17 Burst results for "Richard Stratton"

"richard stratton" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"richard stratton" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Everybody. Here we are. Zoom cast in, like a bunch zoom casting our asses off. Let's just be honest about it, uh, weren't a week. I don't know. 30 something maybe into months, 67 I don't know. More. Does it matter anymore? Paulie Mac Creative. Tony Creative, Shannon Kale, or the Three of us can't be stops. They've tried to stop, but it's not. It's not gonna happen. We roll right, Aurea, how you guys doing, boys? Paul. You reminded me when you said here we are. You remind me of the theme song from Silver spoons. Here we are face to face a couple of silver spoons. You know what I mean? Come on. What is that? I believe you've talked about the mom on that show before you, Erin Gray. Just take hold. And then Ricky Stroeder had the race car bed, man. Come on. It was your rotor. Dude, We're Schroeder today. What Schroeder up to? I don't know. Richard. Richard Stratton. The third. Sorry, Shannon. Go. No, I just want to know where are you? Staying? Shredder is in like the teenage Mutant Ninja turtles. Bad guy shredder, Schroeder. Rotor where you date yourself. Shannon Schroeder regain throwing Do some home, produce a moment for the weekend and watch a little silver spoons and have a little respect for Ricky Schroder. No disrespect all Ricky Schroder bad fall for us as they call them on the show, the Ricker Did they? Christ grows A well. Here we are. It's July 15th. It's the Wednesday on We're gathering here today to break down a few things we got topical. It's funny, you guys here we are now we're actually After months of the self quarantining and sheltering in place, and We're now days away from a competitive baseball game. Tony, who's up first on the giant stock it you've got a schedule? I believe we have some exhibition contests between the Oakland Athletics home in away Monday and Tuesday, and then the Giants travel down to Dodger Stadium for the greatest rivalry west of the Mississippi. Where Johnny Cueto will be taking the hell he's confirmed is the starter. Of course. I mean, yes, he is. And I'm eyes. What a what A wacky time emotionally is unexcited. I'm pissed. I'm excited. We shouldn't be playing ball. I'm excited, and I'm scared like All of it. You know, because I love baseball. Excited. Sea bass. Welcome back. But what are we doing again? Buster Posey, What are we doing? So on that note, Tony is one of forward tease a little bit. It's part of the radio industry, The mechanics of forward teasing. I just want to let the listeners know if he just stumbled onto this that we're actually gonna hear from Brandon Crawford. In a few minutes who was a guest on the murder from Max Show today? He gave us a good 15 20 minutes. You guys. We talked about that Tony like he's working out in the mask. You know, it's a It's a whole new world, so we'll get his thoughts on everything going on. But you have a you, Shannon as a fan. Are you excited or you skeptical? Do you think this Things will go off without a hitch Will. Where are you with all this? Well, I'm a little skeptical about Brandon Crawford. Did he say that he will or will not actually hit for a good average this year. Well, wouldn't I told him that his bat was so hot? I'm going to take my clothes off. No, that's right. Good if you get it. Is branding is branding. I got to say quietly. That.

Shannon Schroeder Tony Creative Brandon Crawford Shannon Giants Ricky Schroder Johnny Cueto baseball Shannon Kale Ricky Stroeder Richard Stratton Erin Gray Aurea Buster Posey Dodger Stadium Oakland Athletics Paul Mississippi murder
"richard stratton" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"richard stratton" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Zoom cast in like a bunch zoom casting our ass is off. Let's just be honest about it, uh, weren't a week. I don't know. 30 something maybe in two months. On 67 I don't know anymore. Does it matter anymore? Paulie Mac Creative. Tony Creative, Shannon Kehler. The three of us can't be stopped. They've tried to stop us. It's not. It's not gonna happen. We roll right over you. How you guys doing, boys? Paul. You reminded me when you said here we are. You remind me of the theme song from Silver spoons. Here we are face to face a couple of silver spoons. You know what I mean? Come on. What is that? I believe you've talked about the mom on that show before you Erin Gray ball. That's it? Yeah. And then Ricky Stroeder had the racecar bad man. Come on. It was your rotor. Dude, We're Schroeder today. What Schroeder up to? I don't know. Richard Richard Stratton. The third Sorry, Shan and go. No, I just want to know where are you Staying? Shredder is in like the teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. Bad guy. Shredder. Schroeder. Schroeder, where you date yourself. Schroeder Regain Schroeder. Do some home, do some over the weekend and watch a little silver spoons and have a little respect for Ricky Schroder. No disrespect, told Ricky Schroder fall for us as they call them on the show, the Ricker Did they? Christ Rose. Hey, Well, here we are. It's July 15th. It's the Wednesday on. We're gathering here today to break down a few things we got topical. It's funny, you guys here we are now we are actually After months of the self quarantining and sheltering in place, and We're now days away from a competitive baseball game. Tony, who's up first on the giant stock it you've got a schedule? I believe we have some exhibition contests between the Oakland Athletics home in away Monday and Tuesday, and then the Giants travel down to Dodger Stadium for the greatest rivalry west of the Mississippi. Where Johnny Cueto will be taking the hell he's confirmed is the starter. Of course. I mean, yes, he is, and I'm eyes. What a what A wacky time emotionally is. I'm excited. I'm pissed. I'm excited. We shouldn't be playing ball. I'm excited, and I'm scared like All of it. You know, because I love baseball. Excited, CBS. Welcome back. But what are we doing again? Buster Posey, What are we doing? So on that note, Tony is one of forward tease a little bit. It's part of the radio industry, the mechanics and forward teasing. I just want to let the listeners know if he just stumbled onto this that we're actually gonna hear from Brandon Crawford. In a few minutes who was a guest on the murder from Max Show today? He gave us a good 15 20 minutes. You guys. We talked about that Tony like he's working out in the mask. You know, it's a It's a whole new world, so we'll get the thoughts on everything going on. But you have a you, Shannon as a fan. Are you excited or you skeptical? Do you think this Things will go off without a hitch Will. Where are you with all this? Well, I'm a little skeptical about Brandon Crawford. Did he say that he will or will not actually hit for a good average this year. Well, wouldn't I have told him that his bat was so hot? I'm going to take my clothes off. No, that's right. Good. If you get Is Brandy. It's Brandon. I got to.

Regain Schroeder Tony Creative Shannon Kehler Brandon Crawford Ricky Schroder baseball Giants Richard Richard Stratton Ricky Stroeder Erin Gray Johnny Cueto Buster Posey Dodger Stadium Oakland Athletics Shan Paul Christ Rose Mississippi CBS murder
"richard stratton" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

06:07 min | 1 year ago

"richard stratton" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"To do so the thing can do could be a jigsaw puzzle and you know I'm also interested in because we have a lot of listeners especially those that might be a little older that live by themselves so if you have any suggestions for things that people could do by themselves other than play solitaire I think a lot of our listeners would benefit from that I can tell you now I have been making prodigious use of the new Amazon fire stick that I got and again not a lover of Amazon but they do have some great stuff so my wife and I watch this week V. woody Allen movie wonder wheel we both really liked it this was a movie that was produced by Amazon but it came out right around the time that Woody Allen was becoming a villain again because of accusations from his daughter and others but it's a really really I thought a really clever picture it really watching it it feels more like you're watching a stage play that M. that a motion picture but Kate Winslet is in it she's terrific Jim Belushi who I gotta tell ya never exactly knock my socks off as an actor he's terrific and Justin Timberlake who I'm convinced is going to go down in history as this generation's Frank Sinatra is phenomenal in the film so that's one of will and it takes place in one of my favorite places Coney Island so you knew I was going to like it so I enjoy that but that got my wife and I on sort of a a Woody Allen kick that were in the midst of what we're quarantines and that's the nice thing about Woody Allen is irrespective of what you think about his personal life they are there are so he said yeah I think it sounded filmmaker and it tell the writer and a great performer but there are so many Woody Allen films there's over prop this is at least sixty two that I've been able to count that I don't think anybody has seen everybody out so even once you think you've seen every Woody Allen film you find that there's one there's one from nineteen ninety one they didn't realize was released because he was coming out with films at a prodigious prodigious rate so we're in a very much a Woody Allen kicks so we watched the curse of the jade scorpion which I can't believe I've never seen and this film wonder wheel is more of a drama the curse of the jade scorpion is a comedy and it's hysterical woody Allen's M. self which is not in wonder wheel he's the male lead Helen hunt is the female lead and it deals with a hypnotist that it's a period piece in the forties and it deals with a hypnotist who hypnotizes two people working in insurance company in order to go out and commit crimes so we did that so yesterday we started a television mini series called crisis in six scenes which was a Woody Allen mini series that debuted only on Amazon video ad we only watch the first two they're only about twenty three minutes each it's interesting I don't love it yet I mean this is also a period piece will probably finish it today I mean this is like twenty minutes apart but it's good but it's not great at least at this point so that's it I also watched Toy Story four because I'm still finishing all my academy award nominated films from last year and this had I believe two nominations it was pretty good yeah I liked it if you enjoy the Toy Story franchise or if you have younger children who enjoy the Toy Story franchise we've if they're not familiar with that I think they'll get a kick out of it it's fun it's fun great music the voice at some great voice acting in there not only is Tom Hanks terrific but you have Mel Brooks in there you have Carl Reiner in there a lot of great voices they recognize which is kind of fun story pretty good similar to the all the other choice during movies to be honest which again can argue with success so I think this will probably be the final Toy Story film and I think that's fine so we'll see the way it ended it should be the last toy story movie but you never know if their heart up then they need to make a billion dollars in a hurry we'll find a way to continue it so that's what I'm watching now in terms of books again he was a guest on the show a month ago and I just recorded a podcast with him but Richard Stratton my friend Richard Stratton his memoir his three part memoir the third part is out now is a must read the first part is called smuggler's blues of all that is life as a marijuana smuggler and on the run from the government the second part is about his time in prison is called king pin and the third one is called in the world from the big house to Hollywood and all three books are just terrific so if you haven't read any of those books yet I do recommend those I'm reading Tom Golisano's book now there's an open interview next week I'm a big admirer of Tom Golisano I support him for governor all three times he ran and I'm looking forward to hopefully interviewing him next week we'll see if that's good will gets disrupted all given everything that's happening but that's all about entrepreneurship but I'm enjoying it not only for the tidbits about business but I'm enjoying it for a school built not born I'm also enjoying it for the addict goes from his own life that's a short book expected finish that in the next day or so so if you have suggestions for why people should be watching for what people should be reading for what people should.

