20 Episode results for "Richard Serra"

What we know so far about the Russian hack

Reset

05:17 min | 10 months ago

What we know so far about the Russian hack

"Adam is the payments platform made for today tomorrow and whatever comes next with adnan single solution. It's simple to accept all kinds of payments in-app online in store touch free and beyond and it seamlessly adapts with your business. So keep your customers. Happy and your business growing with adnan business not boundaries visit amazon dot com slash. Vox to learn more. That's a d. y. e. n. dot com slash box Russian hackers are believed to be responsible for a new cyber attack into the us treasury department commerce department in government agencies. It setting off alarms. That part's of washington. Could be at risk but although news at this just broke. What's kind of crazy is it. Hack is suspected to have happened much earlier. Richard serra morrison is following this for us and here to tell us what exactly we know. Hey sarah so backup. You're like when exactly do intelligence officials think this hack occurred. So the malware leave behind. It was installed probably between march and june so quite a while ago. wow okay. That's an unusually long time for something like this to happen before we know about it. Honestly i don't know but it's certainly a long time for someone who has access to various systems to have had that access and there's probably a lot they could they could do. And so what exactly happened here. Basically there's a lot of government agencies and there's a lot of companies in general use this network management software from a company called solar winds. And you know they were updating it the way you update various you know your computer or your phone tells you update stuff in an update for that software in that had malware in it. I don't think we know exactly how it got there. But it's there and once it was there any of these companies agencies that you know stoled potentially were affected by this which then gave the hackers access to various parts of the systems. They were installed on. Do we know what damage they've done or is it. I know obviously we're just hearing about this recently. But do we have any fears or any insight into how bad it could be. People have been pretty quiet about it. I know that the cybersecurity infrastructure security agency issued emergency directive Any government agencies. That are using this. Which store indicates they don't. They don't do that very often. Indicates that they're kind of scared of it but right now other than there are some reports that like e mails were accessed. We don't know much more than that right now and we are sure it was russians. Do we know who exactly within russia. Or what a motive might be so reports. I've seen say that government officials services and other sources believe that it's this russian intelligence linked hacker group called cozy bear. The russian government has denied it right. We've we've heard of that before right. Yeah cozy various believed to be behind. I think hacks of obama administration i believe hillary clinton campaign's emails and possibly Attempts to hack research agencies that are doing research into the coronavirus vaccine a couple months ago so one thing i always struggle with. And maybe you can help me out. Here is when i hear about hacks in the news like i feel like i never have a sense of proportionality right. I never know you know sure. There's a hack every day somewhere in the world like you the sense about how. How often something like this of this magnitude happens helped me assess how concerned we should be for america. I never liked to be too scared of anything. And i don't want to say people should be scared like right. Now we just know a lot of government agencies in the military you know use this company and not sure exactly about this product. Thousands of them might have been affected companies and government agencies. So there's a lot there it's been there for a while we don't know how targeted it was like you know which agencies exactly might have been accessed what they wanted or even what they were really looking for right now. So you know i. It's it's a concern. Obviously the government is taking it seriously. So i mean the idea of this. Emergency directive is that's somewhat unusual. And i don't see that everyday. Cybersecurity and infrastructure security agency issued that emergency directive. It's only the fifth one They'd issued since two thousand fifteen so you know. They're pretty rare. You can read more about this at recode dot net ceremonies and thanks so much for joining us. Thank you adding. Is the payments platform for today tomorrow and whatever comes next with adnan single solution. It's simple to accept all kinds of payments inap- online in store touch free and beyond and it seamlessly adapts your business so keep your customers happy and your business growing with adnan business not boundaries visit adian dot com slash box to learn more. That's a d. y. e. n. dot com slash box.

us treasury department commerc Richard serra morrison russian government obama administration Hack Adam amazon sarah washington hillary clinton russia Cybersecurity and infrastructu america
Einstein's Unified Field Theory

The Best of Coast to Coast AM

20:43 min | 1 year ago

Einstein's Unified Field Theory

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I'm Kim as a rally in celebration of the hundredth anniversary of American women getting the vote where bringing you the voices of a hundred groundbreaking and history-making women listen to Seneca's one hundred women to here on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts wherever you get your podcasts. Now here's a highlight from coast to coast am on iheartradio. Welcome back to coast to coast. Am Richard Serra sitting in for George Noory and Mark Fiorentino, stay with us the author of Master of reality. So the the experiment again, that is in the final chapter of that book and you're encouraging physicists all around the world. To to perform this experiment I mean, what's involved I mean, is this a costly experiment? A lot of equipment required there is a need a powerful magnet. So you know high magnetics labs that'd be the place to do more powerful the magnet. The more likely you'll see. The expected effect. and then we would be good is to turn it on at different. Intensities and then chart plot out. I expect there to be an exponential. Game in the blockage of the gravitational field as so as you get stronger gravity electromagnetic. Or magnetic field strength It will suddenly rapidly rise the the blocking capability of the gravitational field but you know you have two different intensities and see how much lighter the object is at each different intensity, and you'll. You'll get a curve basically and as you get to a certain really strong maybe I don't know two three, hundred Tesla's or whatever You'll eventually block all of the gravitational field in in the item, we'll just float there and My big concern is the you know the government will try to cover it up again and I'm hoping that doesn't happen but if people are doing it all over the world and they all submit these documentation and here's a little bone to throw everybody out there the first one that does it I guarantee you're going to win a Nobel prize because that's big news and it's really important and gravity is the biggest discovery is going to ever be on this planet. So there's something to work for motivational factor to go for it. Well, how how practical is this because it's one thing to for Pencil to be lift off the table using this magnet magnet but I mean if if you wanted to. Use this as a propulsion device or to to to lift a let's say a a Boeing seven, forty, seven off the ground. How much power would you require? A lot and that's that's one of the big. The one of the major problems to solve because the the amount of energy is going through I'm going to estimate as hundreds of megawatts. Maybe more, and so now we have to have a power source, the drive those coils. If you want to surround a cigar shaped thing, the size of a seven, forty, seven with concentric coils so that you make the basically make the the whole thing into a giant magnet. So you have magnetic field going around it That's GONNA. It's GonNa take a lot of energy and it's got to be a package, the power source to a fairly small size maybe the size of basketball or something like that and I know of away then I believe can be done but I don't talk about it because I don't want to interfere with the people who are actually working on this device and there is people with patents and such but. There under the radar and I would like them to stay there at this point and So I think that's a big hurdle that has to be done but that's the way it's done in a apparently it. It can be done because aliens are using it and they're getting here and So there must be a way to do it. All right. So let's let's talk about the light speed Berry. A does the the unified field theory. By solving that by cracking that does that allow for Super Luminol motion? because. My unified field theory is an extension of both special general relativity. So there's going to have to be more equations to bolt into those so that you can. Except as a reality, the the ability to building a spacecraft that can go beyond the speed of light. So. What would you do? You're you're building spatial bias drive that stretches apart even more because you have to look at it as like. Qatar string when you pull it tighter tighter, the frequency goes up and it's the thing with the the ether. We know it must be very tense because speed of light is very fast. So we stretch it even more and make it more tense than the capability of moving faster comes a possible and Maxwell's equation. Defines the speed of light AC- equals one over the square root affirmatively times permeability. So what we need to do is to lower permeability and and affirmative. And that can be done using a magnetic field. So the stronger you make, the more space is stretched the lower those two numbers become the faster you can go. So as long as you're inside of the slip wave. Completely surrounded. you could go and he speed you want. And if if you reduce those two to zero, so the those two property, those are basic properties of space permeability primitively the reducing this era which I do not recommend you can go infinitely fast and they have built materials that. Exhibit that tape ability they're they're making patents right now they're called Meta materials look it up on and practical lenses made Meta materials. The light inside of those materials is being They're saying it goes infinitely fast only while inside the material as soon as it comes out well, then it goes back down so. The speed of light is being determined by the properties of space. If you manipulate those, you can change the speed of life. So I think there's good evidence to support that theory. But again, the energy required would be enormous. Would it not? Of you know like we said for the the slipway by right? Yes. It requires an enormous sum, but it's amount that we could. Generate if we have the right power generating system I think some of the experiments that the the US did. in the early days of building UFO's. Using small nuclear reactors inside. So these early UFO's that they were building were spewing radiation out of them. It's not practical it's not safe, but you need that kind of a Power source like a from a whole power plant to guidelines. These seems like it's like impossible but obviously, it's not if you know how to build the. The right technology and you know, I limit myself I hold myself back about talking about that right now but I do think there's a way to do it. So you mentioned the per permeability. And there was one other one. Primitively, and from ability you said not a good idea to bring those down to zero. What happens if you bring them down to zero? If you're in a a spacecraft, there's a lot of dangers about going after the speed of light or beyond it. If you go back fast, even second and moving at that rate, you'll be out of the universe. You'll be in someplace in between universes. You'll certainly be out of the galaxy. It's Infinitely. Fast well, it's it's really fast. It's hard to calculate that So I thought you can't ever really get down to zero 'cause you know and I just suspected it'd be very difficult I'm hoping. That that's impossible but it might not be and one would have to do experiments by building the ships and building in some sort of a monitoring system that can make that measurement on the fly. So you know that you're not going to do that because you'll be lost at the very. least you'll be in a place where you won't know where you're at after a few seconds traveling at the speed because when you go beyond the speed of light and you're looking at your front window, everything goes black because of the the top ler affect. So all the stars you're looking at ahead of you you can't see anymore because they're blue shifted to the point where they they're not visible and all the stars behind you are red shifted to the. Point they're not visible. So at best you might be able to see something out of the side window that looks like a little bit of a rainbow and that's because they're you know you're moving parallel to the light sources in that area but going a thousand times the speed of light. That's that's probably not even to be available to you. It's you know it's scary looking it's pitch black and you have no radar that can scan ahead and make sure you don't hit something. So you know how that how the solve that problem. I'm not really sure you just gotTa be details details. What happens to? When you do that What happens to mass as you approach the speed of light. Good question. That's that's something you gotta cover here because under normal circumstances mass increases as you approach the speed of lightness, the special relativity section we're talking about now the transformations. If you're using a rocket ship, it would take like the hugest biggest racket ship. You could ever make all the energy in the universe to get Iraq it up to the speed of light because there'd be an inertial drag because you're increase of mass as you go faster and faster toward the speed of light. Well, that's a problem. But if you use my slipway biased drive, you cancel all the Lorenzo transformation problems because you're stretching space apart and so it's like you're moving through almost nothing. So there is not an inertial. Increase in math. while you're inside the slipway and there's no time dilation time becomes absolute again like Newton liked it So if you wanted to go to Proxima Centauri four point two light years away and you go fifty thousand times the speed of light, it may take a few minutes to get there whatever. It's real time. So if somebody on earth is watching and you go off and you go and you look around and you come back in twenty minutes, it's twenty minutes for you. It's twenty minutes for for them. There is no time distortion on the spaceship because the learn girl Lorenzo transformations are canceled out. Because you're being protected within the the slipway bubble. So, it's a great system and allows you to break the speed of light without having to experience all the problems you would have if you weren't inside of the the bubble and you were trying to use a conventional methods like rockets or something to get you up to the speed of light, you could never do it. So. So let's let's suppose supposed-. The the US military industrial complex was on board with this and they said, you know mark we're going to give you a lab. We're going to give you all the resources that you need. How much how long do you think it would take before we had essentially UFO's well the equivalent propulsion systems to a ufo with with subliminal speed. LUMINOL. Super Luminol you mean. I'm sorry I'm sorry super aluminum my apology. Super. Well, it depends on if we have the power technology ready to go and it also depends and I talked about this in the book, this is why I wanted physics physicists to stop wasting time looking for more particles. That's little value, and at this point, what we need to do is developed to the power source and we need to develop Room temperature superconducting wire. If we have these things now and we may already have this the room temperature superconducting wire. But it's probably been classified top secret. So you know I don't know. Somehow you know there's rumors that area fifty one has flying sources flying around and they're going and doing missions now already. So we already have all that stuff. So I don't know why they would hire me other than. Because they probably know most of this stuff if not all of it I again assuming that they don't have it though I guess I'm trying to get a handle on. Are we ten years out? Are we are we twenty years out? I would say. Without those things and we had to develop it twenty years out If, we have those things I bill. The ship in two years. We, this is interesting because when we think of extraterrestrial civilizations, for example, we often think that they are tens of thousands of years more advanced. But based on what I'm hearing from you it, they could just be a couple years ahead of us. It is possible in a civil advanced civilization civilization may only be a hundred or a thousand or something like that but odds are. Really. A young civilization. we're just barely at throwing rocks at each other and spears. Odds I there are millions of years more more advanced. So not only do they have all this technology and then some they've got you know stargate technology they have. Undoubtedly they have a mental powers that are well beyond psychic. Six cents, powers, all of that Psycho knishes and telepathy and all that stuff well in advance that they probably use along with their advanced technologies. How how about time travel then if if we can achieve super luminol speed, we could travel into the future. But what about time travel to the past did nine Stein rule that out? And you know I thought that was my possible either but you have to look at the bigger picture This is the book is the Master of reality. So reality includes not just our physical reality but. Reality. Of other universes and other dimensions. And since that is most likely from all the NDA experiences I've read that's what exists there are infinite amount of. UNIVERSES in an infinite amount of dimensions. Therefore time is he's also a out of bounds when you go to like the afterlife, there is no time. So that means here. it's possible that there are time segments all running in parallels. So we're living in a time segment, but the pastime segments may be accessible if you can. Build something that can move beyond the speed of light and somehow create a portal between this time and another time segments. It's highly theoretical. It's the most speculative part of my book and I was pretty uncomfortable writing it but I made an attempt. To do it anyway because I thought I was told it was important to do it. So I did my best to try to design. stargate system based on knowing that fracture lenses exist and materials exist. So I could get light to move faster than the speed of light and within that material, which would then causing electromagnetic shock way when it comes out of that material and that might be enough to affect. Space so that we could. Pass into these other realms listen to more coast to coast. AM every weeknight at one am eastern and go to coast to coast am dot com for more high coast-to-coast listeners. It's eleven eleven pm in an underground bunker somewhere in Los Angeles and we're the hosts of night call a Colin show for artist. Topi in reality, we're three friends who up every Monday to take your calls and emails about new conspiracies Internet weirdness. The increasingly Scifi world we live in having a strange day or a lonely night. Give us a night call at one, two, zero, four, six, night you can listen to night call on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcast. Who? Below. Hi I'm Heidi Merkava host of what to expect a new podcast from iheartradio when I first wrote what to expect when you're expecting I was pregnant with my daughter Emma and my Nisshin was simple to help parents know what to expect. Every step of the way that mission has grown a lot would it hasn't changed fast forward now Amazon Com hey, guys. We're teaming up to answer your biggest pregnancy and parenting questions from breastfeeding to sleep to tap linked Tantrum. Motherhood is the ultimate sisterhood, but it can be overwhelming if you don't know what to expect. Listen to what to expect on the iheartradio APP, apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcast. Emma ready mom I was born ready.

GEICO apple US stargate Mark Fiorentino UFO Seneca Lorenzo Emma basketball Richard Serra Kim Los Angeles Seneca UFO Amazon Iraq Boeing
Paranormal Marital Activity with Ben Axe

Open Loops: Conversations That Bend

1:00:45 hr | 1 year ago

Paranormal Marital Activity with Ben Axe

"Erzen. My Dad always tells me whenever we happen to be at the same. He always says Greg. You don't marry the person. You marry the family. Sounds, great. Of course, if two of those key family members happened the not be living. And that still the case. Things little things are a little different. They. Certainly are for Ben, axe who married a psychic medium. We go into that. And so much more. Coming up on open loops. I consider it an affront to my family that you. Haven't heard about anchor. It's the easiest way to make a podcast. Let me explain and can't let me. Let me just lay this out for. It's free. There's creation tools that guide were coordinate Eddie your podcast right from your phone or computer. And and this gang. Anchor will distribute your podcast for you. So it can be heard on spotify apple podcasts and many more. You can make money Moolah from your podcast with no minimum listenership. Everything you need to make a podcast in one place, download the free anchor APP or go to anchor dot at them to get started. Do do do. Do Do do do do. Open loops do or burn ruled song. Open loop St-. Helping Lopes, you must listen to the all pinups theme park for absurd beliefs and systems integration between the mind and to create this ramp. Hey Ukrainian some intellectual stimulation. You you like going on head trips I, know you do. But your head trips lack destination. There's a place for you where you can always go a magical land were intellect meets imagination. It's a theme park and it is here you are at open loops. I'm your host chief looper Greg Bernstein. We have been axe host of paranormal axe titties. I didn't know what direction we'd go in I. Knew that. He was primarily ghost oriented. I mean his. You'll hear about his father he's he's had some paranormal activity to. I never know. How interesting goes people are going to be I mean we see the shows like like what happens on TV? The the stuff kind of shakes a little bit. You might see a a specter, the light go by, but the cameras got the flair going. So you don't even know if that's It's not all bad interesting. That said and this episode I think what really grounded it for me again don't know if I'm a believer no idea. But what grounded for me the fact that his wife is a psychic Biniam and This stuff just Kinda came up coincidentally. I think that's what's most interesting about it. You know if you want it so much sometimes it it pushes it away but the idea that like. Both of these two people have sort of floated in the paranormal space, and then things started manifesting as a result of marriage. Well. I. Don't know I mean is is that a good review for marriage? I think it's Kinda. Cool. Though. Might scare some of you to. This episode actually contains you're GONNA. Hear it. There is. There was a ghost in this episode, you will hear it. Or maybe you won't. But Ben's all about providing that undeniable lack of explanation. And he brings several cases to the table. What are you? Now? I'm not sure but I will tell you this. You're going to go into the realm of the astral plane in this episode. and. Ben Definitely has some compelling stories. His podcast paranormal activities is fantastic and I'm so honored that he came on my show to really talk about all the things that make him want to explore. Those. Classic. Classic. podcasting right here. The things that go bump in the night. Yes. It's ban acts of paranormal activities coming to you live with people that aren't. We have been axe from paranormal activities bog as available on the all everything entertainment dot com that work, but also old apple podcasts. Stitcher spotify all these things of a man that talks about the things that I love him out paranormal spirit said, ufo's and all that sorta stuff I am excited to get into it with you ben thanks for coming on open loops a great man I appreciate having me. Thank you so much I'm. I have to say Real Quick I. Love Your Voice. You have an amazing like announce announcer voice I dig it man well, thank you I. Appreciate that I. that. Yeah, Dude like I'm I'm just always interested I listened to a lot of coast to coast am George Noory that's like late the late night popular paranormal radio show and I listened to there's a conspiracy unlimited. Richard Serra He's a big guy that sort of like weird. Knowledge Space I love these guys I lived for these guys nominee people interview these guys and that's sort of what I'm I. I'm always curious about like dude I mean like you're a you're a channel of all these other voices in the community of whatever that communities called. Like, how do you get in this position where you are like cure rating the conversation about the paranormal like where in your life did this interest start and how do you think you got here now? That's the league. Tell You I've been interested in the paranormal sense. I was a little kid on thirty three almost three. Now I guess thirty two and I am now I don't know I've always had like weird feelings on my belly when I was a little should I watched unsolved mysteries out that kind of stuff. Yeah. Always really into it on the recently. I got married a couple years ago in my wife is really into the payroll as well. Are Not really willing if that makes sense but also has a lot of experiences and then I also have a lot of experiences of my life we got together. We both had a beer experiences together. WHOA. Yeah Yeah Yeah. Interesting interests tagged. Wow. Wait a minute. Yeah I was GONNA ask about it's pronounced Dina right a DNA. DNA Yeah I was gonNA say DNA DNA. You bring her on a couple times in your podcast and I was Gonna ask like what is up with this? Who is this person like like DNA like what is tell me a little bit more about her and like she have a paranormal background like there's a family connected to spirits like what's up with her oh? Yeah. Absolutely. She definitely has a minimal background of she dislike myself when she was little kids, you had all kinds of experiences. She told me at one point she was brushing her hair colleague it's interesting but grudge choose. Hair and she felt fingers through her hair. Down her back now, like one of these transition had as a kid but she's had a lot of experiences then unfortunately, her younger brother pass away than her mother passed away. And after those two things happened the Experiences have been constantly and you know there's all kinds of things like we believe on safer fact, this isn't a scientific fact. But she's had her brother and mother and other people that she knew that has passed away. Clear as day I, mean we have a spear boxing literally talked to her brother through the spirit box what does that mean? Well, well, go into what it is. Yeah this is great. Already I love it Yeah. What does that mean? Exactly you talk to the spirit box in the sphere box talk to you what is that look like paint that picture for me? It's a weird thing and honestly I didn't really believe in. The spirit box is until recently bought one but basically, it's just like little especially a radio and what it does is it goes through radio channels very quickly cal against you're looking at a car radio you just trying to animals no fast. It does back times not probably early no the scientific methods behind it, but according to the stuff that I read doing when it goes through channels that quickly like the white noise that generates. A path or away for spears to communicate, and you can hear him talk and basically this cheer like the CH in the background, which is the white business creates Wino- there's a white noise maker at the end of the day. Interesting. There's can communicate through that and you actually physically hear their voices and yeah. So I didn't believe that until around two thousand and fourteen when I used one at a haunted house that I lived in at the time and then I, recently bought one when I started doing my own podcast paranormal activities and I've used it a handful of times and we've had success every time we used it. So I really do believe in that tool now. What is exactly like getting? How do you know it's the brother. With her because she would ask it questions and it would respond accordingly and we haven't s meter as well that that basically dislikes up if you're. You can use a Ouija Board I. GUESS ANY NFL leader? Yeah in so she would ask questions would light up. We've got the spirit box shoot ask questions in she could with both of us related could physically here his real voice on the other side which kind of confirms and it could be said it could be argued that what you just want to hear it. So you are but you know there's GonNa be haters. Look. You know what I always wanted giove into both sides of this like the haters aspect of it because I mean personally I'm definitely on the. I'm definitely skeptic with curiosity. Like like very curious. Very hopeful that this stuff is there you know what I mean like. Like hell. Do you do you have to experience it to believe it like how do you really get into the idea that this is even not just pure coincidence Absolutely and I'm also a hater in a lot of ways in. If it's not me or my wife I'd probably don't believe it. Even my sister like her and I grew up together and she also has paranormal experiences and she believes Tarot cards and stuff. I don't don't get into that kind of stuff and she called me out. She's like he had all these experiences. You don't believe my stuff. No I'm sorry. How do you justify that to her? I can't you? Know and you know I'm not a hypocrite, but you know seeing is believing no I. Just knowing people and knowing the field I've worked in like certain fields where I have to talk to people who may so I understand that people do lie or even lie they just want to believe that kind of stuff. So this like you will foes, you know ninety nine percent of the ufo sightings are probably not UFO's the one percent could be and I feel the same way with the paranormal half the stuff you. See is s senior head or can be explained away but there was a percentage that can't be in. So not everybody who says a see a ghost actually sees a ghost or whatever in. So to me seeing is believing if I don't see it, I'm probably not going to believe it. Wow. Yeah I was GONNA say like does that even extend to on your most recent episode? UFO's are they real. You had your down on. and. He said he saw Ufo I mean, do you believe him? I, do I believe my dad because I for the historian he us on a beach and he saw the light coming from one direction and stop, and then go into another direction over the ocean and so I remember him coming back. I was like seven years old when this happened and he came back. So excited. So pumped at my dad's not really one the like makeup stories you just Kinda like you know whatever and even now this was how many years later he's still downplays it. When it happened, he was jacked up he's like, Oh, I saw this this this and accuses so excited he'd been telling that same story it hasn't changed in. You know how many years now I don't do math well a right right. So he definitely something in could be military it could be I. Don't know but he definitely, well, he says he saw he definitely saw I can't say it's an alien or not. He definitely saw what he says he saw is their family conflict because you believed your dad more than your sister. Doesn't come up. And this? Okay. This episode is going to start the FA- I don't want it to. But maybe we need to get them on right now and Duke this out. Good time they might anyway. So it'd be a blast. Do you have any other siblings that have like I have two sisters. One is believe in ghosts, trillions or anything. She's she does her own thing than my other sisters definitely a ghosts paranormal believer. She's actually going to be my show eventually it hasn't worked out. Yeah. Because of covid Oh my gosh. I I have two little sisters and I don't think they believe in any of this stuff. I think they entertain it but whenever I I totally on the skeptical side. Fair enough. So have you ever had any paranormal experiences or any kind of ghost interactions I've never never actually experienced it directly at all ever. That's the thing and you know of interviewed some people in this podcast ban and the closest. They always tell me they're like Greg your spiritual per here's the thing I guess there, and maybe somewhat should do this someday like the scale of the scale of rationality I guess is one way to put it on the scale of magic magical thinking the scale of supernatural like if I were to do a list if I were to actually put a list together of the different rankings of things that seem not of this world like to me low level spirituality and it's not actually level practice like meditation experiencing enlighted meant than on the lighted states is like on the lower end bat spectrum and then like. full-on seance where were ghost are actually like Sir like Disney's haunted mansion. But actually like that's like higher up there I know people I knew a guy I worked with him. He told me he did say a Ouija board session and like it was like he was transported to another world at ghost actually came talk to him like soft figures like it was a really traumatic experience. But to me also like the idea that light, you can heal your energy and fix your shock. Russia's is also like a version of that kind of thinking why where do I stand on that? I feel like I've had because my hypnosis background I feel like. A powerful state I feel like it can actually lead to things that are not commonly thought of as scientifically based, but for other worldly kind of experiences. I don't think I ever have. I don't know I just gave you a lot. I. Just gave you a lot on Nathan. Yeah I don't know what is your like do you will I always just think a general, the paranormal and the spiritual overlap. Argue. Spiritual at all. I WANNA. Say Him I do agree with a lot of that because you know I, don't really think that ghosts are just you know the system guide hang who died hanging out on a house I. Think there's more than that and I feel like ghost not to get religious or anything but like I feel like ghost. Affiliate. Was Multiple planes of existence in after you die your spear or your soul or whatever goes to the next level of existence radiofrequency you're in the same place but you're a different place at the same time if that makes sense. Yeah. In some somehow sometimes they can cross and interact and come back but then they go away again and they're doing their own thing. On a different level of existence and sometimes they get tracked here I guess or they won. Or whatever. But I don't really believe in the heaven or hell aspect of it by believe that is just another plane of existence. At. The end of the day. Is that what you're out with UFO's. To. Honestly. Know when it comes to you those I. Think There's I. think There's aliens out there man and say that and it could be both. I don't know. But like I just look at the sky and there's so many stars dots in the sky in those dots have planets in those planets have moons. There's just so much out there like I would be very disappointed if aliens don't exist in our same universe and our same plane of existence, just another species on the different rock hanging out I. Truly believe that because it's just there's so much out there in the could be another. You know because you mentioned, you listen to coast to coast when my favorite coast to coast moments was in September Eleventh Nineteen Ninety seven when a guy called in. Claiming that he worked with the military or whatever, and he was like crying and scared running away and he was like that aliens are out there and they're doing this or doing this and it's actually a. Dimensional beings what he said. Stuck with me, and so it could be something like that. Too I guess but I don't know. Yeah Ya Dude well first of all I Beta. Art Bell Rest in peace. Love that guy is like the God he's like, yeah, he's amazing second. For, those of you out there listen to art bell. You can listen to the old coast to coast stuff on Youtube. Yeah it's great. It's great. But the Inter dimensional thing I had never heard until a few years ago. WHO's The guy? The guy's name is because he was actually just on coast to coast I think or Jimmy Church show Jaccques Valet or something he's like a French guy that's like a ufo. he's all about the interventional stuff is like it's all there. He kinda takes an anthropological approach to UFO's and says like look you can look throughout history and that's the thing Ben like the idea that these sky creatures have been around throughout history not in an ancient aliens way because there there's a difference there's people passing that off is like a legit field I don't think that's I. Think there are actually like things that are questionable that have gone throughout history that show this kind of our type creature that has similar features that points to what we now know. As the alien or the UFO do you do you give any credence to like ancient aliens or stuff like that? Like we're you add in sort of like the historical impact of UFO's and culture aliens it's one of those things. I. Don't believe or disbelieve if if somehow told me or they came with this, all this evidence that has proved this is how it goes them. Sure. There's somethings like question like the Pyramids Centre Staying in Oh there is multiple cultures around the world appears at the same time. We didn't know each other that's like fearing rights. You know that's hard to explain away I guess at the same time I, honestly don't know a lot about. The history of those cultures are are Wyatt Pyramids riffing and like religious huge back then and you talk about cherries in the sky and that's a big popular thing to. Be a spaceship at so it's possible but my question would be, where are they now? Why did they hang out a thousand years ago within disappear because off at the possibility I guess we started to to gain apology your gain grow species. So they were like, okay, our work is done and they took off. Could be. I don't know. Yeah his anybody ever changed your mind about like a paranormal field based on an interview you've had with them on your podcast. Only comes to a field my podcasts. No but I will tell you that my thoughts of the paranormal definitely changed when I met my wife and we had our experiences together. She explained to me were her thought process was and my that's when I really began to believe when she told me her experiences in her stories. That's when I went from being oldest haunted houses in their go settle know why to this more complicated than that multiple planes of existence they go back and forth they're not stuck. They have their own things to do outside of coming back to their loved ones so. My wife has really made me believe in a different way of believing when it comes to the paranormal for sure I, want to hear more about this today in what she's tie you. She's amazing. We actually here's this little story for we got into a fight about ghost we went to Philadelphia Back in two thousand sixteen is November twenty sixteen we had just moved in together for the first time immediately drove fill we live in Ohio Cincinnati we've go to Philly To See a concert in downtown Philly, and for some reason, we got into a fight about goes I. was you know had my own? No hard beliefs and she had her. And for some reason, we got into a fight about it at one am and out of nowhere while we were dead arguing we blew a tire on it made no sense. Retire blue. Now, we were stuck downtown Philadelphia at one am because we're fighting about ghost like theft. The TAIBU may be was go incidence, but it's like what the hell. Yeah. Wow. While you know another thinking about it like I definitely had I will say, I've had moments where this is kind of the dream thing I know you did an episode on paranormal dreams. I have had experiences that are pre cognitive I. Think Dream Wise like where I don't understand why dreamed about something and then the next day something related to that dream came like those seem out of nowhere. You ever have anything like that. Uh taught my head. I can't say that I have by definitely believes in that kind of stuff especially after the interview that you just mentioned appreciate you listened to my show. That's awesome Elliott that was with a Kathleen a canvas Kathleen O'Keefe canvas was renamed. Yeah. was really really good actually, and she a made me really think a lot about dreaming the dream stakes do have weird dreams and stuff but never had a premonition quite like that I definitely believe that stuff can happen for sure. Is there anything DNA? Tells you that you're like a honey I. Love You. But I don't even believe this is possible. Do you have any disagreements? Probably. Yeah. There is one time again again after seen it change my mind. This was early on he lives in an apartment together a couple years ago and we were actually hanging out and having. Fun and she just kept telling me she's like there's a ghost or there's somebody trying to talk to me like there's a nonce just relax we're hanging out. Your mind a little bit and tell me all these things and she started talking earlier least acid Nurgaliyev Franson, and serve it up shoes pants. I thought you this losing her ship. Right. But she's like note, there's this person who try and talk to me, and this is her name and she's an older lady and you know she was giving me these facts and then she was like I have to go outside and this is like January Mike. No, we're not going outside right or degrees outside what are you doing and but she she went I thought it calmed her down like we're good. We're GONNA stop drinking because clearly you can't handle it. You know we're done and but she got up and she ran outside. So I walked after again one am in January and We go in, we live in a complex that had like some wooded areas around. You can tell like back in the day, it would just woods but they've since some of those trees out to make room for department. So there's still some woods and a thin and So we went out there. So many come in his to find a ribbon like what are you talking about but I should you not she went to wherever the thing in her head to order to go and she found ribbon. And she said that the person I was talking to her to start talking to her because she could because he was open to it. So she was latched onto her and she wanted her to find this ribbon because the spirit that was talking to her said I had good members if you're a child and I lost a ribbon a long time ago, I wanted you to find it just because that was there is no explanation. She just was there if few open. So just happened in. Macau. And she did not find that ribbon I would call it and I'll say she was a little nuts but she found it. So yeah. I don't know. That's why old then is a wild story. I wonder about like. I think about this all the time about. The. Should you get involved with a psychic woman? And here's what I maintain. Here's what I made it my in my. In my dating profile online dating. So one of the things I did to filter out people that makes me at least they're going to be more interested in talking about these things is I wrote something that was like I'm weirdly. That's like weirdly attracted to and I said weirdly attracted to and I filled it in with. Women that say their psychic. Or. Even if they are clearly not still believe they are. Love it. That's an awesome way to do it. You, know what I've been getting like a lot of people that say like Oh interesting I had the gift or. Like. They say, Oh, my God like a kind of draws people out I also know that there's like. Coast-to-coast to coast I think George Noory own or coast to coast owns like paranormal dating dot com link offer that actually. Like. What do you do? You recommend seeking out a partner like this knows I'm with you man. If you tell me, you're a psychic or if you tell me your medium or if you told me your whatever I'm GonNa Call Bullshit right away. I'm not going to believe you people who actually have these gifts in my opinion. Don't say like my wife will never tell you she's a medium or tell you she has. She will say that she's open but she'll never say that she has powers or abilities or try to like make people talk about it because she's saying it like for one you have to bring up to her to talk about it at too. She will never use those words in enough people that I do know were come across a call themselves out mean disliked we talk about it. So the other bring it up but like a straight up, tell you I before anything else Oh. Yeah. I'm a psychic and here's what I can do I call bullshit right away because I don't believe that. When attention and a lot of ways, and that's where to you get attention and I would not personally recommend dating somebody who does come out right out and says, Oh yeah, I'm a psychic. Bryant not a psychic. Yes. Totally. Totally, and that's what I wonder too. I do think there is like a pop element I've talked about this and other shows too too, which is especially in terro like there is a popular articles about this, all the time Ben about like how it's now that is the new religion. The new age is the new religion, this kind of astrological connection. That people have with these APPs before using them like like it's a hot thing, but it also I mean this is going to be kind of a selfish question I mean, it really ends up being that does it kind of like dampen it a little bit does kind of make it a little lamer that everybody's like trying to study their astrological sign in that it's popular in like their witch craft stores in Brooklyn. Like I don't know I kind of feel like it doesn't make it as special. Well it's just. I. Don't. I think that's all nonsense astrology I can't stay in. This is like what is I matter like Oh, you're libra does it is it matter? Does it really matter? Does. Your wife, not do any of that stuff. She doesn't believe in any of that as far as I know I've never heard about astrology witchcraft will talk about got into. Terro, cars like I. said earlier I really don't believe in that. My sister is all about it and she actually did a session with my wife before remarried a few years ago and like it won't tell me about it. I don't know. So maybe there's something to at don't know about but I've never. I've ever done. I did do it once with my sister and I just didn't think it mattered but same time though maybe it's one of those things that you have to like. Be In with for to work if I don't know I don't five now but I, don't want that stuff and like the witchcraft stuff the stores in the APPs on the phone like I even tried a few apps be right before I started my paranormal podcast I download a few APPs justice, check it out nonsense a main like in. That's why I really believe in like. When it comes the tools, the only a few things I really believe that works the ems meter I believe. A two point if it's on your phone though it's GonNa be a game anything can be made for any of phone device. So it's not going to be a real thing and how you gamble by your by your extensions for your apps it makes it work make him excited about it. So you buy more. So it's all going to be fake when it comes to a phone it's all for profit. It's not. Real So I believe in certain tools to an extent and pretty much. It's just the investigator that I really trust and now more recently spear boxes well. But yeah comes. Believe in at all. Yeah. Totally. Totally who do you think is like like when you see all these paranormal investigation shows out there how can you discern between like the people that are really doing it in the people that are just trying to make a TV show? Honestly I can't say I've only watched a couple. Now's younger watch ghost centers in it was just two guys running around screaming before commercial break event would come back and there was nothing to be scream. Yeah. Then The. Same thing I've tried ghost adventures as well, and it's the same thing. Honestly I don't watch a lot of stuff I don't listen to. We'll podcast of for one. I don't WanNa copy anybody. So I try to do my own thing and. Again I don't trust people. I think that people say a lot of things that are that are true and if it's on TV I'm not really going to believe in it because they're trying to get viewers and how you get viewers you make shit up and make people. You know I need to see more and sometimes para molesting is really really boring. So you have to keep people watching. So we're GONNA, do you're gonna make fake stuff happened organically candle like change things I even had a guy on my show called Keith Lender who was investigated by the Paranormal Adventures Guy Goes Adventures guys and he said they. Were in the final product, they manipulated everything to make it look differently than what it actually was during the investigation, which I understand is a TV show. That's why I don't trust those shows when it comes to real number investigating. Yeah. Yeah, that's interesting. That's a very interesting point about. The way that the final product definitely is is I mean I had Christie some there on the show and she she's she's made her round around the a lot of podcast. She's part of soul sisters paranormal and she was very much like look we have been offered to do these guys have shows and we would never do it. We take the science whatever that is the actual integrity. Alright. Process Seriously Yeah. So it's I mean. It's very interesting. The question of integrity and truth in the paranormal realm is I think very hard to navigate just because like how could you ever really prove that there's actually a ghost there I mean, could you do you think you could spend time with someone for a weekend and? Actually talk them into believing the truth you and your wife, and you know your other paranormal contacts have that ability right now. Honestly I don't only because the people that I, know you believe what you're going to believe and I could sit here and tell you all my experience. I have had a best friends actually he was never a believer in paranormal or that kind of stuff and I told him. So my stories especially in a house in two thousand fourteen for a little over year that was. Haunted basically excuse Malaysia on your show but has. A, lot of stuff was going on and I told him that story and he. At the time. You know he's like Oh. Yeah I mean I have no reason not to believe you. But if you'd ask him outside of me like right now, there's some guy asked him. If he believes in ghosts, you'd probably say, no, you know what I mean. So people couldn't believe what they wanNA believe and as it really is about in order to really truly believe. That, there is something else out there other than what you see in on in your house in your home or outside. There's something going on that. You don't know about and you're not going to believe it until you see it basically, and that's why I firmly believe. So I could tell my story my wife Patel restores to everybody. We know you're not truly going to believe that unless it happens to you. When something happens that you just can't explain. That's when Oh man. There is something going on but I can tell you that you're not gonNA believe it unless you see it. Yeah. Yeah. Interesting. So you've never had like any people close to you like spend time with you and your wife and all of a sudden. They walk. Away. Believers. I'm honestly not that I can think of one thing we will bring this up on like a out of regular life for hanging out. At a House party, we don't start talking about all the time. So many people in your life know about this like look you have this secret podcast life. I feel like all of my friends no but I don't dislike probably don't know everything like again I don't talk about it outside of my podcasts unless it comes up it's usually for a drink and it'll come up sometimes ask about it but that's really it like then same thing with my wife doesn't come up but there had been a few times in the people that do. Ask about are typically believers already and they are their own story. So they want to share their stories with us because they look at us as somebody who knows what they're talking about. Because if you know if you have other people don't believe in ghosts talk about ghost they think you're crazy. So typically they share it with other people who have the same kind of mindset and. So I can't really say that people have changed their minds or anything like that. 'cause we don't really talk about it to those people. If it does come up, it's just like You know we keep it fun. It doesn't get real serious. So yeah, we'll look at the same time. One of your goals is. To make the existence of paranormal spirits, common knowledge like what do you think that what is that world look like to you? Well, that one is kind of easier to say I said that I especially when I first started this show back in March I said that in as time has gone by that goal has kind of been pushed aside because I have decided, I'm not GonNa if you don't WanNa believe you're not gonNA believe but my goal is to capture evidence that you can't deny and that includes the ems readings that includes hearing voices. To be the for example that were captured that on the show. Could we ever hear like? that. Yeah. Absolutely. Actually I have I have caught I just started paranormal investigating I. Did my first investigation. If you weeks ago on my hometown at a newspaper called, the evening leader in that building has been around since eighteen ninety-five in we caught two different spirits in the building talking to us on the spirit box. Actually have one play for you. If you're interested OEM very interested. Yes. That sounds amazing. So, see her she's I had uploaded until yesterday I literally did a different episode last night and I changed all the my all of my presets here but I had ear are you ready for it? Ya'll yes. Yes. Absolutely going to be quick and somewhere play at like three or four times is a recycled. And I'll let you and give your headphones on by chance or I don't I have the headphones. Yeah. I was told you need headphones. I will I. It's done. So here we go. Maybe. Burden. So. That's just one little clip there and what I heard their lowest. Did you hear anything by chance? I'll I well, it sounded I could not make out specific words, but it definitely sounded the like I. Mean I heard kind of that kind of thing played on parallel shows before and. Yeah that is. Sounds like something specific definitely is specific. Yeah. What did you hear? So the split up again I understand that can be debated because it is kind of leary. It up. But I'm not a master at this stuff. But what I heard was be nice to me, and then I played for tonight and she also heard that Elyssa mother people listen to you separately in May Be Nice. These sacred, the words be nice and and what the story behind that was always at the me-media spots and our meter was lighting up and so I was trying to talk so I said you know my name's Ben you know Blah Blah Blah I'm his ear to see what's up guys up to. Talk to me let me know and I urge different voice originally, we had a conversation with a dude named Jeremy I know it sounds crazy but he was coming through pretty clear live i. hear as I was talking talking back. In Nam now went and listened back wall of the audio from that day this popped up and I heard I was watching the sound waves as I was listening and at that point on the sound waves why didn't think anything would be there that you jacked up and so because I could see it back and listen to it several times and that's what I your that. During that clip and so I zoomed in on whatever and I hear the words it'd be nice to me. Yeah play you. Can you play back one more time? Absolutely. Wow I'm going to have to like really keep playing this back later. I'm wondering like what part is the I kinda here they're like, well, I hear like jeter through genuine. Nasty. Annoying part actually had a guest on last week. The terrible hosts I figured named Alstom ahead because I'm an old man but in and sign the free named Steph Brady, and she says she has uses a Toca. She's an investigator in she's like hardcore. She is multiple houses a week in all of this stuff like she's a professional investigator and she has a device. Africa was called now stop my head. But apparently without device, there's background noise which would be which would be fantastic. Wow, well, then then you know what I mean look I know you So so perhaps your your undeniable evidence is really where you're at now with the show but then the other part of that is also like figuring out how and why the spirits are there I mean is that's still of your investigating. Absolutely. So I really do want to know why because I don't believe. In the term haunted houses per se I don't feel like there's any spirits trapped in a house. I, don't think that exist I feel like spirits want to be there or they're there for another reason, they think they're trapped or whatever. But one of the things I do really want to know is because of the belief haunted houses to that unit to that to the original old school. I can talk definition of Haas's yeah. I our spirits trapped places like waverly. Hills. In Louisville Kentucky that's an oldest thing alum where there's a lot of death why would they stay there? You know that that kind of stuff. So I definitely do because you know for my experience with with the next brother he comes and goes as he pleases in you know says that there's other stuff going on. So how come he can go into these things but these other spirits Don't or refuse to seven. I'm wondering does is there something unresolved? You always see at least in movies unresolved stuff why keep hanging around like? Is there any true link what's up with the brother? Does the brother still feel like is the brother like a benevolent spirits or is there something that like your sister keeps having to earn a sorry his sister your wife has to keep like doing to appease this premature death note from what I understand is he comes when he feels like she needs sometimes she'll have really really bad impression or she needs number or whatever and show up and be like what's up. My Oh. So this is like a nigger. Happy. He sat us. Open. Yeah Weird things were like a few months ago on a Saturday morning be whipped out her Nintendo we if that system. Or? Them we implicit Mario and apparently that was a system that her and him together when they were younger and as soon as we got al our fire smoke alarms started beeping. Out of nowhere, and then the same thing happened we decorate for Halloween last earlier this month. I don't know where restaurants we whipped out Halloween decoration. It'd be something that they enjoy together was Halloween. So it seems like when there is something that she's doing that illegal relatable to him, he would show up or if she was in like depressive state, he would come or she felt like she needed to talk to him for box once she was asking, Hey, are you here and he was but at the same time he has also toward according to her she pulled me this but according to her he has come in he was like you need to not need me as much because I'm also Doing my own thing over here in my own side of the. Of the universe or whatever it is. Where do you think he is? Is he in like like Yeah Whoa what is that plane look like that I don't know. I. Have No idea what that would clash. And I I I don't I just all I the only way I can explain it is another plane of existence and there would be when their own things over there. So let's just because you have a loved one who died doesn't mean they're just hanging out with you all day they're doing their own thing and they may come back. But they're doing their own thing the majority of the time that's what I believe and understand as paranormal side of things Yeah. Because you've got like heaven which seems like a, you know a great place to hang out and I guess supposedly you know based on religious texts like when people come back from heaven down to the earth like it does clean to prophets are sometimes described is translucent enter you can see through them Of this Cernan, the in culture, the symbols of angels definitely have ghost like Wallet is but I've always found it strange ban that like you know and I know again you you don't necessarily believe in heaven and hell and stuff like that. But I, do find it weird that like. Those, belief system for some people like they believe in ghosts and they also believe in heaven and Hell and they believe in angels and it's like it feels like these are different species in a way of like post life forms. It is it's interesting to think about and I I liked the show supernatural lot. So it's kind of fun to like. Hey they can all exist together in that universe I I. It's Kinda like maybe maybe you know the archangels back in the day were actually ghost maybe we talked about earlier the UFO's how. They're into lamentable or whatever, or they came down as Jerry of God maybe same idea but they thought it archangel an archangel. But in reality it was just a ghost be like, Hey, what's up you should do this. kind of stuff. What about what are your thoughts on Ouija boards? You like them. I don't use them. I don't know why a lot of people are afraid of them. I've never used one once miles a little kid, but they do give me a bad vibe. So I honestly don't use them at the same time I feel like using a spirit boxes the exact same thing but in my grandpa different. So I don't know me a little bit of Oak Hypocrite I understand that but I don't use them. is asked all stay away from him. Yeah. Is there a good entry way into light payroll investigated? You think for people that just like casually want to explore if there goes out there. Well that's one thing I would say if you're casual about it, I went do it because and there's a few reasons for that one. Ghost. Are also people or used to be people anyway, and they still do have feelings and I don't feel like there are circus act. So if you're casual about it, it's fine. It's fun to do and stuff, but I won't. One thing I hate to see our like investigators are like. Younger people I don't know people mocking ghost or people like antagonizing all you in here where going to do want to do something that kind of stuff amazing I wouldn't have been doing that. But if you're legit interested in it, I mean absolutely I feel like anybody should do it. If you have a real interest because it's not a circus not a game show. It's not you know shouldn't be fun thing. In, my opinion because they are. They. Still have feelings I do believe in evil spirits and spirits, and if you don't know what you're doing I absolutely believe you could have an evil speared or whatever attached to you, and that will wreck you up a little bit can cause. Problems in your house in 'cause and bring negative energy will she caused depression and caused bad things happen to you so I'm I'm all for anybody doing it but you'd have to have the right intentions and you have to be smart about it. I wouldn't recommend summoning a demon just do it because I do believe you could someone something that will that will miss with you just to do it and we've had with my wife and eye contact in some things we've had some. Some. Spirits that claim to be bad spirits and that kind of stuff and we. We bounced because we're not. Dumb I. Get to actually like bring out the candles and do the sage stuff I mean, are you doing that level of man I actually do believe in? Say I never I never staged my house ever until March of this year March of twenty twenty and I'm telling you as soon as I did it just you could feel the heaviness of the house leave and it's. been positive in every now even I'm I believe in tournament traction, which I've done episode about actually Misha was well, and I do believe that talking about ghosts especially, if you're sensitive to spirits and stuff can make stuff happen and we lived in this, we moved into this house in December of two thousand eighteen with nothing paranormal happening at all then in October of twenty nineteen. Just Almost a year ago. Now I said Hey I want to start parable. Because I think it'd be fun and almost immediately we had shit happening. My Gosh Rohr's opening and closing the smell of cigarette smoke at his head like Deep Lake Depression in my gut for no reason. I had a headache for like a week and a half or no reason, and this is gonna sound crazy because he can't back it up. You can't I can't provide evidence. But for a week, I could just feel something watching me I, do you know how you just had that feeling of somebody watching you? Yeah I. For a while at the same time. I had a headache I had that feeling and I remember it clear today it was almost a year ago. Now I was. Just got sick of it. I was in my I have a theater stairs hang out ally the time and I was watching wrestling wrestling thing as well. She host a wrestling podcast will and. Just watching wrestling I. Can. Feel it looking at me. I got mad I went downstairs I went to the refrigerator. I could feel behind me by the kitchen table. So I turned around like a nutcase and this is the first time I've ever done anything like this but I turned around and I was like you know what? GET The out of my house I see you looking at me I'm not GonNa talk to you. Whatever I said I went off on on nothing basically. As soon as I did that I do not my headache went away. I went back upstairs and that feeling in my chest just went away as in. March star of the show and we started Seiji nefer stuff started happening to yet kitchen sings turning on and off by themselves all kinds of stuff. Your wife catches you like yelling at nothing. They're like this is that just normal I mean she hasn't really seen it, but she definitely believes and I believe that's you like when it comes to like sage and I believe in saging and is telling the goes to go away those things you have to do all this other stuff. We have all kinds of rocks or feathers or I don't know there's all kinds of things that people do I personally believe at least it's worked for me if you just tell something to leave and then backed up with the sage. You're going to be fine and you have to do you ever talk to his spirit like you're in a conversation with her and all of a sudden you have to be. Second. One. Second. Not that extreme, no I've said things but they don't act in that scenario. I would love that I would love if people came over and you your wife or just engaging with these beings are non beings gas but back, probably a little more free now had never heard it goes talkback next the closest I've come to is in my old house I wake up to hear voices in my ear then esther like woke woke go away that happened along that was that wasn't the same scenario. So I'd probably a lot more famous I get on my house and something said now I've probably. Oh. My Gosh. Wow. Oh Wow. Yeah I mean, do you think overall like a One hundred episodes into. Know Paranormal activities you've done you've talked to lots of investigation people that investigate you've done more investigation yourself I mean, what do you think like at the end of that after one hundred episodes like what do you think your belief system is going to be compared to it is now what do you hope it's going to be Oh that's a good question right now I don't really know I'm twenty five episodes. I've interviewed a a handful of investigators a handful of people who've had experiences and as of right now, I have no reason to believe anything differently a Malaga. Kind of backup what I believe in already and there's really been nothing told to me that I have no reason not to believe or to change my point of view of that being said I can't say that's a fact I have heard some religious things and I don't really get into the religious side of things so that I kind of I don't WanNa say take with a grain of salt I kind of bypass I. Look I kinda dislike well, that could be explained by this so maybe that's on me for not really listening hard enough I suppose but overall I have no reason to believe that my views change unless I get that guest that really has a has a story that really makes me believe are chase on beliefs which could absolutely happen who do you like really WanNa. Half on like who is like your dream paranormal guest for podcast. On and honestly I can't really give you one I. Don't know of anybody that I like I don't really get star struck for one into. I. Don't know anybody in the paranormal side of things. Honestly this is just me fan boy little bit I really do like Chris Jericho. He's a former wrestler. Yes. His own podcast. Journal absurd and he has his own. Has Paranormal people on as well. He has his own paranormal experience and I really talk to him about that. But he's not really like a paranormal guy. He just has talked about before and there's also a warm pocket ideal earlier accident. What's dependable podcast? and has called haunted S, and basically they just tell people stories and they're really fun I'd like to talk to them to was opposed. But when it comes to somebody who is like from the paranormal world I, honestly can't give you name right now 'cause I don't know. Yeah, yeah do you think about I mean look this is like like let's get like very metaphors second like there is a yeah there there is an interesting space out there that you're doing normal stuff. I occasionally bring people paranormal people on like at the end of the day were exploring these topics that we love. But like, do you ever think what are we? What? What is WHO's the audience for this like WHO's out there? WHO's really like listening to all these barrel podcasts? What are we trying to do? What are we trying to influence like? I sometimes wonder am I even making any difference in anyone's life whatsoever or is it just secure entertainments like I? Just I don't know. Or. Maybe you just love it because he loved the field of IT I don't know what is it for you ben I need help I know. Man I don't know I know I don't know I. I've always been drawn the tournament side of things and I know a lot of people like stuff like that for whatever reason like you know the horror movies are Super Popular Belykh. Chew kind on people are drawn to paranormal. It's just one of those things you can't explain it makes you scare people to be scared. It's just a popular thing I don't know why I do it. I really I mean I can tell you why started this podcast one I really liked the podcast. So it's like I like the paranormal stuff my wife I we keep experiencing this stuff yet. So cool that it's like in family in love and partnership like it's like it's cool that you've had you have like a, you have a base of people that you know that are also into it. Absolutely I mean I would say I hadn't even visited my sister who the Yankee with. My Wife. Now, my dad believes in it they'll tell you he might not. But then when I came, tell me all sorts he's experienced too so I do believe that like some people are just sense. I think my family is one of those one of those groups. So happens my whites as well and I just wanted to talk about national. Got Me started with the show in the first place was I wanted talk about almost and you can't do that reliable the times because you'd looked like the nut job so I'll do it on my own. Stuff yeah. Click them to help people I mean I feel like anybody that has a podcast you entertain somebody and you no matter what you have one audience member or a million. If one person is listening to what you're entertaining somebody and that's enough for me that just you know I'll keep doing it just because I get a little bit of feedback and so why not entertain if I got the ability to entertain or or just educating or whatever. But if people are like why not continue to do? Yeah. Now I think you're right and I think you know just I I'm doing it as a tribute to my like you said, you were fascinated by it like I. Love Podcasting as a tribute to the fields that keep me engaged and learning more about them and sharing those learnings with others hopefully in an entertaining way I hope this interviews metrics. I think you're awesome. I. Really enjoyed this show. Oh Man. No I'm. I'm very interested in You know I definitely recommend everybody keeps following. Paranormal activities. Or Acts. Yeah. No it is. Activities paranormal activities like I said, it's on all the podcast platforms as well as all everything entertainment dot com and you know what I mean. Look you just did UFO's a lot of ghosts stuff I mean are you getting into other topics other Guy Kinda fringe areas beyond ufo's and goes Oh. Yeah. Man I'm open to anything is everybody has anything that they want US say. I really don't care no big slut lock just monster anything that's just not normal considered normal, and that's beyond bill since you also Ufo so I would love that anybody on has experienced back you WANNA chair absolutely. Awesome awesome everybody check that out Ben Acts It has been a pleasure to chat with you perceive Ning I've very much. Enjoyed it. Oh, the pleasure is all mine. Certainly do very much. I've had a blast, your urising tastic podcast Oh so you're amazing. So thank you so much. So much. That means a lot man I appreciate it. Thanks for sharing that sound with us stick. Thanks for sharing that Oh absolutely. I never caught. So it was like, yeah, I had to hear winner. Thanks. Dude. Will the dodge break you have a great night. Did you hear it? What do you think that goes was saying? Was it to Julia. I'm curious what you all thought. Was it saying Yanni or Laurel? I'M NOT SURE But I'm so honored that Ben brought the spirit box onto my show. How was that? I. Kind of worry about this episode. Now I mean, maybe this'll be a self fulfilling prophecy and I'm doomed for all times. But like did I do we trap a ghost by having this recorded? Like era, we forever going to be condemned. To help this ghost like is there a? Is there a gofundme page? It's an help me. Look I'm not sure how you know kickstart. Works in the The ASTROTURF but. I'm so honored Ben came on. You have the links on my show notes checkout paranormal activities the final at him in his wife Denier up to next. Now one of my up to next well telling you. How much I love you. Yes dear listener you you mean the world today. And I really I thank you for listening to the show. Your Great. If you made it all the way through. I mean I I'm honored that you took the time to learn about bannon his perspective, and if you like open loops, please do subscribe and Apple podcasts. Rate Labor Review, it definitely helps until next time. I'm still here the ghost didn't get until next time.

