overshadowed it ignited at almost the exact same time is the great Chicago fire which killed about three hundred people and destroyed thousands of buildings. It also didn't help the pitch Tago lost its only telegraph in the blaze, leaving the survivors with no way to notify the government or outside newspapers. So the horror of what happened in Chicago went totally unheard of for days while the Chicago fire dominated the news and went on to become legendary in the American consciousness. In the days after as word slowly spread of the catastrophe interest auto doctors arrive to help treat survivors some of them came with newspapers. There were no stories about what happened in their town, Chicago it was on the front page. I'm Mike Rosen walled. Thanks for listening for more forgotten stories from history. Go to Washington Post dot com slash retro pod.

Wisconsin Mike Rosen California Chicago Richard pod T. Rowe Washington Post US Green Bay Bel Air Washington Peter Pearn Tober Michigan five million acres
"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

"Richard pod is sponsored by T. Rowe price. Are you looking to learn a thing or two about getting your finances in order saving and investing? Check out the confident wallet a personal finance podcast series by T. Rowe price and the Washington Post brain studio find it wherever you get your podcasts. Hey history lovers. I'm Mike Rosen walled with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered everyone knows Alexander Graham, Bell invented the telephone. You know, who doesn't get a lot of credit his dog. And he should bells adorable. Terrier is part of the crazy story of how the telephone came to be today. I want to share the stories of two unlikely characters in the development of the telephone. The first is the dog go back to eighteen sixty three. Alexander Graham, Bell was twenty years old, his father and grandfather were prominent speech and language experts in England one day bells. Father encouraged him to make a machine that could mimic the sounds of speech bell solution. He turned to his dog bell. Brought out some treats as the terrier growled bell moved the dogs. John by doing that. He was able to make it sound like the dog was talking. He manipulated the growls into real sentences. How are you grandma was one of them? The incident. Cemented bells determination to follow in the footsteps of his father and grandfather bringing sound to life. It also awakened the crucial curiosity and creative instincts. He would need to bring the phone to fruition. The dog isn't the only unusual character in this story. Another is a cadaver while teaching at Boston University bell began working to improve device for the death device turned sound into wavy lines on paper, which the death cadet read bell wanted to approximate a human ear to test whether the sound waves could travel through the idea was to help the death. See the sound of words, he turned to an ear doctor friend for help who suggested that bell should just use a human ear for his experiment. One arrived in the mail a few days later bell set the Europe with the transcription contraption in began shouting into it it worked, but not well, not well enough to help the death in the way, he'd imagined. Then bell had another idea. Maybe the vibrations could travel along an electrical line like telegraph and be turned back into sound on the other end on March tenth eighteen seventy six in his Boston workshop bell setup receivers in separate rooms connected by a wire in powered by batteries, his assistant Thomas Watson helped it was late afternoon. They were both tired bell went to one room Watson to the other. And then it happened almost like magic bell spoke on his receiver Watson heard this Mr Watson come here. Bell was so excited. He spilled battery acid on himself that night he worked late with lots and taking turns talking seemingly through the air. They read books to each other Watson sang eventually bell signed off belting out God, save the Queen. The telephone was quickly transformed the world in so many ways bell seem to know it after that first phone call he sent a letter to his father. He wrote, quote, I have constructed a new apparatus operated by the human voice. And the day is coming when telegraph wires will be laid onto houses, just like water or gas and friends converse with each other without ever leaving home. I'm Mike Rosen will thanks for listening for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com slash retro pod.

Bell Mike Rosen Alexander Graham Richard pod Thomas Watson Washington Post T. Rowe Washington Boston Boston University John Europe England twenty years one day
"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

"Richard pod is sponsored by T. Rowe price. Are you looking to learn a thing or two about getting your finances in order saving and investing? Check out the confident wallet a personal finance podcast series by T. Rowe price and the Washington Post brand studio find it wherever you get your podcasts. Hey history lovers. I'm Mike Rosen walled with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered some of the most overlooked people in history are spies. They go to their graves with secrets with untold stories of daring adventures, sometimes we get lucky and a great tale emerges like the story of the limping lady her real name Virginia hall back during World War. Two hall was one of the most important spies for western allies. She worked with the French resistance and acted as a fixer finding safe houses surveilling targets in nineteen forty two. She found herself in a real pickle. She was in Leone, France, the Nazis were closing in on her. She knew she had to flee how she know. Because after years in the spy business, assisting escape, POW's and all manner of other covert ops stuff. She had that sense. She was being stalked. She was right. The legendary Gestapo chief nNcholas Barbie was on her tail. They called him the butcher of Leo. And the pursuit was on. The limping lady had to contend not just with the butcher, but her own physical handicap, she lost a leg after a hunting accident years earlier, she limped along through life on a crude wooden replacement. She nicknamed Cuthbert. As the Nazis closed in hall had only one way out through the French mountains into Spain. With just one good leg. She linked up with other resistance members. And with the help of a guy she carried a Ruxton in hyped up with the snow by dragging her prosthetic leg and using her good right leg as a snow plough at one point during the journey. She was able to send a message to her handlers back in London telling them that Cuthbert was giving her trouble a CIA dog Orphee recounted, maybe they didn't know or wooden legs name because this was the reply if Cuthbert is giving, you difficulty have him eliminated eventually hall made it to Spain. Although she was jailed for not having a passport with the right stamps. She was let go after twenty days. Hall was determined to return to France despite her most wanted status among the Nazis, the British refused, but the US office of strategic services the precursor to the agreed to send her back on its behalf to help the allies prepare for d day. After World War. Two hall continued to work for the Shia until her retirement at the age of sixty in nineteen sixty six she lived in mostly anonymous life after that never getting much credit for her work and brave escape, but in two thousand six the CIA hung and oil painting of hall. That depicts her inside a barn in southern France. In one thousand nine hundred forty four using a suitcase powered by an automobile generator and bike parts to transmit messages back to London. The limping lady always found a way. Mike rosenthal. Thanks for listening special. Thanks to Shapiro reported. This story for the Washington Post and for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com slash retro pot.