"richard stratton" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

12:08 min | 2 years ago

"richard stratton" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"And his father Charlie as Jared Kushner grew into his teens attending the first school a coed modern orthodox yeshiva in Paramus New Jersey where he was an average student ranked in the third track of five in his grade his father Gresley built an empire for his first born to inherit it was a pedestrian Colossus tens of thousands of so called garden apartments multi family buildings surrounded by landscaping mostly in New Jersey but the income from them was enough to turn Charlie Kushner to someone has money in approval were sought by local politicians who is now a New Jersey power broker the logic behind Charlie's lit largesse was fairly simple according to a Christian family member quote Charlie had a messianic complex it was his father who delivered us from Poland and Charlie was going to deliver us to Manhattan he's going to get us out of New Jersey and on to the Forbes five hundred list but to do that you gotta by governor Jim McGreevey and quote in November two thousand one McGreevey had won the gubernatorial election with the friendly push the Charlie and his pals Charlie was now an autocrat whose rain sometimes felt like a noose to his relatives friends employees and even fellow synagogue members who came to me and his dad his role as a family patriarch but his relatives were not to question his aggressive message methods of social advancement he was nicknamed the dot the dapper don or don Corleone partly because of his Natty suits him perfectly coiffed hair but the nickname was also appropriate some felt given Charlie's godfather like approach to running both his business and his personal life business was life life was business take Marcy plugin for example the accountant Charlie had fired for having an affair with his brother in law even though she was now at the accounting firm invests SMB Kushner companies still paid or annual bonuses of between fifteen and twenty five thousand dollars and reimbursed blocking for the cost of her son's private school tuition which was disguised in the IRS's legal expense Charlie wasn't just being nice he needed her cooperation beginning in the mid nineteen nineties a Charlie's direction according to legal records the company had begun to commit financial fraud to fund is growing social political and financial ambitions as is common in real estate firms each of the entities Charlie Allen had its own LLC or was its own L. L. C. H. I. L. L. C. was owned by a partnership a combination of Charlie and some backers all of the L. L. C. is passed down by Joe Kushner were per the instructions of his will equally divided among Charlie and his three siblings and the respective children's trusts the Charlie set up a management company Westminster management and made himself the manager of all the buildings initially his siblings all thought this was a good idea Charlie viewed as increasingly public profile as a public service but his lust for the limelight brought some large bills invited politicians to speak often for a large fee and an assortment of venues ranging from his office to his home offsite conferences and his synagogue even invited the entire New Jersey political leadership to attend Kushner's maybe babies breasts a speech by Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu for example because as much as one hundred thousand dollars and Charlie paid him to speak in New Jersey four times rather than pay out of his own pocket for as many political and charitable contributions Charlie or senior executives in the farming Charlie's direction took LLC money without pre approval from the partners in the L. L. C. to cover these costs none of the Kushner companies partners were informed of how the money was being spent not Charlie's business partners as friends or even a siblings children nieces and nephews nor did they know that neither the internal or external ledger presented the true numbers for each of the LLC's if Charlie was short on cash on one project he borrowed from the bank account of another that wasn't the only fortunate one on Courtney court documents there was euphemistic language used at the Tuesday weekly meetings also called cash meetings hello Charlie's home early in the morning the phrase losing a bill as in how do we lose this bill and finding a way to turn expense from one project into a capital reduction somewhere else personal expenses were also lost and submitted as capital business expenses from whichever LLC Richard Stratton liar and an executive vice president Scott Zucker picked those ranging Charlie some improvements to vacations New Jersey nets tickets Superbowl packages even the alcoholic Charlie insurer Kushner bought for a holiday cell celebrations I contribute contribution from Charlie to Harvard University to smooth the way for Germans and mission was funded by the company that Charlie the check was signed by Zachary and that was no accident Charlie never signed anything is corner office in Florham park was enormous but Spartan it was forty feet long and had a private shower and sitting area he also had amassed outdoor terrace on which you build a sukkah a temporary outdoor hot under the roof of which he and his family would celebrate the Jewish holiday of Sukkot his desk however had nothing on it no pens no paper no computer most critical of all the apparent health the company's balance sheet was what was called a Richard special named after Richard staff our Charlie's brother in law and vice chairman of the Kushner companies which was essentially bank fraud it Charlie wanted to do an acquisition or do a refinancing their core required a lot a line of credit stop by our power a chartered accountant in mensa member would direct a subordinate to alter the figures that the banks to be tricked into believing Christian company's finances met the crew preconditions of their covenants as a result the firm would receive lines of credit and tax deductions it should not have been entitled to most of the senior members of Kushner's companies knew what was going on the book by Vicky ward Kushner ink greed ambition corruption foreign this is Tom Hartman program happy Tuesday tomorrow in here with you a lot going on tonight is the us in the top what is I. tenth I believe democratic debate and I'm pretty sure it is and this time but billionaire Tom Steyer has brought his way back in so there will be one additional person on the stage I think it takes it from six to seven might be seven eight but whatever it is you know in the in addition to billionaire Bloomberg billionaires tire and meanwhile Bernie Sanders has rolled out his his plan to pay for absolutely everything he's proposing was with one and done this some time ago now Bernie has there are there there's a lot of overlap between both of their proposals not much it's sad to say that they're identical but you know philosophically and structurally they're very very very close and and it's just common sense it's basically undoing Reaganomics you know prior to Ronald Reagan the top tax rate in the United States was seventy four percent Reagan drop that down to twenty eight percent in the in the nineteen eighties and that seventy four percent top tax rate in the corporate tax rate was over thirty five percent during the Eisenhower administration for example corporate income taxes paid for fully one third of the cost of government now it sounded like five percent so basically if we just roll back reaganism we've got enough money to pay for all of his programs it is and Bernie is even talking about really rolling back reaganism I mean keep in mind as I said you know the top tax rate during the the the Franklin the the the Franklin Roosevelt Franklin D. Roosevelt administration was ninety one percent during the Harry Truman administration was ninety one percent Truman wasn't complaining about it during the Eisenhower all eight years of Dwight Eisenhower Republican it was ninety one percent white Eisenhower wasn't complaining about it John Kennedy ninety one percent Lyndon Johnson ninety one percent Richard Nixon ninety one percent were actually Linda Johnson dropped it down to seventy four percent so then it became seventy four percent for Lynn and Jennifer Richard Nixon seventy four percent for Gerry Ford seventy four percent for Jimmy Carter and during that period of time we had the most robust economy the fastest growth growth of the American middle class literally in the history of our country which came to a screeching halt when Donald Trump with heaven when Ronald Reagan drop that top tax rate and this is I mean it along with the unions the main driver of building that middle class was that talk to at the top tax rate because what it did was instead of you know people accumulating more more cash in their own private you know the Swiss bank account instead of the Jeff Bezos and bill Kling gates of the world becoming you know multi multi multi billionaires and keep in mind a billion dollars is a million dollars a thousand times and then you get you know tens of billions of dollars that's the you know the it's mind boggling the amounts of money and that just didn't used to happen because instead of taking the money out and stick it in their checking account you know and how it worked Beano however however they would do it people like mark Zuckerberg back in the day would reinvest that money in their company and pay their employees better yeah the top tax rate actually encouraged the growth of small and medium business as well as made large business healthy so Bernie is laid this out and you know and I'm in a very straightforward fashion and I'll just I'll just go through very quickly for you yeah he wants to expand social security so that everybody on it it on low income senior citizens and people with disabilities will get an additional thirteen hundred dollars a year by increasing benefits how's he going to do this he's gonna have the wealthiest one point eight percent of Americans as people make more than two hundred fifty thousand dollars a year the same social security tax that you pay in that I pay and that whether we will extend the solvency of social security to twenty seventy and beyond I mean that's just like that's the endpoint for the math he wants to end homelessness that's going to cost two and a half trillion dollars how does he do that he puts a wealth tax on the top one tenth of one percent yet that will lease thirty two million dollars and you're gonna start paying a tax on your wealth just like I pay and probably you pay a wealth tax on your property on your house and even if you're renting you're paying a wealth taxes got a property tax every year you know your house may be worth say a piano on a hundred thousand dollars but every year year after year after year you still have to pay that property tax that's a wealth tax that the middle class has been paying for generations and all Bernie analyst with Warner Bros saying is let's have the multi millionaires and billionaires pay wealth tax on the money and their money to right if they want to take a deep dive in a you know in the ends and swim in their piles of money and their money been just pay a pay a property tax on it and we're not even talking about a property taxes anywhere as high as what the middle class pays on real estate property and this would be a property taxes like you know a tenth of a percent or at the most one percent was Elizabeth Warren suggestion universal pre K. that'll cost one and a half trillion dollars again that wealth tax will cover that eliminating medical debt there's eighty one billion dollars in past due medical debt held by seventy nine million Americans and Bernie just wants to completely pay that off and how does he do that with a income inequality tax on large corporations that pay their CEOs more than fifty times with their workers make keep in mind when Ronald Reagan came into office in nineteen eighty the average American CEO made thirty times what is lowest paid worker makes now it's hundreds to thousands of times Bernie is saying if your company makes.

Charlie Jared Kushner New Jersey Gresley Paramus
"richard stratton" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"richard stratton" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Seven forty this is Frank Moreno on AM nine seventy the answer at which seven thirty we're gonna take a little break for the Lutheran hour look for an hour is only a half hour don't ask me to explain it I can't but then I will be back at eight o'clock eight o'clock we have denunciations with trains within a few more your calls and then we'll talk with John Catsimatidis and get a preview of what's coming up on the the cats roundtable real quick here Mike before we go to break Mike Porcelli is here a designated program observer you were Mike you were telling me that today is the final Sunday in the month of February and the month of February in addition to being a number of months that we know about is something else I didn't know about what is this month this is career and technical education months CTP month and it's a well kept secret so you didn't even know about no I didn't right so what are we doing career ten technical education we go and learn to be V. like fishing or some well it's supposed to be about promoting trade education in all the schools high schools colleges and the education system is not doing a very good job of promoting trade education which I think is the best way for young people who don't know really what they might want to do with their future if they have any kind of mechanical ability or interest they should be investigating at least pursuing mechanical career technical career well I I think that's that's good veggie any place specifically you do recommend people go to learn more about trade education or or anything like that there's a a website there's an organization called tech force foundation they are in business to promote automotive traded but I absolutely will will definitely check that thank you for informing me of that and enjoy the rest of the month you know she team please I'm sure you've got big things planned for the next week right absolutely sure thing eight seven seven nine seven zero two nine nine nine if you want to call back at eight o'clock we'll try and get you I don't have that many people to denounce today so we will have some time for falls you would email me about anything we've discussed from Pat recommendations to discussions about presidential race to white strangers Richard Stratton drives down anything with email me at Moreno NYC radio dot com that's M. O. R. A. M. O. N. Y. C. radio dot com if you're on Facebook could you join the morale in the morning fans and haters Facebook page and you have discussions about any of the topics that we covered this morning the where's the great Barry Farber to be considered this is.

Frank Moreno John Catsimatidis Mike Porcelli Richard Stratton Facebook Barry Farber Pat Moreno NYC M. O. R. A. M. O. N. Y.
"richard stratton" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

09:26 min | 2 years ago

"richard stratton" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Harvey Weinstein will happy to take your calls or anything on the seller a Mike in new Hyde Park hello there Mike well I guess I'm getting boring at this point but I just want to say it so that each of the regions so echo lactic and you always make these great choices I can't wait for you to go prime time each day with great interview and I have an idea about your cat well let's hear all and make it very warm hi and put it in the in the carrier and sprinkle a little tight in the you know what we've tried stuff like that before I don't know if we've tried that specific strategy a hot towel and catnip in the Kerry to kind of trapped him in there I mean you can go relax because he's in there with Chad Neptune drugs which adds but I don't know I I have to catch the ball from the street I took the men off the streets and they are completely domesticated now and I mean that that's got worse from there well I will suggest that to my wife she's probably listening now anyway thank you Mike eight seven seven nine seven zero two nine nine nine Bobby in Staten Island hello buddy a bill for I don't understand violence okay what would you would you email or text me his name it makes it makes house calls he's got a of mini Winnebago like any pulls up to your house thanks to get you can take the cat out you will go in the local yeah well that but we can't get him so we are we're an apartment building there's no way we can get him out of the apartment in this carrier when when when my wife moved in with me about two years ago it took literally a month of trying to get him in the carrier you know before she finally was able to get it it was only able to get him out of it get a man well when all of the other furniture was out of our out of her apartment that she could that he couldn't hide behind so what will this vet that you're recommending actually come in our apartment and and deal with him inside the apartment yes all right okay so I'm you wanna give me his name now do you want to send it to me privately what was the second major script Dr seven one eight five six hello three zero one good I will I will I will will we will definitely call him Bobby thank you and I gotta say one other thing these kids these days don't understand about socialism that was an actual socialism grandpa's for like do not use them as well yeah well you know what then thanks for the call by look I'm not a socialist at all and I think a lot of Bernie Sanders program would be deleterious to the country but two things one I mean what the **** did call themselves national socialists a if you look at what they were doing it was not a traditional socialist program it was an authoritarian a totalitarian regime based on hate I mean they weren't all about things like universal healthcare and college loan forgiveness it in terms of the one point that I thought Bernie Sanders made during the debate which he's right on the money and again I'm not voting for Bernie but there are a lot of what he says that I like and one point that he made that I thought was right on the money is we do have socialism but we have socialism for corporations right we have a situation where if you or if you run a small business what does the government do it lets you fail and it lets you your view of your house get get claimed by the back when you can't pay your mortgage L. as you can start I mean they'll give you some basic subsistence so that they don't literally starve but they don't really care about you if you're a failure as a small business there are small businesses that that fail every single day in New York may maybe every single week certainly and the government does nothing to keep them busy but if you're a giant multinational corporation like Amazon would you pay in taxes you pay zero what do you get if you in subsidies from the government well it's substantial and then what happens if your a big bank or a big auto company that fails what is the government to bail you out the taxpayers they bail out all these corporations that are too big to fail so we've essentially socialized risk and privatize reward because I can promise you that the people who are running these companies these bailed out banks for instance they're doing pretty well L. their bank their businesses may have failed but I guarantee you they still have something resembling an Olympic size swimming pool in their house so I don't are you really have to question people right if you want to be Bernie Sanders I think it's not enough to just say he's a socialist it's not enough because the sting of that socialism label isn't what it was in the height of the red scare that's my two cents eight seven seven nine seven zero two nine nine nine E. Frank very quickly only have about a minute here what's on your mind sure just we're talk about the pardons of president Donald Trump I I I I I I feel that they were inappropriate to a certain point because you know these individuals like Bernard Kerik the stocking and the other people that he pardoned they they really didn't deserve I think maybe he did because he felt that the pressure for the was a cruel and unusual under constitutional law I love Frank I don't even get a pardon for harassing a Canadian naturalized citizens and the knights of Columbus after that I was arrested for years ago four years ago years ago for doing something like that I'm not dismissed and sealed on the queen's comfy clothes print club so I think I don't understand why don't we it is time pardon these guys well first of all I was all for the pardons not just not just the high profile ones like you know Bernie Kerik and rob McCoy of age but people like you know Clinton the rants who was imprisoned for nineteen years and it was at people like you know F. and others who have their sentences commuted for some nonviolent drug crimes like crystal Munich Unioto's who was in prison for fifteen years eight months for conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute a thousand or more kilograms of marijuana second with Richard Stratton last hour he was in prison for eight years for nonviolent drug offense here crystal move new neos was imprisoned for double that time I'm all forcing her out of prison or you know attorneys hall who is in prison for twenty years eight months for a nonviolent drug crime now if that's what the president wants to let out of prison I'm all for that in terms of Bernie Kerik I happen to think he was totally railroaded a you talk about weather was not paying taxes on his apartment renovations or whether it was not paying taxes on his nanny when he was and then lying about it when he was nominated for homeland security secretary I don't think there's any value to society at all in putting someone like that in prison because he he's not a danger to the community all you do is your then now paying to house him in prison you are now I mean Bernie was actually out of prison for several years and your no longer getting tax revenue on the money he would have been earning a I mean I don't see at all what the value is for putting something like that in prison it's clear to me in Carrick's case that his prosecution was politically motivated in the case of a boy image yeah he committed a crime a serious crime but was it really worthy of being in prison for a decade so he talked about selling ascendancy and by the way he talked about it in the kind of language that I hear politicians use on a daily basis did he sell the Senate seat now so he talked about selling insanity is that worthy of being in prison for eight years I don't think so I'm all for that that computation but you're free to disagree eight seven seven nine seven zero two nine nine nine I'll say a little bit about banking a second we'll be right back more weather wisdom in just a moment with more on on a a nine seventy the answer all right well speaking of small business which I just was when we were talking about the small business versus big business situation I am obsessed with New York City small business owners because if you listen to anybody that grew up here in New York nobody talks about.