Ben UFO investigator Oh spotify Greg Bernstein George Noory apple Lopes Eddie Richard Serra headache Philadelphia Youtube Chris Jericho Dina spears Pyramids Centre
Kerry James Marshall

Monocle 24: The Big Interview

28:05 min | 3 years ago

Kerry James Marshall

"Yeah. I'm not looking for really obscure material to make pictures about because I won't be confused about him. Not looking for that. It's usually stuff that's generally available, and I think everybody should be somewhat familiar with. That's important. And if if people are going to art museums, then I would think that people are also taking some responsibility. Know something about what the point of going through art museum. Fa, Kerry James Marshall painting is a problem to be solved. No, for him the self expression of the obstruct expressionists. Rather this modern American master takes his cue from Europeans of the past, drawing on the techniques and visual language of art history to make a powerful comment about absence and representations. Oh, yeah. This year is the set of his painting past times made him the highest paid African American artists ever. But his eyes on for more than the record books. They're engaging with the past. He hopes to reshape the power of the future, bring African American voices into the narrative. I'm macho Laurie. I sat down with him to the big into. James, Marcia welcome to the big interview row pleasure to be joining you just before your new exhibition is David Zvornik Alary. So we'll get into that in a minute, but I, I just like to talk a bit about your childhood relationship to painting because I'm aware that all children paint, but you at an early age knew that you wanted to be in the business of producing images. Yeah. All the time. I couldn't have told you that it was about being an artist as professional because I didn't know what that was, but I knew there was something about images that I had been looking at that excited me enough to make me know that I wanted to do that thing. I wanted to make images like those that would make other people feel the way I was feeling while I was looking at the ones I was seeing. So I mean, that really was the beginning of it for me, and it started really early that I experience was in kindergarten. What point did it come to be paintings rather than photographic image making or draftsmanship that kind of captured your interest over the long expand? I mean, when you're growing up you the more things you experience the more things you're aware of the broader, your sense of what possible starts become. And so I looked at everything and and I was interested in everything. But cameras equipment. I mean like the do photography, they'd be have apparatus. And then as young person, you gotta spend money to get the film, developed the cost in doing that kind of thing. Doesn't immediately present itself to you as a possibility. So you you pick up thing. That's easiest in closes at hand, so it's pencils and it's pain, and you do what you can with those things when you're in school. So in about third grade, I believe it is when they first introduce you to the library and back then as opposed to now, I guess we used to have to get a library card. They take to the school library I and teach you how to use the Dewey decimal system for looking up books. And then we went on a field trip to the public library, and that was the first place. You got a library card, you go into the library and you realize that the section of the library where their books on art, and I just simply looked at every single book that was on the shell. Off that was about art. And of course, most of that was about painting early on my sense of what had been done and what seemed really good. And what was interesting I mean was kind of expanded by that experience, and I just simply continued on that route. Fill out this appoint which sort of for a child or young person, painting and image making becomes less an exercise imagination and becomes kind of externally constrain constrained by these expectations to reflect the world around you or later. If you go to art school to kind of reflect the kind of narrative of art history, how did you find yourself navigating through that? If you're looking at images of art from an early age, was it never so much about this kind of. Imagined interior woes more about looking. Well, I guess because of the way I started out it was always about what was external. I never thought about making art as a candidate self expressive activity. I mean, it was always about trying to fit into a match to kind of what I saw the magnificence the things that I've seen that other people that done. I never went through that phase where doing kid art, where that's in the make sense. Because if you look at those things that kids doing and you look at things that professionals were doing the professional stuff look better and so you wanna do that and then why would you want to do something that looked like you were just starting out whenever so much else. Available to you? Were you copying at this time you kind of working? I'll start it, but this is how I got interested in materials. Yeah, it was copying things. I saw in books. Funny in elementary school in bathroom stalled. When the toilet paper used to be these little square sheets that were folded in half that fit in the toilet paper dispenser. You use those traces paper. Did you find a way of making them a bit more stable material did? Well, I didn't hear I didn't care, but you could take the two ply, she you could take splitting them has got to pieces and you could see through you could trace things out of book. So I used to go to excuse myself, go to bathroom. I come back with a water paper in my pocket because I needed. I needed it as material. Funny, those kinds of things. I mean, so then you start saying, okay, well, I don't have to just do this. I can also do this and this material allows me to do that. I just started building on things like that. I always was I became interested in processes really early. And then I was lucky enough. My third grade teacher used to do the bulletin boards and stuff like that for holidays, and I would stay after school and help her do do that sometimes. So you learn, you learn techniques. I don't even know if they still do the tissue paper, the tissue paper in different colors, and then you put some start start on the tissue paper, put the tissue paper down on people, and you pull it up and it will leave color behind. And then she would show me how to make how she liked painting flowers. And so she was, you know, if you wanna paint a daisy, you painted daisy like this. If you wanna paint a Panzer, you painted pansy like this and so technique. So to become really important to me really early, you kind of knowing that there was a right way of doing things. Yeah, and how I wanted to do. It's not a part of your characters that reflect in other aspects of your life. Yeah. I mean to degree, I'm interested in knowing how things work. It makes a difference to know how things work and how to make something from nothing. You know how to take a piece of raw material and converted into something that can be used usable. That matters a lot to me. And so I spent a lot of time trying to make sure I knew how things were then moved to LA. Well, third grade, I'm Elliot. We left out second-grade been come to California. And this is where you spend your lessons. Right. And what point does it become clear that you're gonna go to art school? That's not until in junior high in the states, you go to elementary school until six grade and in six grade you graduate from elementary school, then you go onto junior high, which they call middle school in some places you start from seventh grade to eighth grade and ninth grade through junior high school. When I got to cover junior high school was the high near us when I got there. So I have a brother who's a year older than I am. So he goes one year ahead of me. And so when I follow meet teachers who had had him in his class because they had him, they think they know me too familiar with me because he was there. And there was one teacher who missed the Rometty who knew that I was interested in. I was really interested in drawing more than just about anybody else. It seemed. And so that was an. Opportunity for junior high school kids to take a class at older started to, but it was supposed to be for not for seventh graders supposed to be for somebody else, but he let me do it. He gave it to me going there. That's the first time I knew that was a place called like an art school, a place where people went to learn how to do things. And the teacher who taught that drawing class showed us and pictures from a book, call images of dignity, drawings, Charles white, and told us that Charles white had a studio on campus. He took us up to see that studio. And later that day I came down from that studio, visit Charles. He wasn't in there. But when we got back to our room, I was copying picture from that book and Charles white walked into our classroom. And that was the at that instant, I decided when I finished high school, I was going to go to school that Otis. Where I was going to go to school. Have you continued to copy from knows when did that stop. Well, I mean early on, I mean e the copy pictures from books or you hire model. Well, that was out of the question. I mean, there were a lot of fascinating things about art school. So. Now we were kids in a special class, they're so we weren't in the same kinds of classes that adults were, but every now and then you would pass by room and somebody would come out the door and you would look in and you see that with naked people in there. Wondering how you. But when you look at art history books, you see a lot of mega people in pictures. And that's where they do it. They do it in places like these art schools. So that's also another one of those things that makes it more fascinating, but it's clear from looking at the history that you need to learn something about how the body is built before you can draw it well. And so this sort of anatomical studies and things you look at. And the first book I have a bought on my own was one of those big coffee table folios of Leonardo Davinci and the anatomical drawings and all that stuff really important to me. So this knowing thing that really mattered. So again, the depending really is it's, it's not what it looks like. It's how you understand that matters. That always mattered more to me moving bit foods. I've read the sort of. Making abstract paintings, which she described as pushing painter around. I think my idea what art school was was that you went to school and you learn about everything that was possible to do for artists up to that time. So I'm born in one thousand nine hundred fifty five fifty five. Almost the end of abstraction really come nineteen sixty nine hundred sixty one pop art and the reintroduction of imagery and stuff starts to come back in in a big way. So the whole cycle had already run its course in a lot of ways about a time I was born and so but by the time I got to school, I graduated from high school in nineteen Seventy-three. Even Papa were done. You know. You know. So history of those transformations means something. And if you're starting school at a point where you can lay out the sort of historical time line or the way in which form changed and ideas developed about how you should do things called right. Well, my idea was that you need, you have to address all that and my things you have to know how all those things work again from the inside out, not just because of the way they look. But why would anybody make that choice as opposed to doing? Another thing I did abstract work did collage did figurative painting. I worked was working with egg Tempera because I want to know and the only way you can make choices, clear choices about what's worth doing. If you know how to do all those things. And so doing the work you're talking about when I finished, I graduated from Otis in nineteen seventy eight, and I was doing a lot of these sort of non objectives, abstract mixed media, collages with foul material and paint and things like that. And at a certain point, if you do that long enough. If I. If I pushed this paint around long enough Italy eventually coalesce into something that looks canonize. Could be interested in and that wasn't satisfied at a certain point you've run you run out of interest in that, and I did. So then you come to paint a portrait of the artist is shadow of and that was in nineteen eighty nine thousand nine hundred. I really important painting view. Yeah. Could you describe it and took a bit about the circumstances of how you came to make part of it was after that period of doing the affect when when I I didn't feel like there was anything left to know about how that worked. You got figure out how to reset your priorities, but I wanted to also make use of what everything that I had learned from looking at sort of classical renaissance painting and things like that. I had been reading Ralph Ellison's, novel invisible man, and I was struck by the idea of in visibility the way he articulated the way he framed it, which was not the kind of perceptual invisibility if Amelia with a lot of science fiction, horror, movies. I mean, I grew up Levin, horror, movies and science fixing one of my favorite writers HD wells. And so of course, the invisible man is the wells novel and in the movie version of it with cloud rains as the invisible man. Of course, he takes his clothes off and these completely transparent and invisible. But for Ralph Ellison for black people in the United States and visibility, didn't have anything to do with this sort of transparency, being able to see through the psychological in visibility where you sort of socially and politically not welcome, not desire to be seen. And so I took that notion of invisibility with. Seem to suggest the cata simultaneous presence and absence and tried to figure out how to make an image that would do that. And that's when I first started sort of laid out this figure that would be a black figure against the black background basically. And you figure out how to adjust the color temperature to feel so that you could often see the figure not see the figure. And the first one I did was this thing called the portrait of the artist says shadow of his former self, but I tried to design it the same way. I thought Michelangelo head design the last judgement where you take responsibility for the way every shape in the picture fits into a place and that it fits into a place because it's meant to do a certain thing that has been to move in a certain direction, the ellipses and things like that stretched across the picture plane and a certain way that so I was building that painting up like that. And then I painted in Tempera. And it was way of using thirteenth century technique to make picture that didn't look anything at all, like thirteen century painting to use all of the devices. They use to compose pictures in the renaissance, but it still didn't look anything at all like Michelangelo painting. That's how I was thinking about it. And it's based on a kind of folk humor that talked about black people being you're not being able to see a black person in the dark. Unless you see the white to the eyes and the whites of their teeth smiling and in the white shirt on that was just the triangle. So I'm taking all of those things and putting all those things together to arrive at at that image. And that was the image that really launched me into the wrecks in that I started going in and let me to start into paint my figures using black paint exclusively for the figures later than this kind of. Worked out this way of conflicting technical efforts and the steep theoretical underpinning since then your work, of course become more visually complex draws from a much wider pool of allusions and references that has this really intensive narrative of them, and it's not self expressive. As you've said, it's the working out of Ryan of system. I'd like to know about how you come to find an image and put it on the canvas. What's your research? Like? How do you compose it and sketches and where you during these symbols from? Well, that's a lot of different things. Just ask about just pick your favorite. So because there's the decision to make certain candid picture, and then as the research to find source, the Tyrian a references that can make it believable. Understandable. And then their symbols, which is a whole other thing all together. I mean, those things they're not always present in picture, although sometimes they are from that portrait of the artist has shadow of his former self. Our saw that as a candidate zero degree going back to a basic fundamental thing and then starting to work more complexity from there when it comes to narrative and things like that always was always really captivated by the sort of grand history, painting tradition. And I wanted to do work that operated in that way, but using black figures and black hist. Auricle moments or incidents, or an idea about that history. So in terms of finding out what's important to do history was always something that I wanted to use as a basis for making a lot of pictures, but I always understood that you could never really do those same cans of history paintings that were done to three hundred four hundred years ago. You can't do those kinds of paintings because I've seen too many other things that happened since then. So trying to figure out a way that made those kinds of paintings current was a bit of a challenge, but having had that experience doing collage and stuff like that. Gave me a way in because. Some of the modernist imperative was always to make sure that the material and the process was up front available. And so this kinds of fragmentations and ways in which paint has its own identity with the smears and drips and things like that. So all of those things ended up being devices you could use in, they can his paintings, but the way I approached the history was always a little more oblique than a kind of direct illustration of story of a moment. How do you direct people to historic moments? You don't have to tell all of the story are some key elements that have to be present. So if I'm doing a picture about the middle Pat, so let's take a picture called Great America. Well, that picture sort of its history painting. It's about the middle passage, but there's nothing in it that there's no slave ship in it. It's reconfigured another kind of ways so that the slave ship is embodied in theme, park amusement park ride. That's just seems overcrowded with figures who riding in it. So they don't seem obviously in distress traumatize they seem to be having fun. But of course, yes, it's a little overcrowded. So these are the ways I when I'm thinking about doing history painting, this is how I'm thinking about building that history. So it's like it's a, it's tangential in some kind of way. It's it's along with this. It's embedded in another thing. The one thing that that might be more direct as I have a painting called. Portrait of net Turner with the head of his master. Well. A couple of ways you can do that. But I'm doing that because it's back to the Judit and holler furnace paintings. It's back to the beheading John the Baptist paintings back to those kinds of things. So house, these kind of almost into textual, always always, as you say, it's impossible to go back and just sit of repaint you can't. You can't do that. I'd like to know about is how your expectations of a grasp of history on the part of your origins and how much people should know how educated they should be about it in your mind when they come to see your paintings and how important that is? Well, I mean, you would hope that the population generally is generally educated. Everybody goes through a public school experience. I mean, you're supposed to learn something. When you go through school, I'm not looking for really obscure material to make pictures about because I want people to be confused about him, not looking for that. It's usually stuff that's generally available, and I think everybody should be somewhat familiar with. That's important. And if if people are going to art museums, then I would think that people are also taking some responsibility to know something about what the point of going through an art museum should be, and you should know little bit of something a little bit about what you're going to see. I hope well, qua-. Do we don't go to the museum completely blank. Everybody has expectations when they get there. And so I'm, I'm trying to meet some of those expectations that the work you see in the museum should be of a certain kind of quality. It's supposed to be intelligently thought out and it's opposed to be reasonably well executed. I think if all those things work in the way they're supposed to, then the workers available for people to try and read and have a meaningful experience. So to beyond just, oh, that looks nice yet to decode, I suppose. Yeah, I think what's different is that it in a lot of galleries. Now, the importance of meaning as opposed to subjective interpretation is the two. There's no power to between the two and to come across a painting that you can read. Yeah, must be shocked some people, but I think the world. That way. It's like you gotta know something about the world. You live in its multiplicity of experiences. So if you go to my show down the street. It's clear that you can do all those things are not incompatible with each other. So you got paintings that have this obviously a constructed around some sort of purposeful, meaning, and then you have things that seem to be meaning less. And this is all in the zags made by the same person. It's in the same space. How come we're not having that kind of dynamic relationship with things. When we go all the time. I mean there's just how it is. I mean, it should be like that. I think. I wanted to ask about the record breaking sale earlier this year about collecting as a political act and the sale of art. Because I'm conscious that if I suddenly had some money, I couldn't necessarily wonder into the goes in by Richard Serra, whatever to install in my garden. Right. That's not the way it works. And a large part of your agenda is having your paintings in institutions. There was a description of Sean combs as kind of right by for this painting. I wanted to ask about who say that I think it was, but I remember. But I just wanted to ask about what it means to you who buys you work. I mean, if you think about the history of collecting the history of participation in the art world who has access to the museum, I mean, museums are largely built on the collections of wealthy white aristocrats who often made a lot of their money as part of this trade too. So you have a system that sort of ends up continuously bringing the benefits of that kind of wealth to the same people who were prepare trading, some of the problems that colonialism and imperialism and slavery were built in the first place. So you got saying people profiting from that, and then you have black people who because of the way they came into the west, didn't have access to the kinds of excess capital that made collecting art. Possible, not in a position to profit from work beds made by black people who are now finding their way into the marketplace at a level. It does matter that black people have access to the work of artists of all artists in particular artists of color who are making work and to have had access to that work at a time when the value of the work starts to increase that they can also profit from it. Because if it never happens like that, then you always on the bottom in the market. You're always the ones watching other people profit from things that you do in saying that you will always sort of standing on the sideline watching the same imperialists that profit from the sale of black people in the first place. To me, it's exciting to see like people -ticipant in the market at a level. Where they can then to reap those benefits. Because what we do know is that the objects that get made will ultimately be so somebody's gonna profit from that, there ought to be more black people profiting from that to the ought to be more Chinese people profiting from that to. They ought to be more other people profiting from that too. Is that are just having white people profit from those things. Thanks to Kerry James Marshall. You can visit his latest exhibition history of painting at David's Verna gallery in London until the first November two big interview is produced by your lingo fan and edited by Cassie gal. Pit I'm much Lowry. Thank you very much for listening.

Kerry James Marshall art museum Charles white junior high school David Zvornik Alary Ralph Ellison Laurie California LA Fa Sean combs Richard Serra Michelangelo Italy Leonardo Davinci Otis United States Papa Marcia
Seth Godin - 11/17/20

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

1:04:09 hr | 11 months ago

Seth Godin - 11/17/20

"So i have a question for you. How far would you go for a friend. Game arrived at the airport. Share half your sandwich with them. How about donating a kidney. Tony winner analii ashford may just be that kind of friend for silicon valley's thomas medal ditch in the new original series from chuck. Laurie be positive. Be positive coming. This thursday at eight thirty seven thirty central on cbs. Hey the moment and brian koppelman. Thanks for listening to. This is as big treat as i can. Have on the podcast. Today's guest is the most frequent guest on the moment. One of my closest friends favorite people to talk to creative hero mentor t laser gentleman. Seth godin high surf brian. I gotta tell you when you say the moment it's a trigger for me it triggers possibility and pushes me to dig in deeper and i often listen to the pod just for the first thirty seconds to go back to just need to hear you say that. So thank you for your today. Because i wouldn't have a podcast if it weren't for conversations you and i had before i started it however many years ago and i'm especially thrilled today because you're book the practice has just come out and has already a massive bestseller and more than just being a bestseller. I know you're already getting notes and letters and emails and tweets. Even though you don't see your tweets from people telling you how much this book has affected them and how much this book has helped prod them and how understood. They felt by the person writing. It and i had the pleasure of reading the book in a couple of different forms. And i'd just love it. And i find it so useful and I was so touched that by the at the end of it. You mentioned that you felt like it was in some way our response to or inspired by conversations. You and i have had on here. And that's awesome man. What a what a. What a great thing knowing that. I'm you know. I've been reading you for so long and that somehow what we talk about stays in your mind and enough that you wrestle with it enough that that this kind of thing can happen out of it yeah. I'm i'm actually a little overcome if it weren't for you there'd be no book if it weren't for the moment there'd be no book i meant what i said about you raising my game so i'm in your all right. Let's get into it for everybody here. I have a bunch of stuff. And i've a bunch of stuff that we haven't talked about seven. I just want to say one of the sort of personal thing even though you hate the personal stuff generally which is getting you know you and i have seen each other a lot over this pandemic on zoom and then socially distanced in person. And it's just. I'll just say it here because we talk on here so much i mean getting to see you and getting you know you and i had some kind of ridden this thing out together in certain ways and i just want to say you know your your friendship and counseling and the fact that you know you. Give me purpose sometimes in that. Sometimes you'll come to me with a question. And that kind of thing is rare and at i just want to publicly. Say thanks and you brian. All right let's talk about the following. Let's talk about the. I've been thinking about a bunch of stuff anticipating this one thing. I've been thinking about a lot at applies during the pandemic but it applies to all the creative stuff you talk about in the book is the idea of the long haul and what i find myself wrestling with. Sometimes and i hear people wrestling with is how to keep the long haul in mind without becoming dispirited. By the fact of it. And i heard you talk about chunking and stuff in the past. But i'm not just talking about in the you know on a specific project. I'm talking about a life of trying to do a hard thing. We're dealing with all the vagaries of that might come your way okay. Let's dive in. I have to begin by dividing between hobbies and professions. We are not going to talk about hobbies too much today. Hobbies are important. Everyone should have them. Hobbies are about authenticity and personal satisfaction. You shouldn't do your hobby for someone else. And you shouldn't try to sell your hobby or look for market acceptance for your hobby. 'cause that's why it's your hobby but if you want to be a professional it means that you are making a promised to someone else putting yourself on the hook showing up and saying i made this for you. And they're lots and lots and lots of ways to do that. You can do it by being completely subservient to the audience. You can do it by being arrogant with the audience because ultimately it serves them because some people will choose to follow you as you go on this journey. And so when you talk about the long haul and being dispirited. I think we have to decode. What's not happening for you. In the short run. That's making you dispirited. As you go on this long journey because we do need a cycle with the marketplace to keep going but often we measure the wrong thing. And what do we measure. What's the wrong thing to measure. Well we might measure whether our agent smiles when they see us. We might measure. How many likes we got for something we put on some pieces social media we might measure follows. We have or how big the advance was on the last project. we did. Okay well this is great. This is great okay so another way to look at the agents. Smiling at us is is something we've talked to helene your wife. Who's this incredible. A owner operator of a group of bakeries. And what made me think about is if she gets her bakeries the by the way bakery and she gets wonderful yelp reviews but if there's even a yelp review that's not five stars i've seen it take a toll and and that's the kind of thing right you're trying to do something for the long haul and then something happens in the short run that you can't control and sometimes it might make you feel like there's no point or like well this thing could actually disrupt my way to the succeeding on the long haul and it balancing to respond the instant versus how much to keep your eye on where you're going is tricky. How do you. How do you ambiguous that stuff. Yeah bingo so my david chang story which he may not remember when momofuku. I opened They weren't busy on saturdays at noon. They hadn't become famous yet and family. And i used to go into the city for lunch and we'd sit at the counter. It's not a very big place and I don't eat meat. And i would say to the person working the grill. Love the brussels sprouts. Can i have the brussels sprouts without the bacon on them. And that's a win win. Because they don't have to pay for the bacon. And i get beat the brussels breath and four weeks in a row. This is delicious and the fifth week. I'm pretty sure was david behind the grill. But i'm not sure. I ordered them and he turned to me. Says we make them with the baking because we liked them with the bacon. And that's the kind of restaurant we are. We get the your vegetarian. We really appreciate your support for the restaurant. Three doors down that somebody else runs. That's way more friendly to vegetarians. Why don't you start eating there instead. And that was today that at least for me david. Chang became a success because he was able to say. It's not for you. He was able to do with respect and dignity generosity. There's someone over there who will serve you better than we interview. Because we don't want to become the kind of restaurant that has to compromise for every person who walks in the door. And what if you're not someone with as much agency as dave who owns a business in is doing that. What if you're someone who has a good new idea and you're working for someone else and they don't respond to it and you're trying to serve them. You're also trying to serve holistically the whole thing you know. How do you get up the next day and come up with the net because so much what. Your books about is Being able to do the work each day in the way you define the work you know and and there are so many roadblocks that could put up. And and i think in time like this. These roadblocks can seem insurmountable coach. All fraught were standing on thin ice with quicksand underneath. And it's raining out. And in that moment we come to believe that sheltering through the storm is all the time offer so i. I think it's very important to acknowledge the moment that we're in and say in this moment. Conditions are not ideal but it's also worth remembering that it's when conditions are not ideal that almost every single. Creative breakthrough happens because creative breakthroughs only occur when what was working isn't working anymore and it's in those shifts you. In in your businesses you know shifting from filmed television or radio tv in those moments you need to create a breakthrough and life was not easy for somebody who was in the dying medium when another medium started. Take up the slack. And i get it but if you just weather out the storm that's insufficient but i wanna shift gears because you you made a really good point about what if the client the boss. The people you're here to serve don't get the joke. They don't like what you brought them. And i think it would be really useful. I've been saving this conversation with you to talk about genre or as delete great. Alex trebek's said many many times. I can't even say your own sean. Yeah exactly people who are creatives. Bristle at the idea of genre because they think it has something to do with generic it has nothing to do. With generic it's the opposite of generic. John ra means that you understand your part in the chain in the process in the market. Well enough to make something magical that still rhymes with what came before you've done the reading. You respect the audience enough that you can't just show up and say this is like nothing you've ever seen or heard before it actually is where it belongs and one of the things that you and dave do so beautifully and have from your very first film. Is you understand what has come before. There's no no corr- cranny that is unexplored. And then you put something on top of it that blows people away. But if you didn't have genre you wouldn't be able to go forward so lots of times people show up and go. Hey boss haymarket. I got this great idea. And then when the market says in they blame the market when what they really should realize is that they didn't understand the genre they were in. They didn't understand how big the box was and used the boxes a lever as opposed to attract. Let's that's all. I understand everything you're saying. And it's great you expert that amazingly well in the book complete with a name. Check to me but Which i appreciate it a great deal but let's talk about the emotional side of that being in our private conversations. We talk about the emotional side a lot and the emotional side. Meaning when you get you know. I think a lot about the fact that for a while. You weren't writing books because as you've said on here and in other places it there was pain attached to it and you can find a way for it to have utility in the market and then now you're back to reading books which you now see something. It's not just for you. it's for everybody. We need your books. But can you just talk about the emotion how to excel this. I guess what. I want you to talk about. How have you learned to accelerate the emotional cycle from the from the grappling with the rejection and feeling bad and feeling thwarted to getting to the other side of it where you're producing the work and ideas and changing and making the thing better again so you know there are tools. I know that you use there are things you think about. So can you just talk a little bit about the how to make that cycle happen faster so i wrote something a bunch of years ago. That wasn't true. And i have worked to make true And i'm still not as good at it as i want to be. But it is super useful And i think it's essential for any creative who doesn't count on a super lucky streak to have in their arsenal and it's we have to figure out how to detach from the outcome while we are doing the work so i can remember word for word the rejection letters from thirty years ago and the slights and the things. That just didn't go right. Despite how hard. I had worked to make a thing what it could be and i was a wreck because i was attached to the outcome. I thought i had a good reason to be attached to the outcome. Which is i was broke. And i wasn't going to be able to keep doing the work unless somebody got the joke. And so each rejection cut it hurt particularly when it was personalized by people who were dealing with something. I couldn't see at the time and over the years. I have figured out that my work get dramatically better and my life gets better when i do the work simply the work. Merely the work disconnecting from the outcome and the blog has helped me enormously because there is no outcome from the blog. I don't have comments. I just recently took off the last vestige of stars and thumbs up and all that other stuff. I don't read what people write about it on twitter so i write a blog post. It is what it is. And i don't keep score because the act of keeping score wasn't few all it was instead slowing me down. It was holding me back now. That doesn't mean we shouldn't listen to the market. It doesn't mean we can ignore the person we are here for. It means that if while we are creating it. We are imagining the standing ovation. Imagining that there will be zero. Criticism will end up ruining the work because we will ruin it in service of everyone sorta liking. That's one hundred percent true. It's one of those. There's no there's no air between our positions but but how do you man. I need you to talk a little more about how you reconcile that with something. That's throughout your work. Which is the difference as started with the hobby and work is. It's four somebody. So how do you want to talk more about how to turn a hobby into work right. Something about the songwriting. But how do you do both things. Meaning how do you do the work detached from result and then also have to keep keep a changing it till you land at target right. so how. how do you know there is an audience at or there is a client base. That's going to respond right. So i i think i mostly backed into it. But i'm thinking about nineteen eighty six and i know i did part of it on purpose. Which is we have to be really clear about. What enough is and we have to be really clear about who exactly it's form so a bunch of years ago. I got a phone call. I like to audition for this new show. It's gonna be on in a year and a half. It's called shark tank. Would i be willing to be the judge. Who's a jerk and It's tv it's abc. you'll be famous. You'll have all the things that everyone's supposed to want and with no hesitation. I said i don't wanna be that because if that means i have to be a jerk to people who are trying really hard. Count me out. When i got into the book business. I had a chance to go into the film business. And i decided to stick in the book business because the people i knew because i didn't know you from the film business. We're playing by a different set of rules and keeping score in a different way. And i didn't want to please them. I liked the idea of pleasing. The kind of person who i was having to please in the book business who was keeping score of a different set of metrics. So when you pick your audience you pick your future and you don't get the right to pick the audience you want and expect them to behave the way you want them to. They're going to behave the way they behave. And how do you reconcile that. So yes i agree again agreed. But i guess what i'm asking is. What do you use personally so that you're aware 'cause you're aware of at your where you're publishing a book. You're doing a bunch of stuff you you like. Anyone would want to have the audience read it. You want it to land with those people yet. when you're working on it you want to divorce yourself from it. So is there a a moment in the process. When you're doing the work that then you you take the time to then in an in an interregnum of sorts to to then think about what the feedback might be and then go back into the work again. I mean what is that process like that goes from sort of the most purely creative spot to the spot. that's going to present something to the world. Okay so i. I don't believe that there's such a thing as a purely creative spot. I think were constantly reverse engineering based on the understood but not necessarily vocalized limits of what we're working with. When i started in the book business. I didn't understand what those constraints were. And so i made things instead my fingerprints all over them that no one would publish and i understood after a year of failing if no one published my work it didn't matter where whether my fingerprints on it or not because no one was going to see it and so i shifted to generous posture. It said i which gatekeeper am. I going to get this through. That will enable me to have ended up in front of a reader who will benefit from this. I'm not writing this for me. I'm not writing this to show off. I am writing this. Because i can turn a light on for that person but at the bank shot. 'cause i i gotta get it through. So how does that synthesize. I just for a practical purpose. Shadows that synthesize with when you're then writing you're not thinking about that audience is it because you've decided on the concept. You know the boxer. In so i throw in your no no. I'm totally thinking about my audience. I am not willing my audience to act in a certain way. I have made the best empathic decisions. I can about their state about the desires in their fears. And if they don't get the joke. Okay but i. I had to decide who that group was and make some circassians about what they needed to hear. I'm wrong a lot. But while i am doing it. I am consistent to my assertions. And if i'm wrong i'm fully wrong right. I get that. It's sort of like you know hemingway would always say he was. He was competing against dead authors. And and i thought about that a lot and part of what. I think it might mean he is. He was writing in a way that he thought those people and people who liked those people would respond to it and he wasn't going to give a fuck about anything else if he if he was able to do the work on that level he would find an audience basically well. We're dancing around something here. And i think what we're dancing around is fear yes and there are lots of ways to rationalize through the fear but we should just name it. Which writer's block as you and i've talked to about ad infinitum isn't real and it's real at the same time it's just misnamed. Fear fear of bad writing fear of ridicule. Feeler fear of being seen as a fraud and an impostor. Yes and the way. We do generous important. Creative work is not by making the fear. Go away because it cannot go away. If we're doing important generous work when we let the work in the fear comes with it and so i view it as would. I feel if i got tired while running a marathon. I would not be ashamed of it. I would be proud of it. And so if i'm not feeling afraid when i'm writing my work i know i am not doing my best work yet me too. I think that's exactly right The pandemic has caused immeasurable loss of lives and livelihoods it shutdown economies enforced billions of us to change the way we live but in the midst of the upheaval in new future is being etched out in everyday decisions like whether we decide to ride a bike or take the bus and bigger ones like whether countries decide to take on more debt. Or not the world as you'll know it is a new podcast about how those decisions might play out. Five in-depth conversations between journalists and experts on how cove might change the nature of work cities higher education and the economy. The world as you'll know it is supported by avin thein a nonprofit research institute whose aim is to invest in work that explores how today's decisions will affect the way. We live work at experienced life in the years and decades to come the world is you'll know it is available now on apple podcasts. Spotify and wherever you get your favorite podcasts. I wrote down this word. Monolith when you were about these rejections and there's something in almost like the collective unconscious that this fear of facing a kind of rejection that that doesn't acknowledge si you yup is so painful that will do almost anything to avoid it. Do you know what i mean. Well is the alternative rejection that does see us. I think so right a rejection. That says i i yeah i much i would much prefer rejected as i actually see what you tried to do. I get what you tried to do. Here's why doesn't exactly work. Yeah as opposed to this sort of like. I don't know why i'm being rich entry. Which is what you get so much in the world now. Just because people put out there and there's no response correctable void. What i want from a colleague. And a conspirator is that someone who is good enough insightful. Enough professional enough to act. As if if i was the kind of person who believed x y and z. I would have liked what you did here. But i am asserting that the audience doesn't do that so they won't like this. Let's decode that bit by bit. And i have found that the number of people who can have that conversation is tiny and the chances that they are in very close familial or professional proximity to you are very low. And so i seek them out and real breakthroughs in my career have happened bob. Dorf who is one of the inventors of the harvey wall banger. drink which is great trivia. Question was an important publicist for years and years and he saw me give a talk eighteen years ago and he came up to me at the end of my talk. This was early in my a bit about using no words my slides and he gave me three pieces of feedback that i have used every single time since then it was priceless. Was worth a million dollars. The three pieces of feedback since then a million people two million people have seen me give talks and no one's giving me it's hard to do and it requires a level of generosity and bravery and care plus domain knowledge. So you know one of the cool things about your industry is. There's more there than in most places but there's still an enormous number of frauds who are pretending. They know what's going on but they're just guarding their luck. And i think it's important to respect those people but also ignore them. Yeah that's brilliant. I hope everybody's circles that as they're listening and goes back. And here's seth say that again frauds protecting the idea that they have to main knowledge that they don't actually have is great to recognize and to allow yourself to personalise rejection or some weird. I have some weird questions that you're going to like talking about okay. Big 'cause they all relate to the stuff you're writing about think about but coming from a different place than we've talked about it before this sort of the opposite of bob dylan question. We've spent hours arguing now. Which is a quebec talent. one can't comprehend and i was thinking about. Acdc who just put out a new album today. And i've seen online so many people so excited about the new album which intentionally sounds just like the last ten cds which sounded a lot like the ten before that no i love acdc. And and what. I thought about as i was putting on their record and is it just immediately. Acdc album is what are you. What is the lesson to be learned from an entity like that that goes deep so many of us want to want to complete always want to eight. Wanna change in iterating all the time because we're worried about being pigeonholed as a fake but the idea of going deep into a thing instead of going wide and it seems like there's maybe a lesson to be learned from a cdc and the sound of what it is that they do. And i was wondering if that might hit you in any way. I love this okay. So pigeons are glad that they have pigeonholes. They exist for a reason and you can last a sinecure like that is a really useful way to live a productive life where you're saying there's a group of people who have defined the work i do as a onto itself and i am the one and only person who can do it the way i do it and i'm going to serve those people by giving them what they want. What you don't get when you do that is a life on the wire and there's nothing wrong with that. There's absolutely nothing wrong with that. They are creating a product that fuels people. That gives them something that they want but if they went to bed last night before. The album dropped worried that the album wasn't going to succeed there foolish because of course the albums going to succeed. They've proven it again and again that this is what people want the same way. If you go to nathan's on coney island and they give you a. Nathan's hot dog. You got exactly what you came for nothing wrong with that. But it's different than living a life on the wire and what are the rewards living a life on the wire. Because i think well one thing i would suggest about the difference and i think it's worth you talking more about this as i post. Here's oppose it. So a lot of people wish they could do the same thing again and again but the thing is acdc always makes it seems to me. They actually always make sure that the quality and i know you love to define the word quality but they always the intrinsic thing. That's happening in their albums isn't going to deviate from what meaning it. They're still going to give you. They're not gonna give you the guitars that sound like that. They're actually going to do the work of coming up with that by. Those standards are good rips. They're going to come up with choruses that by those standards really work and that part is not. It may not be scary. But it's very hard. I think yes or people would do it right. So there have to be rewards. They're they're not an ac dc cover band right near dc. Those are two totally different things. And i if i if. I'm not showing enough respect to them i apologize. It's no you are. you're showing respect. I'm more talking about it for sweet. Were doing work hard to do something that is in of itself. And so we look at richard sarah richard ceramics two-million-pound sculptures and if you look at his early work. It's not richard serra work. It's work done by a art student named richard. Sarah and it was years later before. Richard serra became richard. Serra and now i mean i have no idea if he's still active but now he can tell when a piece of work is worthy of putting his name on it because it's in and of itself it is a complete whole of what it is supposed to be. It is not just a reproduction of what he did yesterday and to do that is really difficult. And you know. I was listening to a nineteen seventy six lp of gene roddenberry talking to different people. He worked with on star trek the other day. And when you hear roddenberry talk about how. He approached star trek. Each great star trek episode is in and of itself and the ones where he varied tried to come up with something outside the genre. Where either you know hack jobs your failures but you can make one. That has no line that was in the previous week's episode but is clearly in and of itself. Yes and there's value in that. How do you think about that when you set out to do a piece of work in other words how do you think about the fact that to a certain audience. You are a brand like acdc as yet you want to offer something new each. How does a creator. Who's not at the beginning of their career. This is why i'm interested in this right. Someone who's not at the very beginning but is trying to find a way to still put themselves into the work but they know there's an expectation from the audience. So how do you balance those things. You seth godin and then how should we balance those things. Well no it's something. I've been wrestling with particularly in the last seven months so sometimes someone will send me a blog post that i wrote five or ten years ago and i will read it not remembering anything about writing it but i know i wrote it because it sounds like me and that took a long time to develop my blog my blog. It sounds like me and as the times of twenty twenty were and are so fraught. There were people who said to me. You have all this power and leverage you should repurpose your blog and make it about that. And i really wrestled with that because part of me wanted my blog my blog. But it's not itself spock and sess. Blog does a thing. It is in and of itself and i was really torn. Because if i really felt like shifting to come in politics and things like that would have changed things substantially of course. But it's not my tool. It is a thing that belongs to a lot of people and it isn't enough itself. But when i work on a new thing that isn't the blog in those moments i am digging into a deeper place and saying well. I'm going to live with this thing this medium. This project is company. This new approach to something for a long time. So i should build it in a way that i would be happy. Living with an inside of and it's not going to be suspect is isn't going to be a new thing i made and some people aren't going to get the joke and that's okay well but here's the thing to the astute reader of the blog actually didn't do what you just said. Let's talk about better. Help terrific sponsor and they're offering something so useful genuinely useful which is always my favorite thing to talk about. I think about this. What interferes with your happiness. What's preventing you from achieving your goals. Like i've thought about this stuff over the years and have gone to therapists to help me figure this stuff out and used to therapist in-person now. I talked to my therapist online and a better help. Assess your needs match with your own. Licensed professional therapist. You connect in a safe and private online environment. You can start communicating and under twenty. Four hours does not help it professional counselling you can send a message drew council wherever you want. 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We have not talked about this directly so this i'm not using special information. I'm a reader of the blog and so come on and talk about what actually happened because you didn't just ignore those people and you didn't just decide you weren't going to address it and i think it's valuable to talk about the so people could go read the last four months of blogs. And why don't you talk a little bit about what actually happened on the block. Well i haven't by dear friend. I have a different take on it. Because i two blog posts from ten years ago and fifteen years ago. Sure why did exactly the same short with maybe not as much frequency nerve. You depends The thing is that what i was responding to was a real need for road runner. Coyote type Broad statements that i felt would be ineffective and actually fine. The way that i write and who i'm writing for. So you're correct that the people who are in sync with me and my voice in what i'm saying. I'm thrilled that. What i was trying to teach came through what i was responding to his. That's different than Day trading in of course. But that's this goes back to know. But i want to. I think you're heroux here. And i want to go back to talking about that in fact because what i love seth is that you're so true to the values that you a spouse. You're one of the few public figures who is in the business of sharing your thoughts about how all of us can keep growing. Who actually walks at the way that he or she talks and i would. Don't i know that. Because i know you intimately but i really know that from knowing your work which is even better and so i would say that you always talk about. This question of authenticity is being kind of bs. And i know what you mean by that on the other hand what you hold to be important and crucial. You did find a way to put into your blog without changing its form or readability and we only have to look too yesterday and yesterday without and you're gonna tell me you wrote it nine months ago and i don't care because what happened yesterday is right in the dead smack in the middle of your blog. The following paragraph results. Don't care about our explanation. We need a useful explanation. We're going to improve. But denying results doesn't change them november twelfth twenty twenty and and so. Didn't you actually find a way to be true to your audience. Who wants from you what they expect from sets blog andrew your innermost thoughts and feelings and concerns about the world. And i've been doing that as long as i can. Remember will then in fact when people said you should change the blog that perhaps they just weren't reading it carefully enough correct and i understand why they would feel that way that as someone who has had so much good luck and so much privilege i have never been in a movie theater that was on fire. But if i was and somebody wasn't screaming fire at the top of their lungs. I would be annoyed at them. Yeah so you're going to write about results if you feel it's important to write about results but i'm also gonna do it in a way. That doesn't involve screaming at the top of my lungs. Us you served both things. That's what i was so happy about. When i read that blockposts right not even knowing we that was gonna come up today but but i do think for people listening. When there's this question of i wanna be myself. And i want to say the thing and i want to do the thing yet. The the the medium in which i'm working doesn't allow for it. Go back and listen to the way. Seth is talking about what he does. And then go back and read the blogs that have come out over the last four months and understand how you can serve both things. It takes a tremendous amount of skill in work. And you have to be willing to work hard enough at it to do that right. I mean to craft something like that. You have to actually be thinking about like you said at the beginning of this your audience in. Here's a short story that not told him public I've been to the gravesite of tom. Thomson the great canadian painter who they formed the group of seven shortly after he died more than anybody else's grave more than any grave of anyone in my family. It's up in aqua park. And i would take School kids eighty one hundred and twenty two time me and two other adults on a ten mile canoe journey to visit this thing and i was always in the back because i was canoeing instructor and i was always in the canoe with the smallest weakest kids. So everyone's coming back from the trip and they've gone off ahead so it's me and two nine year olds and i've had surgery on both shoulders. They don't work very well and to get across the portage through the seventy pound canoe on my back and started walking and as i threw my back my shoulder dislocated and was right in the center of my chest. Flopping their the authentic me would have been heard in toronto. It hurts so much and isn't going to help me get home. And i somehow got out of my larynx. The following sentence tracy. Could you come here for a second. And i have a con a canoe on my head right. I'm bent over with my shoulder in the middle of my just. And i said would you might just chugging my arm a little bit and it turns out. Tracy was somehow related to hulk hogan unbeknownst me and with two hands pulls my arm so hard like a barbie doll that goes right back into the socket that hurt again and i said okay now. Let's paddle home. The point is that my desire to be consistent in that moment. Got me to where. I needed to go more than being authentic would have. Yes yes well. This literally leads into old definition. Leads into this question that i had here which is about loyalty a cousin of authenticity. And not really something. You've talked about that much publicly. So most of us love to identify as loyal and you talk about serving the audience. The customer being professional. But there's also the notion of serving the version of yourself that started on the path. How do we balance our varying. And i think it's different from authenticity because loyalty involves the other some other entity to which were being loyal. Maybe a part of ourselves. How do we balance these various loyalties. Such a juicy brian. Wow okay so first. Marketer answers that airlines talk about having loyalty programs airlines have no loyalty for dollar we switch airline and so the the programs are basically just an organized form of bribery slash lottery to pay us for not switching for a dollar and said we'll only switch for twenty dollars. That's not what loyalty really means. Loyalty is a price we pay because we are telling ourselves a story about who we are and where we used to be if there is no price. There is no loyalty then. You're just making a series of short term. Decisions happened yard and so when we start decoding who we are and what story we tell ourselves about being loyal to ourselves bebop being loyal to a publisher about being loyal to an idea. We have to come back to. Who's it for what it for this work. I seek to do and I remember when i was struggling so hard to make it as a book packager and we finally had a project that was working and it was five years in the making maybe more and it was working and it turned out that the client sent a lawyer. Every meeting was harassing us. Was the most difficult client my small team and i had ever worked with and i knew we could work our way through it and we had a meeting as a team and i said these people represent one third of our income. We might not be able to keep everyone on the team but if we stick with them we're going to become the kind of people who are good at working with difficult clients. And i said i don't want to be that kind of person and i want to do this for the reason i set out to do this. Which is to do work that. I'm proud of in a way that i'm proud of and to the teams credit. They had my back and we just gave all the rights back to these people. Dan the making fortune from it and We replaced all of their business and ninety days because getting back to what we saw to do was so freeing and powerful that we were able to get back to work and i have never once regretted making that decision and that was because you knew where your loyalty should lie right. I wasn't loyal to bigger. And i wasn't loyal to profitable. I was loyal to if i wanted to make a lot of money on wall street. I have an mba right. I did this for different reason. So many loyalties are inherited right. There they're received was there received in a way. And what tools do you use to five out. Does it always just show up because of a conflict meaning a situation arises that forces you to think it through or are you ordering those things somehow ahead of time for yourself. This is also great. Let me just interject one thing about costs because it could blazel fused with loyalty. Yes song costs are the very common human desire to stick with something that was hard to get in the first place. We have acquired theater tickets or made a decision to go on vacation or Somebody we look at the sunk costs and we say why might as well stick with this because to change means acknowledging that i was wrong and starting over and what we know in a business context is that ignoring sunk cost one of the single smartest things you can never do every day. You make a new decision based on new information and if you wanna accept the gifts from your former self please do but if you don't want those gifts if you went to law school for three years and you hate being a lawyer you don't have to take that degree from by the way same thing if you're of acdc fan and you've defined yourself and your the t shirt and you play the guitar and you don't like the new album you don't have to spend two months listening to it. Adam outmoded idea of loyalty correct. So what i think is really practically useful to do is to amplify your loyalties by treating them like sunk costs in the way that people make a mistake with some costs. Meaning you start modeling for your self at expense. What it is that you stand for because expat expense say more about that yes free right yes at right. If three times in a row you've walked away from a client who was a jerk. The fourth time when the stakes are even higher. It will be much easier for you to walk away from them because the sunk cost of. I've done this before. That's who i am makes you more loyal to who you want to become right. Flip it and use the sunk cost to your at us. The sunk cost fallacy to your benefit as a way to groove. What because. We're talking about grouping behaviors so as a way to prove that which you want to be loyal to not what your default loyalty because of some your parents said or something. You've thought mattered. But actually Reaffirming your loyalties in a conscious way through your actions. So you've told me several stories about various famous movie and record producers who were just pieces of work. Prima donnas discharge rolling disaster. I am guessing that most of the time they did that they were actually playing a role. They had decided that this is who they were that you couldn't possibly have pissed them off where than most people had they were just saying. Well this is what i do in a situation like this. We act in a way. And then we become that person and so when you decide what role you're going to play as a creator and you practice it at cost than it is more likely that you will groove that and become that person brilliant well said okay. We rarely talk on here about form usually content but reading the practice may the the form so incredibly serves the content and so it made me want to know. Like how much do we need to know about the form ahead of time. And how flexible should we be on that as we're doing the work. Whatever that work is. I know you think about form a lot so i but we don't talk about it as much so i would like you to talk about it a bit. I've been on the cutting edge of media. Since i worked at spinnaker software. No since nineteen seventy six. When i got my first email address. I helped invent computer education computer games in nineteen eighty three. I think form is essential to giving us the vessel that our creativity can fit into. And if you skip over the discussion with yourself about form you have really hindered your ability to do the work with the impact you hope for. I think you don't have to do at first but you have to have the conversation where along the way of the conversation for me. It's always at the beginning so when an idea surfaces whether it's for a course that you wanna give or a series of videos you wanna make or a book right as the idea. Hey i wanna. I want to serve this audience by presenting this batch of material. You're immediately thinking about not just. Hey it's a form of a book but they'll form that that book ought to take to be the most effective of version of it. It's even more than that like the nba. I defined the entire form before. I came up with one lesson. And i just did a podcast serious for Himalayas and i define the entire form before. I figured out what it was even going to be about. I need to understand the foundational building blocks before i start moving the blocks route. So that's the gift that gives you. Once you know the form you know how to fill it and you don't know how much you should fill or what you should do until you know the form. Yeah because i can't. I'm sure other people have different habits in different ways of doing their creative work. But you know clement. Greenberg is really well known as an art critic for pointing out that the picture frame is essential. If you wanna understand. European art without the picture frame. There's no european art and once you have a picture frame and canvas now you're pretty limited and then there's some colors it hasn't been invented yet even more limited within that framework nowadays gonna do right. Yes so forum isn't a constraint to form is useful so my blog intentionally doesn't use eighty percent of the features that wordpress with lighted half. Because if i took those constraints away. I couldn't do a blog post tomorrow. You don't use video for instance. I don't use video. I don't put a embeds in i don't do polls i don't put in all sorts of the cool fractional interactivity things that make it hot for a minute because then i would spend my time saying well. What do i do with that part of the media instead. All i get is twenty six letters. And i can't write something more than a page in like that's it. Those are my constraints that allows you to do the thing that you do know. Owens did i mention that no semicolon. That's really important. The no semi colons. I know somebody who puts a semi colon every constraint is i must use one semi colon in every email and i've seen it benefit that person. It helps them. It helps them. Think about what they wanna say. One semi-colon per email. I know you've gotten emails from this person to vote later off line we can talk about. I've been thinking about realtors lately this market because thinking about how you reframe your mission. When circumstances on the ground change. And i've watched realtors in cities and their circumstances changed in one way and realtors in herbs and rural environments. Their circumstances changed in a whole different way. And you would think that that. The city re- realtors were absolutely having a harder time of it and they probably are. But i've seen realtors in these excerpts or rural places where suddenly values of skyrocketed. They're decrying the lack of inventory. They're there. And i've seen a couple of really thrive as they've just realized that their job is not the same job as it was six months ago. And can you talk a little bit about that about how to allow yourself within your career within your work to. When when do you want to reframe based on circumstances on the ground and how to do it because even the way you say i know you understand what i'm talking about yup so interesting. We have lots of statistics about the real estate business and one thing that we know is when real estate values go up to number of realtors goes up and when they go down the number of people selling real estate goes down that most people who call themselves real estate brokers are amateurs they are showing up doing their best with their authentic self as a middleman in an industry that for a long time required a real estate broker to be in the mix and a few of them are professionals and the professionals see every change in the market as an opportunity because they know why they do this who they do this for and they are eager to exchange one set of tools for another if it's going to serve the function because it means embracing momentary incompetence on their way to getting good at something new and they know that when the world changes the amateurs are going to go away. The amateurs are going to whine and complain and the professionals the ones who are in it because they see the craft of it the professionals do better than ever fascinating and really applicable across things. Okay we're gonna go to a little bit of a not even a speed round. We don't you don't have to answer quickly. It's not as i would like you to talk a little bit about emotions both energizing and enervating and i don't like an in case people enervating people's one of those words people use enervating means it's satire. Entered the people sats your energy but can you talk about the emotions both energizing and enervating around selling meaning. A people are so conflicted about asking financial recompense. People are so conflicted about to monetize what they do at times or knowing how to charge enough and and you know you are so good at at being willing to say okay. This thing has value. I'm going to ask you to pay for it if you can't afford it all i mean you're very good at also people can't afford it finding ways for them to get your work but that's not what i'm talking about. I'm talking about the baseline thing. Hey i'm creating something. it has a value. i'm going to assign a value to it. And i'm not going to give it to you for free. Can you talk a little bit about that. Here's an analogy. That i think will help people Because i've come to really like selling. Let's say you were head of fundraising for 'cause you really care about whether it's you know buildings on campus or the aclu or anything in between clearly. Free is not an option because then it's not a donation anymore. Why would someone give one hundred thousand dollars to have a building named after them. Is it rude to ask a billionaire to spend a hundred thousand dollars to have a dorm named after them. Well here's how i think about it. If you're a billionaire you have just about everything you can buy with money. What you might not have enough of his legacy and respect and being admired by people in your circle and it might be that naming building. Fdr campuses worth three hundred thousand dollars to you. But it's only one hundred thousand dollars. So i'm calling you because i would like to give you two hundred thousand dollars value because for one hundred thousand dollars name of building. Fdu and maybe you want that and maybe you don't but let me paint a picture of what that might feel like and if the person buys it from you they should say thank you because you just gave them something that they couldn't get from anybody else that gave them sustenance and help them get to where they want to go so if you can imagine that then shifting to this is my screenplay and here's what you're going to need to pay for it. Isn't that different. Because there's plenty of free screenplays online. These people aren't looking for free screenplay looking for a screenplay that they can tell their boss about they can be proud to work on that they can get funding for an all of those things will happen because they bought it from you and charging is part of the story and has a story because the paper is not worth anything. It's a story about who we are. And what we've got and what we're capable of. And so what we get is the privilege of showing up with something we made and saying. I have a story for sale. And if you want the story. I'll send you somewhere else but if you do want the story this is how much it costs all make sense and and why do you think what is it culturally. That makes some of us less willing to ask for what the work is worth. What what is it. That's what are we. What is the negative story. We're telling ourselves that we have the first of all. I'm sort of glad that biased in that direction. Because no one wants to be hustled. Yes and it's really easy to take what i just said. And turned into a justification for hustling every single person. You find and so. I'm glad not everyone's out there doing that But why don't we do it. Well one thing is. We haven't quite divorced the work from the person who made the work and if someone says i don't like that or it's not for me. It's easy to come to the conclusion that they don't like us or we're not for you. The other thing that's easy to do is to imagine that its final in the sense that if this thing in this moment that we thought was our best work doesn't work then we're doomed and i worked my way through this by adding the word yet. To all the rejections. I was hearing right. I don't like this proposal yet. I don't think your book is any good yet and yet opens the door for. Oh i can learn something right now. Maybe i can learn. I shouldn't make this better for this person. Because they're never gonna want it. Or maybe i can learn that they were trying to tell me something and i didn't hear it before but i heard it now and i can make the work better beautiful. Is there anything that you wanted to talk about. We're hoping that. I would ask wanted to ask me before we end wanted. I had a one minute ref about gimmicks. 'cause i just started reading a new book on gimmicks it was written up in the new yorker and i discovered gimmick is magic spelled backwards and It's lot. It is tempting in various forms of media as things are changing to seek out a gimmick because a gimmick get to that flurry of attention and a gimmick momentarily releases the pain and the tension. So what's the difference between a gimmick. That's a gimmick and a gimmick that becomes a building block for the future of whatever creative medium. you're in. And i think we don't know the answer until after and so we shouldn't do gimmicks as a short-term hustle but at the same time i think that anytime we're getting a signal from our subconscious that were playing a little too close to the shiny bright objects. We should explore it a little bit because that might be exactly where we need to go. Well say that what. I want to figure out exactly where i need to go. One of the first people i call you and your advice and the way you listen and your friendship is just invaluable. And i'm so glad that we get to do this on the microphone. So people can hear everything that you're thinking about and take some of that into their own lives over. Everybody reads blog. Don't try to tweet. At seth because he does not read twitter. You can tweet at me. Because i obsessively read twitter at bright koppelman. Even i'm trying to do so less. These days is also is on instagram. You can find him talking about stuff there. And seth godin thank you so much for being on the moment i hope everybody picks up the practice. It is a incredibly useful book. It is the opposite of a hustle. It is at three times the price it would still be a bargain now. That sounds gimmicky. What i just said yet i mean. So what can i tell you set. Thanks brother everybody else. Thanks for listening to the moment and we will see you. Brian thank you.