Virginia hall Cuthbert Washington Post Hall Mike Rosen Leone Orphee France CIA Spain T. Rowe Richard pod London Mike rosenthal assisting escape Gestapo Washington
"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

"Richard pod is sponsored by T. Rowe price. Are you looking to learn a thing or two about getting your finances in order saving and investing? Check out the confident wallet a personal finance podcast series by T. Rowe price and the Washington Post brand studio find it wherever you get your podcasts. Hey history lovers. I'm Mike Rosen walled with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered. This is a story of a marine the first female Marie her name offer may John it was close to the end of World War One when the Marine Corps decided to fill some of the gaps left behind by all the men fighting overseas. In one thousand nine hundred nine Johnson was one of three hundred women who showed up to take one of those jobs. Women weren't even allowed to vote at the time. Johnson was born in Kokomo, Indiana, and she was a rapid fire typist. She was working in the Interstate Commerce Commission when the marines issued that call for help Johnson was literally the first one in line. She took a job clerking at the Marine Corps headquarters in Arlington. Even though they were clerks the women have the train and drill. Just like other marines. You'll sergeants made their displeasure clear calling the women marinates. That's according to Linda l Hewitt's book women marines in World War One. The female marines were not amused by the nickname in a letter included in Hewitt's book, one of the female marines wrote, isn't it funny. The minute a girl becomes irregular fellow. Somebody always tries to quit by calling her something else. She added. Well, anybody that calls me anything, but marine is going to hear from me. The women were all in. But their time in the marines was brief after the end of World War One all of the military branches began disin- rolling the women who signed up. Johnson was let go in nineteen nineteen she stayed in the Washington area and was active in the first American Legion post dedicated to women for decades, she met with new veterans supporting women as their roles brew more prominent in the military. She live long enough to see women raising the colors at the marine barracks to see captain and lengths become the first female commissioned officer to see staff sergeant Barbara olive Barnwell become the first female marine to be awarded the navy and Marine Corps medal for heroism today, the marines make no distinction between men and women in the recruiting materials. They simply say becoming an enlisted marine requires the ability to meet the highest standards of moral mental and physical strength. When the Johnson who was very thirty seven years to the day when she made Marine Corps history by signing on that dotted line. I'm Mike Rosen Rosenwasser, thanks for listening special. Thanks to Petur divorce for reported the store for the Washington Post and for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com slash retro pod.

marines Marine Corps Johnson Washington Post navy and Marine Corps T. Rowe Linda l Hewitt Richard pod Mike Rosen Mike Rosen Rosenwasser Washington Interstate Commerce Commission Kokomo Indiana Marie Petur Barbara olive Barnwell American Legion
"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

"Richard pod is sponsored by T. Rowe price. Are you looking to learn a thing or two about getting your finances in order saving and investing? Check out the confident wallet a personal finance podcast series by T. Rowe price and the Washington Post brand studio find it wherever you get your podcasts. Hasty lovers. I'm Mike Rosen walled with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered. In two thousand seventeen a utility worker sunk of into the ground on a Philadelphia street. It was a pretty normal thing to do. It was replacing some old cast iron piping, then things got really weird along came a tree expert in Arborist rotting pass on her bicycle. Julie Snell was her name, she spotted something odd about some would the worker had unearthed, and she leveled her expert opinion what the water department which was quote that didn't look like a normal tree. It sure wasn't. The worker had unknowingly unearthed an incredible piece of Philadelphia's history a nineteenth century water system made almost entirely of wood. A timber base. Pipe network that for a few years made Philadelphia of Vitre in sanitation technology. The sanitation system came to be in late eighteen eleven Philadelphia was gearing up with the rest of the country to go to war with Britain for a second time. The city was a center of art and engineering and a working on Spruce Street began installing the water main of a new sanitation system crafted out of hollow tree trunks each section came. From a ten foot pine log. The system have been designed by Benjamin Latrobe the architect of the US capitol. Building the Phillies system used to steam engines to pump water from the Schuylkill river up to the center square waterworks, gravity then shot the water through a wooden pipe network at its height that pike network eventually grew to more than forty five miles in length. The system was a huge upgrade for Philadelphia and represented the spirit of American ingenuity. Sure, the water tasted slightly Woody, but it worked. Before the system was installed. Residents. Relied on household. Wells that often share the yard space with the family home. But now residents could either fill their buckets for free of the public standpipe or pay five dollars a year to connect directly to faucets in their yards or kitchens. This is also made it possible to regularly flush the streets of horse poop in rotting garbage experts thought that could help prevent infectious diseases such as yellow fever outbreak that devastated Philly in the seventeen ninety s. According to Philadelphia water department historian, Adam LeVine wouldn't pipe system was in use for two decades before the city replaced it with cast iron pipes in eighteen thirty one and is good. As it was Levin said people still complain about one thing when the system was built, quote, the old newspapers were full of complaints about the amount. It was costing. Might be centuries removed from using wooden water pipes some things never change. I'm Mike Rosenfeld. Thanks for listening special. Thanks to Steve Hendricks for reporting. The story for the Washington Post for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com slash retro pod.