Harvey Weinstein Mike Hyde Park
"richard stratton" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

10:26 min | 2 years ago

"richard stratton" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Richard Stratton who is the author of a book called in the world which is all about he went how he went from federal prison to being a pretty respected and pretty complex writer and producer and now some of the writing that he did in prison wise you know personal correspondence to keep himself sane and Richard you chronicle a relationship that began in prison with a woman named Naomi in the song guns N. roses sweet child of mine was apparently a big part of your relationship with her and this turned out to be your first girlfriend once you got out of prison cells will do that a little bit about mail me well she was a wonderful lady still as I'm sure and we started this relationship when I was at Otisville when I say relationship there I was like whoa she was she worked there and she was in the education department and she was kind to me she used to smile to to the per other position was different from all the other people who work there a whole different she's bring like a whole sunny up upbeat atmosphere into the prison when she came in so I started writing letters to her after I got transferred out those letters became senior and steam your S. prison correspondence between a male and a female tends to do all that pent up energy gets expressed in these letters and once I get out she was there for me and welcomed me back into the world of women which is a great thing because once you after eight years of being around nothing but man and being you know absent from any company at the activity with the other sex it's it's it it's not an easy thing again it's one of those difficult transitions that you go through when you're coming out you're just not ready for it and it was a very welcoming and warm experience all right so at you will chronicle some very interesting relationship how difficult is it I mean I think every guy has been told by their significant other at one time or another that maybe they have difficulties with intimacy I would think that at that time have a relationship when there it will you're coming out of prison that there's all these other psychological issues that tend to be difficult in terms of a relationship how tough is it to have a relationship with him when you come out of prison well I obviously think it varies from person to person but yeah it's very difficult because you're not prepared for in any way mean when I was in prison I think it's still the same today there's no real pre release counseling you don't get to speak to anybody who can tell you how difficult it's going to be to become intimate with people even with the people of your own sex so you don't look at them as potential enemies which is awaiting work everybody in prison except for maybe once you form some close friendships in prison but it's it's really it the thing about it is that you become M. immersed in it the entirely different culture when you're in prison that that culture of of respect it's built up by aggressive behavior and once you get out you have to you have to adjust your behavior to to beat up the street so when you're in prison you were secretly well or maybe not so secretly working on this novel called smack gonna sway tell me about the work that you did on this novel in prison and then what became of it when she got out well I met this extraordinary woman when I was here in New York in the metropolitan correctional center MCC which I read a lot a lot about the second amazing place I mean it's it's not house did you you called called the criminal Hilton is that we right where the rock and roll jails what we used to call me the thing that made it so interesting was that there in those days there were men and women in the same prison they weren't obviously selling together but there was a whole floor full of women and you would run into them and I met this woman in the law library she was represented by a dear friend of mine who actually was my lawyer Ivan Fischer we speak about him too and I met her and learned but he she or her story been all over the news uses so called drug dealer to the stars she was in all the papers and everything English woman and we became friends we became real good friends while she was there and she got be a pretty significant sentence she was also charged in the kingpin statute and I said well hard she said others no way I'm going to go for all these years without heterosexual lan activity and I said well how are you how you gonna stick that she goes well I'm gonna escape I thought oh yeah okay you're gonna skate we're all going to escape everybody thinks has his escape fantasy but sure enough after a year or two I forget how long it was she did escape from maximum security women's prison somewhere in West Virginia and the F. B. I. had an idea in mind that I had somehow been helpful in getting her out of there which were which I wasn't now and but they came to visit me in prison and asked me where is she you know could target you could get some postcards from her after she left but she actually fled back to England and was living in England and her boyfriend in England ultimately gave up she not corresponded which became an issue for my parole officer when he realized that I was corresponding with someone who is a fugitive at that show smack goddess is a fictionalized version of of her it is a fictionalized version for right in the office she wrote it while you're incarcerated right and you had to you did they they tried to stop you from doing that tonight well they were always very suspicious of people who were riding or are you writing about this press Xen or you know is is it anything that you're writing that could help people escape from here so they're very suspicious of writers there they they look after you really intensely if you're someone who's on a typewriter right and most of that writing was done in the law library on the typewriter so it's it's mom a kind of a clandestine activity in prison to to be a writer if you get this book published well I sent it out senator mailer sent it out to a few people he showed it to a few people and sure enough there was a publisher here in Manhattan who wanted to publish it she eat well you're in a better position once you get out of prison then a lot of prisoners are in that you have a check for a book advance waiting for you yeah I mean not only did I have a check for book advance what I has loving supporting family I have good friends so I was in a very different different situation from most of the people come out of prison you you also though you can't just tell your parole officer I you know I'm spending most of my day writing you have to secure gainful employment that also became a bit of an issue for you tell us what job you talk in addition all the writing that you were doing what you came out pretty well I met in the came close friends with a great criminal defense lawyer named Ivan Fischer who ended up representing me at my at my appellate hearing he spoke in front of the public court and got you know was indeed involved in getting me out of prison so after I got out he's offered me a job so you could come work for me writing researching doing all of the same stuff used to do in the law library but working for me which was fascinating for me of course the parole officers told me right off the bat you can't work for hundreds fish that we're not going to approve that job because you will be in touch with other people who are involved in criminals yet SO IT and that or you'll have access to files about who were arrested also we had to fight them it took almost a year of fighting against the parole board and the parole commission to get permission to work for Ivan I continue to work for him all the time as it turns out he was actually a probation for a tax charges at that so they were like now just as a probation or parole no way going to be working for him but we ultimately won and I was allowed to work for either so that was that was a big part of my initial battles minute was just one battle after another we should give secure gainful employment you're writing briefs for a very well respected criminal defense attorney you publish a novel how the novel end up doing the noble did really quite well I mean it was well we see the kind of both front page review in The New York Times and did well in your it over there was always a talk of a possible movie or what have you but the eight did well enough that along with some of the other stuff that I was writing I was writing short stories were getting published one that won an award so I might I did have I kept thinking this career as a writer could actually turn into something for me and and sure enough it did we'll find out how well Richard went from being a prisoner to a novelist to being a television producer and film producer when we return this is an nine seventy the enterprise rental here with Richard Stratton for the hour more weather wisdom in just a moment with more on a on a a nine seventy three I say if I went to prison one of the things that I'd missed most aside from my wife would be my pillow because I have the privilege of sleeping on one of the most comfortable pillows in the world and are the my pillow is terrific it is the brainchild of Mike Lindell Mike Lindell has led a pretty fascinating story is pretty passing life himself he will eat it was a crack addict ten years ago and now is she over multi billion dollar come today and he owes a lot of it too he he ascribes it to his faith in god and to his pillow now how can one pillow change a man's life like that we got a try if you haven't tried the my pillow yet go to my pillow dot com give it a try if you enter the promo code M. nine seventy you can get some great deals not only the my pillow but all the other my pillow products or some you may already have the pillow you might want to think about the my pillow mattress topper the Giza bed sheets and a whole lot more so now but but but the all the my pillow products come with a ten year warranty and sixty day money back guarantee so let's say you'd sleep on the pillow you sleep on the streets you are crazy.

Richard Stratton writer producer
"richard stratton" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