brussels analii ashford thomas medal brian koppelman wrestling John ra Seth godin brian Richard serra avin thein david chang dave Alex trebek thirty seconds david helene richard sarah richard two-million-pound Laurie haymarket
High Strangeness in Kentucky - Best of Coast to Coast AM - 5/21/21

The Best of Coast to Coast AM

18:18 min | 4 months ago

High Strangeness in Kentucky - Best of Coast to Coast AM - 5/21/21

"When the brightest minds at the university of florida come together. Something extraordinary happened. Engineering empowers medicine data scientist rice. Agriculture geology fuel space exploration and artificial intelligence transforms learning and research. The ideas that go on to change the world. They're launching right from here. At the collision of big ideas and massive potential something momentous becomes possible at the university of florida. Ufl dot edu. Now here's a highlight from coast to coast. Am on iheartradio. A welcome back to coast to coast. Am richard serra. Sitting in for george noory say hello on twitter at richard. Serra s why. Because i love you r e double t and were exploring unsolved murders disappearances history of violence in western kentucky nathan isaac is the host creator of the penny royal podcast. We were talking native about the unsolved murders of lynda gibson and cody garrett. You said when you one of the first things that happened you you wield into town in the town square people were holding signs or placards saying we know you did it. So what's happening there so When i when. I finally got home i. I spoke to my neighbors. And they told me the story of The two victims have been murdered in nineteen ninety four and their grisly murders. Their bodies were found in a hedgerow. And this is. This is one of the strange thing about it to their bodies found in the hedgerows. Right where the city and county limits and so There was this Confusion and the bodies were whether or not it was the county jurisdiction sheriff's department or if it was city police and so the fbi were called in And it just was. It was very high profile case It occurred on july fourth. That was the last time that either one of them was seen and their bodies were found on july center And there was just some weird the way they were saying. Just the circumstances were very strict and and my neighbors as telling also added in that there. Was this idea that there was a a cultivable. Right there were You know people in power here in town That were involved. And that's why the family had the sign pointed at city hall that there was something going on that there was some you know. Criminal conspiracy of all people in the murders That sort of led me into this investigation into the stories surrounding the story about why people believe that there was a cult here which i don't think there's a culture anything like that but And and it turned out to that that story of the murders had become focal than admixed to other crimes to other murders. Were mixed in with that as well. So but you know it took researching mrs to sort of unraveled at the see How it had worked its way into the the local cultural consciousness. And we're not. We're those murders ever solved nathan. Now no they still unsolved dateline. Nbc actually came in two thousand nineteen on the twenty fifth anniversary And anyone has information on the borders. They can go to the plastic county sheriff's department website. And they've got a tip line there but there's never been any resolution for the families There there are a lot of rumors about who people think. It is Obviously their stories that share involved. You know that you know files were lost conveniently cost case to go on but you know those are just worth local story. But the nature of the murders and how strange they were in the end. They were found And then the sheriff that was investigating the case. Same tatra was this larger than life. Figure flew a helicopter. Instead of drowning tropical amazingly in two thousand and two he was assassinated at a fishpaw at a political rally in somerset's actually stands kentucky county But that also was sort of a strange events that had sores these weird undertones killing of the king ritual and so there were lots of other disappearances once we started digging into so just crimes in the area we found all kinds of disappearances all kinds of unsolved murders You know People who have been burned lives near the caves Here in plastic kennedy said. We're talking about here and Just lots and lots is like a long history of violence poisonings in. We've got an old story about group of school children Who someone try. They'd never found out who it was. But someone tried to poison twenty two school children and my tonight paid twenty six and just just tons and tons of very strange stories of murders over right and that area is also rumored to be kind of a serial killer dumping ground. Is that true there. There have been a few bodies have been found in the county that were linked to Forget the name syrup tuba but from california They had driven all the way from california to plassey county and had dumped a body of fishing creek leauge And they were gonna have interviewed smoke people that they were focused on researching That aspect of it and had sound That that there were stories of other burgers people here but you know this is right on the edge where we're at right now is right on the edge Danish national forest and so like you said huge vast wilderness. And there's a lot of places to do that. No one would ever find you know to to put some the body so right around the fort. One one cases you know there's a lot of wilderness here right. And what was the murder hotel nathan from the early nineteen hundreds. Yeah so i. I was interviewing Rods airman sort of local historian. He's a radio. Dj historian of the ten collects pictures all old stories. And there's a huge connection between cincinnati which is known as queen city and then somerset. You're in plastic. County is known as little bitty because there's railway line that goes from cincinnati straight into somerset. it's kinda funny thing too is if you are injured or die on the train tracks here in somerset. It's considered a burger cincinnati. Because of this easement that they have but There's been a walk connection between cincinnati subset and there were stories rod toll thing In the newspaper from the turn of the century where there was a hotel here in somerset in the mayor and the sheriffs had rains. This plot to advertise this hotel motel as a safe place. Unwitted winded to stop and stay the night if they were travelling south from cincinnati knoxville. And this mayor in the in the share with murder the women that were staying there and they were tons of the old news stories about this happening. and weirdly that layer is connected to the pearl bryan murder Which was one of the most famous murders in Us history in the eighteen hundred comes about or something but Land murderer was possibly themsember's you know they. It involves Two dental students walling and sleep but Bobby mackey is the place where they supposedly found. They headed per o'brien and supposedly them to her head as well bobby massey's and payroll groups there but But it's rumored that the two dental students were not actually the murderers And the real true merger was fine. Second which is crazy crazy. Rabbit hole right and is. Is that your theory that this some of this gruesome history might be tied also to the Kentucky anomaly this. This high level of electoral or geometric geo magnetic energy. Yeah so there's there's a lot of research that The that high levels with electro-magnetic energy can affect the brain of people you know that was my original sort of theory was. That's why people and sedona maybe we're seeing all of these balls ally affecting perception But then when we started this area and then tense relation. I started find research in japan. You know research in europe about high levels of suicides upticks and i want all of these things that they found associated with this and the other thing about this area to that there are large quartz. Deposits and a large amount of courts and the rock as kentucky is a quartz agate. There's tons and tons of quotes here especially in this region and if you take a piece of courts and hit it with a really intense electromagnetic geomagnetic field. It causes something called the ps and electrical se and burst of electrical energy. So when we look at this area and look at the amount of course and how intense this geomagnetic energy from the earth. It's it's easy to draw correlation between the level of violence year and the mental health issues. Better in the area with that normally and my understanding is that there's also a lot of Mental health issues in mental health problems in in and around penny royal. Tell me about that. Yeah i mean the whole region people would probably say that there's a connection between maybe poverty levels and mental wellness but In this specific area. I think it goes beyond that Some people that we've interviewed it worked at the kentucky's eastern state mental hospital Which i don't. I don't think i've been lexington anymore. Looking in lexington kentucky and people there when they found out that she was a plastic kenny. They were like what's in the water down there because seventy percent of the people in here right now are from that one candidacies watch county massive win but also is a is a pretty big population especially in the countryside. But they're they're here s. I think it was two or three different people that we talked to. That made that sex mentioned of sort of being standard At they dig into the newspaper are just keep finding all of these crazy stories of people doing insane things of this violence of just weird just mental health stuff so i just wanted to confirm i heard you correctly. Do you say seventy percent of the state mental hospital patients at one point where all from seventy percent of the patients in the state mental hospital. Where from pulaski county. That's this is the Mid two thousand that the people were working there. so yeah. it's crazy so now it did it change. I'm not sure. But but there is a a large amount of There are lots of mental health facilities here in plastic. Kennedy's well And and later we can talk about it too but definitely the story of oakwood You know experimental health facility plays into this. And i think it's worth moving to that in kentucky in lexington kentucky just an hour. North of here was the federal drug on which wasn't official impale tra- when you know hit the fan in the files were exposed You know the congress about the entails or premium shut down one of the only places that they acknowledged was this Federal drug farm in lexington kentucky. And that's where they administered the most lsd experiments in the entire program. So you know. That's that's just you know. Like i said just a little bit over an hour north of here And then that was in the early seventies at the same time this weird State run experimental mental health facility opened that was oakwood. That's oakwood right. Well we have a few minutes here before the top of the hour. Why don't we talk about this As you say this experimental oh health mental health facility that was built in somerset In the early seventies this was supposed to be kind of a flagship for this new age of mental health. In the us right. I guess after the you know. We're we're familiar with one flew over the cuckoo's nest in the way that sort of the old method of treating mental health patients. This was sort of the new age of mental health oakwood so what happened in oakwood. Yeah so You know this was the vietnam. War was raging The mental health industry in america was was viewed very poorly. And so this facility was going to be this flagship of of how how that was changing. How things better and so dateline this is lines have been busy somerset quite talent but they came down and they did a special in films for a week. This new mental health facility and within six weeks of this place opening an anonymous letter was sent to the governor of kentucky. The hint state police sheriff here in town the mayor and it alleged. This is all eighty working police newspaper fascinating but the weather themselves from an anonymous employee stated that there was a which called operating on the third shift and they were performing seances and summoning imagine in the tunnels beneath facility and if they were burning symbols into the backs of some of the and i was like. Oh my god. This is just totally. No this is like some weird stranger things kind of stuff. You know And when we come. They ended up firing. That was working there but the guy that was running the program. You know he'd gotten in trouble for You know not wearing a suit. He's kinda wearing Beads long beard. It was sort of the effluent institute. angle on this and the place itself is is very weird especially if you look at it from spaces from the satellite image It has a weird shape almost like a single and In a lot of thought went into the design of the place. And i found out to from interviewing that it was actually supposed to be built into desert out west and then they ended up moving it to somerset for some reason but they retain the same as is so these cottages that they built are very slightly down into the ground and they were like that because of the high winds and called the visit. They're earning how wins here. But they still buried in the ground and have tunnels that. Connect the various cottages. But anyone that's interested in. This should definitely pu up a satellite image and look at the shape place. Because it'll blow you listen to more coast to coast. Am every weeknight at one am eastern and coast am dot com for more acapella university. You're in control of your education with the game. Changing flex path format. You can set your own deadlines and move at your own pace the faster you move the more you save visit cappella dot. Edu to learn more to local families at the center of the most notorious crime in ohio. History eight people dead all from the same family she talk you late expand wishlist cold core now on the five year anniversary of the massacre and in the middle of production on this podcast breaking news right now. A shocking confession. None of us were expecting tweety wish hitter and listen to the pectin massacre returned to pike county a production of studios every wednesday on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts.

somerset cincinnati kentucky university of florida nathan isaac lynda gibson cody garrett plastic county sheriff's depar kentucky county plassey county george noory richard serra nathan lexington Bobby mackey bobby massey Serra california eastern state mental hospital
We'll Always Work Through It

Committed

28:12 min | 1 year ago

We'll Always Work Through It

"Most of you guys know that besides podcasts. I write books for a living but one of the things I can't do is illustrative book. That's where love book comes in Lovech. They actually let you make your own book. You can create characters that look just like you or just like the person that you're giving the book to customers have the option to personalize each and every page as much as they want to love back nosed once you create one book. You WanNA create more books. So they're offering membership program. You receive a free book when you sign up. Fifty percents off any additional books. Unlimited free digital books and discounts on gift wrap and other products so for about the cost of flower delivery. You can have a premium gift that will ask ask for years. Here's how you get started. Go to love book. Online dot com slash committed to receive a special twenty percent discount for listeners. That's love book. ONLINE DOT COM. I'm to receive a twenty percent. Discount committed listeners committed is a production of iheartradio Feel like every couple I know has the fantasy of quitting the corporate jobs and finding a way to make living doing what they love. Can I have a fantasy about opening a bookstore. Wine bar cheese and chocolate shop together all of the things that I love under under one roof but for most people neck and I included. It's a fantasy Richard Serra combs of turn that fantasy indoor reality ready in two thousand thirteen. They're fancy corporate jobs in San Francisco to renovate an old house in southern California. It was right outside Joshua Tree National Park and they thought they just use it as a base for them to freelance telecommute. But Richard. Serra were so successful in that renovation so successful in promoting that house that they were able to open it up for fulltime reynolds pretty soon after that. They're renovating another property in Joshua Tree and then another other than another outside our national park in Arizona. That one's an in and it opened a couple of months ago. It's absolutely breathtaking. Rich and Sarah managed managed to leave behind the rat race. Embrace the open landscapes the snow living. I'm Joe His community the Syrian Richard. Just kids when they first met literally they were thirteen. This was the early two thousands and they started started their relationship. The way most relationship started in the early two thousands chatting online. Here's a real blast from the past from rich my town used. ICQ A Q.. And then Sarah's town used aim so we were kind of chatting on both but eventually we just switch over to name. You've got mail. We talked about everything on instant messenger including including how much they both loved to draw so when they met in real life they decided to take a drug class together. We never expected to get married or anything like that. We've always been drawn to working on projects together to even when we were in high school. We were always dreaming up these businesses that we were going to start together making not shirts or like our own homegoods this collection and things like that. They both ended up at the Same Art Art School in Baltimore and stayed together the entire time after that their careers took them San Francisco where they both got chops. Web Designers rich proposed Sarah a year after they moved to the bay area. I mean being together for I think at the time we were together for like seven or eight years or something Dating so I had a pretty pretty good inkling that she would say yes but I was still just so incredibly nervous that I'm bringing to different spots just being like no this one's not right. This was not right and then finally like at the end of the day. Sarah's there's like let's just go home. She knew that we're walking down this path. And then I see like kind of another like small path off that main path than it led to this really awesome spot like looking over the ocean and the cliffs and stuff. And that's where I just like mumbled the words because I was so nervous and yeah it was very sweet week. He knew a hundred percent that I would say. Yes but it's just one of those moments though that like I don't know it's just there's so much pressure because he wanna make it like a really special special moment and yeah makes you nervous. They got married in the same New England church that riches grandparents had been married in decades earlier. Her It was before pinterest and all that so we kind of did our own. Diy Wedding where we we had this empty venue and then we chose everything in mix and match all pieces and had fun little beans and everything but yeah four before all the help that now exists. Yeah it's Kinda crazy take all of our friends are able to use pinterest and get inspiration. Spoiled oiled now rich and Sarah had these really good jobs in San Francisco. Web designers are always in high demand. But it wasn't what they loved. We started craving working with our hands and getting off of our computers. We wanted to work on her own projects again. Working in San Francisco is really really inspiring but at the same time it was always for somebody else and we really craving Creating something that we're really passionate about then. The same question question with what we were working on was. Is this what we want to do forever. And if the answer is no which it was at the time then and now it's time to leave as any Um we're gonNA take a quick break here be right back Do you ever wonder why you wake up with a scratchy throat or stuff he had. It's a thing that happens all year long. You can't blame cold and flu season instead. You might WANNA blame the air inside your home. Believe it or not. Indoor air pollution can be five times worse than what's outside why microscopic allergens in pathogens like pet dander gender pollen dust mites and mold. They thrive and doors and air filters. Can't fix the problem because these harmful microbes don't live in the air the live on the surfaces says of your home they live on kitchen counters. Keyboards carpets and beds. These places are literally crawling with them. But there is a solution. The probiotic biotic purifier by better air. Better air uses all natural environmental probiotics to remove these unhealthy microbes from your home. That means you can breathe better sleep better live better. That's the better air promise. And it's backed by a sixty day. No risk guarantee learn more about the probiotic purifier at better air promised Thomas Dot Com. You can also save thirty three percent when you order now just in time for the holidays. That's better air. Promise Dot Com rich and Sarah were ready to make a change. They knew they'd regret it if they didn't after a lot of talking and a lot of planning they finally did it. They quit their jobs to freelance projects and just started traveling the clear their minds and we actually went on cross country road trip and we were working while traveling so kind of spend each day driving in the morning taking an afternoon hike and then staying at a motel and just working for the evening it was during that trip that they landed in Joshua Tree If you haven't been to Joshua Tree Desert Wilderness Paradise. It looks like something you'd find on one of those planets and star trek with its red dirt roads alien looking trees. It wasn't actually at that time. Something we're thinking of doing full time. It was more just wanting a shift shift in perspective or a place to reset creative retreat. After almost a full year of traveling across the country living in New York for a little bit going and traveling through Southeast Asia we came back and it was like a magnet straight back to Joshua tree and and we started looking for a place that we could call our own and with that craving of wanting to work with our hands. We found this House that we could work on after months and months of searching and trying to find the perfect one the one that we ended up getting just was this craigslist ad with really tiny bad photos and somehow we we jammed and knew it was the one yeah I was wouldn't Sarah found it on craigslist exist. I was in the shower. And SERTA's comes running in screaming and I thought that a family member had died or something because because of her reaction and then she showed me and we just fell in love. That house right away we send an email to the person in. The person didn't respond for early three or four weeks or something really long time. She's like I didn't think anyone who's going to respond to this Ad. And then we're trying not to get our hopes up. Assume assume that somebody else had taken it and then she gave us a call randomly one day and it was actually. We were planning coming down to Josh. Treat a look at some other houses like the next day anyways so it was kind of perfect timing. We were the first person that she had called. That came to look at the house and we just immediately said that we wanted to sail directly by the owner. So and we've never bought any property before we didn't really know what we re doing but we're just on a Anna phone call with her. Okay Hi we want to get the house. How do we do this sweetest person? She just walked us through it. She had also bought it it directly from the previous owners. So she really likes the continuing that tradition with the house. She was really really awesome. The House was built in Nineteen forty-nine Spanish style terra cotta roof tile cement floors number two bedrooms two bathrooms on two acres with over one hundred different Joshua trees. I had really great bones and for a first project. It was really awesome because it didn't need like any major construction. Russian just need to be freshened up it was mostly just really focusing on interior design freshening of the House with pain and updating a few areas doing supplanting and so on. It's really great. I project for US getting her hands dirty And then we got addicted from there and wanted to do more. Anyone who's ever watched a couple of hours of fixer. Upper totally gets that feeling. That pulled to be this real life chip and Joanna Gaines Rich and Sarah were now living on their dream and slowly but surely their dream was becoming a business. Once they got in good shape they were able to run out the Joshua Tree House. It became team Book to the point where we couldn't really schedule time there are solves anymore and we just loved being here so much that we started looking at other places and craving even a little bit more rural area and so they did it all over again. We found this other property with a house in a guest house. And that's when we ended up moving to Joshua Tree full-time was at this property. Just felt like a place we could not leave and when we tried to leave and go back to the city it was always like dragging our feet. How is your relationship through all this where you guys always on the same page about the work you're doing is artists? We've always been kind of the opposite. He's much more of the detailed oriented one and I think more in terms of the overall feeling of a space or peace or whatever. It is that we're working on so there is always this tug and pull back and forth between the two of us where I think where we meet in the middle is actually what makes a lot of our projects work work. Yeah like it's what makes us in become come in love with the final outcome of a lot of these projects that we work together so yeah of course. There's always a little bit of like. Oh Oh I think it should be this way and then he thinks it should be another way but then it's that space in the middle that we end up that yeah we just would never ever have been able to arrive at that honor own. Somebody had mentioned to me. Something about two sets of eyes in life are better than one and I feel all that that has been true for us We're GONNA take a quick break here. It is there something interfering with your happiness or preventing you from achieving your goals. If so better help online counseling there for you. Better help offers. Licensed professional counselor who are specialized in issues such as depression stress anxiety relationships sleeping trauma trauma anger family conflicts. LGBT matters grief self-esteem and plenty more you connect with your professional counselor in a safe in private online environment. Anything anything you share is confidential. And it's just so convenient you can now get help on your own time and a your own pace you can schedule secure video phone sessions plus chat and text with your therapist. If you're not happy with your counselor you can request a new one and anytime at no additional charge. Best of all. It's a truly affordable option and and committed listeners can get ten percent off their first month with discount code committed so why not get started today go better help dot com slash committed. He fill the question here to help. Assess your needs and you'll get matched with the counselor that you'll love. That's better help dot com slash committed I wanted to know more about how this became a viable business. A lot of people think they can do something like this and there's days I think I can do something like this think. Think I can renovate a property. Make it beautiful. Find enough people who want to rent it out actually make money off of it the end of the day. You have to make a living the Joshua House. How's the first house that we did really just doing it for ourselves as a retreat so everyone is kind of telling us like? Oh just like the House with Ikea furniture and and stuff but we just felt like that had no sold like a lot of people. Were telling us that that's what we should do. We were like no. We're designing this ourselves ourselves as our retreat. We want this to be to feel like home for us when me come down here and like splitter time down here while doing doing that we kind of created an instagram mostly for family and friends to kind of follow along with what you're doing you're on the renovations and also out of a personal craving raving when we were away. We were craving able to see photos of Joshua Tree. 'cause we always missed it so much so we were kind of like okay. We'll we'll just do do that for other people too and then it just became more than we ever imagined it would but I think because it just came out of a a place of love and something we were so passionate about that. INSTAGRAM account became incredibly popular. Taylor I mean how could it not does it. Landscapes Weird Trees Interiors is gorgeous as the sun sets and look. We live in a time when instagram gets people. Excited excited about travel account. That led to bookings of the Joshua Tree House on Airbnb when the first house started renting. Well when we weren't aren't there which was our our initial goal was just to cover the mortgage trying to pay back some of our renovation costs but when it started renting so while we thought okay other people are also craving what we were craving and then we decided to continue that path because really we love creating spaces together a lot more than we enjoyed creating web design projects together mid something a bit more permanent and creating this emotional response and experiences. We just are completely in love with it so oh I think just out of that. We kept going and it's been a transition through the last few years of slowly phasing out our our old work and then phasing in these new projects and we only just got to the point of being able to work on this fulltime last year here. So it's still a fairly new thing. Whenever something feels right in our got we jumped into it? Their next project is an an in Tucson Arizona on the outskirts of Guero National Park. That's on forty acres and has ten bedrooms uh-huh and it's over ten thousand square feet and has these crazy outdoor spaces and it's just so massive he says but it's so overwhelming to think about because we we love designing every little detail and having each room be its own thing and cured rating vintage pieces and incorporating the local environment. We are now doing that on the large scale. We have ever done which has been even even more important to have each other as a team. Because I think neither of US would ever be able to do this alone. Definitely not yeah yeah. There's so many decisions be made every single day with this project that we just need to trust each other in making those decisions and and sometimes you can't really like look back in. You just gotTa trusted. This is the decision that you're making right now. This is what you're going to go with but when you're making so so many different ones. It's it's very tough the year. They've spent renovating the end. Has Been One of the most challenging years of rich and Sarah's life. They faced mental physical all and financial exhaustion to get to the point of being ready to be open. They spend every last penny they had. In addition to borrowing from friends and family and taking out a small business loan as designers their strength is always been in creating spaces but this project required them to be a bit of everything anything marketers business strategists project managers builders cleaners cooks host. It was a year of finding the strength and endurance to continue on and about finding the resolve to continue standing up for their belief that this dream of theirs might just come true. Yeah Yeah it's intense but I think through it all it. In relation to our relationship it does feel will like win. Those incredible challenges come up and then you know immediately that you are willing to do whatever it takes is to fight through it and make it work. It's the same with our relationship. Renovations approved that the best laid plans hands can go to hell in a hot minute. They always lasts longer than you expect. They're more expensive than you ever think. They're going to be and things go wrong that you never thought we're going to go wrong. Yeah we've had very bad luck with water. Ironically since moving to the desert we have had. Ah Pretty major roof leaks at times while we had renters and that was incredibly stressful. It just became worse after we try to fix it. You had to find a couple of different roofers before we actually got to fix the first root for just made it so much worse and then he just has destroyed the roof the ceiling actually caved in because he did such a bad job it was pretty disastrous. But now we have a great right now. Now it's beautiful nicely insulated put a new ship lap sealing up so it ended up better in the end but it was definitely one of the most stressful times times. Yeah then the other big issue that we had was once. We moved to the Hacienda. That we live in now after being here for like six six months or something we gotta water bill and that was just like really really expensive. There was no sign of a leak anywhere but apparently the water meters said that a ton of water went through it. We have the water company. Come out and then they couldn't find any sign of a leak. They were just like well. The meter said it went through so it must have gone through and and we fought as hard as we could. Unfortunately they wouldn't budge. We still had a had to pay that so that was a pretty tough hit. Yeah so now with the Tucson place we are being very very careful with the new roof and Reuss so that's great. Yeah Yeah but all the time the little things are coming up like. We are renovating the kitchens there. We thought that we were going to be using the existing thing base cabinets and reusing them and then as soon as the oven gotten we realized Oh. These cabinets are not standard standard size. We should not have assumed that they were and now it's like okay. Well here's another project. In addition to the thousand projects projects will make it work. And it'll probably end up being better. Oh it'll be a lot better. We've always felt that we will fight through whatever comes up because we want to be together and we know that we want to make this work however possible so yeah. There's definitely a parallel allow between the projects and our relationship and once those challenges come up. It's like almost refreshing or relieving like okay. Well now we know what the challenges and we can figure it out from here. Wall said there's always a solution if you want one. How are you guys making sure that you set time aside for gesture relationship right now? It's pretty difficult with the Tucson projects the it's Kinda just. We're just trying to get through that the moment like renovation wise and stuff for money reasons like we have to get it done. It's a little hard. We still try to like take time to go and enjoy hiking or go out to dinner or something but this is probably the hardest projects that we've worked on so it's it's definitely been a little bit hard with this project right now of our in Joshua tree back back home so that's been a nice way to kind of get away from that project and kind of be president again and enjoy. Enjoy your time time together and just enjoy like a garden in our house and time with our cats and refresh visiting this week in their awesome to to really bring sound earth and get to stay president with them as well so no matter how much working always make sure to at the very least is just watch the sunset and so we always have at least that break at the moment. Our work life balance is definitely mostly work mm-hmm but ultimately it's all work that we love and are passionate about and we would be doing it anyways so it doesn't feel so so much like there needs to be this line to divide the two but we are pretty tired to be honest It has been marriage which is better now because she left her corporate jobs. Having done this taking on all these projects and do you feel happier. Is your marriage stronger. You're definitely definitely all of those challenges every time something like that comes up it makes us feel stronger. The desert in general has made us feel feel stronger. The extreme weather here being able to handle anything that comes up like how how to fix. Yeah literally how to fix. Our House has taught us how to just be comfortable with things going going wrong whether it's whether house with our relationship and figuring it out there's always like wall was by the way to work through it this episode was hosted and reported by Jo. Piazza especial thanks to rich and Sarah Combs it was produced. Bruce Edited and mixed by Ramsey on the executive producers are Joe Piazza entire cling theme song by Tripton McNeil For comments suggestions or to be part of the show. Give us a call at four zero four nine nine six one one seven three. That's four zero four nine nine six one one seven seven three or send us an email at Joe at committed. PODCAST DOT COM. That's J. O.. At committed PODCAST DOT com. Grab a copy. BE OF JOE's book how to be married on Amazon or wherever books are sold committed production of iheartradio and produce it is located in Atlanta Georgia. For more podcast. That's from my heart. Radio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows communities supported accorded by better air. Is You know the errands had. Our homes can be five times more polluted than outdoor air air filters often can't get to the root of the problem and the problem is microscopic allergens and pathogens live on our beds counters and other surfaces gross. Right the good news is the probiotic purifier by better Eric and get the problem. Better air uses environmental probiotics to remove these microbes. From your home. You can literally breathe better and easier. You can learn more at better. The Air Promise Dot Com. And there's a sixty day. No Risk money-back guarantee plus save thirty three percent place your order now go to better air. PROMISE DOT COM and start breathing better today.