Philadelphia Washington Post Richard pod Mike Rosen T. Rowe Mike Rosenfeld Julie Snell Phillies Washington Schuylkill river Benjamin Latrobe Steve Hendricks Adam LeVine US fever Wells Levin
"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

"Richard pod is sponsored by T. Rowe price. Are you looking to learn a thing or two about getting your finances in order saving and investing? Check out the confident wallet a personal finance podcast series by T. Rowe price and the Washington Post brand studio find it wherever you get your podcasts. Hey history lovers. I'm Mike Rosen walled with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered Madam speaker, the president of the United States. Last night. President Trump delivered the annual state of the union address to congress following along. Of course, we're the millions upon millions of TV viewers tweeter snap Chatters in YouTubers. The state of the union is obviously a big deal for political junkies and the politicians who camp out all day hoping to snag a handshake with the president as he walks in. It is a spectacle on par with the Super Bowl there's cheering and occasional boo. And even post game. I mean, post speech analysis. But like much of life before the advent of TV, which helped usher in a political landscape defined and controlled by images. The state of the union wasn't always this way. It was actually for rather simple process. The president gave a short speech to congress or many times just sent the letter. The tradition itself. Dates back to the earliest days of the presidency beginning as it should with George Washington. It was January eighth. Seventeen ninety Washington arrive by carriage at federal hall in New York, which served as the new nation's temporary capital. The constitution said he had to do this to provide the house and Senate with as it says information on the state of the union and to recommend to their consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient, but the constitution said nothing about how that information was to be delivered. Washington decided to do it in person hours before he arrived the Senate chamber where he would make his address was a scene of chaos as lawmakers scrambled to rearrange furniture to get the room ready for his speech when the time came Washington delivered in eleven hundred word address, there were no lines designed to generate big cheers. No references to honored guests Washington permitted himself, the occasional rhetorical flourish knowledge. He said is in every country the surest basis of public happiness, but for the most part Washington confined himself to a fairly dry to do list for a nation still in its infancy, a political commentator today might refer to the speech that's a real dud. Washington urged uniformity in currency weights and measures and ask that congress provide money to support the conduct of foreign relations. He congratulated the house on its endorsement of an adequate provision for the support of the public credit, which was a long winded way of talking about the country's debts. Not surprisingly Washington. A lifelong military man devoted a considerable portion of his speech to national defense to be prepared for war is one of the most effective means of preserving peace. He said the speech also foreshadowed another issue that continues to dominate American politics immigration, though, he spoke with more of a mouthful than politicians. Do these days various considerations? He said also render it expedient that the terms on which foreigners may be admitted to the rights of citizens should be speedily ascertained by a uniform rule of naturalization. Washington delivered seven more state of the union addresses, but it didn't become the tradition. John Adams who succeeded Washington delivered four during his term in office, but his successor Thomas Jefferson ended the practice in eighteen o one and submitted a written report to congress. Instead, the symbolism of the speech troubled, the genteel man for Monticello who feared monarchal aggrandizement in the years that followed presidents continued Jefferson's example and delivered their constitutionally required reports in writing more than a century later in one thousand nine hundred thirteen president Woodrow Wilson revived the address to congress for precisely the reasons Jefferson found objectionable Wilson's address wasn't a tension grabbing move it created a bully pulpit. For the presidency. And laid the foundation for the spectacle. We know today. I'm Mike Rosen walled. Thanks for listening. This episode was adapted from a story written by Robert Mitchell for the Washington Post for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com slash retro pot.

Washington president Washington Post congress Mike Rosen George Washington President Trump Richard pod T. Rowe United States Thomas Jefferson federal hall Senate Robert Mitchell New York Woodrow Wilson
"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

"Richard pod is sponsored by T. Rowe price. Are you looking to learn a thing or two about getting your finances in order saving and investing? Check out the confident wallet a personal finance podcast series by T. Rowe price and the Washington Post brand studio find it wherever you get your podcasts. Hey history lovers. I'm Mike Rosen walled with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered. On september. Twenty sixth nineteen Eighty-three Lieutenant Colonel Stanislav Petrov of the Soviet Union's air defense. Forces was sitting in the commanders chair on overnight duty in the secret plonker southwest of Moscow. His job was to monitor his country's early warning satellites over the United States just after midnight, the sirens began blaring they were alerting him that the US had just launched a nuclear missile attack against the Soviet Union. The second missile was launched then another then two more a red button on the panel in front of him flash. The word start on his computer screen was the word launch in red bold letters. He had only minutes it's not seconds to act his decision that day undoubtedly changed the world. Stanislav Petrov died in two thousand seventeen in relative obscurity, he had been living on the small pension in a town outside Moscow. His funeral was attended by only a handful of family members. The story of what he did that day in one thousand nine hundred three wasn't even known publicly until the late nineteen ninety s. Military protocol instructed him to tell these commanders that five intercontinental ballistic missiles had been launched against them by the United States. So that the Soviet government could plan a counterattack in two thousand fourteen documentary called the man who saved the world Petrov remembered that seconds felt like minutes and minutes stretched return. But he knew something didn't feel right about those warnings. Why would a country only launch five missiles if they were starting a war? Why didn't ground-based radar installations which detected missiles show any evidence? I'm gonna Tak. In the documentary. He said I refuse to be guilty of starting World War three. So in those critical few seconds Petrov picked up an intercom in one hand and a phone in the other and told his commanders that the computer warnings were false. It was a guest. He said if he was wrong his mistake would be catastrophic and deadly the military would have no time to respond in the face of a nuclear attack. But if he was right he'd averted a nuclear holocaust in the middle of the Cold War. Luckily, he was right in one thousand nine hundred nine interview with a post Petrov remembered that Soviet officials didn't exactly praise him as a hero. They interrogated him heavily asking things like why he didn't write down every detail of that night. He was ultimately not punished or rewarded, but the government deemed the incident classified and he stayed silent about what had happened. Years after the collapse of the Soviet Union. Details finally emerged and Petrov received some recognition like the world citizen award from a San Francisco based peace organization, the western press hailed him as a hero. But Petrov said repeatedly that he didn't consider himself to hero. He understood the full weight and potential consequences of the decision. He'd made. I had a funny feeling in my gut Petrov said I didn't want to make a mistake. I made a decision in that was it. A Mike Rosen walled. Thanks for listening. This episode was adapted from a story written by Christine Phillips for the Washington Post and for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com slash retro pod.