11:56 min | 2 years ago

"richard stratton" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Also on bark on an audio adventure in which nothing is off limits politics movies organized crime and the social issues that really Q. it's all on the line now please welcome the man who all the talk show host one of B. and all the politicians come to see live five AM nine seventy the answer Frank Morano well let me read you the very first words printed in a book that I just read and absolutely devoured I returned and saw under the sun that the race is not to the swift nor the battle to the strong neither yet bread to the wise nor riches to men of understanding nor yet favor to men of skill but time and chance happens to them all if that sounds familiar to you that is because it is from Ecclesiastes chapter nine verse eleven it is followed quickly by a three word question ain't life grand and then if that question sounds familiar it's because you heard it uttered by Warren Beatty's character the real life Clyde barrow in the film Bonnie and Clyde those are the first quotes that begin a fascinating fascinating memoir of the memoir is by Richard Stratton Richard Stratton is an old friend of mine for about thirteen fourteen years he is somebody that is a gifted writer a tremendous journalist a Hollywood producer we've talked to him previously in studio before about the the documentary that he produced four godi god father and son we've talked to him about a number of books he's written in the past including smuggler's blues and king pen and now we're thrilled that he is brave the elements M. V. the hour and joined me in studio to discuss in the world from the big house to Hollywood Richard is always a pleasure to see you well francophones a pleasure to be here I look forward to seeing you whenever I can see you and I love doing a show where we are well I you know what a fan I am of of yours and you've done it again with this book in the world from the big house to Hollywood but for people that aren't familiar with you for people that might be new listeners to my show and haven't heard any of our previous discussions here not shall you've gotta tell us anybody that meets you anybody that hears you can tell you're very intelligent guy you or somebody that does you don't even look like you would J. walk how does someone like you this area died intelligent intellectual writer end up in federal prison how did you how did you get into federal prison had to get out well I got into federal prison because I started smuggling marijuana when I was in college in Arizona when I was eighteen nineteen years old I started bringing back a kilo or two at a time in a car that we have my roommate and I had and then I would bring it back to Boston and sell it to my friends and make a little bit of money it was really more of something that I did for the adventure and for the extra cash it gave me but gradually I went to Europe and then I went to Lebanon I started smuggling hashish it got bigger and bigger and bigger and we we became huge me where I was so called king pin I was smuggling tons of good of cannabis from all over the world into United States until the early eighties I had about a fifteen sixteen year run on I got arrested and was sentenced ultimately to twenty five years and six months in federal twenty five years in federal prison a quarter century right wow yeah but you didn't serve twenty five years no I ended up getting out after eight I became a jailhouse lawyers started studying my own case realized that the judge who sentenced me dear Constance Baker motley who's a federal judge here in New York City had said the reason she was giving me so much time was because I refused to cooperate with the government by that they meant I refused to rat out on other people I said no look I did it I'm guilty put me in prison for what I did but I'm not going to become a stool pigeon and start giving you evidence on other people and that turns out to be a good way to get yourself us a shorter sentence if you end up cooperating with the government but they cannot give you more time for refusing to cooperate that makes the sense coercive rather than punitive this I discovered sitting in the law library after six or seven years and I appealed my sense on the grounds that it was coercive rather than punitive the second Sir I know you don't have any legal training any formal legal training at that point right now well no I mean all my legal training was really in the law library in different prisons and talking to other jailhouse lawyers who really immersing myself in the language of the law I was a writer before I went to prison I was a writer all the time that I was smuggling pot I was a journalist so language was always something that fascinated me once I started reading the law I thought you know this is really just words it's all about words the the crimes that they're charging me with are defined in words the evidence that's going to be held against me is word to come out of the mouths of the witnesses and therefore I really need to immerse myself in the language of the law and figure out exactly how I can get myself of the situation all right so you end up getting out of prison and you didn't serve the whole twenty five year prison sentence you were able to get one of your convictions vacated you end up doing about eight years in prison eight years old and I want to say to you if you're listening if that sounds interesting Richard's story of being a drug smuggler it is right and if you want to learn more about that you've got to pick up is available on Amazon and elsewhere Richard's first book in this trilogy it's called smuggler's blues and in it you have basically you would learn about Richard and his time evading law enforcement in this country you learn about law enforcement cracking down on him you learn about Richard's criminal cohorts that were writing him out you learn about some people in in really wild adventures and you see you chronicle Richard as he goes all over the world one trying to carry out these crimes and to trying to evade capture it's a fascinating fascinating story and possibly even more of a fascinating story is what Richard just alluded to his time in prison working by himself to get himself out of prison writing his own appeal by the fact he was a lawyer and getting an appeals court to say yeah you can't send someone to more prison time because they refused to rat on somebody else that's a book as well that book is called king pin so you go to Richard Stratton if you're Amazon dot com just type in Richard Stratton or anywhere you like to buy books or promote Amazon specifically anywhere you buy books just type in which is trying the whole world opens up that brings us to this book and here we are now in the world from the big house to Hollywood cell you're in prison for eight years you've been into a bunch of different prisons Otisville ray brook the M. C. C. here in the New York area and you describe different conditions in different prisons and then you describe coming out of prison but it wasn't as if they set you loose right away and you were totally free there was still some level when you were first released from prison of government of Abd I don't know how you'd characterize it but tell us what happened once you were let out and were told you were going to be on parole and it turned out you had a parole officer well it was it was interesting because I have what they call a non parole sentence meaning that I was not eligible for parole so as I'm walking out the door walking out the gates of prison my my unit manager my counselor has me papers as you've got forty eight hours to report your parole officer and I was like winning parole officer look at the senses non parole sort of well you're not gonna be on parole you gonna be on supervised release so I said well supervised release what's that it's the same thing as parole agents of the different so you know it's government speak so we figure out another way to get you so in other words the time that I got with so called good time while I was locked up they take that away from you when you walk out the door you have to do that serve it on the street as they say so I had to report to my parole officer and the conditions of my parole were extremely the harsh I might say because my parole officer immediately suspected I was going to go right back into the marijuana business which I had no intention of doing I had every intention of getting out and getting free and staying out there was no way I wanted to go back even though I didn't look upon my particular crimes is and now we know that stuff is practically legal so but I didn't want to go back so I was determined to adhere to the conditions of my parole as different difficult if they were and also as badly as I felt about being on parole when I wasn't supposed to be on parole so that was this constant thing playing in my head why am I having to report to a parole officer when I was serving in on tonight's nonsense and you know you name the parole officer in the book as ms lawless was her name really lawless no but I can't so I won't okay all right fair enough it was similar to that but not exactly so then you you're out on your your out on parole you're trying to start a new life I think a lot of people who further we actually have a lot of listeners in prison right now listening but we also have a lot of people that can't imagine what it's like to go from being in prison for close to a decade and then be told okay go ahead go start your life where do you begin when you're set free from prison where do you go from there well you know it's a very difficult thing in fact I even say in the book that in many ways getting out of prison is more difficult harder than going to prison once you imprisoned basically everything's taken care of in the sense that you have woman board right now the way that how you can pay your rent you have to worry about how you pay your rent you have to worry about keeping a job you have to worry about any of that stuff they've got you there's nothing you can do about it so when you get out you walk out the gate you think oh god I'm free at last free at last then you really got to find a place to live I got to try to get a job which is not easy when you've got convictions and you've got your a polio however whatever the conditions are so gay getting out and then getting for free and that's a big part of the book because it's one thing to get physically out of prison it's another thing to get your mind out of prison to get your your your habits out of prison get your responses out of prison me even to this day there's still a lot in me that after almost thirty years now but I've been out recently we were out on our own driving around going to come back from a soccer game I was riding shotgun somebody came up and banged on the window of the car I was out the door and ready to beat the living daylights out of that guy because just that we act right you know you in I've had situations where people come up to me and aggressively on the street for whatever reason of walking yeah I have dealt with the New York observer but those reactions that that they are inculcated in you in prison that you have to have absolutely stand up to any even though.

Frank Morano
"richard stratton" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

10:40 min | 2 years ago

"richard stratton" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Thank you so that you'll be using me being dumb because that's really what it was doing but he doesn't want to say that so there you have it I I do try to focus a bit less on politics on on Sunday mornings just because we discuss politics so much less excuse me so much during the week but we're in the midst of a presidential election right now and people were just voting yesterday and I think this Sanders Jagannath is only going to continue to pick up steam out I think there is a great chance that Bernie wins in South Carolina as well as of now Biden is still leading but barely I mean nobody was too surprised the Bernie one in Nevada yesterday what I think some people were surprised by including me is the margin by which she won so he won all seven delegates in Nevada he got forty six point six percent of the vote the staff at the Canada the finished second Jordan Joe Biden nineteen point two percent I mean that is a distant distant second people to judge finished third and Elizabeth Warren finished a fourth so I think it's going to be very interesting I started my brother yesterday because my brother is a Bernie Sanders supporter and I was asking him what he thought the reaction of the Bernie supporters would be if Bernie has the most delegates and then they take the nominal what nomination away from him and give it to somebody else and he said forget about it it's over you know trump trump one it's the election's over and the the Bernie supporters are not going to get behind whoever the DNC happens to back that was his opinion if you're a Bernie supporter I'd love to hear from you if you might disagree eight seven seven nine seven zero two nine nine nine twenty my friend al who well who is a regular listener to the show and occasional caller he said it would be fun to talk to John gambling this week and get his opinion of how Bloomberg didn't debate because he is such a Bloomberg supporter and because they did a show together for so long and I did call John gambling this weekend he didn't want to get up early and I can't say that I blame them I think he was doing some running around some traveling and he said that it was not a good night for Bloomberg and he looked he looked bad so even he acknowledged the Bloomberg supporter that he is that it was not a good night for Bloomberg so we'll see the interesting thing about Bloomberg's candidacy though is he has the money to stay in wait past to produce day all the way to the end and what he's done is in some respects made it more likely that burning is going to be the nominee because by staying in he and sucking up so much media attention he is really keeping anybody else in the from the curse centrist wing of the Democratic Party all of it to be honest the centrist wing isn't that centrist he's keeping anybody else from coalescing in becoming the anti Bloomberg Canada so as of now Bloomberg excuse me the entire banking Bloomberg is polling at fifteen percent or more in most states that he's actually leading in Florida and his money and all these entities running can buying him though those poll numbers so regardless of the debate performances and I think I can't imagine going into the debate before South Carolina the Bloomberg is gonna have a similarly bad debate he's going to definitely have a better performance I would think and now expectations are so low for his debate performances that if he does anything resembling sound like a normal human being he will have all these pundits the same buttons that wrote how terribly was last time they'll all be saying how he exceeded expectations so Biden booted judge and clover shark could all be viable alternatives to the Sanders Warren wing of the party but this is they now essentially have to split the vote with Bloomberg so I don't see any way that anybody is going to be Sanders in terms of delegates I am less I'm missing something if even if Biden wins in South Carolina which again I don't see happening even if Biden wins in South Carolina going into super Tuesday you have Bernie the delegate leader winning in New Hampshire getting the most votes in Iowa winning in the vada super Tuesday you figure clover shar wins Minnesota Bernie is leading in Texas Bernie is leading in North Carolina Bloomberg is leading in Florida where it is but I Warren has to drop out at that point I would think should not have the money to continue I I think but he's got a drop out at that point so who's gonna have the money to compete Sanders Bloomberg bridge and then if you have a situation like the Republicans so on twenty sixteen with both K. sick and crews stayed in and they were both campaigning to be the alternative to Donald Trump what happened trump was able keep winning primary after primary with a plurality of the vote I see the same thing happening this time and the DNC is I looked over this absolutely Patrick there are really two wings of leadership in the Democratic Party you have the Obama wing and you have the Clinton way and there's two things that will unite the one is money everybody in the DNC leadership is there because they've either donated a lot of money or they've raised a lot of money the second thing is they both can't stand Bernie Sanders and they are terrified at the notion of a Sanders nomination absolutely terrified I speak with I have a lot of friends who were democratic elected officials and democratic candidates for office and including on Staten Island which in some ways even though it's part New York City is much more representative of the country then the rest of New York City is because it's at least politically it's very purple since you know the south shore's solidly conservative the north shore solidly liberal and the mid island is a little bit of a swing district and my friends on Staten Island there are Democrats looking to run for office this year they are terrified that if Bernie's there are many they're all gonna lose so I'd be curious to hear your thoughts eight seven seven nine seven zero two nine nine nine and again you gotta hand it to Bernie would you combinations or what a little bit later in the in the show and I'll let you in on a little spoiler here I'm commending Bernie because he has built this campaign from nothing this was somebody that wasn't even taken seriously for years ago and this is somebody who is too old to run it according to the conventional political wisdom is not backed by millionaires and billionaires this is somebody whose support is totally grassroots at just like with trump in many respects and I guess I can't help but give them credit no I disagree with a lot of the things that he's proposing but some of the things that he that he talks about getting the money out of politics fair trade but ending these foreign wars that we've been involved in forever they're some of the same things that attracted me to president trump now I think it's ridiculous that Bernie Sanders voted against the U. S. MCA which is a terrific trade deal but buy it we'll see what happens which can be easily eight seven seven nine seven zero two nine nine nine let me say hello to Gary in in what hello there Gerry go to your group I have a quick increase in money page question when Nancy Pelosi looked up that paperwork that paperwork was secured after the fact at the end of the night it's a great question I I don't know you mean the the torn pieces of paper afterwards yeah I'm saying that right nickel off the bed bound up in the garbage men or any individual and because the individual could gotten older that people yeah you got me it's a great question I have no idea honestly because there is money to be made with that affect how well that would like the building itself and I can't because but I was very curious well if you want to auction it off on eBay guarantee all debts were I was going with that I would be it I tell you I was going to die with them constantly I will go into my wallet on that yeah well I I I'm sure a number of hours would yeah I do I do I don't know I don't know what became of it and that trust me if there's money to be made in Washington there's somebody that's figured out a way to make it but it's a great point thanks Gerry thank you live cricket eight seven seven nine seven zero two nine nine nine I'd love to hear your thoughts your calls on the presidential race and where we go from here a little bit later Ron we're gonna talk with Greg Orman who is one of the leading political independence in the whole country and in the six o'clock hour my friend Richard Stratton is going to be here he's got a new book out this is the third in his trilogy of memoirs and I you know I'm a big Richard Stratton fan he's been a guest on the show many times for my money he is one of the best writers in the world and he's done it again with this memoir this is the last in this trilogy it's phenomenal it's absolutely phenomenal it's called let's go in the world going from the big house to Hollywood and we're going to talk about his transition from being in prison to being a involved in motion pictures and television so I'm looking for that conversation and really looking for hearing from you eight seven seven nine seven zero two nine nine nine eight seven seven nine seven zero two nine nine and we are on Twitter as well at Frank M. O. R. A. N. O. let's break in the war and now returns in.