Sarah Combs Joshua Tree San Francisco Joshua Tree House Joshua Tree National Park first house Arizona Richard Serra combs Joanna Gaines Rich Tucson Thomas Dot Com Joshua House instagram California Lovech homegoods Joshua Tree Desert Wilderness US pinterest
Irish Designers Take Architecture's Top Prize; Hemingway In Quarantine

Here & Now

43:08 min | 1 year ago

Irish Designers Take Architecture's Top Prize; Hemingway In Quarantine

"From NPR and WBZ. I'm Jeremy Hobson. I'm Robin Young. It's here and now. And today's the day in Florida. Many businesses reopening although and retail stores will only be allowed to have twenty-five percent capacity and the reopening does not apply to Florida's most populous counties. Miami Dade Broward and Palm Beach meanwhile the. Us Senate is back in session today even as Washington DC remains under stay at home orders and the House of Representatives remains shuttered. The Supreme Court has started back up to and for the first time ever. It is hearing oral arguments over the phone we're joined now by NPR national political correspondent. Mara Liasson Marlet. Start with the Senate Majority Leader Mitch. Mcconnell called the Senate back into session Democrats are not happy about it but with the house still out. What is the Senate plan to do? The Senate is going to do the things that can do by itself like judicial. Nominations are executive branch. Nominations those are things that Mitch. Mcconnell has made his number one priority. And that's going to continue. They don't need the house for that. And what about the House has speaker Pelosi given any indication of when they might return? Well that's really interesting. She has said they might return next week. She says that she's GonNa follow the recommendations of the capital attending physician. Brian Monaghan Who has said? Interestingly enough that he doesn't have enough Kovin tests for even one hundred senators. The White House offered Congress some tests after he issued that statement and in a rare show of unity. Nancy Pelosi and how the majority leader in the Senate Mitch. Mcconnell wrote a joint statement saying no thank you. We would rather save the tests for people who are really need them. The president didn't like that he tweeted. Maybe you need to do doctor over there. But the different Approach to opening between the House and the Senate really mirrors the red blue. Divide that we're seeing all over the country about how fast and how safely The states can open up and the Republicans in the house have been pushing to open. They've issued some recommendations they think could make it safe more plexiglass barriers larger hearing rooms. Some lawmakers could participate in hearings from home so the house is still a work in progress but it sounds like they'll open maybe next week well one of the things that people are going to be looking for from Congress potentially is more economic relief. Maybe another package but president trump now says he would only sign another bill if it includes a payroll tax cut. How does that demand go over with lawmakers well not all Republicans are on board with that and not all democrats are? It's interesting the president has said. Nothing's going to move forward without a payroll tax cut. Mitch McConnell said. Nothing's going to move forward unless corporations are protected from lawsuits around the pandemic for instance meatpacking workers who say they've been forced to work in unsafe conditions without protective equipment and McConnell has also said he doesn't want to provide aid to the states states should consider declaring bankruptcy. If it comes to that so there are a lot of red lines that are being laid down by Republicans. Democrats want aid to the states. The one area where you could potentially see some compromises on infrastructure. The president's says he wants a big infrastructure investment. Democrats have always wanted that But the bottom line is we're a very long way away from the next package. Tim Economic Aid. President trump also responded to news that he received two intelligence briefings on the corona virus. In January he downplayed their significance on twitter yesterday saying they only spoke of the virus. He's talking about his advisors in a very non threatening matter of fact manner. How does this play into the president's defense of his early pandemic response? The president is determined to convince voters that he acted swiftly despite a lot of evidence that he didn't and he said yesterday in this Fox virtual town hall that the intelligence community is going to be coming out with a statement today saying that they didn't warn him a now that he's put his own people in charge of the intelligence community. Maybe that will happen. But what the president is determined to do is to not be seen as being responsible for a slow and halting response to the virus. He said famously. It's not his responsibility and his political advisors know that his reelection at least right now depends on how voters judge his leadership in that crisis so he has been running ads. He says at every opportunity that he acted swiftly and decisively. He focuses a lot on cutting off travel from China At least for non US citizens which he did back in the winter to say that was a sweet early response But this is very important you know. He's going to be judged by how he dealt with this crisis so it's important that he not be seen as being warned and ignoring those warnings when he's going to apparently start traveling again next week. Let's listen here to vice president. Mike Pence at the Fox News. Townhall yesterday apologizing for not wearing a mask at the Mayo Clinic last week. I I didn't think it was necessary but I should've worn a mask at the Mayo Clinic and I wore it when I visited the ventilator plan in Indiana so that brings me to this question. More of the president's GonNa Travel in the Vice President. Says he should've worn the mask. Is the president just briefly going to wear a mask travels first of all? I don't know second of all. It's hard to imagine the president wearing a mask. It's just that if he did that would be an extraordinary moment. But I also have to say Mike Pence having a very human response to that question saying I should've worn a mask was also an amazing moment in that town is he really did set himself apart from the president. Npr national political correspondent. Mara Liasson. Thank you thank you. Let's go to Europe now where several countries are easing lockdown restrictions. Today Italy the verse country in the world to implement a nationwide lockdown is relaxing some of its restrictions for the first time in more than two months an issue probably know Italy has been one of the hardest hit countries in this coronavirus pandemic. The death toll is nearly twenty nine thousand country of course much smaller than the US NPR. Sylvia Poggioli has been that lockdown. She joins us from Rome. Sylvia's just outlined for us. What will people be doing now? That some of these restrictions are lifted. Well one thing is what they can do what they are. Today was the first day in my sense is that people are really taking it. Very slowly very cautiously. I did not see many many people out on the street more than before there was some traffic but by pre pandemic Roman standards. It felt like a quiet August when everybody goes away on vacation. There were some joggers. More people on the streets. Everyone is wearing face masks. But you know a few things can open. It's only manufacturing construction sites. retail shops except for bookstores and grocery stores are not yet allowed to open they. That's to avoid crowding. And for instance today I saw my bike shop is open. But it's only for repairs not for sales well and you mentioned what sounds like this fear and we heard about this in China as well. People emotionally maybe psychologically affected by what they went through. Not leaping out into the streets enjoy it. It's interesting here. In the United States. We have a lot of headlines. Now about how masks and social distancing have become kind of political statement people who don't like to be told by the government what to do rejecting them. How is that playing out there in Italy where I've seen this? Corona virus pandemic has had an amazing affecting reversing national stereotypes. Italians are the first to admit that they are the lease law-abiding people on the face of the earth and nobody has been more observant. I think of the rules. This has been a very very tough lockdown one of the most restrictive certainly in Europe and Italians have been extraordinarily obedient And as I said everybody I saw side was wearing a face mask It's required inside indoor public places but it has not necessarily been required as you walk down the street but they were all wearing them and the there's a lot of anxiety about going out one person talked to said you know I The lockdown was an imposition. Then it became a kind of coon very protective and made and now. We're all little bit afraid to venture out into the the world this new world that nobody really knows what the new rules are going to be like will but this lifting of restrictions. It was supposed to come here in the states with a declining infection rate. That's not happening in many places here in the state the openings happening anyway but what's going on there in. Italy has the curve in flat and remind us. Oh yes definitely. There's been a decline and and it's a very slow decline. But in the last few weeks it's been declining. And that's why we have the reopening. The government though has made it very clear that if the infections rise again lockdowns will resume if not nationwide at least in the areas where they are the infections. There's been a lot of pressure on the government from business associations to open up everything faster to to try to offset the economic impact of the pandemic. Which is you know going to be probably very devastating but generally public opinion as I said has been on side of the government. Well I was going to say. We mentioned the government How the government being seen by the people? Well it's doing very well and especially Prime Minister Giuseppe Conti who frankly was more or less a nobody until before the pandemic started. He had no political experience when he was tapped. Sort of compromise candidate to lead the coalition government but he. He's been a little bit awkward at times but he has grown tremendously in stature. Now he's obviously attacked by the right wing populist opposition for his cautious approach but his popularity it dropped a little bit over the last month but he still has a sixty four percent popularity rating. You know the biggest test is going to be ahead dealing with the economic crisis already. The lockdown has inflated the ranks of the poor There's been a huge increase in people seeking charity. You know it's going to be tougher ahead than even been up to now but interesting Italian. Not Blaming the government for that lockdown. Npr's Sylvia Pohjola in Italy lifting some lockdown restrictions. Today for the first time in more than two months Sylvia. What's the first thing you want to do? Well I really really want to go to the beach even though it's a little early but that's GonNa be a while because we still have a restrictions on travel outside of your region and where I WANNA go is in. Tuscany and I think it's going to be probably another month or so before I can. Do that. Joined the rest of streaming Sylvia. Thank you thank you One of the many things. You may have missed lately. Amid all the Corona Virus News the Twenty Twenty Pritzker Architecture Prize was awarded to the CO founders of the Irish design firm Grafton architects that would be Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara. I spoke with them in March shortly after they won the prize which is sometimes referred to as the Nobel for architecture and I asked them how being based in Ireland informs they're designing. It's a wonderful thing to come from this country. Both shelley and I are products of the Irish education system. And we've had wonderful opportunities here to be architects and we were building here for many years before we won an international competition for Makoni. University initially is probably not terribly well known but the culture of architecture that has grown in our land over the last ten years. Let's say fifteen years has been gradually getting stronger and in many ways the the fact that we were invited to cure as the Venice Biennale A in two thousand eighteen was a recognition of the people are starting to realize that perhaps something interesting is happening in our land and Jeremy to add to that. It's also that when you live on an island. What is fantastic is that you both have indigenous Influences but also you're ready to receive indigenous from other places so you also have a perspective. That's both very anchored in place but also very open to the influences at global level. A lot of your work features a big open spaces either internal or external like multi-storey. Atri OUR OPEN. Staircases often illuminated with lots of natural light. How much do you think about how people are going to use those spaces as you're designing them well? Architecture is a framework within which people live out their lives. Our role is to make this framework and to give people a sense of dignity and a sense of worth in a sense of elation. I think what was interesting for us in the Venice. Biennale manifesto was was really teasing out. These first principles of architecture. What our material is we wanted to focus on space because we believe that are above all we are space makers were not just object makers and the basis of civic society is really making places and spaces where people can feel comfortable together. That's one of the key roles of architecture is is how to make that one on. Yvonne calls the Unexpressed wishes of strangers that that we're dealing with with particular users but we're also dealing with the stranger who passes by or who wanders into a building thus the joy of city it's joy of architecture is the joy of collective spaces. You learn by accident by Serendipity All of those things come into our thinking when we're we're making space speaking of gathering together and people getting together. How is it to work together as architects to do these projects with both of you involved? I think it's enriched by having more torches shining light on a particular issue. I think what's wonderful for both shelley and myself is also the team of people that we have around us that we really try to have a collective view that we we often discuss architects as as translators that we translate the needs of people into space. Do you know whatever they might be auditory or classrooms or in house depending what it is so we get this kind of collage of if we were making handmade bedspread all little pieces all these handkerchieves of needs we try and understand them for what they need to be themselves. And then we try to find a story that weaves this new scenario. We believe every project is like an invention that that every new project has kind of a an element of fiction in it. That you you. We've a story around which the new lives of all the people sometimes projects. Have you know three? And a half thousand people are going to live in these complexes that we might build the kind of overlap. That's the thing that I suppose. That fascinates Chilean. I is as architecture. Holes you totally. It holds you in the morning. As you wake up. It holds you as you go to. School holds you in cities or in the countryside so we really feel passionate about our profession. I think the fault of our profession is as we many times talk to ourselves and not enough to degenerate public and the general public are the very people who are affected by all the architectural decisions that are made. You know it's interesting. We spoke on this program Earlier with Balakrishnan dossier who also won the Pritzker prize is an Indian architect and Studied with Corbu and I asked him what They talked about what he learned from him. And he said you know we only. We never really talked about architecture. We only talked about life and and philosophy. Yeah well that's it's one of the wonderful things about being an architect. Who is that? You're not working alone in fact you it's it's very difficult to work alone so those conversations that one has enrich our lives and it's something that. I'm sorry thankful for every day that I can come into a space here in Dublin and have the best conversations of my life with my colleagues what we love. Really Jeremy is when architecture is not the object of delight necessarily but that people feel the warmth of a brick surface against their back or that I really beautifully positioned bench holes. You when you're tired or that architecture is at the service of humanity and we often speak about the fact that since two thousand and eight more than half the world live in cities so therefore what is built becomes what we call the new geography so that what we are building is really the if you like the holder the tender arms that whole future generations so that that architecture is not only about the beauty of a particular thing but in how each particular things put together and thought about infrastructurally. That's that's the thing that that that we're really passionate about that. Architects should become much more involved in the infrastructure of of cities. How water is dealt with. How as sewage is dealt with all those things could have a cultural component and our certainty when vast amount of money are spent on huge human needs what we would argue for. Is that a component of this is also talked about as a cultural level. So what do you think about what's being built right now? Because you know for the last many years a lot of the world has been in a building boom and what you see going up in many places certainly in the United States are big glass towers and kind of boring condo buildings all over the place. Well I think good architects need to be given a chance to make the the best quality billings that they are capable of making and very often. The best architects are sidelined and are not in the forefront for a variety of reasons. But just it's interesting when you talk about glass buildings what we found extraordinary when we went to Lima where we WANNA competition. We made a building in Lima. Where it's released like a viaduct or an aqueduct or something. It's it's not like A building at all in a way you could say. And that's because we thought about the climate and that you could move externally because you it's a moderate city and it's It enjoys the breeze from the Pacific and so the only spaces we made were internal where the actual teaching spaces in this new University of Engineering and Lima and so many of the buildings around us were buildings. You could find in in Sydney or New York or Los Angeles or whatever old last buildings and we just found that so strange one really has to take the culture and climate of a place and make things which are particular tours which all of the engine architects would have done if you look at historic architecture. Recently I went to see the film Apollo Eleven. There were scientists who were able to design a craft that could go from Earth to moon and come back to the atmosphere so my point really is that we can make a craft collectively that can go from our atmosphere to a to the lunar atmosphere that we can make at buildings of the future that survives like we often refer to a wonderful building in Milan. Call US Battalion Majori which comes from the fourteen hundreds and it stealing use it still a university. It was a hospital and it has a series of these gorgeous or January courtyards and it still a machine. It still works. It's still very beautiful. That architecture is very interesting is both the future and the past and the present so what we would like to discuss. I suppose and make your audience aware or discuss with you. That can we not stink about buildings in the future that a very little maintenance at running costs and that we think about ordinary things that are very beautiful. The height of floor to ceiling lovely window that opens out. And you could hear a blackbird saying that that the pleasure of looking at a tree that architecture can be setting up very very simple relationships. It doesn't necessarily mean huge expenditure. It actually takes a certain way of thinking. Well I could listen to you both all day long but unfortunately the biggest room if you will that we have in. Our House of this program is eleven minutes long. And we've gone through it all but Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara Co Founders of the Irish design firm Grafton architects and winners of this year's Pritzker architecture prize. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you thank you bye bye bye. And we've got photos of some of their work at here. Now Dot Org by the way if that interview sounded like a blast from the past with all the talk of convenience spaces and getting together. That's because it was. It was recorded in March. The two architects were in the same room probably wouldn't happen today. There was an audio engineer recording. Their end of the conversation definitely wouldn't happen today and I was working from the studio rather than from those were the days and you may have recently tried to buy flour or sugar only to be greeted by empty shells. Darn everyone else got their first more. People are doing pandemic baking Colorado public radio. Stena SIEG has our story around the same time governors started ordering people to shelter in place. The videos began popping up on Youtube. Today we're creating the simplest quarantine birthday cake. Pandemic themed baking like that video from channel called quality POPs or countless others tapping into the same need misty from the pandemic Kito Comfort Food Channel. Puts it this way? It's okay to have a treat now and then when you are filling all the emotions she then demonstrates how to make a giant Kito Cookie Julie Baker in Grand Junction Colorado appreciates these kinds of baking. How to's because as a mom to four young children. She hasn't really had time to bake in years but now she's got a bunch of restless kids stuck inside and on the day that we talked. She also had a jug of old old milk in just the recipe for it man. Well that's our milk is like about to explode in my fridge. So I'm GonNa do that today. 'cause I keep saying I'm GonNa Join US tomorrow. It has to happen. It's happening today. We were making US goods. She hopes that when your children look back on this weird time. They don't remember being afraid. She wants them to remember being together and learning how measuring cups work love and happiness and Diana Ross. Yellow who lives in nearby? Fruita says that when Colorado's Governor Jared Polis encouraged people to reach out to others during the pandemic. She knew what to do. Teach folks how to make a Navajo staples over facebook live. I'll show you the fried bread. That's Ripe Red Golden and glistening. It's like a newborn baby and it's so beautiful. She immediately got thousands of views and lots of comments. Yellow has public health degree and is a bit chagrined. That fry. Bread has seven hundred calories per serving. But since we're in a pandemic it's all K- 'cause we'll have to survive on what we've got you know making and eating too much or just some of the hazards of pandemic baking in normal times. Katie Langford would bring her treats into the office at the Boulder Daily camera and they would quickly disappear but now she and her roommate are still eating their way through a pie. She made with pounds of strawberries and Rhubarb Pie. They won't keep Langford from the oven. However baking is a comfort a link to a time before Corona Virus. Now like in the past she can mix flour and water and yeast and bread like install combine butter and sugar and flour chocolate chips. And it's not become cookies so I think there's just a certain kind of stability not knowing that even though everything feels kinda crazy uncertain right now those things are saying and they still tastes delicious and since many baked goods freeze as well too she can save them in maybe even share them with her co workers someday for here now and demissie. So you've been spending time at home. Pandemic baking let us know. Send us some of your pictures and I'm talking to you the listeners. But also I'm looking at you. Karen MILLEN MEDICINE AND EMIKO. Toga our in house bakers and you can tag on twitter at here now Dr Richard Serra is an infectious disease. Doctor who says treating Corona virus can be like treating patients before antibiotics existed because there's not yet a Sure-fire Treatment Dr Sarah Works at the. Va Boston healthcare system. And he's a clinical associate professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine. He joins US now. Dr Sarah you've been working in the cove awards. What's it been like? The number one impression is a level of uncertainty that I haven't quite experienced in my medical career. It takes me back to when I was first a medical student and resident where you're learning everything in new and I have to say from a novel infection. We're learning so many new things so what I'm present to currently is a somewhat uneasy experience with patients of mine. In whom normal air would walk in feel quite confident but I could treat such and such and this scenario. I'm not entirely certain. So I've had some patients who I literally went off service and I said I think you have made it out of the woods and I said that at day fifteen of their particular illness and I mentioned eighth fifteen because the second week is usually the week in which patients go from asymmetric to having symptoms the most concerning is pneumonia and respiratory compensation. But I've had some folks who look like they're out of the woods only to discover that a week later they're back in the hospital de compensating and on a ventilator and some have died after you told them in person that you thought that they were on the right track absolutely. And that's what makes this the roadmap in my opinion a little bit difficult to offer reassurance. Not only to the patient but but to ourselves and so there's a there's a paradoxical presentation and I think what I'm alluding to in a lot of your listeners. May Be aware is the intense cytokine storm. It's intense inflammation that's occurring. Not Entirely Clear. Who will manifest that but again those with high inflammatory markers? Many of my patients in their seventies and eighties are presenting with that. Some have high inflammatory markers they peak in the amount of oxygen. They require recuperate. Others are doing fine on room air or two leaders only to discover that in twelve twenty four hours they're now on a ventilator and so sometimes it correlates and sometimes it doesn't well. I'm glad you brought up ventilators because there's been a lot of focus on ventilators on how many ventilators that hospitals needed around the country. We know that ventilators can save. Patient's lives but a recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association raised questions about their effectiveness. They found a high death rate for patients who were put on ventilators at twelve hospitals in New York City and Long Island. What do we know at this point about ventilators and whether they do reduce the death rates from covert nineteen so the best way to frame this answer as ventilators are the last stop on the train so to speak and I work on the general medical wards not not the issue the intensive care units and my goal is to prevent as much as I? Can these patients finding themselves on ventilators long story short? What we aim to do is to avoid that scenario as much as possible and you may have heard some stories of reporting literature that other mechanisms high flow nasal cancer treatment pruning of the patient position in the body face down to optimize blood supply to more. Favorable portions of the lung may offset the need for requiring ventilation. There's been so much focus on the respiratory effects of this disease. You've pointed out as you've looked at all the things that are required to care for people with Kovic nineteen. It affects everything it seems. Like from your head to your toes vetoes. We're now hearing about. Have you ever seen a disease like this? That has had so many different effects. And also do you think there's been too much focus on the respiratory effects may be at the expense of trying to treat other areas that could be just as harmful or deadly. Well I think you brought up a good point and keep in mind that the initial presentation of this infection the most prominent clinical presentation. That is obviously life-threatening. Is KOBE PNEUMONIA? So it's a viral pneumonia but it's also augmented by the immune response making an individual experience problems breathing as if they're drowning because of that combination. So what we are seeing is more and more case reports of individuals that have recuperated or our ASE symptomatic presenting with a smattering of unusual symptoms. Such as a nausea. Which is the loss of sense of smell or excuse you which is the loss or change in the sense of taste plus these other conditions. You may your Cova does what we do understand about those presentations. Thankfully the vast majority of those patients did not progress to Kovin pneumonia whereas individuals who are presenting with fevers and muscle aches and a cough. Who Don't a loss of sense of smell have a higher probability of progressing towards pneumonia or hospitalization. At least I just WanNa pivot now and ask you a couple of questions that we're all thinking about at the moment as you watch states open up at different speeds right now. What do you think about that? Is it okay for some states to say the worst is over? It's time to get people back to work. Well a couple of lessons that we're learning from. This is the response to a pandemic and the focus on the public health infection and death rates verses the economy to me that balance is extremely challenging and it makes me nervous but I need to sort of qualified that we do understand that certain communities. There may be much more a symptomatic transmission or carriage of this virus than originally anticipated. So it really comes down to the prevalence of the disease burden at a particular point in time in populations to establish. Is that a safe thing to do. So I believe when Dr Chee and the CDC are mentioning this House to be done very very evidence base with an understanding of what type of communities have what level of prior infection. When Dr out she talked about the antiviral drug rendez severe which has had some early stage success in tests. He said that it wasn't a knockout that we have figured out a way to stop the virus. That's what he said but it wasn't a knockout. Are you optimistic? There will be a knockout treatment or even a vaccine by the fall. Yeah it's very very good question. I think rim disappear could very well be the front runner and Dr Phil. She says now we have a competitor arm meaning we now have a drug that is demonstrated some improvement and now we can continue to study at a different doses different time intervals higher doses for longer for shorter so time will tell and on another note one of the observations. I had is that this became an exercise in restraint for me as a provider on the journal medicine. Ward's I have a patient who I do not want to die and so it's very difficult to say no to something like hydroxy chloroquine based on very preliminary data that it could be useful but now we discover that for example that drug isn't as useful and maybe more harmful than we know and so every week that goes by. We say every week that goes by. We understand this a little bit more. We have more clarity. We have more signal to noise clarity in this in this pandemic this time period is one in which I feel like I can offer the least amount. Once the drugs have demonstrated more efficacy than will know that. Hey we can finally treat this decrease the downstream damage that occurs from this and in combination with other therapeutics. Like these interleukin six inhibitors. You may be hearing a lot about totalism and Sarala map. These drugs are what we're using now in combination but with further studies to come out in the near future. How're you doing personally? Well it reminds me of my first decade being a health care provider in which I relied quite heavily on the science and the clinical and the evidence. This time around this uncertainty is personally unnerving because I cannot quite yet rely on the clinical. I think in three six months from now this may end up being a happier scenario even though and may return in the fall with a fervor we may have more things to treat this with and as a result of that. I think feeling a little less unable to do things that will melt away and I think as a physician I will be able to offer much more than I have. Now that is Dr Richard Surrou- who is a clinical associate professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine and also an infectious disease specialist at the Va. Dr Sarah Thank you so much for joining us. Mo- Perjury Jeremy. Thank you and we should mention. Dr. Sarah has advised our workplace. Wb You are about public health during the pandemic so has been cooped up with your loved ones been difficult. Well at least you're not ernest. Hemingway or we should say his wife Hadley in the summer of Nineteen Twenty Six. She found herself in quarantine with her son. Bombie who had hooping cough bombies nanny? Her husband bombies. Father Ernest Hemingway's mistress. Pauline pfeiffer soon joined by the man himself all of them together in a small cottage bombie would eventually recover from his illness. Having way marriage did not author Leslie. Bloom tells this story in town and Country Magazine. Leslie welcome thank you so happy to be here and we'll sort of thank you because apparently you're you're huddled in your closet twenty. Get quite pleased to talk to us. Highly professional glamorous environment you broadcast is now so town and country of You. You Start Your article by trying to correct the record on a story that went viral. That wasn't true. It alleged that F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote a letter when he was in quarantine in nineteen twenty for the then a nine hundred eighteen flu and this letter claim that hemingway was a flu. Who WOULDN'T WASH HIS HANDS? You want to point out. That letter wasn't true. No well first of all it was written in. Nineteen twenty. Supposedly Fitzgerald did not meet Hemingway Until Nineteen Twenty Five. And yes so so. That was rather significant clue that something was peculiar said letter it turns out that the letter wasn't real and it was a parody that was written for mix. Sweeney's but this story you're about to help us tell is and talk about people behaving badly. It begins Paris. Hemingway his wife Hadley. Who's kind of a plane as you? Say CHURCH MOUSE POOR woman. Their son Jack or Bombay's they called him. They had moved there so that hemingway could be a famous writer as part of that. Of course he has to have an affair he does with the vogue editor. Pauline pfeiffer Hadley just really didn't quite know how to deal with it I should she laugh it off and hope that it blew over or should she probably start to come to terms with the fact that Hemingway was going to choose pauline over her and I think that your she was just getting used to the fact that pauline was real threat to the marriage when this strange interlude happened well. The strange interlude is that hemingway goes off to watch a bullfight. Hadley takes their son to visit friends but the sun is diagnosed with whooping cough. So they have to leave the fitzgerald. Who by now are their friends? Have a cottage. They can use as this quarantine shelter. Halley moves in with the little boy and the nanny but then soon along comes pauline pfeiffer. You're just what everybody wants right to in quarantine with your husband's mistress. I mean I don't know about you. I don't think I could take out right now comes to. How did they do this well? It's look historical records. Little unclear about how pauline materialized down in the Rivera. Some say look you know. She went down to help Hadley. She had whooping cough. As a child she was immune and we all know you know how precious immunity is now ready from our own experiences. You know other historical sources. Say That Hemingway asked her to go down To help relieve highly highly was going bananas So she comes down and then Hemingway comes. Also and Hemingway the mistress. The nanny. The sick little boy and Hadley are all in a two bedroom. Cottage quarantined for weeks. Hemingway thought this was just grand like a great place to right. Do we know what it did to Hadley Hadley was really at the end of her tether and you know she would take isolated walks into town once in a while she would get a shot of Whiskey someplace to steal herself to go back now. It's worth noting that you know when the Fitzgerald's and there are other friends from the Riviera come to visit them there. The pioneer social distance or. They're standing behind a fence on the driveway or on the front road. While the Hemingway Malaysia Trois is on the front porch. And you know on one hand the Fitzgerald. Who are who are full of mischief always. They're there to keep the hemingway's than Pauline Company. But they're also there to see what's going on. I mean it's quite an unorthodox arrangement. It's an odd story. You know it reads kind of with a fantastic devil may care kind of attitude. It's real human beings. I mean what a terrible corentin story. It's terrible Corentin story but with strange fashionable Mrs to it also and the thing that makes it especially strangers that the people in the story are not behaving how most of us would behave. I think that's what makes it. So fascinating and strange. In so hemingway possibly sending his mistress and then going himself and enjoying the setup or finding a you know a nice spot for rating pauline actually making herself available to go down and help you know. Hemingway's wife with the baby and then had lease own acceptance of the arrangement or trying to put a good face on it also seems unfathomable but maybe the most relatable reaction of the three somebody who's just trying to grapple with the situation and feel her way to the right path through it and by the way did pfeiffer get her man ultimately be she would say throughout. I'm going to get everything did she. Yeah well I mean she got him temporarily issue is wife number two and then he jilted her for Martha Gaelle Horn and then Martha got rid of him and then he went onto another journalist. His final wife. Mary became very hemingway. Leslie Bloom wrote about having quarantine for town and country. She adapted the piece from her book. Everybody behaves badly the two story behind him always masterpieces sun also rises Leslie. Thanks so much my pleasure. Thank you for having me your released in the closet and the doors flung open. Be Safe and thank you very much for having me on unless these new book fallout out in August in Germany. This week. We're going to have failed marriage. Counselor ASTAIRE PARRAL. A husband and one of her. Podcasts wants this problem cannot imagine. I'm Robin Young. I'm Jeremy this is here now ooh.

Us Ernest Hemingway president Jeremy Hobson Sylvia Mitch McConnell Senate Pauline pfeiffer Hadley NPR Italy Pauline pfeiffer Europe Robin Young pneumonia Npr Leslie Bloom F. Scott Fitzgerald national political corresponde
What They Should Have Taught Us in School But Didnt

Don't Keep Your Day Job

49:41 min | 2 years ago

What They Should Have Taught Us in School But Didnt

"You do not have to know it. All you do not have to have it all together. In order to start the clarity does follow the action. I believe that the opposite depression it's not happiness process. I believe that every single person has something needs needs to contribute to the world and that's why I wanted to create a show called. Don't keep your day job. Don't keep your day job is about figuring out what it is that you you're do in this world that only you can do to make the world more whole more beautiful and to stop selling yourself short. Stop sitting it out and to figure out how to take this thing love whether whether it's part of music screenwriting or dance of faking and how do you believe this thing that you love into a life that you get to contribute that you get to do you love fulltime right because it's not just about business. It's about contribution. It's about meaning. That is what we seek. Not As what we truly want absolutely are here to serve the world rolled and I want to help them figure out just how much value you have inside of you and every single week. We're going to be talking to people who have something to add to help you. Get Out of your way to help you be more successful to help you be the truest expression of you. My name is Cathy Heller. I'm so glad that you're here. Let's dive in thanks to honey for supporting. Don't Oh keeper digital. Honey is a free browser add on that finds me the best deals online. It's free to use and easy to install on your computer and just two clicks so shop with confidence. Get honey for free at joint honey dot dot com slash dream job. We're also brought to you by native native makes safe simple effective products that people use the bathroom every day with trusted ingredients entrusted performance for twenty percent off your first purchase visit native the other dot Com and enter Promo code dream during checkout also thanks to Peleton work up a good sweat at home for less than the cost of a studio class right now. Peleton has unlimited offer get one hundred dollars off accessory awesome when you purchase the Peleton bike and get a great cardio workout at home go to one PELETON DOT COM and use Promo code dream job to get started. Thanks to kettlebells kitchen for supporting. Don't keep your day job kettle. Oh kitchen knows that meal planning isn't one-size-fits-all which is why they offer a personalized solution go to KETTLEBELLS KITCHEN DOT com enter code dream job for fifty dollars off your first two orders new customers. Only hey guys Kathy Heller. Welcome back to another episode of don't Keep Your Day job. I hope you guys had a great weekend. I was just repeating someone something that my sister in law said to me and it's really been sticking with me and I wanted to share with you. She was talking about this beautiful piece of visual art that she made and she said there are things that you feel you just have to make and she said and I've always known that if there's something I feel that I have to make then they'll be someone on the other side someone who needed me to make that thing someone who this thing will resonate with and I thought Gosh that's so true on both fronts like the way. She said that there are things things that you know you have to make. Sometimes it's a song you have to write. Sometimes it's a play. You have to write sometimes. It's this new business yes. That's just been keeping you up at night and you just know you have to put it out. There and I guess that's part of why I shared that chapter last week where I read to you about Martha back in in her research and it really is really is incredible. Isn't it like she has three Harvard degrees and she's a sociology professor and of course she became a life coach and she she's even Oprah's life coach but she talked about and I read some of the steel. This was on her interview where she just was fascinated. At how many people she met in the world who did things they didn't like doing and she just couldn't believe it like people who had choices who chose to do things that they didn't love doing and there are things that we know we have to make and what's incredible is that when we trust it and we step into that place things just unfold they really do. There's a reason and that we feel the call to make something whatever that thing is and it's sort of like there's clues along the way once we start down that path and then we are led to exactly where we're supposed to be so. I hope that you continue to hear that in the stories that we share on the show and that it gives you permission to go make that thing even and if it sounds like this quote unquote crazy little idea. I also just want to say a huge. Thank you because we saw a few hundred people bought books last week and it means so much to me. I know that we have hundreds of thousands of subscribers end so it can feel like you know a drop in the ocean but it's really not <hes> because we actually are really close to hitting our goal. We don't need hundreds of thousands of people to buy the book in order to be a bestseller and I just so appreciate you know. We've tried so many different ways to offer different things in exchange for you buying the book and what really touched me. Is that the thing that seems to move you. The most is just when I say say I really need your help and I want this book to matter and I want people to hear these words and I want these words to resonate in people's hearts and I need your help and and because I asked for help you answered and it just means the world to me so I just want to say a huge. Thank you for that. I do not take for granted and I think that you're GonNa love this book and and if you haven't bought the book already please do it. Helps me more than you could ever imagine and in exchange for not only do you get the book and the satisfaction of knowing that you're going to help me beyond that same shelf with all the New York Times bestsellers like I said before like if you believe that you know this podcast has been worth fifteen or twenty dollars value if you you believe that I deserve to be on the same shelf with Rachel Hollis and Michelle Obama. That's big company but <hes> if you feel like these words matter than pleased lease buy the book and just to say an extra. Thank you anyone who buys the book were just giving you as many perks as we can and I will be doing a live workshop for five days. It's an immersion immersion. I'll be showing up for five days. Live starting September sixteenth for anyone who buys the book and if you can't make it live we'll replay so go ahead. You can go to don't keep your day job dot com slash book and you can buy the book and then sign up for the free workshop. Which is yours when you buy it so thanks again all right so since it's September and everyone's going back to school. I thought we should look at this theme of what are the things that they don't teach you in school. We did a series of last year <hes> <hes> and if you haven't heard that already we did a couple episodes around this time in September of like some of the things that we think are so crucial that now I'm looking back. I'm like I can't believe they. Don't teach this in school but this year I wanted to share some more advice some different things from pass gas to really highlight what I think are the most essential lessons like what does it really take to build a fulfilling filling life to create a successful great career and to craft a life that really feels in alignment like you're waking up living life on your terms and sadly I feel pretty certain certain that people are not learning this in the classroom so I wanted to share this so let's get into it all right. I just WanNa address the fact that in a typical academic classroom we're not encouraged to take risks. Were told that if we were to dry outside the lines are we don't follow the rules or going to fail and I think this is such a problem because it's instilled in us this belief that we wanna start anything in life. We really must know that. Perfection is something that is a non negotiable and if it's not going to be perfect and we shouldn't really begin at all but some of our guests have definitely told you differently so let's take a listen to what the incredible. Seth Godin has society about this getting out of about to start is the first job start ice merely start. You don't have a permanent record that you have to worry about that. If you look at the original work of Jackson pollock or the original work of Richard Serra or the original work of Jeff Koons it was lousy lousy lousy lousy. It doesn't have to be lousy. I I love this. Stop Planning. That's number one number two. I wrote a book about quitting called the Dip dip and what that book says is. It's easy to start and most people quit at the same moment they start to Jim. In January. They quit in February. They start premed but they quit at organic chemistry. You need to know where the quickpoint is because people have come before you you see where it is and before you begin acknowledge that that's the quickpoint and make sure you have enough resources to not quit then. It's okay to quit by not starting. It's okay to quit after you've made it through the quickpoint but to quit and the dip to quit in the moment when everyone else's quitting is just wasting your time it's predictable you don't need to do that okay and so there is a journey to get from here to publish novel or to get from here to to a successful career as a craftsperson figuring out where that moment is when most of the people give up make sure you've laid in enough resources that when net moment hits you don't freak you say. Oh yeah this is that moment I've been waiting for. I will batten down the hatches and make it through. This cause on the other side is were scarcity lies is the other side is where it was worth the journey. Now I know it can be really scary to start on that screenplay or the painting or the podcast especially when you feel like this is way way <unk> outside your comfort zone and you already have thoughts at tell you things like who am I to do this. I'M GONNA fail. What's the point but this clip is so important. This is the incredible incredible Jensen Shero who wrote the book. You are bad ass. This is going to help you realize how it's actually kind of silly Russell. Listen to those fears. Fear is for suckers because because we participate in willingly and we give it all of our power sometimes until we don't so you know I have a quote in the new book that says when you come to fear you are under the illusion that you can predict the future. What is that about how because thing about how many times when you succumbed to fear. You're like I'm too. I'm scared if I invest my money in my new business. It's going to tank and I'm going to be broken living being with my parents for the rest of my life right. That's your fear so you don't do it. You don't take leave. You thought you predicted the future by fear is true. Thank you you know what's GonNa Happen Right. So how many times have you been so scared of something so so scared new did it anyway and it wasn't really that scary now so many times so that's why fears and in also it's not about it not being scared all the damn time but so what. I'm going to you know am I. GonNa let feared put its foot in my face arm. I going to do it. You know I'm going to do it anyway. It's like you can't go through life hoping that you're avoiding fear yeah because it's always gonna be there. It's it's about moving past it. Yeah I mean I feel like it's about just tolerating it because it's I don't know if it ever goes away and this goes back sort of to what you say in Chapter Eighteen with procrastination and perfection because I feel like there's so much good stuff and it never sees the light of day because people over think it and they're not ready and they're not producing enough and it's just because they're uncomfortable like everyone feels right inadequate eight so how do we how do we get through that that procrastination and the perfection that loop will when you start to understand that that's all fear based progress issues because you're scared to move forward perfectionism same exact thing. I mean I I believe in making things good good but come on people <hes> when you understand that what your fear actually is a magnificent compass pointing in the direction of everything you desire ooh because if you're warren scared you're doing something wrong. If you want to change your life because everything you've done to create the life you have now is familiar and not scary so you better be scared if you. WanNa change so good and I just love how my friend Susie more approaches fear. She's a writer coach and she. He has an amazing piece of advice on what to do. When you're facing something that scares you but do you say to a person who has that feeling of like I would never be able to know what to say. How would I come up with an idea for content content so I'll have to of course I admired impulses injuring contend with every day like to play with it. Sometimes if I feel afraid or something biggest coming up with something new unlike yeah POPs up on like is that all you got come on. Throw it at me. Lay gave it you. If you think something eight call. The resistance goes away like you just you see yourself into a good place now. If you remember my conversation with Amber Ray who's incredible artist and she's also the author of the book. Choose wonder over worry. She's a great exercise on dealing with the parts of yourself that are so anxious or keeping you stuck. Take a listen. My new favorite exercise and technique is I creak characters around the voices in my head then so I have like a grace the perfectionist which is this study. Something British woman who has from non Din wants everything very can you you be that really well. My Grandma's British darts handling. I have anxious Annie. I've deputy doubter and I I have depressed susie and I have Mama Jenny and I have the goddess and I have you know my like creative news and I have all these different characters that I realized allies you know the the voices of the thoughts inside of my head or not me I'm just the vessel that's experiencing those sensations and so when I was able to build the character around around who they are what their name is what they look like and have a conversation with them. I was able to create space between myself and what I thought I was hitting a wall against because oftentimes fear worried out is biologically trying to protect us safe so oftentimes these walls that were hitting our US hitting zone that a part of us as afraid for us to move beyond and you know the problem is is that our brain hasn't evolved with modern society and so usually when we wanna do something meaningful or take that leap or live with purpose or discover who we are. That's when it's like everything gets very dark and scary because that's so foreign and so just not okay to the worry in the fear inside of us and so exercise you can do is literally like okay so this wall in front of me. You know what's the fear around it. What's the big worry. Maybe it's the fear that you know it's not gonNA work out and I'm GONNA fail great. Okay so what's the name of this character may be. It's like afraid. Anne will call her once. I've built that character. I'm again creating distance between me and this this voice inside my head then I can actually talk to any and this is where we can apply what I call the three C.'s which is courage curiosity and compassion so it's one on having the courage to even do this and go there even though it may sound crazy. It's having the curiosity of like why is afraid any here. What what does she want me to know? What message are insight. Does she have for me and the third series compassion. How can I actually like you know turn toward her with with an open heart and a sense of love and just see what she needs for me because so often these worries. Are there these fears they may be something stemming from childhood. It's like an inner pinky child that wants her attention. When if if all of a sudden a kid ran up to you and was like I'm so afraid I can't do this. You wouldn't punched in the face and say you suck away. You would say oh honey. We going on like right homey and so how do we do that. How do we ourselves that way. How do we say Oh Afraid Anne. What's what's going on like. I'm here to listen. Tell me and what I find time and time again is that when we let that fear voice speak it tends to loosen its grip okay before we go on. Let's just thank our sponsors. I try to eat well and urging foods that are good for my body but it can get super overwhelming because there's so much conflicting confusing information out there right and then I ended up saying just forget it. I'm just GONNA go ice cream but kettlebells kitchen knows that meal planning isn't one size fits all which is why they offer a personalized solution they give you the nutrition you need without any of the hassle super flexible you can sign up for a plan or order at all car no term contracts required and they have all these different meal the plans that can fit your goals whether you want to slim down or bulk up or just fuel yourself for the day they have. 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Get one hundred dollars off accessories when you purchase the Peleton bike and get great cardio workout at home go to one Peleton dot com and use Promo code dream job to get started so we also had the best selling author of the book the Subtle Art of not giving enough Mark Manson come on the show and he had a great perspective on how to use any failure to move forward. Take a listen last chapter. I want to dig into before we move on. Failure is the way forward. So what does that mean failures the way forward. How can we embrace escalier instead of letting it completely derail us. What I think is just understanding that again success the this idea of success is kind of an illusion. I see life in terms of it's just this constant iteration of try. Something kind of work. Scott doesn't learn from what doesn't try something else. Try that something works up than dozen. You're just constantly iterating on the ideas. The same is true with a book books never finished at some point. You just have to be like all right. That's good enough. It's close enough. You're constantly iterating on your failures and then eventually you get to a point where people bill don't see your failures anymore because you're you've evolved and grown so far past you know where where they're used to. It's funny because I if I open unsubtle art right now. I guarantee you within one minute. I'll find a paragraph that I'm like Oh. I wish I could rewrite this one. You know ten mortally relate to that. Never stops ups okay now. The next IDEA WANNA touch on is this notion that failure is the final answer I think a lot of us have had this experience of getting a test back or an essay and there's the big red F and we think well. That's it nothing I can do to change it. I'm a failure and it brings up all these feelings of shame and inadequacy crecy and unworthiness but when it comes to your life and your business failure is actually it's actually a good thing. I'll let suzy more. Tell you when it comes to failure. The Way I think about too is that failure and success of the same road the exact same road successes just fucked along down that well my God. That's I'd say the people get you know they'll take a parking space the first one they see right. It's like the end the pulse about success is full of very comfy balkis basis right and so it is just <unk> same Paul if you all into it and I've had had the privilege of getting some really cool people like Sara Blakely who's the founder of spanks and fail-safe. They always ask questions. They never feel like they know enough. They surround themselves random people and when they make a mistake it's like dust off straight straight back on. It doesn't stray from love. The roads are the same. Rohan is just further down that road so this his point I wanna hit on is the fact that you do not need to a+ student in order to be a success. You don't need to be the smartest. You don't need to be this shiny star. He just have to do something that makes people oh feel seen and really understood and Adam grant who is phenomenal. He's a psychologist and professor a Tedtalk Speaker and bestselling author. He made a really great point about why you don't need to be in original why you don't have to have the most revolutionary idea in order to make a huge impact and here's what he said. I don't actually think you have to be totally original in order to do meaningful creative work one of the things I've I've learned recently that you don't have to say something new. If you say something tripp oh I like that and this goes especially to anyone who who writes their communicates ideas is that I think we find a ton of wisdom in the experiences and stories of other people. It's usually not most unique experiences right through most universal experiences that allow us to to really gain something something we can take back to ourselves so you don't have to be original to be creative another huge lesson that we need to learn how to slow down and embrace this season arrest when we were kids in school we got summer vacations holiday breaks but when we become adults there's no one telling us when to stop being in work mode and Danielle LaPorte was a bestselling author and entrepreneur. She had a really good point on why we don't give ourselves as period to step out of our work and why it's so dangerous I have hit. I always say a wall to sake a very sobering use that word mindfully realization. I have been at workaholic. I am a workaholic and I really really want to be talking about this more in the near future because while it's my truth it's where I'm at so it's what I have to offer now and it's rewarded boarded. Workaholic is as potentially lethal as a substance addiction which we frown upon it celebrated and it's a thing it's a real thing I'm here to testify and when you stop drinking you stop working. You should comes up and you are over working because you don't want to deal with real shit. Yeah I can relate to that. We also had kate northrop on the show. She's a bestselling author an entrepreneur and she wrote a whole book called do less and she shared some really good reminders minded on why we need to be more precious with time instead of spending all of it being super busy and super quote unquote productive. What I'm focusing on right now is time and I was raised in an environment where productivity was placed as the holy grail of being a valuable human and so the motto of my life up until a couple years ago when I got got pregnant for the first time was let me show you how much I can do and prove to you how much I am worth. I know that well yeah and I I. I would imagine you're listening as well knows that well because if you're if you're on kind of personal growth track or the entrepreneurship track there is this tendency Z. To be in hyper drive around doing things and it can only get us so far because if if you've read <hes> brawny wears book the I five biggest regrets of the dying. It's really powerful. I haven't read actually the whole thing to be perfectly honest but you just have to know the five regrets and none one of the five regrets is I wish I had worked more or I wish I had done more. They're really like I wish I had connected more with my purpose. I wish I had kept better in touch with the people I love. I wish I had given myself permission to do what I wanted. Instead of what other people wanted me and we live in a culture that glorifies is busy and doing above all but we end up sick and exhausted earned out an alienated from the people that we we say that we love them. uh-huh push push push and it's really this linear model of success and so when we can connect with how worthy we are of using our time in the way that we deem. It's most useful yet than we really can create. These miraculous lives where we are able to get paid for doing what we love. We are able to create these. Meaningful relationships really wake up in the morning loving the day in front of us now. Here's an example of someone who who is built extraordinary legacy just by giving people a place where they feel like they can belong. Howard Schultz who essentially made starbucks the empire that it is today he you recognize that what people want most sense of community and I just love how everything he's done has been so intentional making customers feel seen but also the people who serve serve the customers his employees take a listen when you're building a business regardless of the product or the service or the idea the business must have a purpose and a reason for being in our case as so much of the foundational her experiences based on the people who deliver the coffee serve the customer so I think very early on we realized is that the star of the show has to be an understanding that we have to elevate our people in ways that <hes> really really celebrate them and would be truthful and most importantly we will keep our promises whatever they were going to be so the the secret sauce from nine hundred eighty seven we had eleven stores one hundred people working with the company was than it is today the culture the values guiding principles of the company and it's not about how many stores we have or how many customers come. It's about one customer one starbucks employees. We call partner because everyone's owner it. It's a level of intimacy with regard to the experience level of empathy and compassion in personally uh-huh understanding who the people are <hes> who wearing a green apron really trying on a personal level to recognize that we're not not in a commodity business. The coffee is not a commodity. The people are not a commodity and certainly the customer is not a commodity and so all of that I think sits on the foundation of being a performance driven company through the Lens of humanity in a story that I've told in the book is that for the last almost forty years every Monday leadership meeting and every quarter in a board meeting to empty chairs and those two chairs was a metaphor for one <hes> which was applied by customer and the other by starbucks employees in all along for these forty years trying to answer the question question in those meetings whether or not the decision. We were making what the strategy we're. GonNa embrace would make our people and our customers proud if the answer was yes of course we do if it was no even if it was gonNA make more money. We shouldn't do it all right now. One more piece of advice I wanNA share comes from the amazing artist and writer Morgan Harper Nichols every piece of art she makes a one hundred percent dedicated to making another person feel worthy in this world and I would highly highly recommend that you go look her up on Instagram at Morgan Harper Nichols because her instagram alone is a prime example of what it means to practice empathy in your work and this is why she now has over eight hundred thousand instrument followers so she's going to explain why she is so intentional on creating her art this way and how you can start implementing being this kind of approach and really serve somebody else every single day one thing that I have been able to pick up on. Is that many sometimes the person that I'm writing for is most of the time they're in a completely different season allies than I meant. You know I'll get a message from. I'm a fourteen year old. Who's going through something. I've never been through or someone who is older than me whose experiencing something totally different <unk> groceries are different but there's always a point where I'm reading with that person since we were just sort of feel like tug in the best way I can explain it is that's the part where are stories connect. That's the thing that I deal with to even though we are so different even though our stories of different in that's the place. I always try to start writing. I does look for that thing where I'm like yet. I have felt as has to here's what I say to myself and I tried to find what's inside of me. That needs to hear something about that same thing that again so I would say the biggest thing that the kind of stand out to me that keeps me grounded suggests find a way to cooperate right something in to retain into your your rhythm of things whatever it is that you're making arguing that you can reach reach one person at a time. Maybe you get in a practice the every day or every day that you're working on your business or your project that you you try to respond to one email every morning that somebody who's just saying thank you. I received this like loved it like maybe that's your pigs <unk> once a day. You know it could take you literally three minutes to do once a day or maybe it's you have hundred orders going out this week but you pick one order every week to write a handwritten letter into it just cuts you. Just pick up your like Jackie. I'm GONNA write a letter to her this because can you can either do this like this to you and what you do or you can share publicly and say hey like. I'm going to do that and I just think that having something like that it can really help you. Just remember why do all right before we go on. We're going to take a quick outbreak. I'm pretty much a pro when it comes to filling up my online shopping cart but I'm not so great when it comes to finding good deals and my husband gets mad. He's like why didn't even try to price shop and compare them like I. I just don't have the time but things honey. I don't have to worry about overspending honey as a free browser add on finds me the best deals online it's completely free to use and it only takes two clicks to install and honey members of already saved more eight hundred million dollars in fact honey has saved. It's ten million members and average of twenty eight dollars and sixty one cents. 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Danilo Silverstein is the creator of the popular marriage Martinez podcast and she's also one of our listeners and she shares hear how she gave herself the permission to die right in without knowing exactly how it would play out and and I just think it's amazing that started a podcast because she was inspired by this show and within nine months they had over three hundred fifty thousand downloads and her instagram had over over one hundred fifty thousand followers just because she decided to take this advice to take her own advice so take a listen. I knew at the time when I was searching for podcast America's listen to and I was searching for marriage has I also knew that I needed inspiration and I listened to this show and I remember thinking to myself well. What if we make mistakes because we're GONNA make mistakes and I don't know if I have the energy for that. I do remember you saying that you were recording and re recording according and recording and it was making you crazy and you were like sometimes you just have to let it go and just kind of just put it out there and let it be and I I was like okay. Maybe that's what I need to do. Maybe to get started. I instead of worrying about redoing it and re. You know maybe in the beginning. Thank leading it out. There with a little bit of you know. Some flaws is just step one that kind of took some stress off me because I was I I let go of the I have to put out something that's perfect and I allowed myself and Adam my husband some room room for flaw and and that actually turned out I think to be what the people really identified with most and and it's interesting because in our episode sometimes you hear our dogs barking and you here. We were literally sitting in our living room. It is not fancy and and our kids are slamming doors. Sometimes they're fighting and we my husband works fulltime. We have no other time to do literally a side hustle you know and we we were so worried in the beginning. We were apologizing. We're so sorry that the dogs are barking. Sorry the Jordan slamming and people were like no. We love it really refreshing so yeah yeah okay so another thing we're not taught in school is to just follower curiosity and this is why so many of us have had to do some digging to we just let ourselves explore and have fun. I want to share one of my absolute favorite success stories from one of our listeners Greg Franklin who started the cheesecake Ninja a lot of times. We expect that we should had no we want to do or what our purposes but for. Greg it was just an interest was just as curiosity that grew and grew and grew so here's kind of the origin story of where it Greg's cheesecake journey began. I was sitting around one day and was looking for a new hobby so looking on facebook scrolling scrolling through and a cheesecake picture came up and I thought hey that looks pretty good. I'm going to go ahead and make that. I have no clue what I'm doing and I've heard they're really really hard to make AAC but what's worst I can do so I got all the ingredients together. I got the wrong pan through all the stuff together and deliver research and I found out that it needed to water baths. Athisaari got that and I'm making it. The kitchen is totally destroyed in my wife came home and she's like what are you doing okay cheesecake and she's like you don't bake and I said I know now. It looked good. She's like okay so I made it and it was one of the ugliest things I've ever seen. It was like all dark and crunchy ranch on the top but we cut it ate. It and it was pretty tasty and <hes> kind of thought and it's Aright. I don't really want that that is a hobby so I kind of threw it off to the side again and then a few days later another picture but cheesecake came up because facebook likes to creep on you and so it was throwing some cheesecakes recipes and pictures. Atman I decided to go ahead and make another one so I made an Oreo cheesecake. Can it was pretty ugly too and ate a slice of it is pretty good and then I gave the rest of the way and then throughout the next few months just started making big ones <hes> full-size nine inch cheesecake so I would make the full size cheesecakes and then I just gave them away the and never tried selling him or anything and one day it hit me. Hey I can probably sell these so I made a couple and went on my facebook facebook page to all my friends said Hey I have these two cheesecakes their banana pudding cheesecakes the best cheesecakes ever and I'm going to sell them to you for this price and and I got no response at all yeah did not sell up so I waited a few days and reposted it on my KS still have this. Somebody wants to buy it. It's really good. I got nothing so I thought what am I gonNa do with these and then I ended up taking him to the Fire Department art the Police Department and our town and I said hey I have these cheesecakes. Nobody wanted him so here. Have some free cheesecake and of course they were super excited about it because Zeh like free food they like desserts so in about an hour they had eaten them posted some pictures and shared it with their friends and couple of days later. One of the detectives at the Police Department called me and like hey my boyfriend had one of your cheesecakes his the birthdays coming up pretty soon. Can you make some super small bite sized cheesecakes and I'm like hey. I have no clue how to do that but I'll figure it out. I love this so what I love so much about this story that Greg tells is that he was stuck in one of the most soul-sucking taking day jobs that I've ever heard of and I wanna play you this moment that happened in his life that is so much thicker necessity. I it's straight out of a movie. Listen to this. I was making making plastic bags for dog food companies and cat food companies and I did not like that job so I would work all night for twelve hours and then I would come home on my last guy and I would immediately start making cheesecakes or I would make cheesecakes before I would work that rotating shift nights and then I would work all night and then I would get in my carson is I got off on that last day and then go sell cheesecakes. Oh my God and you're what are you feeding something into a machine day not even that most of them. I'm just sitting. I was sitting there making sure that it stayed running. Oh My god God i WanNa cry for only God and it probably doesn't pay you six figures a year no no it. It paid decent. It allowed me to do I wanted to and I'm like Hannah. Terry up and get this shift over so I can go home and do what I actually want to do. And <hes> as soon as I left it was like the building disappeared and didn't exist anymore. I didn't have to worry about that for several days and I could do what I wanted to selling cheesecake and in being a people person to people that I actually liked because they liked what I was making yeah and then eventually you're doing this. What happened the next big thing was? I had went into work like I always do and <hes> there was a particularly bad day where there was some mistakes made and it was my fault and I got in trouble for it. This was July she had twenty four twenty fifth and I went throughout the day the win at home. I was off from my normal days and then I went in on a Monday in which was July thirty first national cheesecake day so <hes> kind of slightly annoyed that I had to work fulltime type job because of national cheesecake slipped my mind national holiday and didn't get a play in it so I went to work and I'd been working for a couple of hours. I I got called in the office and my supervisor said we're going to go ahead and let you go since you major errors last week <hes> mm-hmm we can't have you work here anymore and I'm like I really wasn't upset. I kind of look at him a Mike couldn't you've told me this on Friday. Okay because today is my national holiday and I did. I love it and he he kind of looked at me. I'm like it's national cheesecake day and it's like Oh. I didn't think about that and I said you wouldn't have goes. You're not the cheesecake edge so my supervisor was walking me out the adore and he said hey now you can sell cheesecakes fulltime. I said that is not funny because now I don't have a job at all and I don't sell enough cheesecakes as cakes to warrant doing that so I was on my way home and I was pretty terrified because I was going to have to tell my wife that I got from my job. Yeah I walked in and she kind of looked at me and said well. You'RE GONNA have to start selling more cheesecakes WCHS head. I gotTa do what I gotTa do isn't that crazy. He got fired national cheesecake day and it's amazing it's all working out for Greg and she skin and but what a sign right what assign from the universe so it really hope that these remind you you do not have to know it all. You have to have it all together. In order to start the clarity does follow the action okay so I hope you learned something valuable today or that. You were reminded of something useful that maybe you didn't learn in school and here are some takeaways number one just start. Let it be lousy Z number two fear doesn't have to control your life talk to it challenge at number three follow your curiosity make the ugly cheesecake and the the next one and the next one number four failure is not a dead end. It's just one stop on the road to the next iteration number five. Give yourself a break. It is okay a to do less number six. You don't need to be an expert or an inventor to make a difference. Just do something that makes another person feel seen. Thank you you guys for being here. Truly have no doubt that you have an endless amount of things that you could be doing instead of listening to this show it means the world to me that you continue to listen definitely subscribe because we have some amazing guests coming on soon including candice. Nelson who started sprinkles cupcakes in Calais who is one of my favorite musicians so definitely subscribes he don't miss these awesome episodes and if you haven't left US review on I tunes please do because I love to read those every few days and it just gives me a left. I know they don't read your reviews but you guys don't know what that means wants to me and you can also help us and help the world by telling a friend about the show. Maybe they need to hear more about these things that they didn't learn in school. Maybe they just need to hear some interviews news with an incredible guest who reminds them that what they wanna do is doable so few know a person who might find this useful. Take Right now and share this episode or another episode with a person with somebody that you care about because it might just change their life and again. I just want to thank you for buying the book <hes> my publisher Macmillan. Your fans are incredible. They said we've never seen someone be able to sell these books. You know this far in advance and they said you're such a contender to be on the New York Times bestseller list and the tears streaming down my eyes because you guys I'm just a girl who was a C. Plus B. minus student who like barely graduated from high school who had not the easiest time and and definitely not the best grades and didn't know what I was going to do with my life. All I knew is that I really cared that. People were hurting and I wanted to make work that mattered and I I was terrified and I'm still scared. Every time I do something that's out of my comfort zone and to think that you guys are here and supporting me in buying this book and that may be I'M GONNA wind up getting to have even more of a voice to remind people to have this permission to play and do what they love is just such a dream. Come true so <hes> I really do need your help if you haven't bought the book yet and you do feel like podcast is worth fifteen to twenty bucks a value. If you feel like it's added that much value to your life. Please go ahead and buy the book and if you do to say an additional thank you. I'll be doing a full week live workshop Monday through Friday starting September sixteenth and if you can't join us live we will send you the replays every single day but I will be there every every Single Day doing some coaching for an hour and I have a lot of good stuff plan so definitely if you're going to buy the book anyway before September sixteenth go to don't keep your data dot com slash slash book and you can sign up for the workshop by the book. I'll leave you with a song of mine as I always do. I love you guys so much. Thank you talk to you Thursday. The podcast is a production of authentic for more INFO on advertising in this show visit authentic shows dot com. They were too so <music> <music> good to start resume. Lou Uh let's do we yeah <music> yeah and did you. Did you most <music> <music> yeah <music>.