Colonel Stanislav Petrov Soviet Union Washington Post Mike Rosen Soviet government United States Richard pod Moscow T. Rowe Washington Christine Phillips San Francisco one hand
"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

"Richard pod is sponsored by T. Rowe price. Are you looking to learn a thing or two about getting your finances in order saving and investing? Check out the confident wallet a personal finance podcast series by T. Rowe price and the Washington Post brain studio find it wherever you get your podcasts. History lovers. I'm Mike Rosen walled with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered on February nineteenth eighteen sixty seven in American gunboat returned to Washington's navy yard after months long trip to the Middle East among the sailors on board outstep, a filthy young men in shackles his name was John Harrison Surat he was the most wanted man in the entire world two years. Earlier Surat had been a confederate spy in a desperate bid to reverse the tide of the civil war Surat conspired with a fellow named John Wilkes booth to kidney. President ABRAHAM LINCOLN the plot failed of course, instead on April fourteenth eighteen sixty five booth slipped into Ford's theater and shot Lincoln in the head newspapers across the country featured photos of booth and Surat under the headline assassins. Booth as you might recall from history. Class was hunted down and killed in a burning barn in Virginia. Eight of his alleged co conspirators, including Surat's mother Mary were arrested quickly tried by a military commission in found guilty. But Surat he was nowhere to be found both physically and later in the pages of history his remarkable tale in the aftermath of Lincoln's assassination is a footnote overshadowed by boosts infamous act. Surat was born in eighteen forty four and raised in the small Maryland town in Prince George's county that bore his family's name Surat. Ville though, it is now known as Clinton his father was the postmaster and also owned the local tavern where hours after Lincoln's assassination booth stopped for weapons and supplies. The Surat's were devoutly Catholic slave owners. According to one of Surat's old pals, his older brother fought for the confederate army in Texas, his sister.

Surat President ABRAHAM LINCOLN T. Rowe Richard pod confederate army Mike Rosen Washington Post John Wilkes Middle East Washington Ville Ford Virginia Clinton Maryland Mary Texas Prince George
"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

"Richard pod is sponsored by T. Rowe price. Are you looking to learn a thing or two about getting your finances in order saving and investing? Check out the confident wallet a personal finance podcast series by T. Rowe price and the Washington Post brand studio find it wherever you get your podcasts. Hey history lovers. I'm Mike Rosen walled with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered. If you're like most Americans you probably visit grocery store once or twice a week. But you probably don't know that one single rosary item is responsible for the rise of supermarkets as we know it's baking powder baking powder. Really? Back in the eighteen hundreds in New York. The proprietors of the great Atlantic and Pacific tea company faced a problem. T- an industry they had controlled for decades had become widely available prices fell and it appeared great Atlantic and Pacific would to the Hartford family the owners of the company decided to diversify. They added a new product baking cutter. Housewives loved the stuff it made bread rise faster taking powder became so popular that unscrupulous producers in rushing the product the stores ward, exactly delivering the real deal. But folks couldn't tell which products were fake in which were real. So the Hartford's decided to set themselves apart by making their own high quality baking powder, the even hired a chemist, and then they pack into the powder and read tins labeling it a and p leveraging the Atlantic and Pacific company name to quality. Historians would later call baking powder, the most important product in the history of retailing most merchants back then were just essentially selling generic products by selling branded baking powder, the Hartford transitioning from being tea merchants to being grocers in selling their powder and a tin. The Hartford's were ahead in another important way. Packaging later on. They would seize on a new invention called cardboard. The company could now brand make and sell its own condensed milk butter. Spices just about any staple of the kitchen. The Team New factor was now the country's first full-fledged supermarket. There was difficult. Transformative work ahead, though, the company needed to end an entire culture of shopping built around the neighborhood store before shoppers purchase their groceries from a number of different places meat from butcher bread from Baker. And so on. The stores were typically small not opens set hours and you pay by credit getting a Bill once a month. AMP had to change all that. The company built big stores stocking as many products as possible many made in their own warehouses products were stored on shelves, not behind the counter for employees to distribute. No credit cash only manufacturers like the month selling products directly to the company not for wholesalers. This kept product costs down for an team which pass those savings onto shoppers. The company became obsessed with prices doing whatever they could to pass on those savings. It was all about volume affordability and selling more for that. And it set the stage for modern day grocery stores. We frequent today. I'm Mike Roosevelt. Thanks for listening for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com slash retro pie.

Hartford T. Rowe Washington Post Pacific company Mike Rosen Richard pod New York Mike Roosevelt Washington milk
"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