"richard stratton" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

10:36 min | 2 years ago

"richard stratton" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Cove down fall river if you have time to go down there and see it I'm glad you brought that up because I have never been down there and I'm glad you reminded of it me either can you tell me about it so the USS passage uses their big mammy they had the PT boat that candy was on in a in a little like museum there's a couple submarines and there's a couple other other ships there's well I don't know remember the names of those but it's quite a it's quite a thing you can toward the Massachusetts you can have lunch there you can do pretty much everything is a day towards really nice and what can you tell me about the ship the messages it's what type of ship it is a class of ship five full we actually don't remember exactly what it is but I know its it's quite big she owned maybe was battleship battleship it was a battleship okay I don't know I don't remember the number to be honest with you it's okay so it was great to hear Jerry I mean he was the real deal he sounds great too yes yes so in Quincy yesterday or the day before there was a gentleman named mark captain Richard Stratton who was a POW for six years and they named a street after him in Quincy yesterday on Saturday or Friday I believe it was and was quite an honor with the governor and the mayor Quincy was out there as well it's called Stratton way if you have a chance you should Google him and look at his his life he was a captain United States Navy as well and he was a POW where'd you now boldly so he's eighty something years old so I wanna say Vietnam maybe for six years okay that's good now as well please tell me a little bit about your service if you want I'd love to hear about it sure is forty four years old so I joined the navy in the mid nineties when I was nineteen and retired in two thousand fifteen twenty years so you were thirty nine when you retire how close we does that it's pretty decent but you know we'll have to come out and get a job obviously not well I'm doing you know the benefits through the air great and so my career started in San Diego and ended in we more California in a BFA squadron I was a cook in the navy so being down below decks all time was quite quite cool I was on a mine sweeper Courtney call work in over two four so that was a pretty crazy time and you know scary I was afraid a lot because we're up the river we're basically doing the you know trying to clear the mines that were still out there from the previous war in the MTA's that's what they call in the mind in your area so the shooter stick it in and in March of those three when the war did start kick off again no we were in charge of along with a few other mine sweepers we're in charge of click clean clearing the way and also looking for missiles and things that didn't make their their targets and so with that being said where will I was awarded a combat action ribbon actually the whole ship was from the commander for sleep which of course at the time was a vice admiral and now we have the ceremony and stuff in my just my captain and a few other captains of terror vessels were awarded the bronze star as well so those are pretty much pretty good tour while we were there congratulations and thank you and the other cool okay I have a couple questions if it's okay yes when you would go out to see how long do we have to see it and one at a crack well we go one deployments it depended on what the mission was so but I remember in my younger years when I first joined we had actually like to be your days so we're out to sea over forty five days was a beard a so we had like ninety days three months at a time the longest and then but they don't do that much anymore the beer days to try to get you back in and when you're out there for three months is it does the time drag does the time go quickly are you working so hard to time goes fast as a gift do you get bored or you to speak is too scared to get bored what's it like out there depending on what size ship your own but most of the time you're you're so engaged I mean you yes so engaged in what you're trying to do whether you're an injured man down the in your room are machines made or you know a C. T. up in the Intel spaces are not your so engaged you know days role in the night to night trolling the days and you know you your your you just gotta do what you gotta do and and you know you reality hit sometimes and you just go out there and look at that the clear blue skies are the rain or whatever you know you can use the time passes but you know Jim is it pension get high yes Sir I do absolutely thanks to a friend of mine that are active duty but the thing I miss the most is camaraderie and don't miss the navy that much but the people you meet you know who go on and have wonderful careers you know why your ring because you know there were you in the young you know they were young officers or or you know young enlisted men a after you retire you find out that their you know senior enlisted leaders or their senior naval officers you know after you retire and stuff like that so it's cool to see them still do you know having a career and and make an impact as well I am married now yes Sir I married in two thousand twelve when I was a thirty six race I waited just because you know in the military is hard and you see other people haven't struggles with her family in young children so I actually waited so my wife did a tornado two tours with me one in new port in one on in we more California when I was at my last duty station this is like being on the tour with you yes she is you know it took a little while for her to get used to it because she wasn't you know I'd explain a lot of things in wasn't just like us all right this is what we're going to add explain how a lot you know how the base was what you what you were able to do once you weren't supposed to do and things of that nature and everything else but during my last four actually got to ride the USS Carl Vinson which is named after the torture center so one of the only aircraft named after US senator kids aircraft carriers named usually after president but because he was on you know had a heavy hand in the military you know I think the US one of the committees and stuff like that but he had a long career in a in this in Congress as well so and that's a really nice ship to be on are you too old to to go back in the navy with if you wanted so because I retired in two thousand fifteen I have to be in the fleet reserve so the only way if something happened and they were you know trapped in are they needed reserves I would still be eligible I have so is is my fourth year so I six more years so twenty twenty five my last would be fully retired so hopefully nothing between now and then happens yeah but he seems like you like the navy it wouldn't be that bad or absolute no no because like I said it's still people and so me being a a cook I think that I could get some pull some strings poll possibly and you know just go no staff or something like that how many people did you cook for so we're on the carrier you know those five thousand but each each masses you know you have the cheese Massimino reward rooms on the carrier so anywhere from you know that four hundred or five hundred chiefs to the two three thousand enlisted support for three thousand I know this is kind of basic question about what did you eat on I'm bored with it burgers and fries or was it what was it you name it burgers fries so burgers in name your call sliders hot dogs are called rollers with French fries tater tots you know steak chicken lot of chicken rice vegetables no other people if you ask people the navy food challenge pretty good actually yeah it's gotten better and you talk about right yeah they've chocolate milk in a five gallon bids because in a milk machine actually yeah man I don't I I met her and when I was a little a wee lad we wanted this thing called the east coast tour with the Boy Scouts and we stayed at navy bases restated Brooklyn restated Norfolk we got to eat in the mess with the sailors and there's a lot of burgers and fries and chocolate milk I was very impressed yes yeah the child got really really good actually you know but the bad thing is when you think you're headed somewhere and the captain comes over the you know the one M. C. announcement says that are due to something we have to turn around so that's when we get the lobster tail on the steak dinner I legs thanks for sharing Robert absolutely you have a good night thank you absolutely thanks a lot you know I do thank Robert for service but I hesitate to do the whole knee jerk thank you for your service because it's become this mandatory thing that people say even though they don't mean it so I congratulated him and I truly deuce thank you for your service there was no other away now to express that without the cliche of thank you for your service I mean I want you to know that I really appreciate it I'm not just saying that thing that people feel they have to say that's got talk to Dave in the car next on WBZ so you can talk.

"richard stratton" Discussed on WBAI

WBAI

06:43 min | 2 years ago

"richard stratton" Discussed on WBAI

"And you are anything a lie or not. I certainly you know while I'm not trying to discount the the tragedy is the of come across in my own life I certainly have not gone through anything remotely to the extent of what Max survive however I would say that our general philosophies on blackboard sweetly into ones yeah. partly because of the kind of sad and partly because of the character choices that were made but it was kind of like taking a magnifying glass to to my on Billy nothing can break us ultimately if we keep on Lovin station tact. now if your breakout role was and Wall Street money never sleeps what led you to go for that movie. our older style when I was producing a political ads for MoveOn dot all about bringing troops home from Iraq against this is back in two thousand and five two thousand six and and we just hit it off yeah I I I grew up watching his movies he certainly was nature and clutch ally and becoming a writer actor storyteller in any capacity but we would going it cast me in a movie called thanks bill that could was kind of the dream role fortunately self rule before we started shooting so but a major let down well they're upset but then all when I heard he was doing Wall Street to like neatly something in the mail so you do are a Wall Street moved and the orchid you're not going to cast a guy from Brooklyn that that you know open up gas. and he he certainly made me work for I think I can do about five audition rules for that but finally won the grand program reserve playing this part with this extraordinary cast the collapsed on the casting room floor. bye woke up and realized the loads this is real because apple and forwarded to like that movie was yeah and what what you went to high times as executive editor and its description as quote an outlaw version of Vanity Fair. yes well at the time I was living in LA actor my mother's cancer had returned so honestly I'm looking for any job that would take the docking York's Richard Stratton. it was a good friend of my father and son certain time one of the biggest cost smugglers American ever see and observe all eight years I believe or else what he got out he became the you could go to prison entertainment guide and I had been around. first started seventy four so he and I will close the circle and then tore them look out from a and we're an ally he told me that he was coming and could become the editor chief of the magazine. radical makeover to bring it back to its roots as a medical source certainly right up my alley so the combination of the job will take you back to the York the opportunity to have a voice so that's the George W. bush's presidency. our allies confluence of ingredients gourmet. now I know you've already said a little bit but is there anything else you want to say about what to feel a movie about the past the second son has to convey to audiences today. well yeah when you talk about. the Holocaust we're talk about World War two. never a bad time to remind oneself that this happened the foods our recent past and obviously there's a lot of echoes today with the build up towards the kind of the Taliban. fascistic concern hello to our country go ahead I do find that it's very hard to write directly about today the one reason because the technology is changing so quickly by the time you write a script and and take the the months and years that it takes to get information out there it's already data so in many ways I think what we're seeing is a trend of looking back on our past with the new lands and re evaluate it what we thought it was in order to speak to what's happening today I certainly hope the second son that's under that category because the that that aspect of it was such an essential component down to the shoes I wore a little relief from nineteen fifty three whatever jobs on that album has certainly unique feature and inform the character hurt quite a bit they came all but but no I think it's really important to to examine those after so that time post World War two today and hopefully learn from some of the mistakes that were made. now about your father Norman Mailer what you feel is the biggest misconception about him. where to begin. I think the I think the biggest misconception about him is that he was gonna stop generals nothing could be further from the truth will out of the door whether they some very very stupid jokes and public not realizing how they would come across certainly paid for them at the end of the day my eyes the was obsessed with the human condition. somebody trying to write novels that word give us insight into deeper questions that hopefully with leaders in the house of direction. actually one of the projects that never happened developing valid so an adaptation old J. Michael Adams biographies Norman Mailer double life that I'm writing the pilot who and bottle for the series for now not to do it's only six seasons here. so if I can. get the right pieces in place to make this happen I think it will be a you know a couple of new generations were introduced to the life and work of Norman Mailer really takes us from World War two allies by kind of a fascinating lands to.

Norman Mailer J. Michael Adams eight years
"richard stratton" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