Greg Franklin Peleton Peleton facebook New York Times US starbucks susie professor depression writer supervisor Adam Harvard Cathy Heller Kathy Heller Martha Anne Seth Godin Jackson pollock
Electric cars are having a moment

Reset

05:30 min | 7 months ago

Electric cars are having a moment

"Support for this podcast comes from goldman sachs what goldman sachs experts and leading thinkers have to say about trends shaping markets industries and the global economy. Stay informed with latest insights from goldman sachs on the economic and market implications of covid nineteen available on our podcasts at yahoo dot com slash cova nineteen or any of your favorite podcast platforms from the vox media podcast network. This is rico daily. I am teddy shlaefer. The super bowl is a stage for america's biggest companies to sell the future and this year that future was electric vehicles. Did you know that norway cells way more electric cars per capita than the us norway. Why won't stand for electric cars. And trucks are having a moment and richard. Serra morrison is here to tell us about at. Hey sarah hey daddy so the big news. What should we know about the future of the electric car. Well there is in fact a lot of news on electric vehicles so you saw the super bowl ads. Gm actually announced a few weeks ago that it's going to go completely electric by twenty thirty five so all of its cars and trucks will be Electric no more gas powered that's entirely. That's what they said. Yeah entirely okay. We also have tesla just reported that twenty twenty was actually their first profitable year ever at snot purely a through car sales but those help and lastly apple is talking to car manufacturers about actually producing its own apple car probably by twenty twenty four and kimmy like a sense about how far advanced you think we are from at least at least driving on the road and being like oh. It's not weird to see. One of these in america are still looking at several years ago. gm's all electric promises. Twenty thirty five. That could always change. And then you're looking at like the process of switching over from their old ones to new electric one so roads with tons of electric cars on them. Probably a ways away but we also have like other countries which will have their own initiatives. And we'll probably see a lot of the stuff even sooner so you know. Everything could change being could decade two decades. Maybe you know we will certainly see a lot more of them and it just coincidence. This is all happening at the dawn of a new administration or tell me about how car companies are responding to the incentives. Come out of washington. So obama in i think twenty eleven said by twenty twenty-five all new car sold america had to have at least fifty four miles per gallon. So you need some kind of electric component in that. I think for that to be possible like hybrid. Cars trump actually rolled back to forty miles per gallon by twenty twenty six and now by here. He has a lot of climate change. Initiatives and i think will almost certainly see him bump that miles per gallon backup so and then also again. Other countries are having their own rules and deadlines for no more fossil fuel cars on the road. So this is the thing that you know. A lot of parts of the world has to happen at some point and so the car cup is responding accordingly. And then it's business decision. Customers are more and more concerned about climate change and getting a car. That will ideally. Do something about it. They're seeing that tesla is doing well they to jail also so there's the demand this is the way things are going. Let's get there now right okay. So we talked about gm now. Let's talk about apple. The seem surprising of create their own car. I guess similar tusla. Yes at apple's been sir trying to get apple car going since at least two thousand fifteen. It sorta hard to say like where and how progress has been made. Because you know it's been shrouded mystery as like custom for apple but you know some point. It looked like it was dead at some points. It looked like they're hiring people to do their laying people off The thing now is that you know last several months. There's been rumors reports that apple's reaching out to manufacturers about using their plants to build an apple brand car and honda actually confirmed. They weren't talks with apple one point then they weren't but it does sort of say you know if apple's talking to one company they're likely talking to others which makes it seem like this is definitely thing that they're serious about it could happen and if you think will they make phones and computers how they make a car a car. It's a tremendous undertaking. It's not the same as a computer but it also kind of is cars of more more computers in them every day. One of the rumors said that apple had like a pioneering battery technology using this car. And that's like the most consistent of all those. Because i mean look what apple's done with phones batteries and iphones and computers. So a lot of the seems kind of like adalah field but then in other ways it seems like totally makes sense. You can read more of sara's work at recode dot net. Sarah thanks for coming on thank you.

goldman sachs apple rico daily teddy shlaefer Serra morrison norway america tesla super bowl gm yahoo sarah richard obama washington honda sara Sarah
Lost in Italy

Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

26:19 min | 4 months ago

Lost in Italy

"Hello and welcome to monaco on culture. I'm robert bounded on today's program. I'm gonna be getting lost in italy. That is the title of a new show at london's luxembourg in co gallery. It's being put together by. The italian star curator francesco benami and alma luxembourg from the gallery itself centers around the autistic world of postwar italy that in the nineteen fifties and sixties seemed thronged with artists showing their own and each other's works and daring galleries who exhibited galleria la salita for example. Show the american richard centers animal habitats live and stuffed which featured a cage with a live. Pig it next stuffed animals and loss of straw people went watt. But it didn't matter there's lots going on and many ideas being tried taken up discarded changed around. So i told me and robert. Rauschenberg became synonymous with working in italy at this time and are shown here but also links made do shrimp bacon yves kline and beyond lost in italy. Surmises walk conversations the art and artists of the time we're having by showing example alberto. Booties walked and burnt. Plastic pieces next to robert rauschenberg. More structured collage like works and a rare new show. Fontana made from an unpainted stretched elegantly inside canvas elsewhere. Man ray and hero manzoni or literal line of rope between their materials and bondage suggestiveness with a brand new work for the show from maurizio catalan. This effigy of catalan. Hangs prostrate from a flagpole outside the show on several road and these wearing a nice suit who better than to get lost in italy with them on the luxembourg and francesco. Bonami alma francesco. Thank you very much emf your time today. Three us to be lost in italy like physically here in several road to be lost in. Italy is a great sort of opening doors here in london. And trust you guys. Thanks for that thanks. I love inviting us to this phil looking out upon golden fields and lots of beautiful art. I want to ask you first. Both about the title lost in italy. It was lost in italy. Because i think we lost the it asked italian mostly. We lost their idea. That italy was really plays in the Fifty s and sixty where a lot private galleries where experimenting with new artists internationally. And he said he was very vibrant in terms of the thing so we lost mad the hours that we lost a little bit the memory of those periods and we lost also. Probably these attitudes as italian to do experiment with this kind of art now completely different environment and seeing that do all the change completely from the fifties at that time was quite daring to bring francis bacon. Nobody almost newly him in intrigue galleria. Or if klein in milano or richard serra room together yellow i mean was absolutely astounding the show. You're talking about francesco. Is that amazing show with the live. Animals live and dead animals in cages cages in cages other than of i witness accounts of that of that show because there was such a for that was such a fertile ground for artists. Coming from all over the world especially the united states as you've gotten to show what was it like to be at that show. I wonder of an italian photographer called abdul wasi from the exhibition and it looks like the opening was packed with lots of people and so i think that it. It indicates that it was probably quite followed at the time. Also get data. Salita was very interesting gallery to go to. So i think people would have gone even not knowing who richard sarah is obviously coming from america and this was one of his first ever exhibition. So i'm not sure that people came especially for him but they would have gone to that gallery anyway. because it was very edgy. Other time magazine does a now. Because it's vein. Stodgy to cities. Because but the massive been a curiosity. I think people hated the show. Absolutely there are critics and establishing probably founded Joke but you see. That was a curiosity there. Was you could see that steele was what now is completely losses some kind of underground and experimental thing. That people were curious to see what was happening. You know and interpretation now of course with the past of the year that the kids changes completely. I think at the time. Richard said i was more couturiers about the rural and farms environment around the old ban landscape. So i was curious about this this or chart and farm with live animals there so he was more kind of an eye of folkloric aspect of the thing rather than conceptual. So now we see as the seed of arta paul ryan and also of a lot of meritas cartoon on the works but at the time i think richard said didn't think to do a highly arte poverty or concept statement he was more probably mocking. Did the italian culture in god and those think are always remove. These exhibition from is is kind of cv for a long time because he didn't think that was part of his is Future language i hear the now it's revisiting because he kind of realize that that that show was seminal for the arctic poverty movement and many many artists like nelly of pasqualini that luca the show and a few months after start to do works not similar but definitely inspired by that. They're in gesture of this american novel. The newly was yeah amazing thing and here in the gallery. You've got in one of the rooms off the main room you have. These works in kind of dialogue with each other. And that's very much spirit of this whole show is these these artworks i'll having whispered conversations in corners. Some of them shouting at each other across the galleries. But that's the idea of this show that there's a dialogue between the idea was yes. This conversation was going on clearly softly and sometime. You know whispering gossiping. I think some of them attending jerks to each other. I saw joe somewhere stealing ideas from each other. There is the oldest. The discussion on the art over artists. Still fight about dates. People guy put sixty six. And they'll say no i did i and sixty five days a cheque right back. Check and that is. It's very funny out the desire to be the first one to do something you know. And it's bizarre because i don't think that when painter of renaissance crucifixion was accusing the other two stolen the idea of crucifixion over. Now i did. I didn't think about now in the contemporary art world is still now there. Is this obsession of being the first and by the nature of the basis. You'll you know is not anymore by teams is by so there must be first and a little bit about artie poetic because you took your show touches on it. But it's not not the basis of i suppose but the materials the russian bug and sarah and And even you chief on tana's And the show these these use the sort of ordinary materials plastic packing paper and all this kind of stuff. Can you tell us a little bit. About how our touches into the works that you've got here and lost initially client a big mix of different materials so from the borey that is made of banned plastic to tanna which you mentioned which is just raw canvas. Obviously there is that side of of the material which comes out of really what was happening in italy which in the fifties and sixties was a whole wave of reconstruction and so all these materials which were ordinary and became such a big pot and take on such a huge significance that these artists decide to kind of go back into engaging with those. Instead of using more decorative materials to make art with resist psycho celebration of the ordinary as a symbolic relationship with these materials. Or was it simply borne out of actual perera was this certain artists could only get the hands on certain if these materials no i i think so. No i think there was a kind of a reaction to formalism and painting and things of that but you can see for example. We put russia combined between fontana and buri. We squeezy him into this too. If you look at it carefully you see completely. The different approach. That italian artists had and an american artist fontana and an old italian by this. They have always this kind of sometime. Preposterous to infinity to kansas thing. That out of the burn best. Your renunciation again. Burp plastic is something dramatic is goes beyond just burn. Plastic is as the war and the wounds and the counter fontana recalled into spacial concept of these deals. Space is a concept. Russia is very much grounded is the seed of the part. And you can see that. He's the man of the society the man of the of the time. The moment the doesn't have any religious aspiration you want to is like a bomb compared with two or three he's like it's reaching out of the county said bomb is yeah it comes out. You know the the the thing little just go through garbage while buri and things they want to trust for. Everything is not. As a kind of spirituality even a piece of plastic is spiritual and there is also this kind of craving for the texture the mastery which use of being the strength of italian art and the weakness because when you do crave to look at the detail of of material you get of says you become an artisan and you lose the idea of an artist york you'll become obsessed with the texture and not with the or other spiritual part of the thing in fact. Is it become more religious rauschenberg than buri and fontan at the end of the day because it rushing by looks the person the human being and beautiful tara thinks about god which probably doesn't exist and that goes back to sarah folkloric thing right. It's all about touching the getting your hands dirty getting some mud under your fingernails artist. I suppose as kind of an intention of francesco is talking about lost in italy from the point of view of what italy lost. But i think there's also the losing of yourself in italy. These artists came and there was a sort of certain freedom that maybe they didn't feel they had elsewhere and the kind of creativity and what came out of it is out of that being in that melting pot with with all these different influences together. I think that's a little way in the way that the show is constructed. We tried to show you that melting pot. Basically those influences that come from different directions and these conversations that happened was sometimes you know something influence something else. That wasn't a direct conversation but there was you know somebody saw something and then did something else and it's obviously has a relationship. It's interesting to see that place because like with everything places changing things in its today. Not exactly like what it was at the time. So you phrase site. One bloom the wall which is quite revealing where it's totally kind of underwhelmed by the experience in italy arrives in italy and founded dirty and kind of not north. These up this thing sign the medici court. But if i'm hasn't and like what sacrifice ferre goes into this farmer distinct and so he has format in. He just formed his disappointment. Sarah in an exhibition and tony said which is more was more refined. Maybe thought it was kind of shocked and so there is this kind of conflicting feeling between having holiday and be exiled. Because you have to remember. Cy twombly went wrong. Not because only want to see italy but because he was not as with the appearing part was totally disregarded in the united states so he was the friend that now. I want to show so in order to avoid this this frustration in new york to move to italy and russia. Mer can follow him. Because we're together but it's so it's interesting to see how history is much more real and endearing and human that artistry is if you read a there is a doll narasaki that is built around artist going wrong blah blah blah. Seeing things in fact people move for reason that are not and we can get the end to to maurice. Hatton moved to united states which is also very interesting is a story alma when she walked through the show with regards to merit sales about scott. Peter and these two also seem to have a kind of who owns them who owns their reputations to they. Have this american versus italian. Well both for scott pete and catalans capital and is a little complicated as to define warns watt. I think catalan still now owns himself. In the sense that is a little bit. His own country is illegal. His own village man is an island apart from ritzier catalan. Apart from a man is is is illegal. Little rock In the middle of the mediterranean. Yes not in the middle of the ocean but a little rock. Scott petersen indefinitely arrived to america. Matt lucas stanley. And it definitely was. He's a much more. Limited artist and catalan is language was very much tied to this kind of world that goes in the show. You just make relation body was definitely. He found his support in your kostelic who supported until the very end of his life. We can say this days through utah. American artists i was telling the problem for skopje. Was that they talion. Study was american. The american studies italian so he never quite gone. Three-tier doesn't have this problem. I think maurice is is is is italian is is. You can't compare to the actor. Roberto benigno is a typical italian. He plays on dizzy. Talion kind of olmos clownish character a caricature the work itself is a caricature of yourself. So what happens to the what happened to the italian vibe. I think it's a mixture you like. You don't know to define it when it happens. You don't know how to define it when it doesn't happen. What if you look at what did happen at the time in italy was that there were great. Very courageous galleries. Who were ready to show work. That was edgy and different by unknown you know and and presenting it to a local audience. The audience that was there was very much engaged with aunt. Not just you know from leaving which in in the live with art in almost every piece of architecture that is around you but also with contemporary practice and artists and collecting and you know bidding museums and setting up infrastructure that enables engagement with art an artist of his lead. You know whereas francesco is saying ready to invent things and and be daring and take stand. What happens is the tips. Some of those things become weaker than maybe the moves towards a different place. That's basically yeah and and the focus of some parts of your show that immediate post second world war italy as well. We know joe. Juvenile said rome suffered from Was suffering from a lack of war. Maybe it is that you need that hardship so to kind of get the creativity going to build something out of the ashes whether it's all to whether it's hospitals and schools and a whole new country. You know what i mean. Yeah that's probably also but then there is that the mentioned before which i love it in english is ingenuity. Because in italia in jane we ta is navy tae a ha- genuity means is a mixture between. At and geniality. And this i think is the perfect cocktail to invent someting and american. I think they maintain this canvas not all but it's kind of ingenuity this mixture. If you're not naive you cannot activate your geniality and the probably the talian is that we start to believe in our own act and we start to believe that they are. We are adjusted genius. We are known either tall we genius. We know toll consuming lint all at least you invented golf you know. Happy position of you've instill. This new work permits catalan. The the for the sa- freshly commissioned work in this in this show schooled you and he's a hangman. These amendments hung himself hanging from what is probably a pulley probably when several had less august reputation. Is he's a flagpole. Okay lifelock pro. Lots of people are taking instagram happy in a selfie happy installation people falling over the postbox things outside china get exactly the right anger will get that get themselves in it somehow so i think this is a piece of mischief. Both of you've created and of course the himself beautifully placed it perfectly. But tell me how that. Tell me how this poor guy is hung himself outside the gallery on several row house. He wants his through line because another is the idea of lines and ropes through line with him into some of the other works maurizio so he hung cancer which is better hunter. While you know the first thing is it's a it's a curator dream coming true. See one of the artists being himself usually push the curators to hang himself or the dealer in this case is changing. It is a dream is is that decided to kill himself and when it's up with marita he saw the flagpole and taught you'll listing as they were selling alma before so is a calculating cynical person. He doesn't care if me or the hurry. Go to jail or get sued or he would never tell ya don't care but it will so when asked the work of course didn't give me a nice word to put inside. But he start thinking. Think what i can do. That gave me the most visibility and Create the most travel for anybody and right. Now we don't have so many trouble self-isolation guys who go. I've had as far as podcast goes. We've had that you've had about eight hours a good time. I think what they say is the fact that he's self-portrait and i think the redeeming quality to the work is it's buca flowers because transform an exemption into a gesture almost lov of despair of failure and you know this is kind of this kind of pleading to another person. You place lobbied. I did it for you. Love me or i kill myself for you. So take away a lot of east dramatic but there is a romanticism in the war is kinda melancholy. Kolia it's not. It's not just a brutal act of suicide. This is kind of imaginary suicide. If you don't love me. I kim myself. It's a good. It's very though. And he's also what sort relationship has pulled. Politician maurizio catalan. Can you anyway got with the great and the good the back of the role academy those kind of old role academy missions who grin that breaches and so trousers and all the rest of it are they getting with each other out that you think will cut whether they talking about. I think they'll be happy to have some new company. The royal academy missions who is sitting there for years. Been hang out start. Gave them somebody else. I think it's also smart coming out of this very difficult period in which people were not able to go outside so much to see each other to engage with odd even to feel comfortable going indoors even into an art gallery the museums today. The academy is still not open. So i you know i think that bringing the outside to the street is a very smart. Take advantage of the situation. Said that this is out is a celebration of the lockdown positive aspect of the lockdown outside of a building even if they would be knocking on wood other lockdown this walk but the relationship academies interested. Because you know again we can take advantage of meritas workers say that. A royal academy celebrates is founder. Father after the were dead and maurizio actually celebrating himself today while still alive with the that portal in south. So is this kind of kind of not waiting for history to sanctify. He's canonizing himself is himself. Live with gesture you know. It's uh taking the burden of someone to kill him. Oreos does himself he does. Everything is generous generous to the end. January and lost in italy is on at luxembourg co on several row until the third of july my thanks to alma and francesco and holly fischer who produce this program. We'll be back next week. With more reopening cultural goodness but for the time being for me robert bound. Thanks for tuning in.

italy francesco maurizio catalan co gallery francesco benami alma luxembourg gallery itself centers around la salita american richard centers anima yves kline Bonami alma francesco luxembourg abdul wasi Salita richard sarah america pasqualini robert robert rauschenberg fontana
Reopening the Guggenheim

Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

30:33 min | 1 year ago

Reopening the Guggenheim

"Hello and welcome to Monaco on culture with me bound today we're looking at light at the end of the tunnel after three months of being locked down, things are looking up and of course here with sporting large and meaningful asterisk, because it very much depends upon where you are in the world in the European. Oh well things that inching forwards and today we'll be speaking to the directors of the Guggenheim Museum's in Bilbao and in Venice. At the beginning of June or be it with a heavily edited version of normality, we'll also be speaking to Richard Armstrong. Director of the New York. Museum and the Guggenheim Foundation as a whole. We should say that the New York Gallery is likely to be shop for another couple of months. Sorry, we'll reflect on what we've missed. They have and how they're looking at a slightly different audience to the Army of art. Loving tourists unusually serve so than I on a Sonya Horizon. We welcome. Ignacio Vidartes, Caravale and Richard Armstrong Guggenheim Inc.. and. Carol I'd like to ask you first. You're not museums in Bilbao in Venice Open. I respectively was an emotional moment. How did it feel to open the doors on that on that first morning and and have people? In and drabs at first I'm sure but coming into wonderful buildings. Yeah I think it was a it was. An emotional moment. was quite. Quite a lot of trepidation in the staff waiting for people to come in after almost three months with him lost. There was a lot of fantasy station built into this moment. To. Of course was the same museum, but there were lots of new measures and it was. Very new situation. We were facing, so yeah, we it was. It was a moving moment for us. Carol what about you? In in in Venice It's such A. It's such a well known and well loved. Sort of Paul the Venetian tour the Guggenheim as much as it is of course in New York Bilbao. How? How was it on opening on reopening day? Oh, it was absolutely wonderful I mean we were thrilled of course, a bit of trepidation that at the same time. Everyone had to book online or to make a reservation. And we were full, and we had. We had a long waiting lists, which was very exciting that people were so happy, and they were soon video so grateful, and we were happy and grateful to. So it was it was a two way street, and even though of course are so many new measures that we've had to implement. People were very patient people and it was also a very beautiful sunny days, so that helped. And people are just even if I had to wait a bit. They were thrilled, and even though there's a one way itinerary now, they didn't mind it was okay. They understood and they were just happy to to be in the museum to be in the garden to be able to look at some of their favorite paintings, so it was a wonderful day. Yes Sir it's a! It's a strange one for people now to have a kind of route am I right? INTENDED IS GONNA root directed on the floor, so there was kind of a right way. We've always wondered if there's a right way to walk around in museum and now now sort of sadly there is. Has Sir. Has that changed the way that you've you've hung the shows and you've arranged the exhibits. Well actually. We haven't changed anything so far, but we've only got the main Palazzo Open and the barricades. Able to openly the spaces for the temporary exhibition yet. But we haven't changed anything at all. So an I hope, we don't have to move anything so. They're the installation is just like it was a few months ago before before lockdown. In our case, we haven't either been the exhibitions. Look the same as they looked three months ago, when almost when they opened and what? We have just implemented this this. Suggested one flow through the museum so that there is a way to go in way to go out way to move up to move down. Suggests that pass through the divisions, but actually the works are hanging in the same way, and they experienced in the same way as before even better, I would say because of the restricted access of some of the works can only be experienced at one time by one person or one. Unit. Let's say so. It's a nice way to look at the museum right now I'm Richard to bring you in and ask you about the sort of master plan of this reopening. The GUGGENHEIM has been amongst the first to reopen them in amongst institutions in Europe and America. Have people been in touch with you to see how you've done this? To see how you've sort of managed to control of of getting people in analysis and keeping surfaces clean, and all the rest of it what we're taking our cues from Bilbao and benefits. Because New York is still closed and likely. We'll be out the two months at least. So we're learning what they know from their experience I had a meeting this morning with our team about. Very question of direction. which only we had these wonderful ramps that forced people. Up or down and in future reunited suggests they only go up now. That's pretty interesting. Because as this is kind of so much in New York the flow of that home museums directed up and down this rams. We'll say walk up. The ramps walked down the stairwell. Okay, so you're giving you're thinking of people's. Under exercised cuff muscles during lockdown, then Richard. Well in New York. There is no such thing because you have to walk everywhere these days. and. It's a funny one. You must have missed your visitors laws, but has it sort of this is a question full three of Richard. I'll start with you. Has This allowed you as an institution into international institution to sort of take stock? Bit of how you do how you do the job of being a museum. Question but neither have we this solution yet either. We been very dependent on tourists. Almost two-thirds of our attendants would have been from people outside New York City. The bulk, of them from Europe. And now he discovered those same. People won't be coming back for some time, so the question becomes. How to make the institution newly attractive to. New York City residents an area residents. I think it's the. Very much the same question that both my colleagues have. Yes, that's true. Richard Sing for us. At the PG would save seventy percent of our visitors come from outside outside venison the Venedetto, but what was interesting about this weekend and besides I, I stay on on the second of June is, but we had. Mostly, Venetians, but people from other parts of Italy. And people who are coming to the museum for the first time because I think they also wanted to experience, Bennis is while it's still not flooded with tourists, and they wanted to see it literally in the New Light which I can understand. But obviously we're going to have to attract locals. As much as we can. But I think locals will also be happy maybe to rediscover the museum in different way less crowded, which I have to admit is very nice for the businesses I mean. They still can't go around as much as they'd like. Because of a one way itinerary. As an objective outside visitor, the experience could arguably be a lot more pleasant. In a way. You're being able to give something back to locals. Through sort of accident of this pandemic. Really an IT's. It's kind of a nice. It's kind of a nice way to re-engage with the well, not big funny about it with the few Venetians in venison in the area vendetta itself. Rome extremely of going about it, but yes. If we can attract Venetians and people from the Venuto and nearby regions set so much better. We'd be thrilled because obviously we love the the Non Italian tourists, too, but we very much want to engage with the local community, even if it's not a very large community, but where this weekend there's a surprise. There was a surprising amount of European visitors from Germany from France I. I heard French and German for the first time in weeks and weeks weeks, so that was very positive and plenty of families, and that was that was quite lovely to see so many parents with young children coming to the museum, all very engaged and I, myself was in there in the galleries, because in the month of June staff is guarding the galleries for variety of reasons. And I was doing a bit of that myself, and observing visitors and I could see children reading the labels and taking that time to look at the picture at the pictures that that was that was very nice and. Nacional in Bilbao. If you've been I'm sure as a museum director, you'll fascinated by the people that come in rather than just the number of people, but the sort of people that are coming into to your institution there. Have you taken any even keener interest in last sort of seven or eight. WELL WE ONLY A. Peculiar situation because this first week and per the next week to only visitors coming from the area in Bilbao the promise of Biscay are loud because stales. Spain has restrictions of mobility within provinces in Spain, and certainly the borders are closed to so for this week week and this current week. Are Only visitors are coming only from the air in Bilbao, so it's being as Carl was saying it was a way. You feel that people were kind of re. Possessing him it like they were coming back to see, their museum was still in place in good shape, and it certainly has called was saying it's a very unique opportunity because of I mean we certainly. This museum has such exceptional spaces that can offer this sense of wonder while you are inside, I, mean we. We have made a big effort to make this visit, not just safe, which of course that's first priority, but also at the same time pleasant, so we want people to enjoy their coming to the museum, not just to be safe. They're coming to the museum to enjoy to have inspiration to have you know so? We're trying to to make their visit enjoyable and suddenly this this situation offers a very unique opportunity to do so because of the way they can engage with the building, and with works of art. We are hoping that the situation will. Slowly change. We are hoping that once the borders are reopened, it seems that by the end of the month the borders with France will be opening again, so we will be getting if not a huge influx of tourists at least visitors from areas surrounding Bilbao, we are. We are hoping that the summer will will have will be not a regular, some very special summer in terms of reduced number of visitors, but certainly with visitors coming from areas other than Bilbao in the Basque Country Richards to this from what NASA and Carol has been saying. Obviously learning lessons, as each day goes past with how you might reorganize The New York Museum and and the building itself. Does this sort of rain clear? You kind of making notes all the time on how things do and don't work, and what sort of exhibitions even the exhibition design might have to be in in months and years to come. We will certainly have different attitudes towards With are presented in the short term. Yes, yeah, I mean not not just the politics of the famous ramp. No, it'll be the challenge of having people stay x number feet away from one another on a tilted floor. Just imagining. The GUGGENHEIM gift. Shops are wonderful. Wonderful things but I'm imagining just what you guys can commission in the way of mosques. I mean this must be front and center of the Armstrong master-plan show. What we were certainly will be featuring. Ways mask at the beginning. Because we think that's a good cause and we'll have others overtime yet. And I just wanted to know as well, I mean obviously there concrete plans on horizon in happy to the way that this this this change has sort of benefit and threatened kinda music, international museums, although other very clear lessons to how that will be set out designed, and even the expectations in terms of visitor, numbers and things like that. Does this help you kind of be a little bit more realistic and take stock of things by I think wanting to would agree with me, but the building that Frank Gehry has designed. Really allows for very elegant and stimulating circulation to my mind. And it's an unusual non on field. Approach in essence. You're in interconnected pods. If you care to be with access to the outside frequently, almost every space leads you to to shelter space outside. Will it affect our attendance projections? I almost reckon the left to take them up I think UAE dealt with this pandemic really nicely. We have to tell one another that their combined airports are now taking it more people than he throw. And over time I think this need for a clean safe place at a holiday. Will make the place essentially more attractive, particularly to people from northern Europe, but also to some degree Asia, and as always India, which is a very significant part of the your data's panic. Necessarily, that's something. That's something delicious. Rub Your Hands Together about presumably I've seen much of that stuff in in W. did it seem obvious the time I mean it? It didn't seem to me. This might improve the lot of of the future certain museum. Personally, I think we are still very much in the in the middle of this storm, so it's difficult to really make very knowledgeable predictions about the future I. Think we have just intuitions, but I would agree with Richard I. Think I personally think that. Tourism is not going to go away I. Think there will be certain. Certainly many lessons learned from this and. We, will sure we will improve the way we travel. We will improve the way we handle crowds, but the essential need for travel will not disappear, and for that. I think I would be will be. We'll leave position in a very in A. In a very distinct way because this museum will be the place, many people will want to go and experience and I agree with Richard that I think there's something that that building shared with the. Dow! It's a very generous. Architecture is an architecture that really makes you feel well when you're inside, it's very generous in space is very the way it treated. It treats you as a visitor so I think it will very well positioned in this future world. We're. Looking into? And I'd love to know from all of you whether you have. You've appreciated the buildings in the and the collections that you oversee in a different way. Since Lockdown Dana's happened I'm sure you must have. Had A wistful walk around the the holes and corridors in Bilbao Venison New York. Maybe. We'll start with you well. It must be a magical, magical and slightly strange thing to be able to do. It has and I have to. I have to confess that. Walking through the museum and Looking at some of these pieces in this situation where the museum was close to the public, but there was almost no artificial lighting just with natural light. It's a really it's really very unique. Privilege have seen the matter of time Richard Serra sculptures have since some of the works in the Museum of the Keefer works in a museum, just with natural light, not with not with any artificial light, and with nobody around and it certainly a moment to treasure, and to keep for for the future. Yeah, and Carol in Venice. Nonni, as as you say such a busy place. You'll museum one of the busiest. It must be wonderful to have that kind of feather-light walk around. Without crowd Oh yes. Absolutely about sometimes, it was a little strange, so you know in in the garden we have sculptures and we actually. Covered all the sculptures with white topic material because. These pigeons and seagulls which use them as their. Toilets and so as we didn't always have staff there to to clean the sculptures with wanted to protect them so they. I would go to the museum because I'd like to check on. The Gods were here twenty four hours a day i. come across these these these like these goats, the garden which had been covered up. You know just like you cover up furniture in some house, so so that was very strange, and sometimes I would want to go into the museum and look and go round on my own, and that was special, but there were times when I just didn't want to. Because it seemed to sad, so these very conflicting emotions about the wonderful. And privilege of being able to sit the works on my own that the same time the wanting to because it was just too painful moment. Some spooky now vibes hanging of this. Richard in New York. Fill out the museums museum, and it's not full of people, or did it feel like a strangely magical place at least for a couple of weeks embarrassed to say been there since March twelve okay? Is, that will. Maybe this is the question. Did, you funded. A strange place to bail is just not. Say No. Then you walking neighborhood well I'm not in the city I've gone away to the countryside, so I'm not even going back to the city. He flying by yeah remote, and because of Ram cool houses show countryside the future. I been examining. Precepts up close and personal. You took that one. A curatorial idea behind everything. And I wanted to ask you also about about what people have said since they've been coming back. This is a guest to caroline and finding NASA. There is thankfully nowadays less of a boundary between institution and the visitor think people very. Fillmore able to ask open questions and ask why this is here and what swear, and all the rest of it has put you in touch with your visitors, and now all know if you've had some. Conversations with in the last week. About about what they've what they've felt what the museums have meant to them as they've come back Carol. I think visitors have been very very happy to to return. As I've said I haven't had a chance to talk with with very many since the since the attended this past weekend, but I know that during lockdown. Our members were thrilled that we were that we hadn't abandoned them, and even though they couldn't come to the museum. And follow activities and. With the Artemije the very personal physical way. They were delighted that we'd been so active on our social on our social media platforms. In an effort, not to not to abandon them, and to keep them close and engaged, and that was almost more important I mean now. The museum is open, even if only partially, and we're thrilled about that, and I think everyone is very very happy about that, but it was it was. It was really fundamental to be all much close much more present when we weren't actually able to open the doors, but we been certainly receiving very very positive feedback and everyone who's come has just express their joy that we we've opened up and how important it is, but museum should be opening up so I think that there's really a hunger four four visitors to want to come back on site and to experience. In Person. These these exceptional. WHAT SAVANT! Climbing. Have you been? Studying, not just look on people's faces, but some of the things they've said, have you? Have you got some feedback from Famille? Your team in Bilbao I have yes, then I say mention this first few days. Visitors have been all local and we'll tell you most of them. Repeat repeat visitors, so what's been interesting to find out into see? From some of them is. The road that the museum place in their lives I mean how it's. It's always very. Rewarding to see how important museum is for them. It's like a part of their. Life and it's part of the live. They wanted to to recover so I've felt this kind of gratitude in many of them will come into the museum for. Being able to come back to the museum to after like this three months, yachters with. Everything seems to have stopped, but then they're recovering normality. I Always thought that the museum. Without visitors. Felt like an orphan child. Now seeing this visitors come back is like it's like a happy moment, and I've seen that in their faces now I just want to say not only the businesses, but the staff as well because staff is now coming back to to the museum into the officers slowly, and they are thrilled to be back, and they also thrilled to be taking care of the museum and shifts over the weekend. Because in fact, it gives them an opportunity to be close to the art, and for some of them, that's not always so obvious, and also gives an opportunity to see to see the visitors, and also to understand how appreciative the businesses are, and so I think it gives them. All the more all the more meaning and also courage, and we'll go on working as hard as much as they do. Yeah, and that that's interesting point. Do you feel that actually? We're doing this radio show zoom in different countries. You can offer intimate conversations like this. Has This brought you and your teams closer together because you've had to consult with people that you might? Might have got out the habit of doing somehow. This happens across all industries and all institutions. Have you found that Corales? You were mentioning that maybe yourself in Venice, have you have you had pleasant and frank conversations with some of your team that you might not have had a necessary happen well, actually that our team is pretty small to begin with relatively small. and. We always have very open conversations and dialogues. and. That's certainly going on. I think the staff is even more enthusiastic than ever. Little, so they understand that we have to come up with new ways of. Working at the museum I mean I was mentioning earlier on the digital platforms which I think is something that we very much have to pursue an pursuing for the future I mean we have two things. This is a two problem a way of. Going about how we should be. Considering the museum and how we deal with business in the future on site of course, but also. Digitally through the web. So I'm finding a star is more enthusiastic than ever is working hard of an ever and a- finding this movement in a in a paradoxical way, extremely extremely exciting. This is a question of you. I suppose, but maybe I'll pose it to you Richard. The idea of Being closer to your your physicists through the digital realm, as well has this has this? has this pandemic being an opportunity to get a bit closer to mock it to speak to to understand the needs of feel visits as well no question I think it's completely celebrated that. Complementary Approach Onsite offsite and You've seeping. Institution reopened institution. Have you seen? Have you seen that? Does that work well? This kind of? Having. An APP tour of some of the shows? Yes well, the I think this crisis has seventy pushed forward a number of activities that we were already pursuing, but of course we have suddenly realized how central they are, how important they are for what we do, and certainly many of this ways of connecting with our audience through digital means have become something so much more relevant so this possibility of being in touch with her audience. Audience, we have a group of over sixty thousand people who are part of a group of community of around the museum, and we have been constant touch with them getting their fit back, and so this has been great opportunity to learn more about than to, and certainly the APP now because of one of the of the measures that are in place in the museum are trying to. An attempt to avoid physical interaction between people and elements the museum one of them being the device we used to provide all you guys for free for every visitor to the museum. Now we're asking them to download this APP with has the same content of the other guy, but six languages, which they can download at home before coming to the museum, and certainly is a great way to to. Enrich and improve the visit and and unto report visit before they come in. And I just wondered. What what you've been getting your art during lockdown whether you've just been retreating into weld of books and TV shows, or whether you've been the king, some sort of offerings you inspecting your offerings online yourselves, but also some of the other kind of art, institutions and things, or whether yeah, you've just been going for. Bracing walks in the countryside Richard. You're you're out of the out of the city in New York. Somewhere also Mugniyah. What about you? Well? We look at things online. We have a couple of pictures in the house so I. Look at them for ten years. And then there's a lender of nature which has been for me amazing, because it's a place, I normally would come to for two nights in the evacuate. In being your day after day gives you a very different sense of. Let's say the continuity of nature on I'm glad that you've been flattering this to two pitches after all these years they fail. They feel Koi with your attention. They're more than two, but they're only about two worth looking at the. Camera what about what about you have you been exploring? You've been able to explore the city and use insys happened. Have you been? Have you been able to look at anything? Outside of those beautiful sparkling clear canal? Well, I mean looking at the startlingly clear canals has been a highlight of this lockdown. I mean. Even though. I mean we've got from one extreme to the other in Venice from too many tourist, two zero, and of course that was disturbing on so many levels, but at the same time it was absolutely spectacular. And observing the Likud and completely clear cleaned flat waters was extraordinary and in the last few weeks, but this has already changed in the last couple of weeks it was wonderful to see rowers ro on the Grand Canal on hindered by taxis and too many too many other motorboats. and. Just observing looking at the sky and no planes going by which is really wonderful, new smells new birds and fish. No dolphins though. That's been wonderful and really really really quite special, so that that I must say among all this absolute horror has been has been really quite special and something that well hopefully won't be repeated for the same reasons. My thanks to Juan. Ignacio Vidartes Carol Veil and Richard Armstrong for their zoomed in contributions this week. The GUGGENHEIM. In Europe, at least is, it's worth investigating your nearest museum or gallery to with the control numbers, it's likely to be a joy of privacy and communion with some wonderful works of art. This has been another black heath bureau and her hill hub production produced by holly. Fischer join us at the same time next week, but until then for me Robert found. Thanks for tuning in.

Bilbao Ignacio Vidartes Carol Veil New York Richard Guggenheim Foundation Venice Europe Guggenheim Museum Richard Armstrong museums museum The New York Museum New York Bilbao New York City Richard Armstrong Guggenheim I NASA Museum of the New York Gallery Bilbao Venison New York Army of art Director
Jonathan Gudai: Automation can double the digital Out of Home ad spend.

The Billboard Insider Podcast

29:35 min | 2 years ago

Jonathan Gudai: Automation can double the digital Out of Home ad spend.