"Richard pod is sponsored by T. Rowe price. Are you looking to learn a thing or two about getting your finances in order saving and investing? Check out the confident wallet a personal finance podcast series by T. Rowe price and the Washington Post brand studio find it wherever you get your podcasts. Hey history lovers. I'm Mike Rosen walled with retro pod. The show about the past rediscovered. Okay. So it's winter. A big snowstorm is headed your way. You think hey time to research snowblowers off to Google you go you spend the next hour reading everything you possibly can about various models, then your eyes get tired, you go do something else. You forget about the snow blower, but the internet it does not forget the next time. You open your browser. There's an ad for a snowblower on Facebook on. Yahoo news. Another snowblower add. Yes. PM dot com. Snowblowers you cannot escape snowblowers. They haunt your every click. This is advertising on digital steroids targeted ads the industry calls them, but he's not a new idea. Nope. A man named Lester wonderman thought of this in nineteen. Eighteen fifties. He was the king of direct mail. Not Email snail mail. Wonderman was a self taught self made success story. A son of Jewish immigrants wonderment was born in the Bronx New York in one thousand nine hundred twenty his father who was from Austria worked in the fir-trees after his father died on the cusp of the great depression. Wonderman finished high school at sixteen left college to support his family and ultimately worked his way from factory job to the highest ranks of Madison Avenue in nineteen fifty eight with his older, brother Irving wonderman co founded in advertising firm with little to no training in the field back then advertising was dominated by billboards and cute jingles on TV and radio wonderman had a different. And ultimately better idea, though, he thought businesses should collect detailed information on their audiences and target their advertising campaigns specific. To them. He did this by mailing advertisements directly to specific customers. And in magazine inserts targeted to specific neighborhoods were demographics working with the flower company. That was among his early clients he insisted that they carefully keep track of who ordered roses and who ordered tulips made large purchases and who made small ones who ordered only occasionally such as on mother's day or Valentine's Day and who ordered more regularly. It was no longer. Hey you. He wants told USA today. It was hey, you Mr. so-and-so that's a big difference. Wonderment was ultimately inside the heads of millions of consumers, and they didn't even know it. Wonderman had helped though from computers in early database programs in a speech. He wants marveled at their power. It can know and select such personal details as who prefers strong coffee imported beans new fashions and bright colors who just bought a home a freezer camera automobile who had a new baby is overweight got married. Owns a pet likes romantic novels. Serious reading listens to Bach or the Beatles. In addition to direct mail campaigns wonderman use the telephone targeting insomniacs with toll free one eight hundred phone numbers that he advertised on television inviting potential buyers to speak right then in there with one of the operators standing by. While this kind of targeting seems a little creepy online. Wonderment didn't think his ads were all that invasive? He told USA today by sending mail that know something about their needs wants in lifestyle. You're doing them a service wonderman clients over the years included CBS, Geico Ford l L Bean American Express and Microsoft when he retired in the late nineteen ninety s his firm, then called wonderman Kato Johnson had sixty nine offices in thirty nine countries. In nearly two billion dollars annual billings. Wonderment died last week at the age of ninety eight he is survived by a large family and that snowblower ad that is still following. A Mike Rosen walled. Thanks for listening. This episode was adapted from a story written by Emily Langer for the Washington Post for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com slash retro pod.

Lester wonderman Mike Rosen Washington Post Richard pod Bach USA T. Rowe Facebook Google Irving wonderman co Washington Yahoo Kato Johnson Emily Langer New York Microsoft
"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

"Richard pod is sponsored by T. Rowe price. Are you looking to learn a thing or two about getting your finances in order saving and investing? Check out the confident wallet a personal finance podcast series by T. Rowe price and the Washington Post brain studio find it wherever you get your podcasts. Hey history lovers. A Mike Rosen walled with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered. Can you guess what company produces more tires in a year? Then goodyear. Here's a clue those tires. Well, you'll never see them in traffic. Got it. Here's another. It's the Torius for causing pain to souls of bare feet all over the world still guessing it's Lega a company that started as a tiny manufacturer of wooden toys that built itself into an empire of plastic blocks that have provided kids with millions of hours of fun. Why is it that adults are always the ones to step up? Anyway, the story of Legos starts in the nineteen thirty in Denmark with a master carpenter named ole Kirk Christiansen with the great depression in full swing christianson desperately needed a way to earn money. So he used his skill with would to start a company that made all sorts of things step ladders, ironing boards, and an entirely new line of wooden toys yoyos trucks. Duck on wheels christianson called his company. Lego a portmanteau of the Danish words for play. And well, according to David c Robinson, author of a history of the LEGO company christianson ran the business all on his own while raising four sons LEGO survived the great depression it survived the German invasion of Denmark in even. Survived a fire that destroyed its factory, including all of the blueprints for new toys. In the nineteen forties. Lego began producing what it called automatic binding bricks. Not from wood. But plastic they weren't a completely new idea. British inventor already developed the stackable plastic cubes was studs on top. But Christian modified, the concept by sharpening, the edges and in the nineteen fifties gave them the formal name LEGO bricks. The bricks were a hard sell. They weren't sturdy. They didn't stick together. The hollow plastic cubes just did not sell then in nineteen fifty eight Licko got a patent for an idea the company had been working on for years. A new study and to design that let the bricks snap together without coming apart christianson died the same year weaving his son to take over the company. So he never had the chance to see what happened next eight total revolution. In children's toys after watching children play with the bricks LEGO executives realized their future success was not about the brick itself. But about the world it could help create an so LEGO began expanding its offerings with the brick as the cornerstone in the nineteen sixties. The company's brick Smith invented a LEGO wheel around brick with a rubber tire in the nineteen seventies. They were miniature figures to populate. The LEGO towns, then castles with nights kings, and queens, astronauts came soon after by this time toymakers around the world, we're trying to replicate Legos success when the last of Legos patents for its bricks expired in the late nineteen eighties. The company tried to fight back against imposters in failed that it hardly mattered. Lego experienced double digit growth in sales with control of over eighty percent of the toy construction. And then in the nineteen ninety s LEGO found another way to solidify its place in the imaginations of kids and their parents. Lucasfilm was about to release its first prequel to the original Star Wars movie executives there wanted to license. A set of Star Wars toys to come out at the same time at first LEGO executives were wary they valued their companies independence and worried about aligning themselves with a franchise that contain votes. But the company surveyed parents, and they didn't mind the partnership. So the result was the Phantom Menace. Lego line. Then someone else came along. Harry potter. The company's path hasn't always been upwards though, in the early two thousands after expanding rapidly into other businesses LEGO sales sink, and they were forced to shut down several theme. Parks in kill off poor performing product lines. Lego went back to basics those lovable stackable bricks just recently, they released a new set called apocalypse Berg. It has three thousand pieces. Watch your step. I'm Mike Rosenfeld. Thanks for listening. This episode was adapted from a story written by Shapiro for the Washington Post for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com slash retro pot. The Washington Post has a new daily podcast post reports hosted by me Martine powers every weekday afternoon. We're bringing you stories about the state of the country the world, and how we come to know the things we know get it now at Washington Post dot com slash post reports.