12:20 min | 2 years ago

"richard stratton" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Me all right here I was snore snooze alarm a job that wasn't literacy literally asleep but I was working at it will as we were on the air I'm looking at the clock I'm trying to think do we started five minutes after four o'clock or do we we started six minutes after four o'clock I'll spare you the boring details about how that that came to be but what I was doing is of editing some audio that I'm gonna play for you in just a second because this is a piece of audio that requires a lot of editing and then this guy literally was asleep on the job that's right I rely on that guy to tell me Sammy thank you some of the rooster who kicked us off each and every Sunday morning it's funny I am amazed at the radio station still allows me to keep him here because everything is a big deal here there's such a premium on space and everything like that and I'm amazed that they still allow the budget to have him fed on a weekly basis but sorry about that all are playing for you what I was editing and white required so much of my detail in in just a second but there's two big stories this week that on Sunday mornings and good morning if you're listening thank you for listening I'm Frank Maranda we are here each and every Sunday morning right around this time doing their thing and I try to do two things that you know get worth getting up at these crazy hours for one I try to do stories that not a lot of other people are doing and I try to make this a show worth listening to because if you listen to talk radio the whole week people are talking of the same stories about Simpson the comes around it's a little boring sometimes you need a break but the other thing I trying to is give me a break from what's on cable news and maybe offer you a different take however there is one story then I can't resist commenting on and inviting your feedback and that has to do with the death Jeffrey Epstein now Friday the New York City medical examiner came out and said the Jeffrey obscene staff was a suicide no I am a little surprised that so many people are just taking this as gospel and Jay diamond you may remember Jay dime in the talk show host he posted on his Facebook page after this announcement was made on Friday ladies and gentlemen this is your television news reader here the official New York City medical examiner has determined that Jeffrey obscene committed suicide while in the custody of the justice department of the United States of America you may now go back to your normal activities confident that there has been no foul play here and as a reminder to all good Americans there were terrible and the Iraq and then he goes on to slam down trump who he doesn't like it all but his point I think it's a good one is why should we accept this as gospel now let me begin with this I am not saying that Jeffrey opting didn't comes up there again if you are one of the lucky people who have been managing to avoid this story for the last month two months three months for years fifteen years lot I'm envious of you but to me at the very least this Jeffrey up steam episode underscores the incompetence and mismanagement at the bureau of prisons now I talk about this all the time I've talked about this with my numerous interviews with people housed in prisons I've talked about this with a number of other folks we talked about this in the aftermath of the Whitey Bolger death there's no reason the Jeffrey up steam should have been able to kill himself but the more we hear about this in spite of Friday's news with the New York City medical examiner the more we hear about this the more questions are raised again I'm not saying he didn't kill himself however I think the most likely scenario again not basing this on anything but I think the most likely scenario is that Jeffrey obscene was permitted to kill himself he was removed so here's what we know we know that he was on suicide watch and then removed from suicide watch we know that he was the most watched highest profile defendant in the country probably the world and yet he was being guarded by two guards one of whom wasn't even a guard we know that he was being guarded by two people that were won a sleep and to falsifying records about how often they checked up on him I can understand that happening if you're John Q. public but if you're the highest profile defended in the world the letters about every aspect of that prisoners care come down from Washington I know this from my relationship with the gadis John Gotti senior even John Gotti junior every time they wanted to move him from one cell to another there had to be orders from a deputy Attorney General so for all this to happen independent of anything from Washington I find a little suspicious so we know that and yet we know also that the internet message board the anonymous internet message board four chan which is a place where you go when you want to be anonymous and post things and communicate things lot of the ferries activity goes on there we know the anonymous internet message board four chan reported Jeffrey Epstein means death thirty eight minutes before the public learned about so they posted it on four chan thirty eight minutes before ABC news broke the story and long before any public authority talked about his death and one of the columns that I read this week that really spoke to me was a column in The New York Times by Walter Kim and I just posted on my Facebook page you can read it at Facebook dot com slash Moreno fan headline why I dabble in Jeffrey obscene conspiracy theories and then the sub headline is I believe that Neil Armstrong walked on the moon I believe that al Qaeda attacked us on September eleventh but on this story I've been mugged by unreality I read this column by Walter Kim us usually water Kern who's a literary critic and the author make novels including up in the air and he really spoke to me everything he said I just posted a mega read the whole column you can read it yourself on Facebook so we know that this internet message board posted his death before the public learned about now that could mean that one of the first responders linked to fortune okay that end of it self is not indicative of foul play we also hear reports that there was screaming and shrieking coming from apps dean's cell we also hear reports that he told his lawyer as he was leaving I'll see you Sunday we also hear reports that he was according to his lawyers very upbeat very optimistic about beating the case so you couple all of these end then the Washington post's did some very interesting reporting and they're being criticized by this in some quarters so they he broke several Browns brought bones in his neck including his hyoid now it is possible to Blake to break your hyoid when you hang yourself and the the New York City medical examiner's claiming that I've seen how themself from his knees but it's much more common to break your high to hot hydroid when you die from homicide through strangulation so when you're a little older which I've seen was sixty six years old when you again I'm not shedding any tears for obscene to me he's a you know put a file a creep a guy that got wealthy through pretty surreptitious means that that we I still have a lot of questions about the Charlie get spring is actually done some great reporting on and then used his wealth to victimize over and over again a lot of young women it is possible to break your hyoid especially if you're older accepting wise but you all this together his enormous wealth the enormous information that he had about other people the fact that in spite of the fact that he was the highest profile criminal defendant in the world he was being watched by people that were sleeping and I'm qualified to watch him and were falsifying prison records so I believe very much open the door to one of two possibilities either one he was actually murdered actually someone came into a cell hi there that is someone came into selling murdered him he was permitted to kill himself there was an indication that he was going to kill himself and then the higher ups at the at the bureau of prisons said it kinda like godfather part two which we can talk about a minute you know what if he either didn't don't interfere too much don't watching too closely we cover this at length on a liquid lunch this week to newsmax showed I'm pleased to co host and produce which is on every day at noon and we had it was very interesting a former defendant a former inmate at the MCC who lived there for three years Richard Stratton has been a regular guest on the show and he said essentially he thinks obscene was kept so I leave I is is it possible this was just a a suicide that was permitted to happen because of the incompetence of the BOP absolutely absolutely is it possible this was one of those you know in baseball they call it an unintentional intentional walk way unit you don't have the catcher stand up and put his hand out actually intensely walk somebody but they don't try and get too close to the strike zone or is it possible that he was murdered I allow the possibility of all three of those things so that's my take on Jeffrey up steam if you want I know I in turn if he was murdered I couldn't tell you who murdered I mean there's a lengthy lengthy potential laundry list of people and I know a lot of people on the right one to blame the Clintons I know a lot of people on the left one of blame Donald Trump I think it's possible that it his death could be the result of people you haven't even heard of being associated with that sting I think you could be any number of people you understand when you were a billionaire and you're hanging out with the likes of monarchs Senate leaders governors presidents I mean other billionaires you have any idea of the kind of connections something like that has and the kind of people that one let's say for instance you're the billionaire CEO of a fortune five hundred company and let's say obscene in his elocution if he was going to take a play implicates you as having attended one of the sex parties that he used a whole well let's say he doesn't even do that let's say you just says I used to flying so and so out on my jet all the time do you know the damage that that does want to someone's reputation and the damage that that does to someone stock price so I mean if you're a CEO or you're the majority shareholder in a fortune five hundred company a three four five dollar loss in stock.

thirty eight minutes three four five dollar sixty six years fifteen years five minutes three months six minutes three years two months
"richard stratton" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

09:01 min | 2 years ago

"richard stratton" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"R. N. dot and then may be able to comment on the CIA's involvement or alleged involvement in dealing drugs transporting drugs protecting the dealing in transporting of drugs well the first story that says I just I just found something out that's really cool yeah apparently you know we're talking I had brought up Gerry Weber for a law firm Gerry Weber about the guy from mercury news you talked about the you know the drug running on the C. I. A. kind of planning ended up with a bullet hole in the back of his head essentially it is suicide so you know a couple of shots that so there is a movie with Jeremy Renner I I believe that's winner enter I believe it is it's the bulls eye is it tough guy is it it's the archer from the Avengers series of movies the the new Marvel movies and he's the guy who played that he is in the movie called kill the messenger which is about Kerry web hello so apparently there's a looks like a you know a pretty good suspense is nearly as in like twenty fourteen so not really but not I still haven't seen the Julian assignment that either that's horrible for that one's good yeah so Dave so I was we're just saying this off the air is like this is happened absolutely everybody who's been on the show for some amount of time is we've all fallen for some form of you know what they're now calling fake news and this even though and then Johnson you point pointed out correctly here that even though the site calls itself a satire site it's not writing funny articles in every case there may be some that are more entertaining than others some of them just sound believable and decide to search the site the site is world news daily report dot com it says it's intended to sound like world news daily which is the conservative leaning news and opinion site that has been around for quite a long time so they just added the word report to it and it sounds similar enough right like world news daily world news daily report a you know that somebody is not paying attention is going to see this and they're gonna think it's real plus it's presented as though it is real this here's another headline from them to C. I. A. agents arrested by minute man while crossing Mexican border with thirteen hundred pounds of cocaine and it's got like a picture of what appear to be you know the minute man type of guys with machine guns in fatigues and things like that on say that there is an element of truth to every joke that's right and the thing is that these articles that although these articles might be satirical and I guess they they got out you guys are just great I think but they may be fake but that doesn't change you know that doesn't change my message or the idea that I feel like this is a majorly important subject and that's why we we're going to continue talking about this is this is important and I it it doesn't change like my experience doesn't change anything about my perception that these guys don't want to stop the drugs that that they're involved and in the way that they're profiting from it and I don't mean like captain clean can sergeant you know bill co I'm talking about like people like that like the bush family are people hired a high upside high high up you know are making lots of money off this and they killed a lot of people to protect it and this problem with this is to with this fake news kind of stuff is that you can't it's not easy to spot either because you can't necessarily just trust sites like fact check or pulling a fact or Snopes because every single one of these sites yes you know so while some of them might be say oh well you know what is it daily world Daily News report dot com is gonna be fake news or the onion they're gonna point out the obvious fake news yeah yes some of them might point that out and then they're not going to say that this you know obviously fake story from say CNN which is an outright lie they're not like that yeah you know to help and to write you gotta be careful believing something just because it's written on the mainstream side a lot of times those reporters get the story wrong but in many cases you do get sometimes more than one source for similar stories you can look over and find out what our tea is saying which is Russia Russia today the Russian government propaganda on you kind of have to if you want to read the news you have to read let us you have to read a source that's on the left obviously on the left a source that's obviously on the right and at least one or two international sources when you're looking for news to get a full picture and then you still have to make your own decision it's true yeah well you know it's funny I was looking at me like I look at fox news and I looked at CNN just to kind of see what type of things that they were putting on their website what things they were showing and I thought was really telling about what society's really cares about because you know like he headlines were are about what's the woman's name my N. as zero disease to be the show of that married with children you know the guy in remember no no no not Roseanne Barr really good looking guy and married with children he and his character's name yeah yeah I think I deserve a guy that was the husband while he's in a new show now in in that show he's not married to this sort of Hispanic woman who's really good looking anyway so that he key I forget her name whatever and they say look at her bikini on the beach she's not afraid with her husband to show this is N. or whatever this was I fox or CNN and he also had the you know the other popular just they had it was it was just about a lot of celebrities that salon look at Haiti Segoe Katie said yeah yeah meanwhile meanwhile did you know that they killed two hundred forty nine thousand civilians in Afghanistan and Iraq is that all thousand one well that's civilians that's not military contractors that's kids and moms old ladies and old ladies and dads two hundred and fifty thousand so let's get into a story here Dave because I've got something about the CIA since you brought into a piece that we sounded real but turns out it wasn't here's one that's more allegedly real from the intercept okay the intercept is a respected news website it's pretty independent probably has a bit of a leftist tends to it but they do a lot of good research on the stuff they do and they're actually reporting on the history channel back in twenty seventeen did a special about the war on drugs and it has some allegations about the CIA's involvement summary from the intercept it says the core truth is the war on drugs has always been a pointless sham for decades the federal government has engaged in a shifting series of alliances of convenience with some of the world's largest drug cartels so while the U. S. incarceration rate has quintupled since president Richard Nixon first declared the war on drugs in nineteen seventy one top narcotics dealers have simultaneously enjoyed protection at the highest levels of power in America on one hand it shouldn't be surprising the volume in this dumb documentation of this fact in dozens of books has long been available to anyone with curiosity in a library card yet somehow despite the fact that the US has no formal system of censorship this monumental scandal has never before been presented in a comprehensive way in the medium where most Americans get their information television that's why the new special that were new in twenty seventeen the history channel had called quote America's war on drugs on quote is a genuine milestone they say we've recently seen how ideas that once seemed absolutely preposterous and taboo for instance the Catholic Church was conscientiously guarding priests who sexually abuse children I certainly think it's interesting that they're actually having a show that sounds like something like history and not something about aliens yeah right or that Bill Cosby may not have been the best choice for America's dad can after years of silence finally break through in the popular consciousness and exact real consequences the series could be a watershed in doing the same for the reality behind one of the most cynical and cruel policies in U. S. history and then talk about the series in who's the we were the producers there's a bunch of footage and recreations than they've got former D. A. operatives as well as journalists and drug dealers themselves that are interviewed in this there's no mealy mouth chuckling about what happened the first episode opens with the voice of Lindsey Maranda one time clandestine CIA officer the clearing quote the agency was elbow deep with drug traffickers unquote then Richard Stratton a marijuana smuggler turned writer and television producer explains quote most Americans would be utterly shocked if they knew the depth of involvement that the CIA the Central Intelligence Agency has had in the international drug.