"Hi, I'm Dave Westberg. And you're listening to the billboard insider podcast where I interview industry leaders about trends impacting the US out of home advertising business. His podcast is sponsored by mobilize. At mobilized the world's number one audience intelligence platform for media owners. Today's just is Jonathan died founder is CEO of Dombi the online platform which makes advertise on digital out of home speeds, fast, easy, and affordable. I heard one independent out of home operator referred to Johnson's companies add money due to its success at helping out of home companies generate new revenues, welcome to the show Jonathan thank you for having me did Johnson. Once you've just give the five sentence overview of what a does and why it's important to out of home company. Absolutely for small things for having made it scraping the show. A Dominy is online platform created help increase revenue for billboard owners by making it easier for more. Myers to find him by whether it's digital billboards or other types of digital screens to do it all through an easy online process. Can we expand on that? Am I right? You're not just doing billboard. You're also doing is it digital out of home talk a little about play space talk about that. Sure. Absolutely. So we actually started with digital billboards. That was our core. Focus and the first billboard was in Las Vegas facts. We're coming out airport and over the past three four years we've expanded to shopping mall screens moving vehicles. Ours restaurants sports, stadiums hotels, really any digital screen that has a high traffic pattern the crosses past. It is a good candidates to list and sell their their ads online. But I will say that our largest revenue segments of all the different strains, we have is still billboards, and we think it's going to be. That for quite some time if you had to break out the different segments. How would it break out? What percentages billboards what percentage is other screens from a supply perspective digital billboards are not as common as the place based screens. So I think there's somewhere around eight or eight eight or nine thousand large format digital billboards the US compared to over a million place based screens while. So that kind of disparity just in the US market is also another way leans on our website as well. By the end of may are digital billboard counts will be in the thousands and by compare that to the place based we're talking about the next of a hundred thousand on the platform while Jonathan there are a lot of different people trying to make it easy to buy digital screens. How is what you're doing different from what some of these other providers who are these other demand side platform. Terms. Do how are you different? It's a really good question. And I'll say that all I answer it by flipping it around and saying how we're similar in that we're all trying to help billboard owners increase revenue increase. No fill rates, and ultimately look at their static boards and say, how can I convert those digital and make more revenue on those pieces of real estate. So we share that same vision of making an online process in where we differ from others out there and without naming names, but just gonna conceptually number one is price. So on the Dominy platform, we are fixed price model where the billboard owners sets the price, and we recommend that price. Typically, be your Armel rack rates or close to it. So there's never this concern of M I diluting, my revenue potential or my having customers come in and find a better deal. Elsewhere compared to doing it over the phone with my salespeople. After price that the second is just the inventory availability right now, we've got about sixty five thousand purchaseable digital screens that should grow to over one hundred thousand by the end of this quarter. And so we're positioned as a Omni channel for digital screen provider. Allowing an advertiser to say I want to really find a specific audience or blanket geographical area, and they're buying your the large format billboards along with the other smaller screens as a compliment. So I'd say that's also a big difference. It's not just one media type while the last in the third and biggest to us is sort of our our philosophy on the business. We've built the platform is an open marketplace. And as an open marketplace, we built connections in API is where if you're running the Dominy platform, you can connect other selling entities into a Dominy, and you can have a Dominy 'em them. Also selling the unsold space. We. We think that by having that Klopp petition it helps the board owners and the the advertisers by creating more channels others in the market have been more of a walled garden closed off platform where if you're running their system, you really can't listen south with other parties. So what I hear it's not either or I could use you, and I can use one of the other services. I could choose to use one of the other services as well. He sure can okay. Can you talk just briefly about a pricing? How do you make money? You have a commission is disclosed. How how does the Dominy make money? Sure. So it's a fully transparent commission model, which I think is a huge thing in an age where digital ad fraud online at fraud is just horrendous because it's not so transparent. Yeah. You're absolutely right. There are a lot of platforms out there that don't presents what the actual buying price is. And you in a way, it's. By on Priceline or hot wire where you name your price. And then you wait to see what you got. We are the polar opposite. So the billboard owner can say I want purse lot per month X thousand dollars. So let's just say a three thousand dollar price. Yes. We would then our standard commissioners twenty percent. So we would Mark that price up go to market at safe thirty six hundred dollars around there and the big innovation here. A lot of people ask us why would anyone ever want to buy through you? If they can always get it for less. The billboard owner is that the ability to do audience space buying and targeting where you're not through a dominating going to be doing annual buys. If you want to buy a billboard for Mont your best off a billboard owner. But if you want to buy five AM to eight AM, we've whittled down the pricing model to a price per play while and just like Google aware. It's a cost per click of pennies on the dollar. We've also taken out of the data for out of home where a billboard. Might go for thirty five hundred dollars per month per slot really is eight cents per play purchasing model and the advertisers love that because they see a small price in. It's how many ads do you wanna buy where they're still buying thousands of dollars worth of ads? But they're just thinking about it in terms of eight cents increments. Jonathan how big is the digital out who market today, and how much do you think is automated? It's a great question. And there's the groups like, oh, AAA and AB and PriceWaterHouse Coopers that all gonna analyze improvised their assessments on a board of directors member of the DPA. And so we follow this and try to put this out our estimate is that today in the US. Did you a home is around four to five billion dollar market some say as low as three point seven some say up to four point five, but from an automated perspective, that's what's really exciting. Is that it's so early where less than two percents? Of the digital out of home ads that are being transacted are being done online while it'd be the platforms while but we see that dramatically changing over the next three to five years where I think the GPA just plan on a number that they think for this year, automated buying would be one hundred twenty five million dollar transaction business. We think that we can grow along with our partners. We can grow the digital home from that fourbillion of this today. So over ten billion in the next, you know, five to ten years. How does that happen? That's a that's a that's a big increase. Yeah. A lot of people look at that. And say there's no way that's just that's just too big of a leap. Amen. I always say you've got to look back at what our digital online counterparts who were competing with of done even just using Facebook as an example for so many years. Facebook's only mission was just add more and more users and across the billion user, Mark. And they raised a lot of money in went public and they turn on the advertising machine where literally overnight a started generating billions of dollars and last year. You just have one channel just one Facebook company to thirty four billion dollars worth of ads while and we compare that to a home where there's as much reach as much frequency if not more it's the physical world, right? Everyone's passing by these screens. And we say the fourbillion that we're at today is just because we're undervalued while. So it's convincing the market of the value. That's Inada home. That's put how we get there. Exactly. It's showing them the value. It's giving them the tools. To purchase it into measure it similarly to wear all the digital online has been moving. And it's also looking at Bogle in how we all are spending so much time on our phones and thinking about how can mobile actually had a pulse at home and got some big ideas for that as well. Let's stop here for a word from our sponsor at mobilize works with media owners in the US and around the world with all types of inventory to solve one common problem analytics from wheel car counts and classification to pedestrian county and demographics admirable is provides a complete accurate in privacy compliant platform for media owners to be successful. Visit at mobilized dot com to learn more or to speak with one of their team members about their solutions for audience intelligence. You were talking about mobile data and its role in out of home. Can you expand on that? Absolutely thinking about just us in our daily lives, and how and how much time in attention has moved to our mobile phones. It's something that's undeniable and any forecasting person showing mobile ads and mobile data are just continuing to climate as the fastest growing medium when we think about out of home for as long as there have been billboards, the impression counts and the way it's been bought and sold has been more on real estate as a real estate model since we start off as a static billboard industry. Correct. So it's all location based exactly and then with T A B in geo path with branding bringing. What was always just here's an estimated counts based upon the number of people in a car, and in that, you know, evolving to to now them using mobile data. We all of a sudden having ability to say more than just here's a location that I can sell. L you we can start to delve into the audience based buying worlds, and there's a couple different ways that this manifest itself, which we think are really interesting, and we're spending a lot of time and are in d China connects the mobile to the to that home. The first is a better understanding of who actually has his by the screen's, not just how many and using the weekly impression counts, but if you can quantify the top indexing audiences, whether it's gym goers, or it's luxury shopping goers, building those insights into out of home in allowing advertisers to more Intel intelligently choose the locations that they want to to place ads on because it has the audience that they're looking for. That's the first big innovation that we at a dominate have really been investing in and we partner with a company called place. I q who's one of the largest the largest location intelligence. Data provider. And so what they do is. There's no personally identifiable information. So I wanna get that out. You know up front. There's always a question of data integrity and privacy. All they do is partner with different mobile app companies and get location signal pins as these apps on on phones are traveling around the real world's. So let's just use me as an example. I leave my house, and I go to Starbucks, and I am waiting ten minutes to get my coffee. My phone is sending up location signals on one of variety of apps that because I'm in that Starbucks for enough time place like you knows I'm a Starbucks or a coffee drinker, and I go to my office, and I go to the gym afterwards. And I'm going to twenty four hour fitness on there for an hour. My device it knows that my device was in a twenty four hour finished on a gym goer. And imagine that across hundreds of millions of phones all anonymously captured. And then breaking that out into a thousand different audience segments based on all those types of locations and bring that to the outta home worlds show, Jonathan the old model, I might buy some billboards in your mind, Jim because of location in the new model, I might not necessarily by billboards nearby, Jim, but I might buy billboards if I know Jim book goers going by the billboard. And if I know those gym goers may be ended up in zip coach near mind gyms at the end of the day. Is that is that what I'm hearing? Yeah. That's exactly right. So there's no shortage of inventory, whether it's digital billboards are these place based networks what there is a shortage is buyers able to pinpoint the relevant audiences and place dollars on those screens while. And that's where this innovation this first leg of the stool of of let's create a Facebook lookalike model where people can say, you know. Advertisers can say who they're trying to reach. And then we created this concept of an IQ score where we would just rank the locations based upon the audience composition. It's not going to be one to want. It's not perfect. But it shows you as a overall population this billboard on this cross street is the number one. This transit station is number two in allow you with confidence to select those locations because of the audience from a reputable source from place Jonathan there's tremendous upside, what are some of the barriers to it continued automation of out of whom buying from an advertiser perspective. I think it's just wrapping their mind around the one too many medium that we have everyone who's really moved over to the big three, right? Google Facebook, Amazon, they're thinking about one to one type impressions and really kind of pinpointed audience targeting. Yes. It's the first barrier is just getting everyone comfortable with the. Idea of it being one too many. And these screens are still very important to help drive the results, but it's not going to be on a literal one to Larne level where you're going to get an analytics report of exactly how many clicks in exactly how many buys you're getting from a specific piece thing that's still just something that as a channel we have to continue to educate advertisers, by showing them. How it influences how out of home influences all the other channels because of the size, and the sight sound emotion capabilities that you get and I think there's gonna be some exciting research into attribution. That's gonna come out at the next AAA show that might help with some of these some of these questions sear spot on in. It's something that will continue to tolerate that. We're spending a lot of our time not just selling ads, but also helping to tell a story of you know, who bought those ads in why were these campaigns successful? So that others in the marketplace could say I want to do that too. What are some other barriers to automating outta home? The ability to just do it online. Most advertisers don't know the companies like Dominy exist, and I think the barriers just education again in different front of us. You know as a company or as programmatic at home as overall segment of the market. Just getting the word outs that you could go online and within minutes finding by ads. It's just I think the barrier might be just time and education that needs to continue to work. Can you talk about an example of Frisa recent by that was automated, and and what the client thought when they actually hit it to buy. Sure. Absolutely. I actually there's a couple of come to mind. One is a large advertiser in another as smaller local at the end of last year. UFC had a big UFC is ultimate fighting deal. Yes, ultimately championship with the mixed. Martial arts. Yes. In the they have this superstar named John Jones huge following, but also really controversial guy, and he had been banned the your prior for substance abuse and six days before the year's fight the Las Vegas. I've let a commission does a drug tests on him, and finds that he actually violated for the same reason he got banned he had a small small small amount of this banned substance, and they basically forbid him from fighting in for you if see any they're spending tens of millions of dollars, not just producing the fight. But promoting it this isn't just US. This is worldwide in they found this out. I think on December twenty four th or twenty fifth like right after Christmas around Christmas time, they found out and in a span of six six days you got to hand it to their leadership team. They relocated the fight from Las Vegas to hell -fornia to LA why. Because the California's lead a commission felt that. The circumstances or the amount of the substance was just not material to to ban it where six days they had a move an entire fight talking about fifteen thousand arena, where they've sold tickets per view fight all that marketing that went with it what they did was they went on a Dominy they geo fence LA in the surrounding areas. San Diego, Orange County, and they plastered UFC ads all over China sell tickets to the show, and they also went outside of LA to the major markets as well as some smaller markets that had their audience, and they put ads up just promoting the change of any in the fight and literally within four days, they sold out fifty thousand plus tickets at this Halsey event while and we think that never would have been able to be done in a out a whole world of two years ago, where you'd have to give lead time we'd have to make sure that the male ability was there, it was literally launched admits they were on the boards like the same day. How many boards was necessa-? Aerated execute this. I believe in just LA alone. It was over forty while. But it also spans throughout the US. And it took it took how long to execute this fought in a matter of two two days start to finish they had relocated Heather adds up on screens Jonathan net. That's insane. If you had looked at a typical agency process where they send out requests, they get back proposals. They tweaked the proposals they ask for pictures of boards, they leak it. Again. The fight would be gone before you could even have bought a builder. Yup. I think that's what's holding the whole industry back. Yes. Is that we live in an age. I can Google anything and get answers to whatever I wanna find her or no, I can go on Amazon, and I can buy whatever product and get it in two days, and that convenience is just baked into our way of operating in a soon as advertisers realize that that's inconvenience is also available for out of home. It's going to dramatically open up the floodgates and way more dollars start flowing. Wow. Jonathan can you talk? There seems to be a couple of different approaches in the industry that out of home copies are taking some on whom companies. I think more like clear channel or out front seemed to be trying to develop weld gardens where they control the product control the digital out of home selling other out of whom companies, maybe like Lamar tend to be more vendor agnostic or tend to use volt ov- enders to Salomon, Tori. What's your take on different strategies that out home companies are using you're absolutely correct? That different companies have different strategic approaches to how their inventory is going to be shared with others or who can have the rights to sell list. It makes sense. I mean for hundreds years, or however long walls have been painted with that it's it's been a certain way of vying selling in. It's been very tightly controlled managed to get into the open world of digital online and really opening it up to really anyway. One is a huge leap in terms of just thinking operating. So I get it. Where some have said we want to start as a walled garden. And then, you know, see how it goes our belief is that the more open we can make it now open with responsible parties being connected in responsible data sources being brought in but the more open. It can be it's the more surface area. You have to sell your assets the companies are coming out and trying to build their own platforms. You know, I applaud them for that effort. But ultimately to say that just that one walled garden is going to be successful. It's hard to see that over the long term, it there seems to be a network effect in out of home buying that. If I have to go three or five or twenty five different places to do one out of home digital by. That's a waste of my time. Certainly compared to what I could do online where I can just simply go. One place and make it online by and it puts the industry at a big disadvantage if we aren't somehow interconnected with respect to buy. I completely agree. And I think eventually it gets their clear channel as an example is one where they were early pioneer. And they may big investments in their radar product in doing some audience based analysis in I look at them as definitely a true pioneer. That's looking at programmatic and having it available in other Espy's in a way that I wouldn't classify them as a wall garden approach. But anyone today who is looking at their fill rates and saying how can I how can I fill these and look at all these static boards that have all this potential. I think we're seeing an easing over the last couple of years, especially of out of home company is starting to relax a little bit and say, I'm gonna either Bill myself likelier channel or Lamar saying I'm going to partner with the major other DSP, but we need to test, and we need to open it up more. Four. I wonder if as the number of digital screens in increases exponentially, if they suddenly people will be more willing to interconnect. It's one thing when you have seven thousand digital screens in New York. It's one thing to say you wanna control and have a wild garden, but if you are Jeremy mail in your building fifty thousand screens in you may not have enough sales staff to sell all those screens without getting help from some outside players. Yeah, you're spot on there. There's a lot of new inventory coming to market in. It's like basic economics where if you're demand is not keeping pace with your supply. You're just going to dilute pricing. Jonathan we've talked a little about digital signs. What about static does automated selling ever come to static boards? We believe it does. It's a slightly different value proposition in selling model just because of the printing installation involved, but at the end of the day, it's inventory, that's not filled in. And there's no technical hurdle to be able to list it and let people choose their dates than reserve space the way that they're bucking hotel rooms or doing other types of things online. It just comes down to execution and just letting the advertisers know from a from a timing perspective that sort of last minute model that we're all living in today. Yes, looks in that works for digital at a home for static. You have to understand that there's a lead time. And then there's also recognizing that if you want to change out, you know, your messaging, you're gonna you're also need to wait for that to happen. After the flight is really opt. Yes, why don't we end with that discussion about privacy? It seems like privacy is becoming more and more an issue, you know, GP which call GP DR the European Union privacy initiative, spin implemented rice moves afoot to maybe California wants to do to stop. There's talking congress potentially about a privacy Bill, but what government actions could Kerr with respect to privacy. That might impact out of home Swanee week. I was just on a panel about this exact topic at DSE a couple of weeks ago. I was on it with Richard Serra from any sea an and Dallas more from Lamar. It's an issue that right now is not a looming threats to out of home, or at least our plans for bringing audience data and and the digital on world online worlds into at a home. Ultimately, where we see this coming into play is whether you're a billboard operator owner, a real estate company, you wanna make sure that you choose your partners wisely, and for us in going with when the leading audience tells us companies place, I q there was a lot of homework that we did to make sure that they're responsibly gathering the data that there's no personally identifiable information that in some way could become a liability for us that they have you know, the seals. The certifications from groups like NAI trustee com score. Groups so GOP breath as our industry's kind of leading in Olympics, measurement company also has a big role to play here. You know, they're using mobile data on they're using all these different data sources, but they're vetting them. And they're making sure that those companies are also fall the right practices. So it starts with that starts with choosing the right partners. The second is how we use the data for us. This is about audience composition around screens. I'm not sending one add to one person because I know it's it's a woman, and I wanna put a specific at today right things that could in the future come into play where government relations could impact are like with vision. Analytics companies like add mobilize who do things the right way today in terms of they're not storing personal personally identifiable information, but they are using a camera to measure the demographics all that. We just have to make sure that the government is. Step in and say, well, you you can't even you can't even do that. But quite frankly, Ian, down more echoed. This were not that concerned that GDP are is gonna hinder Arbil to sell ads or grow the market with the audience data that we have it seems like it could impact some of the competition way more than out of home because out of home. It's an anonymous data where where you may find that it really impinges on what happens in a digital ad world and online world, you're absolutely right in and for us. I mean, that's that's something that we tell it also when we're talking to a digital agency or digital media buyer, and they're say, why would I just keep doing the Facebook Instagram, Google, we say, well, how about the study that just came out that said sixty percent of online digital ads are fraud. How about the fact that you're paying for ads that are underneath the folds that are on a page that no one's actually able to see how about how digital out of home has no box that are. Roaming, rounds being counted arm. Pression counts those disadvantages you haven't online digital. You. Don't have an out of home. And it's an important thing for short to make sure everyone recognizes that huge set of silly Boyd's. Okay. That's it for this week. Thanks for coming on the podcast Jonathan thank you enjoyed. It. This podcast was sponsored by at mobilized at mobilized, the world's number one audience intelligence platform for media owners. You can listen to episodes of the billboard inside a podcast by visiting billboard insider dot com or by subscribing to the billboard inside a podcast on itunes, or any of the usual podcast outlets. Are Email is filtered inside Ranchi mill dot com. We'd love to hear from you. Thanks for listening, and I'll be back in a couple of weeks.

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The Mando Minute Chapter 16: The Rescue

The Faithful Fangirl

41:30 min | 9 months ago

The Mando Minute Chapter 16: The Rescue

"I've heard your voice thousands of times. She can take are you. Jed i hello there and welcome to the mando minute. The special limited series of the faithful will air weekly alongside the regular faithful finger episodes. Each episode will feature a different guest for a spoiler filled discussion of the most recent episode of the mandalorian. this week. I am so excited to be discussing the season. Two finale the rescue with host of the very popular podcast sky walking through neverland. Richard insufferable ascii. Hey hey richard. And sarah speaking our language a last time you gave me express permission to say. Hey hey yeah but that ran out at midnight last night from renew your on the edit. This whole intro. I'm sorry takes you. Well yeah you wanna talk mandalorian. How much time you got all night time. You got all right well. Yeah so season. Two or season finale. Now chapter sixteen. Okay the rescue. Yes directed by pete. Read which. I was surprised at that. I would have put money that it would have been jon favreau money that would have been george lucas or day. Baloney chad george was on was he on and season one. Yeah that's when he had publicly said that the star wars holiday special was not part of the star wars canon. Wait a minute. He was onset. When rosario dawson was a asuka yes so realme season two well was have more than one. Okay i. i wouldn't put it past george beyond set once right or you know. what have you seen. His schedule is not busy. He's a joint four point. One billion dollars limited up with melody and his son. I wonder if he checks out the museum. The lucas museum from time to time i'm sure he does. Is that finished. You know downtown. La right by usc checks it out. Hops on the four zero five gets down to manhattan beach shuts on the mandalorian. I'm still mad. That chicago disclosed man. It's rioting you live ever ordinary claims chicago yet. I know mad about it. I was so excited. I was like finally a thing like this close to me because i'm about three hours south of chicago. Nope so mad about you wanna donate a trillion dollar museum. Well we're gonna make you jump through all these hoops. I eight or i can go to los angeles right exactly when we're like george come on come on carpet. Break ground anywhere you want anywhere. You want right south. Usc has the mater and matter. All right so what were some of. Your guys is favorite moments from this episode. Well gosh luke skywalker. Everybody's gonna pick luke so we can just get right to it. It try to save that for the last thing but come on now this episode. Not with us here. So what point did you know. It was luke when you could. Yeah yeah we were suspecting of course but for that i love the whole reveal of it. You know you. I see the x. Wing and richard is like on the edge of then. Yeah then you see the x. In and you see a hooded figure in black it was very reminiscent of luke's reveal returned where this hooded figure using the force randomly and then finally reveals his hood he kinda did the like the exact same move. Didn't mean yeah super cool and that the glove like. I don't know how what what did you feel. Jests about like his reveal his slow. I loved it because i saw the x. Wing commit in my mind. I was like okay. It's lugar soka. And i knew it probably wasn't soka but that was just where my mind immediately went because the week before when talking with john's narrow as like okay. It's either gonna be luke or a cal. kostas. I kinda decided like in my heart of hearts. I want it to be luke. But they said they weren't pulling the skywalker stuff. So i was like all right. Well it's not going be luke. Maybe it's a new jeddah. Maybe somebody we haven't heard before and so that speculations been going for a while and an excellent came. And i was like we'll just because it's an x wing doesn't necessarily mean that it's luke says trying to talk myself out of it because it didn't want to be appointed if it wasn't luke and you're right. The way that he came in was very much like his return of the djeddai entrance and so even before they showed the green light. Saber i was like i think that's the way that he was moving. And just the way that everything was shot was just really reminding me of that moment. Like you said of Okay i like so get excited. I think it's luke. I really hope. So it's gotta be. And then i saw part of the outfit unlike that's definitely his return of jeddah outfit okay and then. There's the lightsaber. Just that single green. You know blade and i was like. Oh luke has green light. Saber like okay. This is oh my gosh. They're actually doing at that point. I think i started cheering. And then he's mountain these dark well. They've been very good at sound references. And we see slade one those the same sound effects we here in the empire strikes back. And when luke's excellent flew by. That was the same engine wine that you heard from his awesome. I'm not as good with some of the sound. cues fats. Awesome good at connecting the original films with those one little squeak or one little anything one. Little lightsaber sound effect. Everything always pull from up. I'll that they've used earlier just to connect you with that character. On spatial nazi can keep it all concise two in the same universe. Yeah yeah we had so many arguments with people who said it's going to be luke iota call to look no he didn't jon favreau dave felonious specifically said they would not talion with the skywalker song so not going to be look. It's it's going to be azra yup. Everyone's like okay. You were right. I was wrong. I followed your same logic to richard. I was specifically said that this was going to be outside of these skywalker. Saga that we shouldn't expect to see any of those characters and so i didn't curb those expectations and then yes when it happened it was awesome host surprisingly for me. It wasn't until our two d two came around. That's when i cried. That was like the that. Got me emotionally because i think i was just so shocked to see lucan so excited and then when are two came around us to with we thought which we should have known are two is going to be coming in his x wing. He needs is astro mac and needs to be. You are so caught up in. Luke mowing down all these dog. Trippers eighty even think about it now not at all and then when you see the reveal and arches looking at grow going. Didn't i see the temple. I'm totally i told me. I totally think that they knew each other. Yeah oh. I'm sure. I'm sure i me too. I think that's so cool. Kids are they. Don't forget nothing. Like i think it wasn't in my personal opinion. It wasn't until grow. Gusau are too that he finally felt okay enough to go with luke because he was like you know they have their moment in and mando puts him down he's holding onto mando's leg and then artem comes around and he kinda beeps and that's when grew kind of walks over artist beep at him and grow goose. Who like they're talking. They they know each other and that's when he's like okay now. I feel comfortable enough. That i can go your shiny i wanna play with. I mean it could have very much been that too. I guess i didn't think of that. That's what most people were saying. And then it wasn't until our talk we have like zoom with the walkers that evening that it comes out and someone brought that up. Oh aren't you probably knew grogan and it's like well that makes a whole lot of sense archer grow going. You're not yoda. You're not yet all which only leads to one other creature of your species lure you. I came back. Everyone was dead. What happens it's all been raised in stolen. I don't know where what is anymore. I want to do that. Can't get enough of google being back at some point. They're going to do us. Revenge of the set special edition and you grew every guy. He's in the jet. I in the training room that was talking clones attack of the clones. As well i mean i think you could put grow goo to episode one really. Yep maybe yadel is holding whom interesting Behind share it's right there. Disney come on. I can see so other big thing from this episode is the showdown for the dark sabre. What what what are your thoughts on din now now having it well first of all i loved how are bad. Guy muff gideon mufti. I'm sorry i'm like it's the afternoon about the bag. I'm off gideon. Just kind of you know is three. Steps ahead of our heros. Because he's very intelligent and that just makes for a very forbidding bad guy and so the fact that he knew the power of the dark sabre and how he manipulated the situation where mando would have to fight him and no matter if you lost or won that fight he won. Yeah yeah you would think that bogotanos. We're just want to shove it in mob gideon's face facing go. No i'm good. I'll take it and then later on say okay really I can't take this. But i just wanted to throw this back and yeah good point. Yeah i was surprised how much of that history of the darker he knew. Because i'd heard a theory that he stole it from her. That i kind of enjoyed the explains why she was so you know where whereas a and whereas it does if she had lost it in battle maybe she wouldn't have been searching as hard for it. She would have thought she was worried. Because she lost it legitimately going back to star wars rebels. I think she got the dark sabre then realized i didn't really win this. Is that really mine. So she's been covering this for years now and i think he had moth getting stolen from her way back. When storyline out in this episode some reasons happened and she lost it. Got it and we'll see that somehow somewhere in a comic book or video game or card look up uncle buck up there. You go very explain that. So did you find that. Showdown between did. Did you find that. Satisfying between din and market ian. Oh yeah i did you have these two characters sparring with things other than light. Sabers give a whole new unique. Twist pleasant sequence. Yeah plus the the best gar. Steel spikes yeah spike. A weapon. we've only ever seen that other one time. So it's kind of cool to see this new weapon being utilized against a sabre so that was neat and we already had a lot of action this episode so for me it felt like enough but it sounds like just. You may have another opinion. It was one of those things where i think it was. I wanted. Bow and markian to face often showdown. And i'd been predicting that for a while leading up to it so when it was mando at marketing i was like oh interesting and it was cool but the speed versus the dark saber. Because you're right. We saw it kind of earlier young. Oh and i'm curious on thoughts so one of the big things that i didn't notice it immediately at first but then it kind of stuck out to me as the episode went on when they infiltrated the ship. You had mando and a group of women and you. You said you didn't catch this early on. Or what did you yet early on. It didn't quite click for me. That i'm like oh wait a minute. The entire strike team is mando. He's really just kind of there causing the distraction but it's a group of women like it was one of the things going on it didn't stick out to how cool it important that moment was it. Just it felt very natural which was exciting. You know like in the end game and see all the women get like okay. There's there's your big heroic women shop which is which is great but the fact that the story was primary in this sequence and not so much the who the characters were. I think that's great storytelling. Just i had the same reaction. Yeah and you to raise your by the same reaction where halfway through the scene where they're shooting out people. I'm like oh well together. You know like especially because a lot of the mandalorian that we've seen so far is a lot of meals you know in in a lotta the central roles so the fact that you know all of a sudden here in this final episode you get these four women altogether that was super cool and a nice thing to see ya and i loved it. They had each other's back. There's a moment where car her gun gems and so i think it was was like. Hey don't worry. I'll cover you or or hey cover me because a lotta times. Women are perceived as being always being in competition with each other and yeah it kind of tradition. We're talking about this. That throughout the whole of this series earliest a season specifically never really saw that any time women were together. They were always like very cooperative and supportive which was very exciting. Definitely after agree we are all big deep into its star wars fans. Do you guys have anybody in your life that you would call like a casual fat friends that you have or family members that really only watch the movies and don't dive deep into the lower and just kind of like casually enjoy everything but then also watched the mandalorian. Y'all yes everyone does which. And it's kinda fun because they'll you'll be watching the show with them and like. Why are you so excited. It's a big twilight up there. Why are you so excited about that. Why jumping up and down because you see the pulse rifle. What does all this mean the pot deposit and explain to them. Why all the stuff ties in to the mandalorian. Yeah yeah act. Like i think kelly turquel from the neverland clubhouse she she definitely like got into star wars through the mandalorian really. She hasn't really been into star wars other than that. She just saw the art expect for the first time a few months ago eight. So it's fun to talk with them and say okay what you let me tell you what you just saw that friend that you get the phone calls from people were like. Okay wait a minute what just happened. What do i need to do what i need to watch. So so ballistic over these big giant white spiders those creeks and we saw those and star wars rebels and we saw them in production paintings from ralph macquarie in one thousand nine hundred eighty and two hours. Like i'm sorry. I called a swimming. You bring this up. Because i just got a text this past week from a friend who. He's he was watching. It was just really funny. Hold on let me try to find it. And we have discussions on zoom every friday night where everyone gets together and we just go crazy about discussing the episode and the you get some people say no. I don't who's this orange girl with the things coming out of her head and white light sabers. Now why is she the. Don't make plans that weekend. Yeah so so. My friend texted me after friday's episode and said two things. What was the deal with the scene at the end. Who did he kill. And what other than spinoff ad was the significant it so he didn't know who could fortuna really didn't put it together. Even though he's he's watched the movies is a fan of the movies and stuff he just one of those who really watches over and over. You know like us. So that is really funny. Because one of my casual friends bailey. East have had on the show before one of her big takeaways from it was that as a casual fans. She said she was really excited. That it was luke who showed up at the end because she knows luke and trusts luke and she's like i don't think they actually introduced him like does anybody. There actually know who he is. I don't know he just kinda popped up and said i'm a jet i. The kid called me. And so i'm going to train him and nobody said hi. I'm luke skywalker here to rescue you. Like there wasn't any of that she's like i know who lucas so immediately trusted him so i didn't really think anything of it. At first that you know grocery would be safe with him because it was somebody like ezra or cow. The only reason i know those names. Because you've talked about it on your podcast. I don't know who they are. And so be another person where i'm like wait. Am i supposed to know who this person is. Are they supposed to know this person is i. It would have lost me very quickly in that really pivotal moment to have somebody other than luke show up so when she kind of said that i was like oh i guess that does make perfect sense from a production standpoint. If you're also trying to appeal to a wider audience definitely even with social media had been someone like ezra you may not have known who was in the beginning but look on any page in. It would break it down like five minutes. So it's a fifty fifty split. You can appeal to the people who have no idea who the characters are outside the film or he could appeal to the die hard star wars fans and have it be as room right or are going deep deep deep and go to cal who i know. He's part of the jet. I order no. He played the joker character. And gotham right. Well also Hinting along those lines like luke. Yes he's like you say luke skywalker and most people even if they haven't seen star wars is name recognition software as we got in chapter thirteen. The janai with a soga. You've got a feel for what happens. When a lot of deep star wars fans know who she is in love asuka and yet other people are like well. Who is this. And i wanna learn more and then all of a sudden you get a whole bunch of people watching star wars rebels and star wars clone wars for the first time because they wanted to know more about this interesting character. So if you make the character interesting enough even if you haven't heard of them then people are excited to go check out more. I don't want them to start talking. I don't wanna say talking down as the star wars fans but not really considering them in the big picture when you're going to give us characters just to appeal to everybody. Instead of giving us character that would naturally fit in the story like ezra would naturally fit into the storyline. And we're going to see more of his story line coming up in the soka series spinoff from the mandalorian. I wanna see them considering us more than the bigger bigger audience and put grow. Go in there. They don't care who the looking at well. That's true but on another consideration with luke is the fact. Is once you tie baby. Yoda grow goo to luke. Then you know where the story is heading. And it's not right so that kind of was my like seeing luke. My only thing was well. We know where his story ends. And we don't really know between. I know and the force awakens. We have a. We have a little bit of the flashbacks right but the point is it kind of saddened me that i hear that i knew the ending versus just a whole wide like picking up heir to the empire for the first time and being like. Oh wow where can this story. Go with luke skywalker and lan their key ki. You know. that's the difference now. We don't know how grow got out of there. We did either so i. I'm not going to kill the one character that are worth fandom and bringing them so much money in and merchandising i think roget's ben solo going nuts and said i saw this back the temple by the anikin amount. You're not going to have a happy ending. So i'm gonna take off right now talking to bake some. Yeah comic right. I do help. The i do kind of want a bridge between this where we see luke here and where we see him leading up to the force awakens like i would like to see basically up until kylo in the knights of ren destroy the new order. Will we have a new series coming our way. eleven now. I'm sure there a squeeze storyline in somewhere. I i kinda hope because you know seeing a luke in his prime i really. I didn't realize how much i wanted that. Until i saw him. Just most through all of those dark troopers. I'm a girl at heart. i love light. Sabers favorite thing and star worse. You know luke was kind of my first jet. I did watch the original trilogy. When i was a kid. i was so young. I don't remember the first time. I saw it but that was what captured. My imagination was was. The lightsaber is inside. More luke in his jet. I prime beaten stuff up. Labour's people thought t- more down those dr pursue easily. Our of luke skywalker if he can mow down his whole squadron. Full dark drivers. You know this. This is very very power exactly. I loved the comparison. That i've seen people do luke's moment here and darth vader's moment in rogue one. Yeah oh yeah you see a lot of those connections. The connection i saw was more of the phantom menace when obi wan and kwai gone where mowing down. All those battle droid android decades. Oh yeah like the opening scene. Yeah i could see that honestly for me. Like i was so into the story. I didn't connect connected with anything. I just thought it was really amazing in into it and we'll sit. There was a moment earlier on. And i don't like that. I had this thought why was watching the episode. Because it's very like. I don't wanna have sauce of the outside world in my head when i'm enjoying star wars in this way but early way early on in the episode when mando and boba show up and recruit bow and her cannot remember that character's name ever for the life of me but the other man does go re yes when casa and boba fett started getting into it. My first thought was literally. Oh my goodness. I really hope that this fight ends in a draw or something like i don't want this girl to kick boba effects but because i don't want to hear the whining on the internet about boba fett is so precious to so many people so i understand that and i could understand people being upset seeing him get his butt kicked by like quote unquote a woman in i so i was kind of happy that ended in a draw but i was very upset. That had that thought even to begin with is a fearsome bounty hunter. We've known that since nineteen eighty and we want to keep the lor going and it doesn't matter male female. We don't want his but been kicked by anyway in our mind. That background story of how powerful and strong this character is right. And i think we got a lot of that in chapter the tragedy. Some like that was amazing to see bowe fat and senic kicking some but there. Yeah and seeing that their own in hand to hand combat one on one. You wanted to build a fat. Yeah at least not. I don't win or a draw. Maybe for as long as he was got a little rusty. But still. I wanna see boba fett when a fight. No matter who it is it could be the strongest man the world. I still wanna see what went. And so i was kind of happy that that didn't happen. And then. I think everybody was so excited about luke that i'm like okay. We didn't. We didn't talk about that moment. Okay cold out. Those big of a deal as i feared it might be but it was still. I mean just a great fight between two people who know how to fight. Yeah yes and that cost had gone for. She knows how to pose on every shot of her. She was standing in the action. Figure the where do you think season three is had. I was honestly a little surprised that grew left. Let's yeah but he's not gone. Oh yeah not mando almost to. How many did promise to the audience. That i will see you again. Right right i do. I feel like they're going to follow boca ten and commandos story at the beginning of the season. At least that's what i think they're going and then they won't do much with luke because he's too precious so they can't show him too much. Plus it would cost too much the whole series. Not based on he and now in grogan. What's the mandalorian always developing as a as a character. So i think it's i didn't have a problem with him saying goodbye to grow goo for a while because now we can get back to you. Another story line. A lot of tv series will do this at the very end of the episode. We're going to tie everything up next season to start on a whole new adventure just like the clone wars dead for the final season. Oh yeah alley so good. It's good to. I wanna see mandalorian the series down on its own having to go back to grow goo and honestly chapter fifteen the believer. We did get a whole episode without grogan. It was that everyone say where's drago. No yeah i didn't either. Yeah i came up a lot during discussions okay. Well i didn't feel his loss at all i was. I think after watching the episode is kind of like oh yeah growing. It wasn't in that one. But i had a lot of fun watching it. Yeah i didn't notice. Kroger wasn't in it until john had pointed it out to me on because he was my guest last week on minute and i didn't realize until he pointed out and i was like. Oh oh yeah he. Yeah he wasn't. Oh my goodness. I miss him. I feel so bad. That's that's good. I'm and i want to see more of that. This really really broaden out mandalorian story because a lot of people were saying is like the the grow goo story with mandalorian as a co sidekick right. I mean. I was all for putting baby. Grow goo getting him a little mando sue and teaching him how to be a mandalorian right in that for three more seasons. But i do like where they're headed. They tell better stories than i do. Kinda wouldn't mind seeing that scar output like but he little cutouts for his ears such a fan votes around the internet. That i see every so often of baby goo goo the manno outfit and it just makes me happy. All that'd be we didn't on amazon's and this your practice suits picking up a bigger outfit. Yes i wonder. How much will i guess. Yoda's a bit bigger. So i guess they grow a bit in insides for that species. So what are your thoughts on the good by this big moment at the end tutors. Hanging on demand does leg. Oh not tore my heart out. That's gonna be a co op. That's going to be opposed. It's going to be on lunchboxes. You'll breakfast cereal based on john's leg. Well also i mean dinh's saves grow gutu because moss gideon's about shoot him or he wasn't shooting manno dives eve him all my gosh. I know that's the moment previous but still like just there's a lot there was like so many cool moments in this episode. All anyone can talk about as luke. Watch no favorite non luke moment. Oh i like the space battle in the beginning between the lambda shuttle and slave one. Yeah one in combat. That was so much fun. i love. See the tie fighters shoot out of that shoot like how they're launched in a space that was like. Oh put this in a theme park right now make you. Yes and one of my. I kind of forgot that it was in this episode I feel really bad. That pretty much essentially wants luke showed up. I kind of forgot everything else. That happened But yeah earlier on when they did board that landed shuttle and the the pilot took dr pershing kinda hostage and he's like bathing car dune into shooting him. It was. oh. I don't have the exact dialogue. You're gonna wish you never left. All i saw the tear. You want to know what else i saw. I saw your planet destroyed. I was on the death star mature. You think funny. Do you know how many millions were killed on those bases as the galaxy cheered. Let's dance destroying your planet was a small price to pay to rid the galaxy of terrorism. Oh my the whole time. I was just like what. Oh i've never like hated a character. So like i thought the guy from the previous episode the believer the one who baited mayfield. I didn't think hated anybody more than him. This guy was like. Oh how dare characters that were. On their death star we spent so much time with space stations and star wars return of the jedi. Oh you were on that space station. I wanna just like in certain point of view. They had a lot of stories of characters who were been on the death star. It's stars right. Yeah and you could cut that tension with a dark sabre night. Yeah oh my gosh. It was such a good scene because he i love how. She's like darwich one because she said that that was like that. Was you said what. I was thinking. Girl unreal. i'm so glad you shot him. Because i was i was about ready to. Where did she shoot him. Right smack dab in the middle of the face where he deserved now. What happened to dr pershing do did i miss it or do we know so. Yeah so he was in the next scene where they were planning their mission. But i'm assuming that dr pershing went off with boba fett ship because he was on the slave one right. So and he didn't go with the mission on the imperial cruiser. So you went up of boba fett but then we don't see him again so let me. Maybe dropped him off. I don't know back to camino. Yeah this is okay. This is where i was made a. Tell me more about my history right. Pershing a cloning doctor. That's interesting yeah. He's got a lot to answer for. They've got a connection there fisher who i didn't even think of that. Person is one of the architects for smoke. We think all. I'm sure they're bringing him in talking about cloning he's going to be wrapped up in that storyline and he's got an smoke has got some new blood in them Midi am counts. I loved that. I thought that was the most clever way i was like. If you can't see many chlorine because that'll make people mad you say m counts knows who no no i just wanted to say big chlorine. Everyone meetings laurie. Laurie get over it. Committee chlorine you don't like it go watch something else. Governor is on. Cbs all access. Who go This is hilarious. I won't take too much of your time. Any other final thoughts on this episode or just on the season as a whole well so i will mention that you know we got our little post credits scene and i am excited that finnick. It looks like we'll be having a very prominent role in the book of boba fett. I'm looking forward to her more than boba. Fett honestly in the book and she'll be on bad batch to definitely get into that character. that's exciting. yeah and i. I'm very much thinking of cost playing the that all stare you'd be. Oh yes you look amazing. I just don't know what we're gonna do. Between now and mando season three and vision arco keeping be arbel marble verse for awhile. Wait so richard have you. You've just this boba fett before it. Right django django boba. I mean in my mind. I was like oh my gosh. Couples costs play. Richard as roma's and sarah as fenick causley as a character that you see a thousand other. Yeah that's true. Here's our unique. This'll be a unique thing because it would be a you do also a pairing couple so that that would work just like when we caused played. Sarah was slave labor job with a hut that works. See a billion what was two thousand twelve billion slave labor but you didn't see slave lazy job with the no putin in rome. Yeah salacious from. We walk in puppet from say. I didn't know i knew who it is. But i like. I was picturing a full-sized human dressed as the mckiness. Actually a beanie baby. Yeah he had to that. One hand is prospective. Makes more sense to me. I had a pa system underneath the costume. I would have java sound effects and salacious chrome laughs. That's amazing. I don't think i've seen pictures of this boy. Aeko asked me that mandeville. I send the facebook group. Is it all rolls through something celebration. Six or on youtube. Apparently there's a video call funny java. that's me talk. Show notes will have told me about it and we don't know who took the video right. I'll find it. I'll find it in a league please. I've never seen it will make you guys so much for being on the show and having this discussion with me and and having fun to speak out about this episode our listeners want to connect with you where can they find you. You can find us at sky walking through neverland dot com where we have all of our podcasting network as well as a lot of fun articles. We keep up with all the disney plus things going on. We share all that information each week and every friday night with the sky walkers do pop culture live trivia game at six thirty pm time. Just expect to see you there next friday as christmas action. I might have a more tonight. January first we're gonna pick up our pop culture trivia we've had star wars scattered or disney categories marvel categories. Chris is movie castles. Nubia harry potter. We've had pixar pop culture pop culture. We quiz you about it and those are really fun. I popped in on a couple of them but sometimes being here in the midwest. My schedule doesn't always link up. The gets a bit later here but yeah the the trivia nights are fun zoom calls. I am so sad. I only got to do one. Zoom call because it was much fine. We talk about the mandalorian. Every friday nights at seven forty five pm. We'll probably continue that for one division or one. Yeah we'll do one sometime next week on the disney gallery special with e behind the scenes at season two then we'll go into one division and that starts up january fifteenth on disney plus a day before my birthday disney one. Well thank you guys so so much for being here. It was truly an honor. And i had an absolute blast. Yeah so did we. It's a great pleasure to call you our friend. Oh happy holidays to you and to all of your listeners. You yes this is the way. Thank farouq richard. They should ask you for these. Things are not jimmy. Johns please. And i saw jon favreau and i'd like i'll give them fighting and he looked at me. This really awful look like went to the backstage name. Arby just muscle john. Bevere awda party runs was waiting for his star. Wars days i am. I have not met john favreau. Just wanna talk jingle jangle. What am i guilty. Pleasure shows his riverdale and so jingle means something very different on riverdale. Y'all gonna be doing to capture your face. I see the millennium. That's what everybody says like you're gonna cry because we all cried one of our friends who just couldn't stop screaming screaming. Maybe not. Maybe there was thinner where we the body shape. Apparently john says high. You'll have we said. Hey hey y'all know who was from it a hey. Hey it is very much richard. Serra the minute is intended for entertainment and information. Only any sounds music. In clips played during this podcast are the property of their copyright holders.

luke mando luke skywalker jon favreau jeddah chad george lucas museum richard chicago dave felonious Usc grogan Gusau yadel Guy muff gideon mufti gideon ezra markian kelly turquel
Tuesday, Jan. 12: Lil Nas X, Ralph Macchio and William Zabka