Lego christianson Washington Post Denmark Mike Rosen Washington T. Rowe Richard pod Mike Rosenfeld brick Smith Lega goodyear Lucasfilm Licko Star Wars Kirk Christiansen Shapiro
"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

"Richard pod is sponsored by T. Rowe price. Are you looking to learn a thing or two about getting your finances in order saving and investing? Check out the confident wallet a personal finance podcast series by T. Rowe price and the Washington Post brand studio find it wherever you get your podcasts. History lovers. I'm Mike Rosen walled with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered does appear. Now, it's a little colder. We could get some so starting Saturday evening, and maybe an part of Sunday. We'll keep you updated on that. It is winter in United States. And so that might make it seem like an odd time to talk about beaches and sunbathing and well topless sunbathing. But historical moments. Have a funny way of popping up at the oddest times. The reason the beach and topless sunbathing came to our attention recently is because of a lawsuit in ocean city, Maryland where women are suing for the right to go topless last month. A federal judge ruled it is a okay for the city to ban women from sunbathing topless. And it turns out that the city is using the same arguments that men faced when they wanted to swim shirtless in the nineteen twenties and thirties. Back then arrest for toplessness at public beaches generated headlines about the nearly naked outlaws government officials denounced the public display of nipples. No shirtless. Bather will be allowed tomorrow, the high standard and fine appearance of long island's newly created ocean. Beach park said the resolute local police chief after the trial of three men arrested for swimming topless. That's right men. It doesn't seem like a big deal today, but nineteen thirties. America lived in fear of the male nipple. It was illegal in most states in cities for men to go anywhere shirtless. Even the beach men were expected to wear full swimsuits always tank tops to hide the nipples. Most of them made of wool, the fancier models. Even had attached swim skirts to add a little more mystery to what was going on south of the Belton skirts that were a requirement in many swimming pools. Men did not like this. So what did they do? They fought for the right to go topless. And what did government officials say well, the same things they are saying now in ocean city that it's not family friendly, and that families the same families that passed sexually explicit t shirts being peddled on the boardwalk are not ready for so much skin. Men rebelled showing up at pools and beaches and trunks, then pulling off their shirts or rolling down there tank tops, many were arrested of the New York City police department the Associated Press said this it arrests them onsite fines of one dollar or the penalty. The city fathers, insist on complete bathing suits, tops and trunks for one piece suits combining both. One of the opposition groups to these men were women, it seems they were not thrilled with the Harry and oddest shape chess. Spokeswoman for a group of women demanding men wear shirts told the Associated Press we won't stop until every hairy chested, man. Hovers up on the beach for removes the curls from his chest. The summer of nineteen thirty six became the summer of the men's no-shirt movement arrest and protests were an epidemic, but things quickly changed the following year after landing shitty mayor CB white a man who wants called male shirtless bathing. Not nice went on vacation to Florida and returned as a convert a judge in New York overturned the ban the same year in boom, male nipples. We're free. I'm Mike Rosen wall. Thanks for listening. This episode was adapted from a story written by the Tula divorced for the Washington Post for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com slash retro pot. The Washington Post has a new daily podcast post reports hosted by me Martine powers every weekday afternoon. We're bringing you stories about the state of the country the world, and how we come to know the things we know get it now at Washington Post dot com slash post reports.

Washington Post ocean city Mike Rosen Associated Press New York America T. Rowe Richard pod Washington United States Beach park long island Maryland Bather Belton Martine
"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

"Richard pod is sponsored by T. Rowe price. Are you looking to learn a thing or two about getting your finances in order saving and investing? Check out the confident wallet a personal finance podcast series by T. Rowe price and the Washington Post brand studio find it wherever you get your podcasts. Hey history lovers. I'm Mike Rosen walled with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered. With the holiday season upon us taking a little break. So for the next few days were reclaimed some of our favorite episodes from two thousand eighteen will be back after the new year with more fascinating and fun discoveries from the past happy holidays now on with the show. Today's episode is a special one. That's because we are recording this at the national book festival in Washington DC where I just hosted a trivia our for kids. The winner got a very cool price. She gets to be the co host of this episode. So let me introduce you to our winter. I am Mattie, Mattie. What grade are you in? I'm in third grade. And let's give a shout out to your school. What school? Do you give I go to O'neil lamentably? Okay. Since we're at the national book festival. One of the biggest celebrations of books in the world. And I have Mattie with me. I thought it would be cool. If we look back at the book librarians and teachers regularly ranked as the best children's book ever. So what is it? Charlotte's web. That's right. Charlotte's web by e b white published way before Matty's time in one thousand nine hundred fifty two I loved this book growing up the funny and inspiring and sad story of Charlotte. The spider and her friendship with a lonely pig named Wilbur. I think about Charlotte a lot it's hard not to if you've read the book, but I've always wondered how white came up with her character. That's what will explore today. So I'm going to let Mattie tell you a little bit about e b white. In the nineteen twenties e b white was a famous right for the New Yorker magazine. His nickname was Andy he wrote beautiful essays about life and current events that are still read and admired today. He lived in New York with his wife, Catherine. She also worked for the New Yorker. But New York wasn't for him. That's why was a loner. He was so shy that when visitors came to the New Yorker offices. He would actually hide on the fire escape. Wow. So in the nineteen thirties to get away from it all the whites move to a salt water farm in Maine. Andy loved the rural life, he especially loved being surrounded by so many creatures that weren't people one of his most famous essays, titled the death of a pig is about taking care of an ailing pig and how crushing it was. He also. Really, really liked spiders, Maddie. Do you like spiders now? Well, Andy was fascinated by them. He wants even wrote a poem about them for his wife, romantic not so much. Anyway, according to a writer named Michael Simms who wrote a book called the story of Charlotte's web. Andy got the idea for writing a children's book starring a spider one day when he was working in his barn. He saw Brown spider in the pardon. The spreader was very busy spinning a web every day. And he would check the progress of the web he was very interested by how hard the spider worked. He even Kyle ladder to take a customer, look, and he saw she was making an ex hack for her little babies spiders, but the next day when he came back the spider was gone. If you use your imagination, you can probably guess what happened. But the. Egg sac was still there. And he wanted the spider babies to have a chance at life. That problem was that he had to go to New York City for work. So you will never believe this. But he gently remove the sack brought it with him in a candy box. Wow. Sims wrote that the tiny spatters then came to life in the apartment, and the crazy thing is they started to string webs on his things on his hairbrush near now clippers and the Andy loves spiders, he didn't know enough about them to make their lives really believable in a book. So he did what Mattie will no doubt do when she has a science project or book report in school. What's that research? Andy brought lots spider books. He talked to spider experts. He researched spiders for more than a year before he began writing the buck. You hear that children at only elementary school do your research. And that's the story. How one of the most unforgettable characters in literature came to be. So why don't we in this way with Mattie reading a tiny bit about dear old Charlotte from the book? The scene where she and Wilbur meet silly Wilbur can hear her, but he has trouble spotting her. She was about the size of gumdrops. She had eight legs, and she was waving one of them at Wilbur in a friendly greeting seeming now she asked oh, yes, indeed said Wilbur, yes, indeed. How are you? Good morning, salutations, very pleased to meet you. What is your name? Please. May I have your name? My name said the spider a Charlotte. I'm Mike Rosenfeld, and I'm Madeline daily for for listening and for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com slash retro pod.