R. N. dot CIA Gerry Weber thirteen hundred pounds one hand
"richard stratton" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

11:40 min | 3 years ago

"richard stratton" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Welcome back to coast to coast back with Richard Stratton, of course, and your phone calls as well, Richard. You're telling us a whimsical story. Do you wanna finish it? Well, I was telling you actually about seeing what the the the devastation that was Kari caused by these planes that were spraying paraquat. Yeah. Fields of marijuana in Mexico. And and it was looked like a big black smudge on the side of this. This mountain across from where I was in the guy told me that when they sprayed it there were kids out there and the kids had died. I mean, just you know, for what I mean, it didn't it doesn't stop anything. But. Probably spraying us anyways Richards book is called smuggler's blues. And I assume you can get this at bookstore style, Richard. You can get into bookstores. You can get it at Amazon it is available. I think from Barnes and noble, and yeah, it's out today. Today's the day perfect timing as the publishing day. Yeah. And smuggler's blues is the first of a trilogy. The second book is called gulag America the prison years, and it tells the whole story of my eight years in prison and then the third book, which I'm just beginning on now it's called in the world. And that's about getting out and how difficult it is to to readjust to to society. You know, often say that it might have been different. If I had kids, I I'm grateful of the fact that I didn't have kids when I went away because you know, to to break that been hard. Yeah. That's the other thing about locking people up is it you destroy families. You know when you put somebody. In prison for fifteen years. Ten years that family is without a breadwinner there without that element of the family. And a lot of women are getting locked up these drug laws too. So it's really done its our longest war. It's been going on since the thirties. It's probably, you know, it's an and it's a war against the American people. It's like, it's very very destructive. Although, of course, for for law enforcement, it's been a boon because it's after prohibition these agencies federal agents were looking for something to do, and they needed something to do and Harry answering came up with the idea of criminalizing marijuana, and, you know, going after after drugs, that's where the whole drug war began many people, percentage wise, do you think are in jail because of petty drugs. Well, they say that sixty percent of the population. That's in prison prisoners there for non violent drug related offenses. So that's that's a huge huge proportion. Now, there may be even more that got into Bank robbery or something like that because. Yeah. Because of that and off-shoot sure. So so it's probably I if you if you look at the effect of illegal drugs on the coal crime control establishment. It's probably much more. It's probably even higher than sixty percent is Jilin drugs at the basis of a lot of why these guys go out, and rob banks is they need money to pay for these exorbitant prices for for these illegal drugs. Well, you know, we talked about the the cost of prisons. What about the DA how much do they cost us the DA caustic tremendous amount? But also, you know, now, it's homeland security, you know, up in the Canadian US sport is they've got drones. And you know, our friend Mr. Trump wants to build a wall down on the Mexican border. So any it's it's unbelievable. How much money they spend trying to stem the the drugs. I mean, he was the one who said most of these guys are drug dealers coming into the country, which I think is crazy because if you're a drug dealer, you're gonna stay in Mexico. You don't wanna come to this country, you send your drugs to the summer driving? She wants to drugs here. Put them on mules. Right. Yeah. I mean chapeau didn't want to come to the United States because he knew that he wasn't getting out if he came here. Now, he says he wants to come here. Oh, really he wants to go to the wants to go to court here or something like that. Who knows who knows? When you were. You were in Lebanon. Right. I was in Lebanon. I was in Beirut. It was gorgeous during the time. You were probably there. Right. Well, actually when I first went there. It was gorgeous bay was the the Paris of the Middle East. Sure was wonderful city. But then the civil war broke out. Yeah. Okay. The years that I spent there in fact, I I write about it in the book, I barely escaped there in the in the early eighties. When the Israelis invaded it got really intense. And I the only way I could get out of the airport was closed. I had to go actually backup through the valley and get to Damascus and Syria and fly out of Syria because you couldn't get out of the country. It was it was terrible. What happened in that country run into any people from ISIS? Oh, they didn't have ISIS standard. There was no ice in those days. Believe it or not. Let's go to Charlie in Arizona now. Hey, charlie. Thanks for holding. You're up with us. Good evening, Georgia and Witcher. My call. I have two quick questions. And I come and the first question is what is your opinion of the legalization of all drugs in in Portugal? And the statement that was made by good push beheads that in ten years. Yeah. Consumption had gone down by fifty percent. My second question is what do you think of the new drug war? That's being fought on the backs of visit will people in chronic pain. And my comment is is ludicrous for the government to sagging cannabis his Giga one when they have a sold prescription THC for years and years as marrying off which is a derivative of marijuana. Of course. Right. Okay. Thanks for that, Charlie. Go ahead, Richard. Well, Charlie I think you're absolutely right about the situation in Portugal. I mean, that's the really interesting thing. They've legalize all drugs in Portugal, and the drug usage has gone down the criminality has gone down. It's proven everything that we've been talking about tonight. Now, what was the second question? He was talking about. What about the the gosh, I dunno while the life. I wrote that down to go ahead, Charlie the new drug war. Oh, the new drug well on the backs of disabled disabled chronic pain, while I've always been a believer in medicinal use of marijuana to help people. I mean, I was an advocate of that back in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven. Yeah. There's no question that all various kinds of pain are relieved with Canada, swift THC. So it just you know, my my my idea is they should all be legalize. It should be controlled not necessarily by the government. But by a. Yes by clinics, and by a national advisory council of people who understand this this product is this plant and advise people how to use it because it can be dangerous. There's no question about it. You know, anytime that you are inhaling Kohl's and smoke into your lungs can it because it can cause problems for you. So I don't say that, you know, people should just go out and start smoking pot. No, I'm saying that we should we should study it we should legalize it, and we should make it valuable, but we should teach kids, particularly I don't believe the young kids should be smoking pot. I don't think that I mean, certainly when the brain still developing it's it's proven that. It's not a good thing to be smoking pot. Do anything, you know, to be smoking cigarettes or alcohol or anything to you till you're at least well into your teams in probably in your twenties before you should ideally. I think that people shouldn't be necessarily using drugs at all, except if they have a chronic situation that needs will leaf I happen to believe that recreational marijuana is not harmful. But as long as you don't overdo it. So it, you know, it just we need really to as I said instead of just saying, no, it's just a K N O W saying, no drug education is the answer to this content. Like the like Portugal that it's going to go down not up. Absolutely. There's no question the forbidden fruit will be taken away. And it's not going to be so. You know, you're doing something illegal. Let's go to Brian in Montreal. Hi, brian. Go ahead. Yeah. Great topic. I was one of those hippy mafia guys you were talking about. I got blessed with almost four hundred pounds of pot in New Jersey in the seventies. And what does that look like Brian four hundred pounds of pot? If you had to look at it would be big data days is they they compressed it, and they had it in bales. And it was an interesting situation when they let me out with the like, I was I was actually I'm Canadian. So I wasn't an. I couldn't work in the U S. The US. So they. Parole office when they released being they said, we don't expect you to stay in the US because you can't earn a living. But when we don't show up for your parole hearing. Officer mccleary days for a while as you. So I went home and I don't smoke anymore. I agree one hundred percent education. That's the way to go. And technically thirty five years later, I still on a parole violation. Well, you know, it's interesting calling from Canada. My partner was a Canadian. He was called the hippie. Godfather of Canada, this guy Robert rose Rowbotham was his name from Toronto. He was part of the the whole college up there forget the name of it now. But it was right in downtown Toronto. So the Canadians have always been the way ahead of the Americans as far as I think Trudeau is talking about legalizing federally in Canada now. But there they they don't give you as much time in Canada, the prisons are much more geared towards towards rehabilitation than the US prisons there. There are a lot more advanced than Canada. But this case that I was talking about earlier that happened in Syracuse. They they extradited fourteen Canadians. It was the largest single expedition of Canadian citizens on one case to bring them back into the US to try them for this marijuana conspiracy. And they were bringing. In over the mohawk Indian reservation in the northern part of name. I mean, the northern part of New York state, and they gave these two guys from Montreal. Well, one of them was from macho I think the other one might have been from somewhere Ottawa, but they gave them life without parole. Wow. These guys are never going to get out of prison richer. What do you think of entrapment laws? I mean to to be able to create a crime to catch somebody..

marijuana United States Canada Charlie Richard Stratton Portugal Mexico Brian Montreal Amazon Lebanon chronic pain Kari Toronto ISIS Barnes Syria Beirut robbery Middle East
"richard stratton" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

10:53 min | 3 years ago

"richard stratton" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Okay. Welcome back to coast to coast, Richard Stratton with us for a couple of hours tonight. He wrote the novel smack goddess during his eight-year term in federal prison. He's now it claimed filmmaker screenwriter his films have won prizes cans film festival. The Berlin film festival is a writer and consultant for HBO's ause. That's the story about being in prison. He's the founder of prison life, the former editor and publisher of high times contributed to Rolling Stone. Esquire G Q, and so many others in here. He is on coast to coast as we talk about his work smuggler's blues. Richard great book. Interesting life. Welcome to the show. Thank you. Thank you for having them. A pleasure. Let me ask you this. Let's let's go back. I guess to the beginning eight years in federal prison. What happened would you do? Well, smuggled pot is basically what I did. And I. I was convicted under what they call the kingpin law. And fortunately for me, I was sentenced in nineteen Eighty-four. If I've been sentenced to ninety eighty six I would have had a mandatory life without parole sentence. And in fact in Syracuse New York recently to Canadians would just sentenced to life without parole for importing marijuana for smuggling pot, even though it's virtually legal in this country now Leo in several states legal for recreational use in a few states and believe me they're making a lot of money with tax returns. But we still have these unbelievably harsh laws on the federal books. And you know, like, I said, I if I had been sense to couple of years later, I'd still be in prison. I never would I I'd be there instead of out here with a family and career and a whole life. So it's something really think about the marijuana laws that poor story of that guy in New Orleans twenty years to life for thirty one dollars worth of candy bars. He still. Now since we've got over three million people in prison in this country. It's just out of control. I mean, what why why are we doing, you know, there's almost no rehabilitation behind bars. People don't get any kind of training or counseling for what they're gonna do when they get out. So I don't know the criminal could be Justice system is very badly screwed up, and, you know, Bama claimed he was going to do something about it. And I think he did actually they did let guys go. But a lot of these people who are locked up are locked up for nonviolent crimes. You know, many of them of most of these guys are jail for drugs are Latinos or African Americans from inner city neighborhoods who have virtually no other alternative. I mean, I would say no other alternative but had very few other alternatives for employment. So they'll go out and start selling drugs, and they go to prison for incredibly long time. I mean, if the laws are out of control. In richard. Let me ask you this in terms of I want to get into the eight years that you spent because I think that's ridiculous for what the what they did to you. But I have been a longtime advocate of not because of usage what I just think. It would it would minimize crime of legalizing Oliver everything cocaine heroin all of it. And let people do what they wanna do to their own bodies for crying out loud in. I don't think this is just me speaking that it's going to increase drug use. By any larger amount at all because I think anybody who wants to use drugs right now. We'll be able to find them and can't find them, and they are finding them. I don't know. What do you think of that? Well, I I agree with you one hundred percent. In fact, they found in the states where they have legalized marijuana. It's gone down to give the usage of marijuana has gone down amongst teenagers because it's not a big thrill anymore. It's not the forbidden fruit anymore. So I think that the whole way that we're dealing with this drug issue in this country is is just it's wrong. I mean, the idea of just say, no N O W should be just say know, K N O W, and what we need to do is we need to educate people about the the pitfalls in the dangers of. There's no question that. Drug usage can be dangerous. I'm not here to say that God would kill you. They can kill you, of course. But so can alcohol kill you and food. And I see people on the street all the time smoking cigarettes. So how can they do that to killing themselves? But the point is that as you say in a free society, it's not up to the government to tell us how we can alter our consciousness as long as we're not hurting other people. This is the American way of life and the thing that most interests me now about this whole marijuana movement in this country is the way that Americans have finally said, you know, what these laws are insane. I mean, I grew up during the whole Reefer madness era. We were told that you know, you smoke a couple joints. And the next thing. You know, you'll be main lining heroin. You'll be out raping young women in the streets. And we were like, what did you just what happens is the government tells you these things you get high, and you you realize it's not true. And then you begin to question everything you question, the Kennedy's assassination. You question. Why are we in Vietnam? So I think it's very interesting. How the marijuana MU? Movement has kind of re sparked this whole idea of participatory democracy. We've had people say all across the nation. These laws are ridiculous. We're not going to adhere to them. It's probably the largest exhibition of a civil and criminal disobedience that in the history of our country where people just say, you know, what we're gonna smoke this pot. We're not gonna listen to you guys. So I I think that's fascinating. I think that marijuana as a metaphor for how American democracy works is to me. The most exciting thing about it, quite frankly. And I think that right now. As you. I'm sure no of the major problems that they have in this country right now, it's heroin. I mean air when oh it's growing like crazy. It's become so much suburban these days to exactly in a lot of it comes because these people get addicted to opioids through prescription drugs. So again, we're failing to educate people about the Homs and the and the dangers of these drugs. I think really if we spent even a quarter of the money that we spend locking people up for. I mean, it costs a lot of money to a lot of people just like forty thousand dollars a year to keep over three million dollars three million people in prison if we took percentage of that money and use it for drug education for rehabilitation, and we got smart about realizing that it's not gonna work the the the legal approach the law enforcement approach it didn't work for during prohibition. And it's not working during drug prohibition. So it's really time. I think for for. Us to wake up and change the tune here, and people are just they're so concerned that if all the drugs are legal where we don't go after these people that everyone's gonna start using. And that's not the case. It's not the case. And that's a really interesting thing about it. And I do think it has a lot to do with the idea of the forbidden fruit. It's more exciting people say to me, you know, they talked to me about marijuana now. And I said, well, I was in the business when it was fun when it was exciting. I'm not really interested in getting into the legal marijuana business because I've got other things to do. But it's it's the the forbidden fruit. And meanwhile, what we do is we empower and enrich a really dangerous segment of the culture. Which is these drug lords gave these guys in Mexico, Colombia and other countries don't have any kind of scruples, they'll kill your whole family, if you that's right? Yeah. It's we're what we're doing is empowering them in Richardson them, keeping these drugs illegal. They don't have the the ethics of the Italian mob that they used to have in the thirties and forties where your family was hands off. That's right. Just one after you these these cartels will go after your kids, and your wife and everything else. Yeah. It's a lot more vicious than the whole cocaine thing. I mean, like changed the whole the whole picture here in this country. What what did the TV show, Richard breaking bad due to people in terms of glorifying methamphetamine? Well, you know, I watched that show. I binged watched it just not too long ago and. Addicted isn't it? The drug. Yeah. I mean, the first three seasons. I thought were incredible. Once they started to get to the to the Mexicans. They, you know, they kind of dipped down into the to the area of caricatures and in the end with that Gatling gun or whatever. Skyway from a mild mannered chemistry to to a mass murderer. So, but I mean, I don't know if they if they glamorized because those guys were tweaking on on, you know, they they were pretty pathetic impre- sad. The matthews. Methamphetamines an unbelievably dangerous drug. It's what does your nervous? It's all it's all dangerous. We need to educate people about it. I mean, I see these ads on TV about cigarette smoking what it can do to you. And it's like, oh my God. I mean, it'll kill you wipe out your lungs and everything else. So how did you? We're coming up on a break. Pretty simple. We got a little few minutes here before we come back. How did you get caught? What happ? Well, how I got caught was the oldest way you get caught in this business. Someone else got caught doing something else. Lebanese guys got caught here in New York City selling heroin something which I never had anything to do with. In fact, that was one of the reasons I fell out with these guys with because I refuse to have anything to do with heroin. They got busted selling heroin. The DA knew about me 'cause I have been involved in the founding of high times magazine, and I was involved in the the the attempt to legalize marijuana from a long long time ago. So did they knew about me they'd arrested me in nineteen seventy eight. But the case the case got thrown out. So they knew about me, and they were looking for a way to get me. And they arrested these Lebanese guys here in New York City. Hold on right there, Richard. We're gonna come right back and pick up that story fascinating smuggler's blues. That's the name of his work. We'll be back in a moment at coast to coast. AM? Coast insiders, the new version of the coast to coast AM app is now available for iphone and.