The View

37:24 min | 9 months ago

Tuesday, Jan. 12: Lil Nas X, Ralph Macchio and William Zabka

"Subscribe to our podcast to get hot topics delivered every afternoon. And while you're at it rate us and labor review a brand new darks lock right now responsible party as the house pushes for a second impeachment. President trump meets with his vp. For the first time since the capital insurrection with terrifying reports of future armed protests and threats against biden's inauguration should trump pants and politicians backing false claims of a rigged. Election be held accountable. And he's the music superstar with the longest running number one song in us history little nasdaq's on his journey to give the lgbtq community a major voice in rab plus routh macchia williams talk about their journey from perotti kids to the binge-watching obsession cobra. Kai here come hot topics with whoopie. Sarah she bihar sunny hostage in and meghan mccain. Now let's get things started. Well hello and welcome to the view. The house is going forward with the second impeachment of you know who and yesterday he met with his vp. Mike pence for the first time since domestic terrorists stormed the capital now there are also reports of armed protests being planned. The state capitals and threats against biden's inauguration. The whole mess believe me started with his lies about a rigged election. You know he. He's saying that you know this didn't it wasn't right the way it happened and i just i don't know one hundred and forty seven members of congress support this so i feel like they should be held accountable too because they've been putting into that lie. Do you think. Do i have a point in my crazy sarah. What do you think you are not crazy. We'll be. I do think there need to be punishment. But there's a distinct line for me so the congress members who voted against the electoral college results. I think they're consequence needs to come in the form of elections when they are up for re election. Their constituents need to decide for the people that stoked the violence and raised their fists and asked people to storm the capital. They deserve to be punished. Just like trump does my concern. Right now is win. The punishments com. Not if they come. Because right now i feel like with trump and his his the angry mob of many of his followers. I think they always konya west. The moment like right now. We have a new administration coming in and the tooth. The focus right now needs to be on the inauguration day. The safety across the country leading up to inauguration and january twentieth. We're gonna have three former presidents there. We've seen what happens when they don't prepare and that happened the other day. I also think the attention needs to be on the virus. Joe biden. President-elect biden spoke the other day and he talked about his concerns about the resources in time that the senate congress in general would be attending to this right now he really wants to push through cabinet members. He wants to get his attention. And and i tend to agree that there needs to be punishments. Do they need to be right now. Sucking the air out of the room with everything else going on. I think they need to be delayed slightly but lately punished for joy. Would what do you think of all of this. Which you're feeling. Yeah well you know. Remember when when they democrats wanted to impeach him the. I tried to impeach him the first time they did. Actually they just didn't convict. Because people like susan collins said oh he learned his lesson well. Obviously he didn't learn his lesson. He got worse the fact that they did not convict led him to be completely brazen and arrogant about what his next moves which led us to the other day at the capitol. You know so. They need to be sanctioned and expelled. I think these eight senators one hundred and thirty nine congressman who continue to hold onto the lie and the sedition implications. Therein should be expelled from congress. I just wanted to say one thing about about the congress right now. You know the old saw. I guess you could call it. Is that a democrats fall in love. And republicans fall in line. I think meghan said that. And i think it's basically a truism and what you have here is exhibited with mike pence. Here's a guy who basically they recall in his hanging. Because president trump said he was not cooperating with the lie and then he was going to go and he was going to confirm the fact. That joe biden won the election and yet he is now unable or unwilling to invoke the twenty fifth amendment because what the republicans fall in line has brought us to this point. I'm looking at you mitch mcconnell. I'm looking at you lindsey graham. I'm looking at you kevin mccarthy. I'm looking at you. Mike pence they fell in line to the detriment of the united states constitution and the american democracy that we have been enjoying low these many years all right and sunny when you hear all of this. What's what's your thought i. I think that it's an honor and a privilege to serve your country in the senate and in the house and there's just no question that the fourteenth amendment of our constitution makes it very clear that no person shall shall be a senator or representative if you've engaged in insurrection rebellion against our country. And you can't give aid or comfort to the enemies thereof and. I think it's pretty clear after wednesday's events that republican senators josh hawley of missouri. And senator ted cruz of texas have violated their oath to the constitution and have violated the fourteenth amendment by conspiring with domestic terrorists by inciting an insurrection. It's very clear that i believe on january third. I think it was that senator cruz was giving a speech and screaming and yelling. That we will not go quietly into the night I think we saw that picture of josh. How lee you know. Raising his his fist and solidarity with insurrectionist right before they stormed the capital and during the insurrection in fact my understanding is that president trump was calling senators asking them to continue to stall the electoral college certification. Rudy giuliani in fact was trying to reach. Senator tuber ville and left a message with another senator and that that message was leaked and was reported on a begging people to to continue to interfere with the electoral certification and as joy mentioned. I think it was eight senators. Who objected and one hundred and thirty nine representatives objected and all of them then violated the fourteenth amendment and should be expelled from their positions. There's just no question about it are so megan we've come back. I'll come to you when it take a quick break. We'll be right back still ahead. Sex at a certain age with the return of the iconic series sex in the city with the oj cast still be a turn on for viewers and which starred didn't get back in bed for the report. Still ahead grammy winning superstar lil nasdaq's plus cobra kai stars ralph macho and williams abkah. Welcome back right before we went on air. You know who spoke on the white house lawn about the push to impeach him. Take a look as far as this is concerned we want. No violence never violence. We want absolutely no violence and on the impeachment. It's really a continuation of the greatest which in the history of politics. It's ridiculous it's absolutely ridiculous. Impeachment is causing tremendous anger at. You're doing it and it's really a terrible thing that they're doing four nancy pelosi and chuck schumer to continue on this path. I think it's causing tremendous danger to our country and it's causing tremendous anger. I want no violence. So i i don't know what's your take on all this so he apparently also said that his he takes no responsibility for what happened at the capitol. He doesn't believe that his Any of his language or anything he said incited anything and honestly the first thing i thought was a jack kerouac quote. Which is there's no end to this madness and american sadness american madness sadness. I mean this is just it's absolutely lunacy. That was my first reaction originally after the attack on capitol hill. We're talking about sending ten thousand. New troops in for the inauguration of president biden. They're talking about a police departments all over the country about possible attacks domestic attacks on every capital in all fifty states from domestic terrorists. We are living in a time that it feels like we're in a banana republic and i don't use verbiage like this at all and i certainly haven't used it in four years ronald reagan said that freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction we're talking about the possible disruption of the peaceful transfer of power. Which as i have said before is the bedrock that makes us americans. If he can't take some responsibility. I don't understand why he's not being dragged out by his toes by mitch mcconnell. I it's a joy. Echoing each other on the show right now. But i i have to the thing that i have to live with right now and this isn't about me but i haven't avatar for so. Many republicans in the country is that it doesn't matter what might principles are. It doesn't matter that i was raised a reagan conservative. It doesn't matter that. I've spent my entire life in career. Espousing for one form of the way that i believe. Government and conservative principles should lead this country. All that matters is now. I'm the freak and viking helmet outside of the capitol and the one that stormed inside. That's what all of us are having to deal with. And for those of us that are the real conservatives that are gonna have to deal with this mess and pick up the ashes and somehow move forward. I don't understand why people on capitol hill aren't demanding that this end because as long as we take no culpability for what happened and i say we as the collective republican party. There is no future for this party. There is none if the presents going to keep saying things like that. And we're not going to hold them accountable. This is dead and we can call it over. Actually it's not because people like me who aren't octogenarians are going to be able to pick it up and hopefully move forward one way or the other because i still on the bill buckley conservative but watching that. It's disgraceful and it just. I don't know how much more of this everyone can take. As i keep saying i'm sorry to be so upset. But it's just we're living in twilight zone. Yes we are. i put out so i don't. I tweet occasionally butt. Somebody put this out in amrita t you imagine nine eleven. Only no press conferences explaining what happened or what was going on and a third of the congress expressing sympathy without kedah an urging us to forget the attack in the name of unity. That's what's happening and this idea. Then you know we are sitting and you know he's in charge of everything who's in charge of the department of justice right now. Who in charge. There's no one in charge except no him. No so that's kind of in charge. Well okay well. That means he's nothing's going to happen. See the problem here is. It's all in his hands right now and the fact that no one can do anything and the fact that i just wanna finish the fact that no one is saying you know. Sedition means going against the united states of america. Somebody needs to say that. To clarence thomas wife who also was giving them you know what is the word you said a joy when they're giving them eight eight eight hundred eight hundred. Yeah incomparable by writing an aid and comfort you know and all of those folks sitting there knowing that this is a lie. They are for me. This is treason. You know that this is. This has been predicated on a lie the entire time. And y'all just sit there and let it happen. You are the problem they need to get your out and then go get him out. Yes you were saying but notice. I was just noticed. One thing about the speech that he gave the thing that we just heard. There's a tremendous amount of anger on the impeachment. That is yet another dog whistle to his beija. Lebanese people are to go out and cause trouble and become violent. Aren't you angry that they're doing this to me. Those are the little whistles he gives to people so he's not on twitter so he's on television doing it joy. Can i just say and really quick needs to be held accountable for this to don't let a vodka and charitable and just because they are not saying anything right now. Apparently they're in hiding. Do not let these people off the hook. For what if. God forbid us more violence and i pray from the bottom of my soul there is but if there is all of these people need to be held accountable and again the reason why i never sounded the five fire alarm before this point in time is because i always thought maybe there was a moment when it would be an absolute utter cataclysmic constitutional emergency which is where we truly are at right now. Don't let anybody off the hook. I beg of everyone. Well this is americans against americans. We are now fighting each other forgetting about the country. This is america. We don't do this. We can fight verbally but this idea of having to get down to fight with people with the hand you tell me you gonna shoot me. You're gonna do this to me. When did that. When did that become okay. And i'm talking all those people sitting in that room all those senators and conversely. When did it become ok for y'all sit back while people threaten the lives of people you work with every day. When was that the american way to go. When did that become the way that this country point and we always so other. People say we don't do that and here we are. You are sitting and you're letting it happen. You know what needs to be done and you're leading it happen you. Your silence makes this okay. We'll be right back. You can still get your self care package at deal. Your deal dot com. We've partnered with vendors for half up that health and wellness products. We could all use right now so get to view your deal dot com now. Welcome back people are always looking for all the diversions. They can find these so a lot of sex in the city. Fans were very happy to see. The new trail of that reunites all the original stars. Except kim cottrell who didn't sign back on. But some wonder whether you know you know people are going to embrace this as they did in the past. I'm gonna ask you i. I guess. I should ask you sunny. Are you ready for this. Yes i am good sex in the city about you. Tire season And book movies. So now i'm not i'm not i'm not interested in. I never was interested in this show. But i mean i hate to say that because i'm sure it's a very good show. It's just not my cup of tea. But i think that they need to reboot it for the women in their fifties and let centrally are nixon lead the way as the lesbian and the group and maybe all. The girls can experiment with lesbianism in the fifties. That would make an interesting show. Just just to be have a crush on mr big when you were in your fifties me a break. I'm tired of that. Right megan andy thoughts. Watch this show in high school and college and it went off the air when i was a freshman in college. It's been a long time since this show's been on. I'm not really interested in any shows where they show a depiction of new york without any black people or hispanic people or any minorities whatsoever. I think this show could really evolve into the future and a lot of ways. There's also been criticism of it that it's not by like it's like negative towards bisexual people like. I think there's a lot of lucien this show could take. I thought girls was much better representation even though they had similar issues of what actual new york city is like they do. Need black richard serra. We'll maybe they will add. Maybe there will be black people. Maybe they'll reinvent the little thing. But i feel like as over kai fan. If we can get into men in their fifties doing karate we can get into women in their fifties having some sexy time. so i'm on board. Yeah but you know. I will just read book. Oh go ahead go ahead. I was just going to say. I will put out that. Golden girls blanche dubois had hundred and sixty five sexual partners. You know blanche. Dorothy rose and severe dominated the miami dating scene sophia slept with twenty five men. Rose slept with thirty and darkly slept with forty. Three men don't let anybody tell you know sex after fifty. I'm the online comments. The online combines so augist as if women all of a sudden close up shop when they hit fifty which is ridiculous a lot of them are just coming into their roles. They finally found that g spots with the body. All out guy who has some show is the women close up shop when made are not interested in the people who are interested in. That's the in any case we're gonna go find. Our spots will be right back. Do you time grammy winner. Low nasdaq's is sharing how his groundbreaking journey is taking him beyond old town road and his message to the young generation of americans. Next staying informed never been more. Get information is coming at us faster than ever. So how do you make sense of. It'll start here. hey. I'm brad milkey from abc news. In every weekday we will break down the latest headlines in just twenty minutes straightforward reporting dynamic interviews and analysis from experts. You can trust always credible always solid. Start here from news twenty minutes every weekday when you're smart speaker or your favorite podcast app. Thank you hand. That was the longest running number one song in us history. All town road by the groundbreaking artists and two time grammy winner. Who's made a lot of history at just twenty one years. Oh please welcome little nas x. Lana zak was happening. Welcome to the view. D here are you. I'm here to promote my little book seats for country. I'm just out here. you know. It's kind of amazing. I love the fact that you've written this bug. Tell me how is all of this on your sisters floor one point. Nineteen you write this song and then next thing you know you are everywhere. And it's kind of fabulous. Are you having a good time. Are you enjoying it and building to where you want to get to. Are you having a good time. I'm having a really great time. You know. I am learning a lot more about life in just you know. He's going through the ups and downs and meeting. So many great people that have come into my life since everything is popped off and just for the opportunities that just keep happening first of all. I love your hair. Let me also ask you this. You were one of the first artists to go viral on tiktok. And you're very savvy with social media but you also have a way of really bridging generations and cultures. You invited billy ray cyrus onto the old town road remix and the michael j. fox cameo in your holiday trailer is that a conscious effort to reach people of all demographics generations. One hundred percent. I'm influenced a lot by pop kosher from all different time periods so i tried to bring that together with whatever i'm doing within my own art you know. Well i am a huge fan of old town road like the rest of the planet. And i actually sing a version of the by song to my daughter. She loves it. She just goes eight crazy every time i play it. And i'm so thrilled to hear that. You're releasing a children's book that combines your love of music fashion and all things country what made you want to write a children's book and my the first person to tell you that Old town road is a good lullaby. My god Wish you were. I wish you were but Yeah i've been. I've been told a couple of times. Well i love the messages of inclusivity and individuality in the book and you publicly came out as gay jew. June two thousand nineteen just as your career was taking off and you said you originally planned to die with the secret and that since coming out your support has waned somewhat among hip hop supporters. Why was it important for you to go public when you did. I guess i definitely wanted to be authentic from the start of my career and also become more comfortable in confident in myself so i feel that was bandaged that needed to be ripped off to get to that place. I love your hair. Tow and makes me feel a little inadequate as a redhead. Especially in coverted. Since i haven't got access to the to the bottle as easily you look good. So let's do this. You said that you stay away from politics because it represses you. It is depressing sometimes as a teen. It was frustrating. You say to see protests over police brutality mass shootings and have have nothing changed. Things do change but there so slow that it's very frustrating after recent events and the racial reckoning of last summer. Do you still feel that way or is it something you want to be more involved with or do you feel it's happening at all. I definitely want to be more involved for the simple fact that i now have a platform and i can really have influence over what people see in here and think about everything that's going on so you know even though it's definitely depressing sometimes. Yeah you know conversation to be. Had you know and you do have this huge platform. The other thing. Where you've been really influential is your fashion. You've become quite the fashion icon. Red carpet looks or the talk of every single award show and you recently collaborated with christian cowan on his spring. Twenty twenty one collection. I love it. where does the inspiration for your style. Come from different places or where does it come from. A lot of different places Me and my style is like we really want to make me this shape shifter of fashion and who likes jumps around in many different areas in always try new things and you know just try to step out of comfort zone east side okay. We'll tell us a little bit why you wanted to write this book for kids. I was telling you before that my kids the other day. We're on the couch reading. And i heard what sounded like old town road. And i was like i keep my books for work separately so i can make sure i've gone through him and i'm like is that little gnaws. My kids now have grown attached to your book. But what made you write it. Well you know what the success of old town the majority of success i will like attribute to kids and they like they love this song so much and i this idea. The children's book was bought to brought to me. And i was like this makes perfect sense so we got together. We did this book and it came out amazing and it's beautiful and it's cute little book so really nice and you had a really busy holiday season releasing the new single holiday and taken over for you know the big guy as saint. Nah is So is this going to be something that you we're going to get to see on an annual basis of holiday season. I think so. I think so. Are you know. I'm gonna try to do different holidays and stuff like that or regardless. You know i'm just happy to add music out still. Listen i'm just proud of you. I just love what you do. I love the way that you're going toward your career because you're not restricting yourself. You're going for it. So i just say keep on doing you baby. Thank you for coming to visit us on the view. The children's books for country is out now and you can get it anywhere. Fine books are sold and we. Of course we'll be right back. Thanks in that little nasdaq's thank you allege. Thank you everybody there. How did ralph monty. Yo and williams opt-out handled facing off in fight scenes on the hit series cobra kai three decades after the karate kid. Find out next. These friday wonder vision way of the universe. Something's wrong him. He's expanded on disney plus expect marvel studios one division got an new on robbie a lead. Why do you tango and cash. Tango and cash were narcotics. Detectives a totally different thing. I'm sorry my mistake on trail. Now check out this info Scumbags at the prison gave it up easy prison where we were just talking to a couple of guys who Who knew robin talks. We to smack them around a little bit. You did what. I didn't smack anyone around any more of a good cop. Bad cop situation actually more of a situation you do realize neither one of your cops right there but we got the information we needed. The guy caught up like a chicken bone cried and williams a very awkward alliance in the new season of one of my favorite streaming shows. Call kyw and they are joining us right now. Please welcome rows macchia and williams abc a rough before we we before. We talk about the show i want to mention. You're amazing. why. Phyllis you've been married thirty three years. She's a nurse practitioner. Who's been working during this crazy time. I mean what's it been like for you with her. You know going really on the front line. Yeah and thank you for mentioning that. I really appreciate it and social assault. Will she she. She's doing well. She got her vaccine adviser vaccine yesterday. So so you know it's it's tough. It's a lot of what she does is dealing with. The families and and palliative medicine nurse practitioner and dealing with That end of life scenario or how to to manage you know being apart and go through this it is it is hero work and i am so proud of her and she's doing well and we are. We are hanging in there. Thanks so much for mentioning excellent. Give her a big hug for me. Now let us speak of cobra kai no. I lost my mind for the show. So when you were shooting the your first scene together as daniel larusso and johnny lawrence what what went through both of your minds. Sure our for our first seen shooting together robin. I been friends for many years. So this is the first time we put our johnny lawrence daniel russo skin on so to speak and he walks into the doj episode season. One when he walks into the doj. Oh we have a front Stare down and it was the first time johnny daniel. We're looking through each other's eyes and it was very palatable and we knew as soon as we finish that scene when he walked in these guys were back with all their baggage and It felt the live and we felt when he walked off the set and we completed that scene. We felt like this is going to work or something really special happening. Here is a great great emotion. I mean thirty five years ago. Was the crane kick to that took to the head and so it was. It was nice but but here he is again. I mean he. He's walking into the doj. Janis dojo and perfectly russo form and etc great great spark for the rest of where we're going with it. It was awesome. You have two kids now ralph. Yours are in their twenties which is shocking to me and williams. Yours are only eleven in seven now. None of them were around when all of us were when karate kid was in theaters. Thirty six years ago cobra kai is a huge hit so ralph. How do your kids react to you being part of something. That's actually such a big deal right now and said softly nice to be cool for another fifteen minutes or so friends opponents to the true claim that i am. It's that is an icing on the cake. I was not expecting to have something. That's such a big part of my life back in the day. Now be such a big part of my kids license and lives in them champion. emanate look. I mean this show coming out. Anything every season launch with like christmas morning them all their friends. they're all getting to get binge watching it as a group and it's just it's really quite wonderful friends with some of the young cast members next generation cast. It's the gift that keeps on giving now william. Your kids are pretty young. But have they seen the crotty kid movies. My kids have still not seen the karate kid movies. I always say if i play. Daniel larusso one. That's your dad. But i don't want them to see that guy kick you know in the last thirty five years. Yeah exactly but they love route. Like i introduced him to the karate kid and the cobra kai world by ralph. They love ralph and mardi cove and the whole cast. They've been on the set of cobra kai they're figuring it out through osmosis but i've been trying to keep play dad and you keep the data over here and let let johnny lawrence eakin as he does you know But they're welcome to see it and they want to especially my son. He's eleven. he's like dad. What am i gonna see karate kid. I said any night. Pick a movie night but every movie night. It's not the karate kid so choice. Martin cove is back as sensei kreese and his is really interesting to. There's a lot of depth there but he's scary is ever right. But it's really hard not to miss mr megie even though we get to see him in these wonderful flashbacks and pat morita passed away in two thousand and five. What do you remember most about him was he had all like mr miyagi me. That's a good question he was. He was in him In in a way that few actors you know connect to their roles he would just snap right into the meow comes and yet yet they stand up comedian background so he knew where all the human rights work. You know we would play a scene. We were playing. The scene is as an in depth as And talking about his wife and child back in the japanese internment camps in that beautiful meow drunk scene from the original film and between takes. You know you will launch into afford jokes with sound effects then and and and not right back in and you couldn't help but love him and his dedication to the respect of the japanese american community and and winner of what that role meant to him going forward and i was one of the lucky ones. They got to have that middle bit of magic. That went back and forth with loose up. I'll say this about pat for for meek real quick karate kid was my first film. And when i walked onto the set we were doing rehearsals. There's pat morita and ralph maggio from the outside and pat really took me under his wing and in a way. Kinda was miami augie. it's ours. You know helping me feel at place and at home and i told him on the first day. I said if there's anything that i'm doing wrong or anything. I could do different. Please step in and tell me something and when we did the fence fight with ralph in the crotty kid and the skeleton outfit. I remember during the rehearsals. And i was doing it. Maybe half speed and half energy and he pulled me aside and he called me and he says he says listen man this when you do rehearsals you gotta give one hundred and ten percent one hundred ten percent that we when the cameras are rolling. It's like bread and butter baby. It's like bread and butter. And it was his thing. And that really heightened that scene for me in the rehearsals the energy and he was great. He was super just a great fun. Beautiful guy i call him. Uncle patty was everybody's kinda ankle. He's a part of this his spirit without them. We're not here as ralph always says and yagi as part of this show. And i know he's looking down and you know and hopefully giving us that nod. Sure i think so. I think so you guys. Congratulations you really have put a brilliant piece of work out there and people are loving it of all ages all colors. It doesn't matter who voted for who. It's a universal story and this is this is thanks to the two of you so thank you so much for common to the view season. Three of cobra kai is streaming now on net flicks. And if you haven't watched the whole thing watch it from one all the way through in some good we'll be right back. thank you. Well that's the show for today. You know we always try to have as much fun as we can and today was a pretty good day so we want you to make sure that you Take a little time to enjoy the view. We want you to wash your hands. Wash your mask and then put it on or just put it on dry however you like but we wanted have a great rest of the day and we'll see you tomorrow by y'all.

congress mike pence President trump routh macchia williams perotti joe biden elect biden mitch mcconnell biden josh hawley senator ted cruz senator cruz president trump Senator tuber ville lil nasdaq ralph macho williams abkah president biden capitol hill meghan mccain
Wave Hill And The Lifelong Learning Of Gardeners

Cultivating Place

52:55 min | 2 years ago

Wave Hill And The Lifelong Learning Of Gardeners

"This is cultivating place. I'm Jennifer jewel. Happy Valentine's Day. It's mid winter official spring is five weeks away. Our days are still quite a bit shorter than our nights. And the temperatures remain wintry. Enticing us to stay in more or at very least coming from our outside work earlier than we might in midsummer. It is a more cerebral season in my house with knitting projects in process. It's a time of perusing and sometimes making interesting hearty stew recipes, and there's a good deal of reading to be done books. Seed catalogs garden journals and garden writers at work in this world the garden world as a whole seems to take the season as one that is well adapted to Gardiner's continuing education and community building a winter term in the year round school. That is what it is. Is to be a gardener full of botanic, Gordon lecture series, region-wide, flower and garden shows conferences and symposia all starting up just in advance of spring almost as if to help tide us over to spring, for example, the Wisconsin garden and landscape expo is February eighth through the tenth the northwest flower garden show, which is always epic in Seattle is February twentieth to the twenty fourth the Connecticut flower garden show is February twenty first to the twenty fourth and the famed Philadelphia flower show is March second to the tenth these are full of green plants plants. People speakers, demonstrations floral displays plant and seed sales and show gardens to bolster or creative. Imaginations at the end of this wintry, spare contempt of time. I find. Gardiner's in naturalists to be remarkably ardent self directed life long learners. And I thought I'd take a few episodes to dive into that a little bit for this first episode in this casual exploration of the many ways that gardeners gather learn and grow together, we headed to New York and at twenty eight acre public, Gordon and cultural center in the Bronx overlooking the Hudson river, and the Palisades we are entering wave hill the mission of this. Now public Gordon is to celebrate the artistry and legacy of its gardens and landscapes to preserve its magnificent views and to explore human connections to the natural world through programs in horticulture education and the arts beginning its life as a country house estate in the mid eighteen hundreds the house and grounds were deeded to the city of New York by its owners in nineteen sixty. And wave hill remains one of thirty three city owned cultural institutions it is well known for the beauty of its site. It's remarkable planting and plant collections and its annual educational offerings were joined today via Skype to hear more about this from Louis Bauer. Senior director of horticulture. Welcome louis. Thank you very much. Nice to be here. I wanna start a little bit with the wave hill as it exists today. Tell us a little bit about its current incarnation. And then we'll go back into some of its greater history. Louis. We have been cultural institution for a little over fifty years. We have sort of three spheres of operation in in executing our mission to to bring Mannion nature together. They are I the gardens and horticulture with greenhouses and the revitalized gardens that were made by its private owners. Then we have education which was there from the very beginning of wave hills public life and that program educates over ten thousand school children a year and third we have an arts component of focused. Mostly on emerging artists whose subject is the relationship between men and nature in some way, and some performing arts to go with that like music and dance. And so of the twenty. Eight acres in the gardens that surround the the house and other structures. Are they all under garden cultivation? No, they're not we have a very very site because of the it's called wave hill because the landscape from from the Hudson river when that first became a country house looked like a a wave cresting. Toward the river. And so we have some very steep areas that are native plant Woodland's, and we've had a a long history of forest ecology that takes almost half the property. And so about half of it is horticultural landscape and half urban woodland. Keanu describe I'm it's winter. It's it's a quiet and yet very beautiful time of year in such garden. Can you describe the gardens for listeners who may not have seen them in in sort of an overview Louis, I can the greenhouses are at the center of the property, the they sort of entrance to our tall center house, which we call the palm house had been during the estate days arose garden, so it was laid out with eight rectilinear beds when it became a public place competing with the grand rose gardens of other public gardens that garden became a mixed border beds. So it is a kind of old fashioned flower garden, perennial garden mixed border garden behind the greenhouses. There are some. Class houses that were never rebuilt and their foundations. Hold an herb garden, a Mediterranean dry garden and an alpine terrace which step up the hill toward our second sort of most intense horticultural area, which is the wild garden based on a kind of William Robinson idea of using plants not in their hybrid or cultivated selection, but in their wild form mixed in a cosmopolitan way to simulate landscapes from around the world. So it's a very contorted complex garden that culminates with a little gazebo at the highest point on the property, and too many people surprise that's the best place to see the Hudson river and the cliffs across the river. Beyond that, we have an aquatic garden, which is probably our most placid in geometric garden rectilinear reflecting poll from the estate days surrounded on three sides, by Pergola and the fourth side by hedges outside of that a more naturalistic shade border, which goes to the north perimeter of our property and continues into a conifer collection and that joins the woodland which makes the rest of our property perimeter. And those are the main garden areas we happen to have an underground recreation building that was constructed during the estate days, which has a lawn on its roof, which is our lower terrorists. As I said earlier, we have interesting to poverty, including some men made in interest like that. And adjacent to that is a little. Relatively new small formal native plant garden since it is surrounded on three sides by woodland. It made sense to have that the native plant garden. How new is the native plant garden? It was made in the nineteen nineties when the swimming poll for the estate was finally demolished and filled in and because some some stone architecture remains around its perimeter it made sense for it to be formal. But we wanted it to be native plant. So we have this interesting hybrid of that doesn't usually go together. But we have made it work. And I think a lot of people like seeing that because it's a way that people with townhouses and urban yards concede that yes, you can have a small space with native plants that is livable. Yeah. And not isn't isn't just a prairie restoration. And I think that really starts to get us into some of the educational aspects of wave hill in its prominent rule. Rule as being a model for innovative planting and horticultural knowledge, right? There is that idea that if you can model of formality with native plants, you speak to a completely different audience than I think, the sort of foundational native plant people might might be and that ability to expand the conversation about what we can do with plants and how we can live with them. I think is so important. I I agree. It's a more modern way of thinking it it wasn't top of the mind in in the first decades of the garden here. I think it's fair to say that everyone working here from the beginning. We're kind of plant nuts plant geeks of and it's still a little that way with native plants where we're not Zionists about it. But we recognize the value of having parts of the property that that reflected purely native flora, and and I think that anyone having a tour of of the gardens here from the very beginning would would be pointed to the native plants that are in all of our garden areas. And and so it wasn't a difficult to say, okay. This little small area, which is surrounded by our woodland where we wouldn't want some some aggressive plant that we've introduced escape we will. We will make this little formal garden, which maybe twenty years ago, we wouldn't have thought to as a native garden. So that takes us you've segue very nicely into the early history. I find it fascinating that the original history of the house has a country house garden, there are quite a few in the area of where you are. But that this one come nineteen sixty was deeded to the city to become a cultural institution. Give us a little bit of history on why that might have been the decision of the owners and those early years that you mentioned in terms of how the nonprofit was formed how the mission was was developed and has has grown over the years Louis while I I admit I wasn't here for those. When the property became a city owned. Public institution is it was deeded to the city in nineteen sixty. And I believe for five years, the city's parks department managed the property, and because neighbors who wanted to see something good and public serving happened on the property, they formed a private foundation and their timing was perfect because at the same time some other institutions or making the same kinds of alliances with the city, and it changed from city parks management to cultural institutions management, which was the arrangement with these other groups to run a cultural institution under the management of a private foundation on city property. So we're very lucky that we had some smart neighbors and some sharp political minds on the on the. Board of our founders because something very different could have happened. And even after that arrangement was settled there were was still a lot of floundering about exactly what our mission would be. And what it what the scope of? It might be there were there was always something of the arts and environment and horticulture in the mix, but whether one was stronger than the other in what direction they might take took a number of of years to figure out and and I've seen the same struggle in some in some younger organization. So I I have have some firsthand knowledge seeing what that struggle is like it's not easy, but we have made a wonderful marriage between those three components of our mission now, and I'll be glad to talk more about that. If you're interested. Yes, very interested. I think that is such a wonderful historical. Lesson in many ways about the nature of the living dynamic of nonprofit getting started especially one that has a public mission, and is part of the developing life of of such an organization, especially if it's going to go on to thrive. I think you're right. And like a garden. There are so many things that influence what that direction takes exactly what kind of support emerges, and what its community what what it surrounding community is like and the political environment and all sorts of things come into play. And and they change a little over time. And so we change a little too. There were there were a couple of decades. When most of the arts component of of the organization was comprised of large. Well, known artists putting big sculptures in the landscape. But as the horticulture took hold and gained some reputation that phase of the art component of our mission shifted, and now, I think is in a really wonderful place where our curator's at wave hill have formed. Relationships and made connections with the artists in New York City, which of course. Is a pretty rich environment. And and they now focus on things that really match the nominal education in the horticulture components of wave hill. So it's not an imposition on the landscape. It's very sympathetic with it. We inform one another as head of horticulture. I can say that the artists are very respectful of things that do happen outside. They're not you'd Richard Serra giant steel sculptures. They're very thoughtful and provocative, and and we collaborate often. Yeah. Yeah. So talk about the evolution of the environmental education in horticulture program because I think this is also one of the important areas, especially with horticulture in in a changing natural and physical environment in our world. And in the increasing need for for good and accurate and im- inclusive educational outreach to to the public that all of our garden institutions, as we know them are are adapting and trying to respond to increasing need it. Feels like. There are two things that have been expecially successful in in our school education programs. One is the forest project, which came very early in our history. And so it has forty some years of experience teaching high school age students primarily and now some pre college students during the summer in forest college and basic sciences for environmental education. They collaborate with they have collaborated with at least two nearby colleges. So they have a relationship not only with accreditation accreditation and and access to science teachers. But. But also laboratories and other sites than our little twelve acre forest collaborating with the colleges gives them access to some of the nearby park land which helps expand the scope of what they can do with students. The second part of environmental education is a more in indirect kind of education is a program called family art project. It's a free program every Saturday and Sunday that is for younger audience with their parents, and it is a kind of fun art with a focus on learning. Something about the environment or horticulture built into projects that looked like sort of arts and crafts. But really have some deeper message. Can you give us an example of maybe one of your? Recent family art events, and what look what that looks like exactly tangibly one of the longest running and most popular happens on a a weekend. We call Honey weekend because it has not just the family art project, but sort of Koa is orchestrated with adult education and garden tours and other aspects that highlight what Honey bees do for us. And so the the children learn how the bees communicate and they make a B vest and be hat, and they go outside and they marched around the garden and do be things. How does that sound? That's good. I love me things. So there's a lot of sound and a lot of flapping of right wing and wiggling b but I would imagine. Yeah. Sassa fabulous. And so the the school programs. Do you know what what school districts, you are drawing from that that get to take part in these programmes, well, as you know, the borough of the Bronx is very big borough. And I think they draw students from even beyond the Bronx. But but from all over the Bronx, which has a number of of neighborhoods that have been under served with this kind of opportunity over the years and wave hill. I think has done a very respectable part in helping to change that great. The educational outreach is is so important in my opinion, and especially including whole families. I think is a wonderful bridge to reaching communities and making horticultural literacy part of our world when you look at your horticultural program. Give me a similar kind of history of its evolution overtime from those early developmental years to to now, and how you have are clearly adapting all the time. Well, our our horticultural education is our our gardens. We hope hick. The interest of visitors. We do label some plants we're not a potential gardened, but we do have public programs that help people take a little deeper look at natives or at Alpine's or at learning how to do some garden tasks, but we have a very big neighbor called New York botanical garden miles away, and they have a very highly developed horticulture education program. So it's not that we're not interested, but we have found our niches to fill and actually there's a bit of new interest in offering a little more adult program aimed programs in horticulture that are. Still different from the New York botanical garden that that that we haven't tried in a little while part of that is is motivated by the fact that we have a book coming out soon about how we do and maintain our gardening here at wave hill. And and it reveals some of our techniques and some of the things that over history we have decided we should share with the public. And we're hoping that that might generate a little bit of a change in the offerings. We've had in horticultural education. When is the book coming out and who is publishing? It timber press is publishing it we expected to be out in the fall, they -ture into art the gardens of way of hill. Limit. I love it some of the school programs doing corporate horticultural education. They walk through the gardens, and they learn what gardeners. Do and what gardens mean for urban life or or for anyone's life for that matter? But I think we're about to to turn a little bit of new leaf on the things we offered for more sophisticated gardeners. Louis Bauer is the senior director of horticulture at wave hill. A public house in garden in New York City's borough of the Bronx. It's twenty eight acres of Gordon's in Woodland's are in education in themselves and the garden staff supplement the gardens educational opportunities with twice weekly guided tours with weekly Finley programs and with their annual winter lecture series underway now, we'll be right back to hear more. Stay with us. This is cultivating place. I'm Jennifer jewel today. We're kicking off a winter series exploring some of the ways and means by which we as gardeners undertake our own life long continuing education, the ways we gather learn and grow together for this first in the series. We're speaking with Louis Bauer senior director of horticulture at wave hill in New York City's borough of the Bronx. We're back after a break to hear more. Welcome back when you say, your horticulture niche, describe what characterizes the wave hill horticultural program niche. Our programs are limited. Our our gardens are a different story. Our gardens are very sophisticated in well established and and respected. But how we explain them to the public has been mostly left up to the visitor to explore on their own way. Use AA explore on their own not all plants labelled what kind of interpretive material or what kind of support. Do you have? Because I think the what I'm hearing is that the backbone of your horticulture program are the gardens and the plantings as they exist. And so how how do people make the best use of those Louis twice a week? We give a tour of the garden by well trained garden guides or doses. They know the plants vary. Wh. Well, Charlie day who is our sort of nomenclature and taxonomy expert gives them updates by monthly on what's in bloom and not only that but we're gardening in the garden three hundred sixty five days a year. So there's always a gardener here. So someone who is really curious, and and doesn't happen to be on one of the guided tours of the gardens can find a gardener to ask a question, and I certainly get them by Email and and other ways to to answer, and we do label we actually Charlie days. Other responsibility is changing the labels in the garden. It's true that not everything is labeled. But we do try to keep labels changing on a on a rotating basis for plants that are are making their show or being conspicuous. Yeah. Which is part of the fun of visiting. Garden over and over again, right is to see what what is out. What is looking different? What has changed its color? What is come into boom gone into seed all of those things constantly changing? Yeah. So when you say we and us and garden three hundred sixty five days a year, describe your horticultural team there, and it who makes it up and they're ongoing contributions gladly. Well, I'm senior director of horticulture. I started as a gardener in nineteen ninety four and I've been director for five years. I have an assistant director who who recently departed for North Carolina. So I have an open position. Good to know make note out there. I have a part time administrative helpers named Maryland young. I have seven gardeners Jelena's Scarborough takes care of the wild garden. Susannah Streeter takes care of the alpine house, Jen Seminole takes care of our Pergola gardens and aquatic garden. Shane Pritchett takes care of the little formal native garden and and the cafe terrace, which has an intense summer bedding scheme. I have Christopher biven 's who takes care of the herb and dry garden. I have harnik sing who takes care of what is kind of our front yard the flower garden in front of the conservatory. It is the first garden people see when they arrive at the property. Oh flower garden with with the conservatory in the background. And I have one Gardner position open. And do you have do you have a core of volunteers by chance? Well, I do have a core of volunteers, and it never outnumbers the gardeners, and it is usually primarily for or five people who have kind of regular assignments and regular hours, and it has been like that for many years. In addition. I have four interns, and we didn't touch on this part of education. But are John Nellie? Intern program started in nineteen eighty eight and every season I have four interns from the first of April till thanksgiving, and they spend a couple of weeks being oriented to work on the grounds with myself, and my assistant director, and then they rotate between the gardeners working in their relatively Atanas parts of the garden and apart of at least one day a week working as a team sometimes with myself sometimes with all the guard horticulture crew as we take on projects in the in the more general landscape that's outside the sort of individual areas and. Where do the interns come from? And where are they heading is there is there a kind of MO on that? There is I where they come from all over the place. Although, obviously, there are almost always a couple of interns who have just finished some environmental education or some formal horticulture program. But there are usually a couple of people from other areas often from a career change. Program is established well enough that I do get a lot of applicants. So I have the great luxury of getting a lot of applicants who already have found some way to get a little experience with public horticulture or to be able to explain why they're interested in public horticulture. At least tell me what their favorite public garden or park is. And and and also almost always someone who's already had a little experience with hands in the ground. Now, sometimes that is just a little, and and we find someone who who I believe has aptitude and the passion for it. But we give them that next step. And a lot of our Nellie interns over the past thirty some years have gone on to careers as head gardener's or directors of horticulture both at public and at significant private gardens. So we're kind of proud of our track record and recently, we've been sharing I should say I've been sharing the experiences that I have and that my interns have with some of the other gardens with similar programs in the region. So kind of forming a loose association of similar training programs, and we've been exchanging not just ideas, but exchanging gardeners for a day or a week. So that that broadens their experienced further. And there is nothing like practical mentor. Ship and apprenticeship to teach you the ins and outs of horticulture. There's plenty to learn from book and research, but actually being on the ground with someone who knows what they're doing. There's just nothing like it. You're right. That's that's the greatest strength of our program. And and the ones that places like Shanti clear and stone crop, which are not too far from us. They always do have we still push a little component of of research. We have after the interns cut grass on Thursday mornings. They have a break by doing a little roundtable report on plants of a certain group aquatic plants or alpine plants, and so that's kind of fun. Yeah. And how many years has the internship in in place? It has been I I thirty two years. I may have to check that number. Yeah. But that's. A significant number of interns off into the world with greater greater knowledge and experience. So that's a huge accomplishment. Thank you. We feel it is. And and it's getting recognition from the the patrons who help our institution run. We raise a lot of our funds from private individuals. And this internships history has is beginning to catch their attention to and receive more support. So it's strong. Nice. That's good to hear Louis Bauer is the senior director of horticulture at wave hill, the public house in Gordon in New York City's borough of the Bronx Hoon of thirty three cultural institutions owned by the city of New York and one of five public gardens in that group. Wave hill is in the midst of its annual winter lecture series, stay with us. We'll be right back after a break to hear more. This is cultivating place. I'm Jennifer jewel. We're back from a break in this first episode of a winter series exploring some of the ways we as Gordon IRS continue our own educations throughout our life. The way we gather learn and grow together today were speaking with Louis Bauer senior director of horticulture at wave hill in New York City's borough of the Bronx, welcome back. I know another aspect of your public outreach is an annual lecture series around this time of year every year tell us a little bit about this year's lecture series. And then we'll we'll talk about the history and kind of catalyst for that. Well, I have to say Martha who couldn't join us today wrote something wonderful about the lectures this year, and she wrote this ongoing series curated by wave hill, senior director of horticulture and the friends of horticulture committee is devoted to garden design and the meaning of our interactions with plants in the natural world, and and and beyond that she talks in her introduction to this year series about how a small and intimate garden like ours is in bedded in a much wider world. And that was what we intended the three speakers this year to to help. Explore. Okay. So tell us about those speakers while the first happened to awake ago. It was Colin Cabot, his father and mother founded stone crop and his mother spent time at this garden as a child. So he had deep roots in the history of the place, but because of the influence of gardens in his life in in his sort of second phase of life. He has taken on a project to reinvigorate a large farm in New Hampshire with a renewed active timber operation and iron working operation and fiber production and farming and livestock in traditional methods. So that people in the region have a place to go and see how pre industrial farming was carried out and and what its benefits were. I know the whole world can't go back in time. And and live that way, but he talked about the connections between. The influences of gardens on his life. And and what he hopes people gain from seeing this kind of farming and gardening that he's now carrying out in his personal time in New Hampshire. People people were very impressed. I bet. Yeah. I bet. The second lecture is Lisa Roper from Shanta clear. So you can see we're kind of circling our friends. Lisa Roper has been gardening. The dry garden at Shanta clear, which is a similar size and scope garden to wave hill for about twenty years, and she is going to tell us about how that garden has changed over the years. And and how it's connections to other gardens have shaped what it is nice and third we're having Coralie Thomas who was an intern here for years ago, then went to shan't Shanta clear and then earned a scholarship to work at great dick Stor in in England for a year and has since then been working. As a full-time Gardner at great, dick Stor. And so from from being a college student in Canada to being an intern at wave hill to Gardner in Philadelphia to a gardener in England. I think she is is is going to explain from. Young gardners perspective that the sort of learning curve and the transitions she has been through and the revelations she's seen in that short. But rich experience of the last five years and the date of the final lecture is. March twentieth. And the February talk is also on the twentieth. And do you have any sort of follow up components to the lectures that people could find online, or is it pretty much an in-person experience. Only it's been an in person experience only we have explored finding ways to to get parts of the lecture onto our website. But our website is due for a rebirth. But at the moment, it doesn't include video or or lecture clips yet. When you look at the the history give us a little bit of the history of the lecture series because it's a fairly well known and highly respected lecture series each year. And when when was the lecture series started as an idea, and when did it become an annual element to the to the gardens offerings while you're you're flatter our series of a bit because I have to say, we always feel as though it is it is a sort of tightly held community secret. You make it sound so much more respected, but it does have some history. So I'll tell you it started pry really in nineteen eighty one when our founding director of horticulture Marco Polo, Stefan. Oh invited Rosemary vary to speak. She had planned to visit because several of of England's respected gardens gave Marco great inspiration in making this garden. What it it became, and and they became friends. And so he convinced her to a lecture for wave hill in nineteen eighty one. And so for a couple of years there were small presentations, not a series of three, but but by. Ten years. Of intermittent talks. It hit a stride of three talks one mid January one mid February and one mid March, and it has remained that way since nineteen ninety one. And I think that almost with without exception all of the speakers famous or or simply local celebrities have been asked whatever their expertise to include some personal gardening experience. So we we often have scientists or or experts in some particular field of horticulture speak. But we all we also like them to bring it down to a personal level. How does that how does that professional experience translate to what they do in their own garden? And I think it has given an intimacy to our lectures with your lex. Sure series that matches the intimacy of our gardens. And I would say that is the basis of why it is so well loved within the horticultural world and gardening circles of it's it's become I think at least for my experience one of these kind of bucket list destinations to try and get to at some point because of this sense of connection, and which is at the basis of your very mission. And that it's not huge. And it's not overblown, but it is deep and personal horticultural sharing at its at its very best. And it's at a time of year. I think as well where gardeners are they are perusing plant catalogs. They are getting ready to go to garden shows to kind of get them through the the the longest part of winter. And this is the time of year when we have so. Much kind of compost in fodder on an intellectual level to feed us as gardeners as we go off into the growing season and hopefully expand and ripple out to more and more people each each year each season. You're right about all of that. I also ask the speakers all to have some enticing pictures because we really needed this. Certainly in New York. I mean, it was we were we have, you know, minus double digit wind chill today and so- standing in our palm house with South African bulbs, blooming or intellectual hall with some wonderful pictures of spring and summer is is really unnecessary scheme. It is bomb for sure. And so I wanna I wanna end up Louis with appealing to you and your personal history. And and work in this world and your own pathway of of learning and growing yourself, especially in this public gardening's fear where there is there is great accessibility. By anyone who wants to take advantage of it? Tell us a little bit about why to you personally. This is such an important thing in our world at this time. It it feels critical is a critical time for us to have a connection to the earth. Because as I've heard repeated in in so many different ways from different people. We protect what we love and the only way to get to love the plants and the earth that sustain is to to get to know them. And and so that's why I think more and more. I in my gardeners, and and the rest of the staff at wave hill, see our garden as a way to connect to people that is more and more important. It's not it's not just a scientific institution. It's not a it's it's not a didactic place. It is a place that allows people to take their time to take in things as slowly or as or as rapidly as they like, they can sit on the lawn for a whole day at a time and just watch the sky in the river go by and eventually, I think that has an effect escaping from the city, and if that gets them off their chair and wandering around the gardens than they have another level of of wandering about these incredible plants that that. Support us on this planet. Is there anything else you would like to add? Well, I grew up gardening and thought I would get away from it. But I just couldn't stop. Once the plants get us. They keep us. They do they definitely do. So I hope that happens to other people too. Once they walk around the garden, and are are enticed to to touching a plant or growing plant or trying to start one from seed rather than always turning to the nursery for a potted trae. Tray of of annuals for their window box that they form a deeper relationship and greater appreciation. Thank you very much for being a guest on the program today. It's been a pleasure speaking with you. You're very welcome. It was my pleasure to Louis Bauer is the senior director of horticulture at wave hill a public house in Gordon in New York City's the Bronx. He joined us today via Skype from wave hill to share more about the educational offerings and the importance of this kind of work by cultural institutions around the country. Wave hills in you will winter three part lecture series is underway. Now, as I mentioned, I find gardeners and naturalists to be remarkably ardent self directed. Lifelong learners and doers. How people learn and where and why their motivation to learn whether that be more about a particular subject a plant family or a whole new garden skill wherein. How? This is sparked is something I find fascinating some of us. Learn best, by example, as apprentices or students in practicum 's other of us learned by reading and research, and then trial and error still others of learned by teaching and others. Learn by listening and thinking, and then trying whatever way you learn best. I wanna encourage all of us to follow your internal inclinations and curiosities and dig in for yourselves attend the lecture check out that book from the library or attend that class at your local, nursery or botanical garden sign of for a symposium and gather with your planty people. It's a healthy dose of winter chlorophyll supplement we all benefit from what's your best learning method? And what do you have lined up in the way of continuing education this winter season? Let us know by sending us a note Coulter. Baiting place at g mail dot com. Or make a comment on the weekly social media posts at Instagram and Facebook, we'd love to hear and to share your thoughts forward and join us again next week as these conversations continue, and we visit with Nancy Goldman of the hardy plant society in Portland, Oregon. There are so many ways people engage in and grow from the cultivation of their places cultivating places a listener supported co production of north state public radio. For more information in many photos from wave hill their gardens and programs. See this week's show notes at cultivating place dot com. Thank you to everyone who makes this program possible. Together, we make a difference. Our producer is Sarah Bohannon. Our engineer is skies. Scofield original theme music is by Mont muse, accompanied by Joe craven and. Sam Bevan cultivating places distributed nationally by p r x public radio exchange until next week. Enjoy the cultivation of your place. I'm Jennifer jewel.

Wave hills Louis Bauer New York City Senior director Jennifer jewel Gordon intern New York Connecticut flower garden Hudson river Woodland Skype Philadelphia Gardiner Wisconsin official senior director Mannion director
How Can Art History Teach us How to Heal, Learn, and Love?

The Women

40:31 min | 7 months ago

How Can Art History Teach us How to Heal, Learn, and Love?