Andy Mattie Charlotte Washington Mike Rosen New Yorker magazine Sims Richard pod Washington Post Mike Rosenfeld T. Rowe New York City Maine Wilbur New York Maddie clippers
"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

"Richard pod is sponsored by T. Rowe price. Are you looking to learn a thing or two about getting your finances in order saving and investing? Check out the confident wallet a personal finance podcast series by T. Rowe price and the Washington Post brand studio find it wherever you get your podcasts. Hey history lovers. I'm Mike Rosen walled with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered. With the holiday season upon us. We're taking a little break. So for the next few days. We're replaying some of our favorite episodes from two thousand eighteen we'll be back after the new year with more fascinating and fun discoveries from the past. Happy holidays now on with the show. A century ago. Not long after the United States entered World War One the Salvation Army deployed hundreds of volunteers to France to soothe in bolster American troops. The men were homesick they were hungry and wanted a slice of apple pie. But that of course was impossible. The many indignities of war include this undeniable a foxhole is a terrible place to bake. So the Salvation Army volunteers in Provence. And they came up with a treat that has become integral to the American junk food diet the Donut. In the theater of war. There are no bakeries. There are definitely not any deep Fryers the volunteers fried up dough and soldiers helmets, and they added the most important ingredient a dusting of powdered sugar result is delicious. Those volunteers mostly women came to be known as Donut lasts and their doughnuts. Were so popular that when the war was over and the troops finally came home. The government produced a guide to help veterans open shops. These days Americans devour nudes. Maybe billions of donuts year. The even have their own holiday national Donut day. You might think of national Donut day as a time to get free donuts. I certainly did before learning all these history, but it actually started as a way to remember the sacrifices of World War, One veterans in the Salvation Army volunteers who comforted them. The reason donuts are so popular today isn't just because of the role in winning the war. It's also because of the great depression when the economic downturn hit the doughnut industry worried, they might be in trouble. So they made a strategic decision the industry aligned itself with Hollywood and the glamour of movie stars. Frank Capra put doughnuts in his movies. There's a scene in the film it happened one night where Clark Gable teaches doughnut etiquette Shirley temple appeared in a short film called Dora's dunking donuts. And you know, what it worked doughnuts survive the great depression. Their nutritional value may be questionable. But they're patriotic value is as certain as the round hole at their center. When you eat a Donut, you're eating a piece of American history. The history of American soldiers fighting for what's right? You buy. What would become the country's favourite pastry? I'm Mike Rosen. Well, thanks for listening special. Thanks to food historian. John F and his book doughnuts. An American passion and for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com slash retro pie.

Salvation Army Mike Rosen Washington Post T. Rowe Richard pod apple Frank Capra Washington Provence United States Clark Gable France John F Hollywood Shirley temple
"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