marijuana heroin Richard Stratton editor and publisher cocaine HBO Berlin New York City methamphetamine Rolling Stone founder Bama high times magazine Syracuse happ writer Homs Kennedy
"richard stratton" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

12:31 min | 3 years ago

"richard stratton" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Welcome back to coast to coast back with Richard Stratton, of course, and your phone calls as well, Richard. You're telling us a whimsical story. Do you wanna finish it? Well, I was telling you actually about seeing what the the the devastation that was carrying caused by these planes that were spraying paraquat. Yeah. Seals of marijuana in Mexico. And it was looked like a big black smudge on the side of this. This mountain across from where I was in the guy told me that when they sprayed it there were kids out there and the kids had died. I mean, it just you know, for what I mean, it didn't it doesn't stop anything. But. Probably spraying us anyways Richards book is called smuggler's blues. And I assume you can get this at bookstores style Richard you can get into bookstores. You can get it at Amazon it is available. I think from Barnes and noble, and yeah, it's out today. Today's the day perfect timing as the publishing day. Yeah. And smuggler's blues is the first of a trilogy. The second book is called gulag America the prison years, and it tells the whole story of my eight years in prison and then the third book, which I'm just beginning on now is called in the world. And that's about getting out and how difficult it is to to readjust to to society. You know, often say that it might have been different if I had kids. I am grateful for the fact that I didn't have kids when I went away because you know, to to break apart hard. Yeah. That's the other thing about locking people up is you destroy families. You know when you put somebody. In prison for fifteen years. Ten years that family is without a breadwinner there without that element of the family. And a lot of women are getting locked up in these drug laws too. So it's really done it. It's our longest war. It's been going on since the thirties. It's probably, you know, it's an and it's a war against the American people. It's like, it's very very destructive. Although, of course, for for law enforcement, it's been a boon because it's after prohibition these agencies federal agents were looking for something to do, and they needed something to do and Harry answering your came up with the idea of criminalizing marijuana, and, you know, going after after drugs, that's where the whole drug war began how many people percentage wise, do you think are in jail because of petty drugs. Well, they say that sixty percent of the population in prison is there for non violent drug related offenses. Wow. So that's that's a huge huge proportion. Now, there may be even more that got into Bank robbery or something like that. Because of. Yeah. Because off sure so so it's probably I if you if you look at the effect of illegal drugs on the coal crime control establishments, probably much more is probably even higher than sixty percents is dealing drugs are at the basis of a lot of these guys go out and rob banks as they need money to pay these exorbitant prices for for these are legal drugs. Well, you know, we talked about the the cost of prisons. What about the DA how much do they cost us every the DA caustic tremendous amount? But also, you know, now, it's homeland security you open the Canadian US sport is they've got drones. And you know, our friend Mr. Trump was to build a wall down on the Mexican border. So it's it's unbelievable. How much money they spend trying to stem the drugs. I mean, he was the one who said most of these guys are drug dealers coming into the country, which I think is crazy because if you're a drug dealer, you're gonna stay in Mexico. You don't wanna come to this country, you send your drugs to the seminar and she wants to drugs here. Put them on mules, right? Yeah. I mean chapeau didn't want to come to the United States because he knew that he wasn't getting out if he came here. Now, he says he wants to come here. But really he wants to go to the wants to go to court here or something like that. Who knows who knows? When you were. We were in Lebanon. Right. I was in Lebanon. I was in Beirut. It was gorgeous during the time. How you were probably there. Right. Well, actually when I first went there. It was gorgeous Beirut was the Paris of the Middle East was for wonderful city. But then the civil war broke out. Yeah. Okay. The years that I spent there in fact, I write about it in the book, I barely escaped there in the in the early eighties. When the Israelis invaded it got really intense. And I the only way I could get out of the airport was closed. I had to go actually back up through the valley and get to Damascus and Syria and fly out of Syria because you couldn't get out of the country. It was it was terrible. What happened in that country run into any people from ISIS? Oh, they didn't have ISIS thundered. Now. There was no in those days leave or not let's go to Charlie in Arizona now. Hey, charlie. Thanks for holding. You're up with us. Good evening, George and Richard, Shirley. I have two quick questions, and I come and. The first question is what is your opinion of the legalization of all drugs in in Portugal? And the statement that was made by good push beheads that in ten years. Conception had gone down by fifty percent. My second question is what do you think the new drug war that's being fought on the backs of disabled people in chronic pain? And my comment is is ludicrous for the government to Sega cannabis his to one when they have a sold prescription THC for years and years as marinol. Which is a derivative of marijuana. Of course. Right. Okay. Thanks for that, Charlie. Go ahead, Richard. Well, Charlie I think you're absolutely right about the situation in Portugal. I mean, that's the really interesting thing. They've legalize all drugs in Portugal, and the drug usage has gone down the criminality has gone down. It's proven everything that we've been talking about tonight. Now, what was the second question? He was talking about the what about the the gosh. I dunno wildlife. I broke that down to go ahead. Charlie the new drug war. Oh, the new drug or well on the backs of a disabled disabled people chronic pain, while I've always been a believer in medicinal use of marijuana to help people. I mean, I was an advocate of that back in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven. Yeah. There's no question that all various kinds of pain relief with Canada, swift THC. So it's just you know, my my my idea is they should all be legalize. It should be controlled not necessarily by the government. But by a Fleming. Yes by clinics, and by a national advisory council people who understand that this this product this plant and advise people how to use it because it can be dangerous. There's no question about it. You know, anytime that you are inhaling Kohl's and smoke into your lungs can because it can cause problems for you. So I don't say that, you know, people should just go out and start smoking pot. No, I'm saying that we should we should study it we should legalize it. And we should make it available. But we should teach kids, particularly I don't believe the young kids should be smoking pot. I don't think that I mean, certainly when the brain is still developing its it's proven that. It's not a good thing to be smoking pot to do anything, you know, to be smoking cigarettes or alcohol or anything to you till you're at least well into your teams and probably in your twenties before you should. Ideally, I think. I people shouldn't be necessarily using drugs at all except if they have a clinic situation that needs relief. I happen to believe that recreational marijuana is not harmful. But as long as you don't overdo it. So, you know, it just we need really to as I said instead of just saying, no, it's just a K N O W just say, no drug education is the answer to this. I contend like the like Portugal that it's going to go down not up. Absolutely. There's no question the forbidden fruit will be taken away. And it's not going to be. So, you know, you're doing something illegal. Let's go to Brian in Montreal. Hi, brian. Go ahead. Yeah. Great topic. I was one of those hippy mafia guys you were talking about. I got busted with almost four hundred pounds of pot in New Jersey in the seventies. And what does that look like Brian four hundred pounds of pot? If you had to look at it would be big. They did in those days, they they compressed it, and they had it in bales. And it was an interesting situation when they let me out with the like, I was I was actually I Canadian. So I wasn't I I couldn't work in US Hough. I think you I saw. Parole office when they released being they said, we don't expect you to stay in the US because you can't earn a living. But when we when you don't show up for your year. Parole officer in thirty days for while h you so I went home, and I I don't smoke around any more. I agree one hundred percent education. That's the way to go. And but technically thirty five years later, I still on a parole violation. Well, you know, it's interesting it calling from Canada. My partner was a Canadian. He was called the hippie godfather of Canada, this guy Robert road Rowbotham was his name from Toronto. He was part of the the whole college up there forget the name now. But it was right in downtown Toronto. So the Canadians have always been the way ahead of the Americans as far as and I think Trudeau is talking about legalizing federally in Canada now. But there they they don't give you as much time in Canada, the prisons are much more geared towards towards rehabilitation than the US prisons there. There are a lot more advanced in Canada. But this case that I was talking about earlier that happened in Syracuse. They they extradited fourteen Canadians. It was the largest single expedition of Canadian citizens on one case to bring them back into the US to try them for this marijuana conspiracy. And they were bringing. In over the mohawk Indian reservation in the northern part of name. I mean, the northern part of New York state, and they gave these two guys from Montreal. Well, one of them was from. I think the other one might have been from somewhere Ottawa, but they gave them life without parole. Wow. Lifelock sees guys never going to get out of prison. What are you thinking richer? What do you think of entrapment laws? I mean to to be able to create a crime to catch somebody. I tell the story about how when these the agents busted me back in nineteen seventy eight case that I'd beat. They said it actually RCMP was involved in that case to they said, you know, what we were doing while. We're waiting for you to come pick up that load at the airport. I go now what were you doing? Oh, we're sitting around smoking joints and snorting coke. No. Yeah. And then the guy goes, you know, what's going to happen to you. When you get to court, I go now what's going to happen because we're going to get up there and tell are lies you're going to get up there and tell your alive assistant matter who's live Jerry bleach So they know the, you know, if you got a little hidden tape recorder how much you could have used that in court yet. But anyway, I put it in my book. So yeah, exactly. Jeff in Culver City, California. Jeff, go ahead. Hi stratton..

marijuana Richard Stratton Portugal United States Canada Charlie Mexico Montreal Amazon Lebanon ISIS Beirut Brian Barnes Syria Lifelock RCMP Jeff Toronto robbery
"richard stratton" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"richard stratton" Discussed on KTRH

"Welcome back to coast to coast back with Richard Stratton, of course, and your phone calls as well, Richard. You're telling us a whimsical story. Do you wanna finish it? Well, I was telling you actually about seeing what the the the devastation that was carrying caused by these planes that were spraying paraquat. Yeah. Fields of marijuana in Mexico. And and it was looked like a big black smudge on the side of this. This mountain across from where I was in the guy told me that when they sprayed it there were kids out there and the kids had died. I mean, it just you know, for what I mean, it didn't it doesn't stop anything. But. Probably spraying us anyways Richards book is called smuggler's blues. And I assume you can get this at bookstores style Richard you can get into bookstores. You can get it at Amazon it is available. I think from Barnes and noble, and yeah, it's out today. Today's the day perfect timing today's the publishing day. Yeah. And smuggler's blues is the first of a trilogy. The second book is called gulag America the prison years, and it tells the whole story of my eight years in prison and then the third book, which I'm just beginning on now is called in the world. And that's about getting out and how difficult it is to to readjust to to society. You know, often say that it might have been different if I'd had kids. I I'm grateful for the fact that I didn't have kids when I went away because you know, to to break. Hard. Yeah. That's the other thing about locking people up is that you destroy families. You know, when you put somebody in prison for fifteen.

Richard Stratton Amazon marijuana Barnes Mexico eight years