"Richard pod is sponsored by T. Rowe price. Are you looking to learn a thing or two about getting your finances in order saving and investing? Check out the confident wallet a personal finance podcast series by T. Rowe price and the Washington Post brand studio find it wherever you get your podcasts. History lovers. I'm Mike Rosen walled with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered. One December day in one thousand nine hundred fifty five Colonel Harry shop a highly decorated air force commander was sitting at his desk in Colorado when the phone rang this was not just any old phone call either which shout quickly realized how because Schaub had two phones on his desk. One black one red the red one was ringing. At the height of the Cold War. If you are Colonel shelf a commander in the early interruption of NORAD, America's defensive warning shield against the tax. You don't want the red phone to rig? It was wired directly to a four star general at the Pentagon. And when it rang things got real very real except this time. Carl shout the barked into the phone, but there was silence on the other end in intil. Finally, a small voice said is this clause. Shop by all accounts was briefly confused, and then fully annoyed is this a joke. He said wearing around at the wide eyed staff or any sign of a smile, he let the caller habit. What did you think you're doing that cetera, etc? He began. But then the techno military might of the United States was brought up short by the sound of sniffles. Whoever was on the phone was crying and shop suddenly realized it really was a child who really was trying to reach Santa Claus. The Colonel paused considered and then responded, ho ho ho he said as his crew looked on honest. Of course, this is Santa Claus. He talked to the youngster for several minutes hearing his wishes for toys and treats and assuring him. He would be there on Christmas. Then the boy asked Santa to bring him something. Nice for his, mommy. I will I will Santa shop said in fact, co speak to your mommy now, the boy put his mother on the phone and shout went back to business crisply explaining to the woman just what facility there call had reached. But she also had an explanation. The woman asked shop to look at that day's local newspaper specifically at a seers at emblazoned with a big picture of Santa that invited kids to call me on my private phone, and I will talk to you personally anytime day or night, the number provided M E two dash six six eight one went right to one of the most secure phones in the country. It was a type of one digit was wrong. When Xiaopeng up the phone rang. Again, he ordered his staff to answer each Santa call while he got on the phone the black one this time with AT and T to set up a new link to Washington. That might have been the end of it. But a few nights later shell as was his tradition. Took his family to have Christmas Eve dinner with his on-duty troops when they walked into the control center, he spotted acute drawing on a board showing a sleigh pulled by eight unregistered. Reindeer coming over the top of the world the exchange that followed became stuff of both family and air force legend. What's that the commanding officer asked just having a little fun Colonel? They answered waiting for the blow up shop pondered the offense as the team waited. Then he ordered someone to get the community relations officer and soon shop was on the phone to a local radio station. Conrad as the early iteration of Noor was called seeing to have picked up on an unidentified. Guide but the stink flea sleigh. Shaped object the radio station, aided up and an enduring tradition was born this Christmas Eve will Mark the sixty third straight year that NORAD will publicly track Santa's sleigh on its global grounds. Millions of kids around the world can watch online or even asked. They're smart speaker about Santa's whereabouts as for shop. He went on to even higher ranks in the air force retiring as a wing commander, he died in two thousand nine at age ninety one he was buried with a flyover f sixteen fighters under a gravestone that notes his service in World War, Two Korea in Vietnam. The last line reads Santa Colonel. I'm Mike Rosenfeld. Thanks for listening. This episode was adapted from a story written by Steve Hendrix for the Washington Post in for more forgotten stories from history. Visit Washington Post dot com slash retro pod.

Santa shop Santa Washington Post commander Mike Rosen NORAD Colonel Harry Washington Richard pod Carl T. Rowe Mike Rosenfeld AT United States Colorado
"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

Retropod

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"richard pod" Discussed on Retropod

"Richard pod is sponsored by T. Rowe price. Are you looking to learn a thing or two about getting your finances in order saving and investing? Check out the confident wallet a personal finance podcast series by T. Rowe price and the Washington Post brand studio find it wherever you get your podcasts. Hey history lovers. I'm Mike Rosen walled with retro pod. A show about the past rediscovered. In one thousand nine hundred fourteen on a frosty starlit night on the western front during World War One battlefield miracle. Took place. They're in the quiet darkness of no man's land. The melodies of Christmas and peace row seemingly from nowhere. I own holy night. Then God save the king. Some British soldiers peered over their trenches for what must have been the first time in weeks. They saw Christmas trees lit with candles on the parapets of the enemy's trenches. Then a shout. You know, shoot, we know shoot. And so for a brief moment in a tragic war the soldiers sent to fight each other decided themselves that they would become friends. It's since been remembered as the Christmas truce. World war. One started that summer and soldiers and civilians throughout Europe believed the war would be over by Christmas. Instead that December twenty fifth of nineteen fourteen would be the first of four Christmases observed during the war. The fighting across muddy barbed-wire lined trenches was brutal. As was the mental anguish for those who witnessed it. The war's legacy left. A staggering death toll with more than twenty five million killed. According to time magazine, Pope Benedict. The fifteenth tried to organize an official truce for the holidays. You thought that a break in the fighting would allow European countries to negotiate a peace? But no one was interested in his plan. No one that is except the soldiers themselves who no longer glorified. The war the way they once did. It all started when German soldiers placed Christmas trees from the German emperor outside their trenches in the days before the holiday they sing Christmas songs silent. Knight. Then allied forces responded with their own Christmas carols by Christmas Eve, some British officers adopted a policy called live and let live meaning don't fire unless you're fired upon. Then on Christmas day German soldiers climbed out of their trenches. They waved their arms. So the British would see that they weren't carrying weapons then the British emerged. Knicks changed gifts they talked about their families. They raced each other. They sing imagine that. Not everyone liked the idea of the Christmas. Truce in many cases, the soldiers on both sides were defying their superiors and truces were less common in French controlled areas since the French and the Germans were not on good terms still letters from those who had witnessed the truce made their way back to families in Britain, many of these missives can be found, but the national World War One museum and memorial. A man only identified as private funding of the rifle. Brigade told his parents that the platoon and German soldiers play the game of football or soccer terms. He said a number of our fellows have got addresses for the Germans and are going to try and meet one another after the war. In another letter published in British newspapers one soldier wrote. Really? You could hardly have thought that we were at war here. We were enemy talking to enemy. They like ourselves with mothers with sweethearts with wives waiting to welcome us home again. And to think within a few hours we shall be firing at each other again. These hopeful letters probably wouldn't have reached the recipients until New Year's day. Meaning by the time family members and loved ones read about the Christmas truce the participants would be shooting at each other again. I'm Mike Rosen walled. Thanks for listening. This story was adapted from an article by Washington Post writers, Gillian brook hill and Michael ruin and for more forgotten stories from history. Go to Washington Post dot com slash retro pod.

Mike Rosen World War One museum and memor Washington Post Richard pod T. Rowe Washington time magazine Europe Knicks Pope Benedict official Britain Michael Brigade