"Artists like to say change the way we see the world and so they have They're they're they're no special category. I think in most cultures we have a reverence for artists and And we Not only revere their skills but also their ability to interpret and understand. What's happening so i'm actually going to predict. They're going to be some very interesting things. Coming out of this pandemic period in terms of artwork. Well on that note. I want to welcome you. Stephanie savage to the women under host rosary and and my guest today as the director of the smithsonian museum someone with an infectious Appreciation for the arts and Stephanie can you introduce yourself sure. I'm stephanie sedition. A an endowed position. So i like to say. I moved the margaret and terry stint director of the smithsonian american art museum we just part of the smithsonian which is the largest museum education and research center in the world. So i'm leading actually two museums. I lead the americanism and i lead the renwick gallery. Which is our national museum of craft a block from the white house. Stephanie has been in the art world tire life before coming to washington. Dc she was the executive director at the tacoma art museum for about fifteen years and she was also the assistant director at the minneapolis institute of arts and director at the cleveland. Museum of art. Stephanie got her bachelor's degree in art. History from columbia university and her masters and modern art from the institute of fine arts at new york university. One of stephanie's priorities is getting more people to experience art in real life and she grew attendance from two million to just about three million visitors annually. Before the pandemic shutdown stephanie's the daughter of german emigrants and she speaks both german and french. We spoke over soon. You're the daughter of german emigrants and you grew up and scarsdale new york and your mom was also an art historian and i believe worked at the brooklyn museum which is actually just a few miles from where i'm recording today. I imagine that you kind of feel like at home in museums like louise a hotel. Yes yes well said so. i'm. I'm german by birth an american by choice. I grew up here. I came as a small child really rude ourselves in this wonderful country and i was lucky to have parents with very different interests and enthusiasms that they shared with me and my two brothers. So my father was very sporty so we would spend a lotta time doing exercise and you get a sense of both team play in soccer as you might imagine as a german and my mother has an art historian so plenty of time spent going to museums. We did revolt a little ongoing too many cathedrals when we're traveling both back in germany or traveling around europe and it was a great gift in. It's something i try to do Maybe with some ice cream rewards. When i with my Nieces and nephew and i take them through museums. You've you've described your father as a refugee and displaced from world war two and one of the things that that you have quoted him saying to. You is what you put in your head. No one can take away from you. Would you be able to share the context around him coming to this realization. Sharing it with you sure. So my father was a Ethnic german minority. In what is now the czech republic and so with the assault on the sudetenland By hitler and then of course the russians coming in forty-five and pushing people out my father was first displaced and then he was a refugee. He he would. He would go to austria until the austrians kicked you out And then he came to. Germany ended up on a farm which was good because there was work. And there's food and there was housing and his education was disrupted during sunny both the skipped grades and and missed a great deal of school and as the only boy Among two sisters it was his education. That was prized. And so he he gotta watch for From the people on the farm i. My grandmother was a cook. She off middle-class circumstances change after a war. She was a single mother with them with their own mother and living on a farm as a cook. So she she. He got a farm for his. He ain't gotta watch for his good grades and he would go to university of and so he always valued education. It was very important to him. And when i went to school my father would have a sit there and we'd have to watch him. Sign the check for tuition And he lost everything. I mean it was. He had an hour to take everything you could carry And then your house was gone never to return so that made a big impression. That was those were stories. My mother was slightly. My mother was born in forty two so she actually played in the rubble of germany So she had a different experience. My father was ten when he lost his lost his home. So they're certainly more possibilities for our family here in america even when my father was a businessman in germany. They're still possibilities for my mother to go to school to Make a career for herself and as women had different opportunities and and And and privileges in america and for us to go to school year to But always keeping up. Our german heritage. I think that's a great point of pride for americans. Where do you come from where your family come from. A mad again is a commonality of of of the american experience And then the other wonderful thing. I love about america in in europe often your rooted in place. You knew your family has always lived here kind of sentiment of course aside from the wartime refugee situations and whatnot But in america we move time we you know. Sometimes you go to college. Sometimes you move for your for a job. Your family moves for a whole host of reasons and it gives you a sense of the expansiveness of the differences. I mean i So as i've moved across the country become a great cheerleader for the midwest. Or there's something special about the pacific northwest. And i think something quite wonderful about the district of columbia. You have to come to the smithsonian. It is the museum of the people it is free. We're open remarkably seven days a week every single day except christmas and now we have to museums coming. I mean you know. It's incumbent on everyone as an american to come to washington. Dc more than once in a lifetime because it is a changing city and it is a place also we ask ourselves. Who are we as americans. And i think our cultural organizations we also are places where we ask ourselves and others questions. What does it mean to be an american. What are we proud of as americans. How do we reckon. With the dark chapters of the american story you know as the child of emigrants as the child of someone displaced by war as someone who is openly gay. How do you think that your personal identity has impacted your approach and your strategies to being an art historian So why approached art history. So i i love somebody once asked me. What are you love and i. I was a little chuck. Said like all art I'm really interested in again that that's expanse. That history of art I'm the current steward of the american art collections and for future generations as well I think i'm i'm i. I'm a fan of the underdog And so what. I love about this museum. Is we have a very expansive definition about what art is We have Folk artists and self taught artists. We have american artists who have lived worked studied abroad but have an american s that we prize like john singer sargent. We have artists who were teachers But also maybe we're better understood later in the life in their lives like alma. Thomas from dc influenced many artists. We have many works as a an estate gift We have artists again who work in very democratic Media print artists. We have a great exhibition on now predict the revolution the rise and impact takata graphics. Nineteen sixty five today. How's that for something timely. The issues that these artists were highlighting through their creative skills are still with us today. Police brutality Poor working conditions. the Pay inequity Of people who were overlooked and marginalized Wanna make sure that we spotlight more women artists Wanna make sure that we Surprise people also when they come in that they see both the familiar with. They're expecting an american art and again Offer them some wonder For about how how expansive and spectacular american artists. You know you oversee about forty three thousand objects you manage a twenty plus million dollar budget and you essentially are a steward not just for the building but for the different histories. Can you talk about how people who are in charge of cure rating can impact. What's curated and how you're thinking about that in terms of diversity and inclusion I i think it's a very exciting time to lee. Museums art museums science museums. history museums. I do think that people More than ever before learning different ways. So today as america becomes ever more diverse It's more incumbent on museums to make sure that the stories we tell our ones that resonate so we've been always collecting what other people think are important so early on in the nineteen seventies. We took a huge collections of african american art. When other museums said no snow. That we we don't really see this value this quite the same way that they mayvale w other kinds of art works we've valued craft also something that other museums have not focused on we have quilt collections We have collections of photography and photography only recently Was a worth collecting by museums. Only in the last fifty years or show. So i would say because we're the national collection of american art. We've had a very open definition of art and we really tried to always include all the american voices and again puerto rican artists american work mostly native american contemporary because at the smithsonian to museums that have a focus on american indian artworks and culture. And can you describe the history behind the patent office Yes so The smithsonian american art museum is one of the grand buildings in washington. Dc is two city blocks long. It's okay that's life. let's at home. Dogs people have families. Yes let me introduce you to felices and artem. Mike constant convenience anyway the historic old patent office building again is located between effigy streets And seventh and ninth and it was the third oldest federal building in the united states. You have to imagine that The white house the capitol. And why would you have a patent office. Being such an important building. When andrew jackson signs the patent legislation it is to ensure the incredible creativity. America is a nation of makers of builders of creators that this kind of economic engine in and really solidifying when somebody has a patent has an original idea has created something that they can now Hopefully better society in some way or make things more efficient that that would be appreciated and and respected by the government And it was built a begun in the eighteen. Eighteen thirty six thirty seven with various waves for the for the building which was again also intended to be fireproof because to get a patent. Do not only had to fill out the form. And describe what you've created that you have to make a little model if actually show the proof of concept whether it's a flip out bed or extension ladder or a gin mill or any anything else you've to make a little model that the building also includes two other smithsonian Siblings this Portrait gallery and then the archives of america. This is one of the things that i find so fascinating about museums as places for both recognition and reckoning and this interesting tension how we look at history. You know for example. Enter jackson made sure that innovation was protected at the same time. The trail of tears pushing out native americans and supporting slavery and genocide. We see just in the history of a museum how can bring these themes to a surface. What have you seen in this last year during the black lives matter movement. What designs plans have you seen by artists. That you think really address our reckoning in recognition in new ways I i i think. We're at a a moment of reckoning. I think you've described that very well. And our secretary certainly talks about that and he sees that we at the smithsonian have a role we cannot run away from history we have to present history. Maybe in all its All the facets of it so you can imagine historic objects in a museum often have new readings. We have to make room for For example for different portraits For different figures we have to make room for different artists. Who can also Offer us more provocative views of things and so Artists even in historic times would bring these issues up. Sometimes we are not able to read the images quite so well so the work of careers today is look at these objects and again. Try to tease out the most important as well as relevant parts of the story you know why. Why does this picture speak to us in a new way. So for example we just had our wonderful robert duncanson landscape with rainbow as part of the joint inaugural committee Celebration and this was a painting selected. Both by senator roy blunt and dr jill biden and symbols matter in america and that they would use an artwork from the american art museum matters as well as a an african american artist coming from cincinnati. The duncanson painting. who is this artist. Making this artwork. What is this moment. And and why should we have hope and again. It's from eighteen fifty nine. This is a an image That also reminds us of the civil war Very divisive period and again to pick this painting It operates on many levels And let's not forget. Beauty beauty is important. At least it pulls you in. But sometimes i would tell you things that are not beautiful Might challenge you and So museums again have to Keep a balance and have to make important decisions. The most important decision we make is which artworks to bring into the national collections. The next most important question is how do we display them. Appropriately to honor the artist on the intent and put them in conversation with other artworks and invite our visitors to to to fall in love with the works. It's really they encounter with the visitor that were always thinking about. And of course as we move artworks around They take on different meetings. They're in there in relationships for different works so when we buy contemporary piece Like by fred wilson. Who does this beautiful black mirror of sorts and we put it in a nineteenth century. Galley with us of Super white marble sculptures What what is that conversation. How are we seeing ourselves as visitor in a black mirror made by a black artist talking about shakespeare now when it works it's It's magical and i think that's why people come to museums. They are looking for for the wonder. i think they're also looking to understand themselves and hopefully others Better too so how we display things and what we select tells a lot about us And hopefully Speaks to them. We're living in you know we're living in double pandemic one as old as this country and one novel balance is a tight rope That so many stewards and artists and archivists and especially museums are navigating. You know you have this Almost like a seesaw. Relationship between representation and atonement or a paradox relationship between things that are stagnant and things that are progressing as a southerner and i'm a seven hundred georgian Two of my ancestors fought in confederacy And they're still so much that i don't know and i think so much that has not been passed down. You know one of the things that we're seeing right now as this public reckoning with our our sculptures and our art and public spaces You know we see Confederate sculptures Being taken down sometimes in the middle of the night without new placards coming up to explain conversations we see public dissent over to handle these remnants of the confederacy but really remnants of our tension because a lot of these statues were erected After major progress like the passing of the voting act or the passing of the civil rights. Act and i was wondering if you've seen models or plans that contemporary artists black artists are recommending are putting forward to commemorate build upon or alter these areas where these public statues either have been or currently. Are you know. I was recently in atlanta and there are probably fifty. Something fifty statues like that within a four mile radius. It's really an interesting opportunity for the artists. Like you say to show us ways in which we can re imagine these spaces. I think it's very important that we're paying more attention to civic spaces. Public spaces are meant for everyone and so these decisions often from long ago to place objects that are supposed to speak to community values. But somehow don't maybe maybe we weren't vocal enough at the time that they didn't really include everyone and but today we're very aware of that This has been a topic of interest for us at the smithsonian american art museum for some time we did a community based national survey of sculpture called Sos save outdoor sculpture. Let's say interesting title. Sos playoffs yeah. The program was initiated in eighty nine and ended about ten years later and the beauty of it was community based it was about identifying photographing often recognizing of something needed conservation work and we worked with the girl scouts and the rotarians and everyone else and it again make people aware of civic spaces and art. That was outside of the museum. What's interesting is that. I think people have clearly different Differentiated between sculpture. that is in museums. Where again the ability to change the context we have the ability to change the label quickly and it is not really in public space That you're forced to walk past as you are the park on your way to work or church or temple or or your friend's home so public space i think is much more freighted so to speak and there's again a question of who owns this Public space now. My field of interest in specialty is modern art so certainly with modern sculptors. A lot of debate. You think about the richard. Serra tilted arc how it cut off federal plaza downtown and we'll kind of a debate that that created but with historic figures. Again it's always who story Who are we really putting on a pedestal And of course now we are pulling them off a pedestal. I think the best answer I mean they're the the the the best answer is gonna come from the community itself. I don't think anybody should be coming in shooting not the smithsonian telling people what to do with their public sculpture. We happy to be part of the conversation if you invite us. That's why i was curious if you've seen any artist Specific recommendations so. It's i don't know. I still really new. Yeah i think there are a number of conversations going on so I do think if one can have a civic debate about this and i. it's a great education for everybody in the community. And so i think the way to go is both the fostering understanding you know. What what is it that we have here and then second does it still represent us and could we add i. I'm i'm a historic. I'm an art historian. So i like to keep things But i i think that history and artists tell us new story. So i'm in favor of other works to open up different Chapters of of a story now also there are objects that are really offensive to many Images that are are remain hurtful. Today just as there are words we don't use that are truly hurtful And for those objects like sculptures. I think the place our history museums and again they can tell a better story. And we've seen some examples where Works have been removed and the destination is a history museum during your previous posts before you were in your current role at the smithsonian. You're a coma washington. You spent twelve years there. I think you raised over thirty. Five million dollars oversaw renovation. The increase of more than two thousand artworks you added the art of local residents and jewelry by northwest artists. Adding to hooghly glass. I didn't even know that you hooley was from the washington area to yes gone down very proud of that. I can just imagine that there are so many stakeholders and people that you have to work across internally externally. Can you give one example of a time where you decided that. Something was a priority for the museum. Persevered some pushback How did you negotiate that. And what was that like for you. well Over twelve years. There are plenty of stories again. Another important role is what exhibitions do either create of your own collections Do you highlight which are artists. You think are important. And then also which exhibitions do bring to community The took art museum would bring on an annual basis or the a major show featuring artists that that we simply didn't have in our collection or that with themes that we thought were important and and some days again. Rosie got to get lucky. Museum directors are often talking about white projects. Going on we keep an eye on art jumps out of the arts and leisure section jumps on the front page when there's a controversy There was a major show called hide. Seek difference and desire in american portraiture and It was also difficult political moment and A number of people seized the exhibition. One particular. work By artists since died of aids David rovic and a video. He made and Stated that That had an anti catholic bias anyway just to keep the story short anyway. This piece became controversial and demand By political leaders was to remove the work from the exhibition now in the museum. Field that's like ripping a page out of a book. All the works are selected and build upon each other and also We have experts who who put it at the exhibition together. Who's to say what should be suddenly removed. Let alone added. So this became a big national discussion was very difficult for the smithsonian because it receives federal funding and whatnot and ultimately the piece was removed. sadly it was a bit of a black eye for the smithsonian in retrospect and then interestingly a group of artists took the video and rented your cargo container and parked it in front of the museum so you could be go to the museum of like uncensored art and video anyhow. There's a big debate in the museum field again. This is this kind of political pressure to to You know again sensor an exhibition. And so you know. How do you address. The idea struck me that it would probably be good if more people could see exhibition if this was really an important topic which actually about gay identity in american portraiture very important topic first time Tackled maybe others should seat and we could bring the piece back into the show and it was a big complicated exhibition for a whole reasons. Anyway then i also got lucky because on the ballot in washington state was marriage. Equality so this sedition. Which was was tough. I mean the the previous director in both dc and brooklyn got death. Threats for for taking the exit really inflamed A lot of passions. And i had to prepare my board to speak to donors about what really was in the exhibition. What wasn't And then you know we we would have a public program on evening and you go back to your car and your car will be filled with leaflets against you know anti anti-gay marriage or whatever the i'm the upset was related to the to that exhibition for that group. So and i had one of the most powerful board meetings And also we got letters like we've never gotten before which goes back to your question about representation who is seen in museums. Whose left out. And i think museums are really very eager to be as inclusive as possible. We're we're we're working very hard again to ask ourselves to criticize ourselves about. Why is something missing in our story. and we have to redouble our efforts Again we talk a lot about how women artists and there's a wonderful protest group guerrilla girls and they've made wonderful posters saying yeah. There are a lot of women depicted You know at a at the metropolitan museum of mostly there nudes. Not women artists were. Where are the women artists which is great. Linden auckland essay That really spurred a lot of Reflection and change so again You find that you're a bit of a community leader as an art museum director. I try to be accessible. I i have great. Conversations again in in tacoma was a little bit better known smaller community in the grocery aisles. Hey love that show. I really hated that. Exhibition linking Hey do know this artist. So i love the Civic quality. I civic booster and i've i've figured out that My home is in museums. That are of place. I worked at the tacoma art museum. The minneapolis institute of arts. The cleveland museum of art. The brooklyn museum. I worked at the museum. Love loved the brooklyn museum. Play there as a child is. My mother was a curator there for special exhibition on. Haitian art great haitian community in brooklyn not as visible in the museum until they did this special exhibition so i think museums have a terribly important role to play and i I welcome both the criticism and the compliments. Get it right Because we have a lot of people who are working very hard very diligently to get it right and you also have a very special love story rooted in art museums. I believe you're you've been married now. Five years yes almost five years. And certainly i I kind of knew early on that art museums were were my home art galleries. You'd have to sell the art. I was really in favor of that auctions. Kind of the same thing. Teaching was wonderful. But i didn't feel. I could reach as many people as as as with the museum so i. My career has had me hopscotch across the country and Really became in some cases too much of the focus of my life and i. I didn't give myself enough time for the for the for a fuller life. And so lo and behold Is you see somebody differently The director of the Then american folk art museum animal ritchie. And i had a conversation At a at a conference. And i saw her in a new light and we found we had. We had much in common. We had load shared values and and we got married and it was a bit of a geographic challenge because she was in new york city into. And it's also kind of like when harry met sally. You knew each other for a long time and then it became romantic. But it's also has this pride and prejudice Element of you know. Kind of holding back are this is what i'm in tueting from devouring the foul section times. But you know it seems really interesting to me that you decided within the span of a few months to get married again. I'm new at marriage. So other people can tell me more about it but i think later in life you have a better sense of who you are and who might be a good partner and composing life together and of course shared values Mean a great deal in in terms of and yet we have plenty of differences. I assure you That that we that we continue discover So as My wife in many ways. is was more prominent than me and so i i knew her from afar usually sitting in the audience as she was giving a talk as the chair of the institute of museum and library services or as the founding director of the national museum of women in the arts An and now again. She works for a federal agency the the age and we're both in washington. Dc hooray hooray. She's to joke. she's much more popular At a Always have to carry more of her business cards than my own because she actually gives money away a grand tour. I'm usually asking for money to support the activities of the museum. But but we have a great time or each other's best cheerleaders so now that you've gone from being bi coastal to working from dc new york and now in dc and then what the pandemic is this the most time we've spent together uninterrupted In the past year. Yes i i i think i think that might be true So again being fairly Recently married we still have lots of things to come out. Still still getting to know each other and telling series we. We both like to play games. So we're very active with the yahtzee or boggle or jigsaw puzzles Crossword puzzles were things like that my wife also is an accomplished breeder of dachshunds so dachshunds of entered my life. That's a lot to learn about We we joke a little. We become pioneer women. She makes apple so in and dry seeds. And i'm big bread and bacon dog biscuits so It has been a slower Reflective time and i think the question i think people personally as well as professionally struggle with is what will be the new normal will we retain some of the best things that have come out of This very hard and sad time. Will we have a need to be connected. How how do we continue to Be part of communities. How do we find joy and small things How do we slow down again. Museums are good slowdown places. I n d are offer and they're good social spaces and much to The The the upset of my california music directors. Somebody in california seems to think it's a good idea to keep museums closed. Maybe thinking that museums are really only places of blockbusters where people from out of town come. We're really. we have often a lot of square footage. There's a lot of space. We'd like you to social distance from each other as well as the artworks so And frankly we need mental health breaks. I mean you can only be in your own four walls For so long. I think we Going to museums it's It's about something bigger than ourselves and it may inspire again. A lot of handicrafts people than knitting like crazy or or drawing and sketching. So if we can find more ways to make people feel truly at home and welcome in museums and sometimes a little uncomfortable as they learn new things to so for our lightning round. I like to say we go light after we go deep it's called truth or truth and These are quick fire questions and they're a little bit fun so when i prepared for this interview my I guess i should say that. I also have a similar three months. Kind of situation and that During covid i have met fallen in love and moved in with somebody after being pretty much pretty single for ten years I find myself and a very serious relationship. for the first time and i was wondering As an adult. Do you have any advice for a new relationship. I'm going to quote an artist appropriate. Fear not that is. Part of the james hampton thrown one of the prized art works in the museum self taught artists and up top and the creates his own religious environment with alternate night. He says fear not. I think we have to pitch. Choose love over fear. Thank you Thank you for that and This also might be a little bit and a personal projection. But do you find a lot of people talk about that. How museums are aphrodisiacs Well We had sam have hosted Defining lab which are for people who don't know that that's a washington post column which is delightful because i think we all imagine we might be matchmakers in some way and so people were looking for love. And somehow they're matched up and then they go on a date you know. Usually at a restaurant when we hosted them at the art museum at the smithsonian american art museum because people go to museums on dates and one of my One of my favorite things is how many people actually get engaged at museums. How touching so We used to charge a fee to come art museum for one hundred dollars. We put a little ring in a box and people out and you can have that moment. I would write the couple some kind of not about love and an art and such and given the catalog and of course people choose sometimes choose to get married at museums or have their anniversaries or something like that. So yeah i do think there's something. We can bring ourselves to an art museum in a different way to offer than a science museum. I mean we're reading the facts. Maybe you can tell a story about when you saw fossils or whatever else but but there's a level of interpretation you reveal something about yourself you know i'd like to say you see the world from From where you set so again It's unique things that you bring to your position and that the things your position affords you to to do to improve people's lives. I hope and for women out there who are thinking about. Do i ascend to a higher role in my organization or company. Will i lose my connection to my craft. While i am i qualified. What do you say to have been in that position who are thinking about Stepping into bigger roles. Go for it When you do more you challenge yourself. He challenged others around. You and you actually have more people to help you and actually when you have more Responsibility or power. Whatever you call it you get to make the rules and you can make things better for others Again we're all paying it forward. I try to spend a good bit of my time. Always answering questions about starting off in a museum career. I'm thinking about studying art history. Whereas i love those calls. I love those conversations about people wondering if the museum field is right for them and it is it. Is art museums fabulous places. You can be a photographer. You could be organized. As an accountant you can track the movement of artworks as registrar. You can make meaning for school children. You can Delightful community programs for thousands of people for the lunar new year. They're wonderful ways to bring your talents. that really impact other people's lives and i have to tell you i work At a at a at a nonprofit. I call them social prophets right i. My work is in service of my values. Yes i get paid to do it. But i bring my values to work and i think what we also do particularly women we have to bring our whole selves to work. Everyone should bring their whole self to work. The women as a production of ros read. This episode was mixed by adrian. Wyllie we're going to be publishing every two weeks on thursday so check back in two weeks. I get a chance to talk to. Jessica bongo the first black woman to travel to every country in the world.

smithsonian american art museu united states Stephanie stephanie washington Stephanie savage smithsonian museum terry stint largest museum education and r national museum of craft Museum of art brooklyn museum germany tacoma art museum minneapolis institute of arts national collection of america renwick gallery institute of fine arts white house robert duncanson
The Gulf of Enthusiasm

Armstrong & Getty

38:49 min | 1 year ago

The Gulf of Enthusiasm

"What's super nutritious, super delicious, and a little nutty American becomes the original supernet packed with all the good for you nutrition you need and the flavor that keeps the family coming back for. Recipes and more visit American PECAN DOT com. You can't have a wedding now with thousands of people there is no safe way to do that. We know that I couldn't go to church I couldn't go to synagogue I couldn't go to work those protests. I get I. also get I wanted have a big wedding my suggestion. A small wedding this year. Next year. Have a big wedding. Invite me. I'd come. That's the. Governor of New York saying don't have any weddings with thousands of people doing. Various socialites. The thousand dollars, it's A, it's A. Of Thousands of it's that may be an exaggeration but yeah, that's that's a real It's a do you call it? It's a flex. Yeah. Your daughter has anybody who's anybody on the Hamptons, will be like. Getting married at Madison Square, Garden What's going on? That reminds me a came up in conversation yesterday we the town I live in. there's a lot of like. Twenty twenty one year olds at Dr, hundred, thousand dollar cars, it's very common. Seems odd do for lives to see the coolest newest Porsche BMW Mercedes or whatever being driven by some young good and my son and I were talking about I said, the the parents do it because they're showing off to the other parents. That's that's that's what it is. That's look at what my kid drives. That's how big a deal I M, my kid drives that right that's what they do it for its because he couldn't understand what was going on there. I actually come from a culture where you would do the opposite for the most part. In like, make it clear how grounded you're trying to make your kid wouldn't be a flex because. Trying to be but yeah, exactly. Weird cultures are are like that, which reminds me of It's also got something to do with a lot of foreign university students around where I live and all of them rich in the here's here's an indication of it. So I got a conversation with a woman who's from Vietnam over the weekend. and. This reminds me of a tweet I sent out a couple months ago and is talking about my son's struggling with math or something like that and I always tell them I don't care what your grades are as long as you try and one of our favorite Asian. Twitter followers tweeted back you white people are so funny. That all, I care I don't care what your grades are. All cares you try and I was thinking about that as as talking from this woman who grew up in Vietnam and now lives in the United States. and. She went to a private school the private schools she said run around forty thousand dollars a year. In Vietnam, in Vietnam and she said, Gosh said it's common in all these countries. China Vietnam South Korea to for people to pay twenty five to forty thousand dollars a year to get their kids into these private schools that are specifically designed to get you up to speed on things that will help you succeed in a an American University year on the get your kid into an American University track starting at age five year don't have to learn anything new American universities. Word Gotten back, Vietnam and it's weird just show up at the weird. They don't even care if you can read and our country, it's iphone it troubling in lots of different ways I mean we're to get overtaken by these hungrier. Countries sure. Particularly China so are rich people. Are Photo shopping. An, athlete's head on their kids body to get there very average student into a very prestigious university. So they can coast through not learning anything, but they can brag the friends that they're kids went to the college i. Actually learning and Jamie right in these other countries, their kids are she had to. She had a tutor starting at age four until she was at six until she was six studying all the time for this task to make sure you could get into this expensive private school. So it's incredibly expensive and in possibly hard to get into. Wow. Working their asses off as children to get into these schools so that they can then go to an American University. which is really interesting and she in particular she was she had to be number one in her giant school district. She was the number one student to get into this other school or it was all full of number ones from all the other school distant. And and then went to a school in China's remember well, and she said that was a whole new level of difficult all the things she just told me were like Easy compared to the school she got into in China where she said they're like walking computers these kids at these schools in China. The best schools in China she she she she said it was like walking around with giants I just I was so lost I had no idea as doing it took me a couple of years where I was depressed and thought. I'm just not enough to be here and her friend also got into that school cried every day for six months and eventually. Dropped out. Wow. These were the best of the best who'd been going to crazy expensive schools in studying all day every day she said you have no childhood. Nobody has childhood in these countries right? South Korea Vietnam Japan. Yeah. She mentioned also the suicide rates. So incurred exactly. She brought that up you have no childhood do study and even then when she got the China, it was a whole different level of smart. Yeah. That she couldn't believe that the pather on China we're send an are. we only do this with athletics. Really if you're really good at athletics, we get you into super competitive, but in terms of the smart stuff, a lot of it is, as we all know at the prestigious universities, it's just rich kids getting in. Not only but that's a huge emphasis, but they don't care about that near as much. In in China, they actually want the best of the best. So they can build their takeover, the world. Society she also said at one point she said I hear people. I, hear about people bragging that somebody got a perfect score on their sat. Everybody makes a big deal on it. I've never known anybody who got a perfect score. I've heard of it She said that's what's expected of you in Vietnam. When I was growing up, your parents would say what happened if you? Didn't get a perfect score. Why would they expect you to do? Wow. Imagine that yeah. Well, as long as we're on the eve of the World Series It's worth pointing out that everybody who's involved sports are sports fan knows it's incredibly hard to repeat as champion or or certainly if you do a twice to do it a third time, which is why it does happen it so incredible. It's an entirely different set of brain chemicals you carry around when you're on the way up than when you're already at the top. Yeah. Everything changes, I would never wanna I mean I have no interest in being that hard court my kids. But actually thought you know that whole cares try is probably not. The best attitude. Well, it depends there. There are many many political systems throughout history which are indefensible on a human level that were extremely successful militarily for instance or economically but the people who lived under those systems were miserable many many lives and souls were sacrificed in service of you know the great and grand achievement I don't I don't necessarily think that's a good way to spend your. Few years on this earth what she was describing I don't know people who've done that with academics especially at that young age maybe when you get to high school or something but not at that young age but I know lots of people who've done that with athletics in the United. States starting at a young age for your identified is something something great or you want him to Be something and she said something about the academics that I've heard people say about the athletic same thing and I said, are you doing that with your kid who happens to be you know one of my son's best friends and she said Oh absolutely not she said if you're that smart, you can catch up when you get older I mean if you're that smart, you get. There and I've heard the same people say the same thing with athletics you don't need to you know be doing this from the age of four until you're twelve. If you've got those skills, you'll get right in with those other kids. Immediately I've said that a thousand times don't ruin your fourteen year olds pitching arm he'll be fine at sixteen and he can catch up at eighteen. And I'm sure that it is true of academics if you're that if you're if you've got that brain. You'll you'll jump right into it and catch up anyway yeah she fought so and she's been through the process right? Right Well, there are very few actual stations in life were you would need to be that. Completely, knowledgeable in so many different topics when information is at your fingertips and you build a team of people who have an expertise in one thing and concentrate on one thing in particular. Now I'm not a computer engineer never will be or anything like that, and I realized that especially in your Asian nations, they're trying to achieve technological supremacy and so they're drilling. And killing as they say in those educational systems but that seems the terrible way to live your awful. We were at the park and she said there's nothing like this where I grew up the kids did not have a childhood you study. Yeah. Wow. That's something sounds awful. It does sound awful sometimes terrible you will be overtaken by those societies probably. Yeah eventually in one way or another, or they'll achieve a certain level of success and the kids will think why the hell am I doing this and they will also evolve. She didn't talk about the incredibly high suicide rate specifically in Japan and South Korea Oh, it's it's breathtaking course we're doing our best to equal it by keeping our kids apart from each other for almost entirely political reasons during the covert thing but. As, topic we've certainly hammered that would explain why you know it's kids from India and various Asian kids or whatever that when the spelling bee all time that's just a different lifestyle and make sense to them to different set of expectations. Well, you read about we ought to take a break but you read about for instance I read a great biography of Charles Dickens not long ago and he grew up in an era where eleven year olds went into factories. To work to support their family. So you know they in their seven brothers and sisters didn't starve in the rest of it but eleven year olds laboring ten hours a day doing difficult often dangerous jobs in factories. The kids didn't say why not in Little League Because that's what they knew. There were miserable. But that's what they knew. I don't know now we're down to, why are we here? What is life? What is our purpose et Cetera discussions I'll let you have that with your loved ones in your your clergyman or clergywoman they let girls be, free, Caesar something I don't know they don't administers. Don't go change in the Would they have Vatican three and I missed it or don't start me about the Catholic Church? I'm warning you aren't got any comments on any of that or any experience with any of that. I. Thought That was interesting text line. Imagine the the expectation is you get a perfect Tony. Or text line four, one, five, two, nine, five, K FTC. The Armstrong and getty show. It's an interesting discussion be interested there any text email coming on that home countries? Were they pushed their kids so hard versus hours Not. Not Talking about the individual parenting decision just what it means for the culture. Overall. Yeah I'm sure there's some pretty good stuff on that to be found in red, but probably a little dry. Yeah I get it in places where you're starving in Hungary and everything like that where you work so hard to get out of that but if you're already. Relatively affluent like South Korean. Japan they're closer to what? Like what we are What drives the star the striving, and then I think they have a much more formalistic way of hiring and promoting you check boxes as opposed to you have an interview with the The assistant director he says, you know I like the cut of this Gal's Jeb or guy or whatever. and. Then you meet the director. Then the CEO Mitchen says there's some real chemistry here I like him bright and creative and you get the Gig in south, Korea it's just a your number two at that school number one that's school number you get the job but you know it's not like I'm an expert on South Korean economic society but that's what I've heard. On a couple of things that are kind of Kind of companion pieces I. Word I put that other. This bothered me dion sent this in. Dion has been participating in a survey company surveys fairly regularly and then you can go to the website and their various comments below topics and sent this one along. and. It had to do with the. Republican, Party dropbox in California. And I just did that story gets settled after we were off the Air Friday long story short of the Secretary of State and Attorney General of California threaten the Republican Party in California that the drop boxes that they put off be put up for people's ballots in churches, gun stores, and that sort of thing we're illegal. And they were going to be prosecuted if they didn't take down. Well. We talked to their the Republicans attorney about this on Friday and it is utterly clear. that. That's ridiculous. According to California, Law Antiques member can banging on my door at midnight sagir ballot and I can give them my my ballot and they can turn it in for me but I can't put it in a box at my church. What and. Sure enough. As, soon as the lawyer confronted him on this, the the the two crooks in California government back down immediately they claimed we got the Republican Party to make very concessions such as they will have a lock on the box. Okay. Whatever it was just they backed down immediately were humiliated their best. which brings us to the comments on this survey. The fake gop drop boxes are extremely alarming and should be removed. Those who are involved should be arrested for election interference. Remove unofficial voting drop-off. To increase confidence the needs to arrest California gop leaders for their fake collection boxes. These are people who heard the mainstream media description of what was going on and thought something nefarious was afoot when it wasn't at all California's the one st that allows ballot harvesting, which is a horrific idea but. California's. In the reason I bring that up is. Story Jonathan Turley wrote over the weekend Jonathan Turley. The see the constitutional, a scholar, a attorney professor at George Washington University. Chuck Todd. Interviewed Michigan Governor. Gretchen. Whitmer and the recent talk to the talked about the recent decision to the Michigan Supreme Court. That ruled that the governor had violated the Michigan Constitution in extending her pandemic orders indefinitely. Todd did not challenge whitmer stating falsely that the opinion was a partisan decision, but here's where it gets really crazy. Todd stated, as fact that the court did not cite any Michigan law they didn't cite any law deciding that you didn't have this power. Will Jonathan Turley at the fifty page decision in front of him said, the judges cited over sixty cases and interpretations of laws. In that decision. Over sixty and Chuck Todd said they didn't cite a single law. And a hell of a lot of people are gonNA walk around it and they are going to lob put comments on websites like those I, read to you about the the ballot boxes it's it's disturbing. It is an outlet like meet the press or The Washington Post or whatever can be that far off. I. Know it's troubling Turley. Says NBC is not alone the truth doesn't seem to matter it meet the press. NBC The Washington Post also failed to correct openly false accounts cases. If you see a case described in the mainstream media, a court case or court decision, it is almost certainly misleading. Or completely false. Believe it or not. I've got a little more from Matthew mcconaughey Hayes autobiography that I think you might find interesting dot as a piece of crap I just wanted to finish with that. That's an aunt mcconaghy's. Getty. What's it like to drive the Volvo xc ninety plug in hybrid. The thrill of a four hundred horsepower t eight twin engine. The joy of. Impromptu road traps. And the serenity. Of Electric power in pure ECO mode. Visit a DMV Volvo retailer today to experience the ninety recharge plug in hybrid for yourself. The Armstrong and getty show. was getting a little worried because certain areas. You know we know we're GONNA have a big red wave. About? Tremendous Day. Know. Fakers back there known. Now. You have to do is look at this crowd. When did we set this up like two days ago? Will be in Carson City in about dude as the people come out like crazy. Friend of a friend was at that rally was enormous your normal that's that's something. In Carson City Nevada is not exactly Chicago. I mean people came from miles and miles around to be there. Yeah. I mean enthusiasm definitely matters because it has so much to do with turn out you could get wall upton election and still have. This time around seventy, five, million people vote for you. And it just destroyed good point true that that's a lot of people I've been to concerts were bands that have incredibly loyal following I mean the place a roof was lifted off the place but then I go home and say saw an incredible show by whatever and people who. So exactly Susie as a matters it doesn't tell the whole story nonetheless, the enthusiasm Gulf is astonishingly big I. Want Him to win I would not bet money on it. Would you bet money on it? given certain terms yes. Straight up significant amount of money. just a one to one I don't know. That's a man who knows his way around a bit. So. There's a debate on Thursday the topics are fighting covid nineteen. America's. Favorite. What's the second America's families? What the hell does that mean. Race, in America I'm hoping trump is really coached up on critical race theory in can lay that out please Well, we were just talking to me was that off you're on the air the ABC News Reporter. who who, who said well and TIF. US. Says there antifascist it's right there in the name. I mean are we going to hear talking points of the far left? Are we GONNA really talk? National secure climate. Change is the next topic always always, I? Don't think it's that big a deal for at least half the country no. In the top five topics to talk about will acting super concern is of virtue signal. You tell me what you're. GonNa do that's going to make any difference? Okay and if it will make a difference I'm with you. Oh except that most climate change activists are a lot of them are actually closet Marxists. As we were discussing earlier, they WANNA tear the free mark how about one debate you take climate change input in entitlement reform since they're all going to go broke. Right. Oh. What a great idea well, not great enough to is America's foreign policy in there somewhere on national security. Okay and then leadership about foreign policy about. All right. Let's do a checklist guys. We're going to go through a five nations around the world. You're GonNa tell me your opinion of the relationship and what should be done about it. All right. Let's do China let's do Saudi Arabia. Let's do Israel. Let's do the EU. Let's do Latin America compare notes. No. Got To go for frequent climate change again. Right. So you are mentioned earlier who who, who's WHO's signaling in the media that trump is going to give biden more room to explain himself Jason Miller a prominent trump advisors I would you let that be known house adding advantage? Let your opponent. NO WE'RE GONNA throw on first down I wonder if it's that so many trump supporters are saying for God's sake what he let Biden talk please. And he's trying to reassure the the trump army anyway debate on Thursday and we'll be talking about I'm sure plenty. Matthew mcconaughey I don't think I've ever seen him in anything. Hey Ho. I have several things I know everybody has bought me Yeah Yeah Oh he's. He's you know listen. I respect great actors like I respect. Great Orthodontists don't worship them i. just think wow that somebody's really really good at their craft. Matthew mcconaughey is terrific Sean. You have your favorite line from a Matthew mcconaughey movie as a matter of fact, I do say man. You got to join. A. Lot Cooler and he did. Not Cooler, you did. From the movie dazed and confused which he named his his book after. Interstellar, phenomenal. That's the. Love is performance that he's mind boggling in season. One of true detective I. I love that he woody Harrelson Oh agreed on that as well. I own a car heart jacket because that's what Matthew mcconaughey wore an interstellar and I was like I gotta give me one of those jackets. Actually, as wondered why you work our Heart Jack Yeah I, saw that movie I was like you know what? You don't seem like deny. Jacket doesn't seem like your brand. I was just wondered how you end up McCain now explained. It's great jacket through that thing's GonNa last. Only have a big fan of Carl, Hart stuff. I don't think my car heart code is Bulletproof everything else proof I only know Matthew mcconnahey from the Lincoln Continental Commercials and him being mocked on Saturday night live. But anyway, he's got an autobiography Outta which I thought Okay Star Nobody I. don't care about this until I read some of the stuff that's in it and he's a weird Dude well-known weird duty at a weird bringing. His Dad died of a heart attack during sex with mom. And even weirder than that could happen that does happen I. Hope it doesn't. He's really rather disappointing. Louis CK who was the comedian? Who said forget that he died doing something he loved i WanNa die doing something I. Hate. I A die in line at the DMV and thing at least I don't have to wait in line anymore just about to do the dishes right after new them right I got a call from MOM Matthew. mcconaughey says your dad died my knees buckled. I couldn't believe it. He was my dad nobody or nothing could kill him except mom he always told me and my brothers boys when I go, I'm going to be making love to your mother and that's what happened. He had a heart attack when he climaxed. Good. Lord. So he told his kids their whole lives, the die having sex with your mom. What. That's weird in this. Relationship was weird. He and his wife Kay had an on again off again relationship marrying each other three separate times. Matthew was conceived shortly after their third wedding. Wow. They just really liked weddings. He got married after his parents got married for the third time to each other all three times. They were at times violent. He told People magazine and talks about in the buckle as I say in the book, that's how they communicated. They were divorced twice married three times I mean yeah. It was like the Pacific Ocean Storm. Anyone. Volatile Union earlier this year, he attempted to hook up his widowed mother who's eighty eight with hugh grant's widowed father. Who's ninety one apparently didn't work I just know sparks are still trying you know Kansas when I dying dying in a diamond sex with that lady right over there. Our. Dad No. Be Lot Cooler if you did. So I'm sure there's plenty of interesting stuff in his book crooked riffing. Let me tell you this. The older you get more rules are going to try to get you to follow. You've gotTA keep Living Man. Alive E I N. Had some good stone or humor there. What. We've been talking about schooling and a variety of ways in shutdowns, and all this different sort of stuff got this text. I've never been a I just want you to try parent I'm now labeled as a certain corre. Soft? Practically Epi. But my fifteen year old freshmen who has never not been on the honor roll is failing all his classes and distance learning. Now, I just want him to try and well Jamie. Even Makarov San Jose California Liberal San Jose is saying look get the kids back in school do it now? Just. You grow up you read about the declaration of Independence, the founding fathers, the the principles country was born with the. You studied constitution. You read Supreme Court cases in my case and school, and you just you compare political systems in the rest of it, and then you grow up in your realize it just comes down to WHO's a better liar and who's better at scaring people they get power. Climate changes in in my top two, hundred topics is this texture. It's regularly at the bottom whenever you see those lists. yet, it always ends up in the debate because all of the media thinks it's the most important thing I will tell you this. It has risen up from the bottom of those polls. It's now fairly significant. Where would you put it on your list? I wouldn't I I'll bet I could I don't know if I could name two hundred things but I could name a hell of a lot before I start considering we saw. Well, I'll tell you this because I, don't know what the hell you do about it. I guarantee we exhaust all our time on my first EXC quite a few priorities before we got there. Yeah. Hey. Gets warmer. Plant corn in. The Yukon. You saw the whole thing sell your car heart jacket and by some flip. Flops. We ought to be phasing out fossil fuels. Everybody knows that let's keep working at that. That's fine. Let's not send hundreds of millions of people into starvation decimating the economy touch. You're concerned about poor people. The oceans. Rise. Move Inland Greta. I'm listening to me raise my voice at a little girl. Poor kid she sees. Yeah that's she's. Like seventeen and she's gotta ask Burgers and everything too I mean she's just. A sweet little kid who's who thinks she's doing the right thing. But I don't want to hear from children I don't on him voting. I don't want him screeching their opinion in my face. I certainly don't want them You know yelling euro racist at black cops and insisting that their boyfriends sucker punched me in the head. One more thing on schooling Ravi. Swabi of reason was tweeting out about this abolishing grades in order to be antiracist, we need to go big on this tomorrow big story in San Diego. So go ahead. This is the thing. Oh, absolutely ass San Diego's changing the city school grading system. You can now turn and stuff whenever you want. Yeah deadlines are a white person things. It will not affect their academic grade it will. So late, projects will be reflected on your citizenship grade, not your academic Chris. So you know that's interesting. So my my son's in a private school now because I want him to be in a classroom and the teacher said that all the students coming from public schools have. So much trouble adjusting to the fact that when we have homework, we expect you to actually get it done and turn it in and it always takes him a long time to get used to that. Yeah and I, I didn't even realize that that. My son was in the habit of when we were in the habit of it, it was always kind of a suggestion. And now they like the you know here's your math assignment for tomorrow you're supposed to if you don't have it in for the next day, you lose points, which is the way it was when I was a kid too. But is that something all the kids who come from public school have to adjust to cultural change of your expected actually get your homework done. Not Good. That's not good. Oh, absolutely. Not School is training for life. It is not for its own sake but things like. No longer will like a yearlong average. Determine your grade because they think that punishes slow starters. That's interesting to me. That's intriguing. I don't hate that idea if you if it takes you while, but you finally master the subject the fact that the first test you are still completely befuddled by. That's an interesting thing. I'm willing to discuss that. But things like turning in work on time and classroom behavior will not count towards your grade anymore boy well, there's there's a vote for. Get your kids out of public space. That's rough. Get him out. That's rough. So Does Not Count Not only can they do anything about it? They can't even give you a bad grade because you can get a bad citizenship grade. It's What's their salary? Their academic great I don't know. Go Unified, school district veep Richard Serra says. This is part of our honest reckoning is a school district. If we're actually going to be an anti-racist school district, we have to confront price gets is like this that have gone on for years and years in other words, they will identify things that affect the the grades of any non white students, and they will eliminate those as a factor including four the white students. So procrastinators like ourselves would be off the hook. Yeah, which would help me either that the worst thing school could have done for me what Oh my God I'd sue them. If, they had done a little more on that and other things on the way. Strong and getting. The Armstrong and getty show. My son is dressing up as a character from Zelda, which is a video game. I guess I don't even the. Legendary video game franchise one of the bigger ones. Yeah. So that's a big one. Yeah must be and my kids just started playing it in the last couple of months and they're just obsessed with I'm assuming they're playing breath of the wild on switch Cha- One of the greatest games I've ever played man phenomenon I wake up in the morning I got the breadth of wild. And he's one of the characters he is link he is the the male protagonist of Zelda being the princess who gets rescued Rodley or they together probably not in the traditional sense, the child game. Probably his daughter Zelda after this. Round Yeah Yeah, yeah I pl- I played I played the on the original eight bit Nintendo. There was helping. The I had, I had no idea of this whatsoever in both my kids are so into it. Yeah. It's it's. Maybe not as big but equivalent to kind of The Mario Brothers in terms of tentpole franchises for an yeah. It's interesting and it looks it looks a mentally stimulating. It is. It is gray in a way that a lot of games I played were not yet I it encourages creativity and it's it's very open sandbox. You can do things in any order that you want them to do Yeah it's it's great and all the ways that games should be can't be great I'll be danged. That's what he's going to dress as for. Halloween people. You showed me the picture. Yeah. That's good costume. Halloween costume either who's ever have soared when he's he's got a sword he's very excited about the sword. It's got a sheath that goes in and everything morning on. Strong and. Patrick Store is here host for lots. Joe Getty hails get a final thought from everybody on the press buttons in the Control Room, keeps us on the Air Michelangelo Final Talk Yeah for Halloween this year I think I'm GonNa give workers originals leftover from last year, and then maybe some cream spinach or some cranberry sauce you know the stuff doesn't again so that it's a jelly type. That's good. Good treat positive sean a final thought. Yes. The the good. Lord Bird episode three came out yesterday. Watched it. It's still my favorite show going right now. Really. I love learning about stuff while simultaneously being entertained. It's great. Jackie final thought to share with the folks Senator Pumpkin Patch yesterday with the kids and. Place was packed absolutely packed and I used to do lots of these sorts of things pre. Cova. I really recognize what important part of. I don't know your overall mental health and society that the role these things played these to be just you know something to do on a Saturday but there are a huge part of life. And not having them has been killing us. All right. My final thought is I played golf at six thousand feet of elevations. This past weekend, it was seventy six degrees and we're closer to November I in October I. It is disconcertingly warm. I will give you that doubt on endow and weather patterns are different on the other hand if I have to clean out the wool sweaters in my closet by Munya tank-tops, fine. Strike ME AS A. Key West, you're going to get you're going to start wearing. Tank. Chains Pastelle tank tops. Of course, I'll get gold chains. Kind of question is that. Can you hit the ball further at six thousand feet? Ruin. Yeah. Never played at a high elevation I don't think. Yeah. Yeah, and often. Times, you think you did a great shop. Hurt is flying over the green. And the alcohol affect any differently there was no outdoor. You're still a non drinker. No, that's not correct not playing. That's how I got home Armstrong and getty wrapping up another grueling for our work that so many people who think so little time got Armstrong and getty dot com we have links to all sorts of articles videos we've been talking about you can drums knee mail mailbag at Armstrong and Getty Dot Com. His this week going to seem three weeks long like they all do or it already seems like a week and a half. Yes. Yes. Is The answer I think time got bent or something see tomorrow God bless America. Ever a good time. Not. Shot here for over three hour and fifteen minutes. Thud. If you wish to leave, you may that may just say how very very dismaying and disappointing. good and just change the channel from this mesmerizing horseshoe. We heard words. It's. Your dismissed Corral WanNa rephrase what you're doing. Let's Put now everybody's learning how with the Maga- with me Mega Mega Mega Mega Me Armstrong and getty. Hey, what's up? This is Adam Devine, honors home, Blake Anderson, and Carl Richaud and you might recognize these sweet sultry voices from the hit television program workaholics and we were sitting around and we were bored in quarantine where always on these doom calls we thought, Hey, you know what? This important totaling these are important conversations were having and the world needs to hear it. So please do yourself a favor and listen to this is important on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.

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Sarah Jo Pender & Richard Edward Hull Pt. 1

Crimes of Passion

38:42 min | 1 year ago

Sarah Jo Pender & Richard Edward Hull Pt. 1

"Due to the graphic nature of these crimes listener discretion is advised. The episode includes discussions of child, abuse, violence substance abuse and murder that some people may find offensive. We advise extreme caution for children under the age of thirteen. Steven Stoltz wearily dragged his trash into the dumpster, sighing as he jerked it over a bump in the road. He just wanted to get rid of the garbage and head back to the couch, but as he lifted the lid, something stopped him cold. There was someone lying inside the dumpster. Shocked. Stephen dropped the LID and it clattered back down with a bang. He hesitated for a moment expecting the figure to wake up and scramble out. Maybe someone had gotten drunk and passed out in their. He hope that was all it was. After a few silent moments past Steven steeled himself in lifted the LID AGAIN There was definitely a man inside. But he wasn't moving. With Horror Steven realized that there was a second pair of legs sticking out of the garbage next to the first. He dropped the lid again and fumbled for his phone. As. He dialed nine one one. He gasped for breath, trying to push the stench of debt flesh from his nostrils. It was a smell he'd never forget. Hi, I'm Lena Hobbs, and this is crimes of passion a podcast original. The legal definition of a crime of passion is a violent crime that occurs in the throes of extreme emotion, leaving no time to reflect on the consequences, but in this show we explore how passionate relationship sometimes lead us to criminal activity. How does a husband and wife become killer and victim or killer and co-conspirator? If, there's a thin line between love and hate, one manipulates our relationships into deadly results. You can find episodes of crimes of passion, and all other park s originals for free on spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream crimes of passion for free on spotify just open the APP and type crimes of passion in the search bar. This week we'll talk about Sarah Jo, pender and her relationship with Richard Whole after meeting in two thousand, they fell madly in love, but Richard lived a risky lifestyle, dealing drugs and committing petty crimes. The two had only been together for three months when both were dragged into a deadly altercation. That would change their lives forever. Next week we'll discuss the aftermath of the brutal crime. We'll also talk about how Sarah Jo. pender emerged as one of the most infamous women in the state of Indiana. Indiana was all Sarah Jo pender ever knew she was born in Nineteen, seventy nine, and grew up just outside of Indianapolis, but it wasn't a happy home. Her parents divorced when she was five years old and both remarried. Sarah leader said her stepfather sexually abused her beginning at age nine. She didn't tell her mother until years later when the marriage was long over. Her mother said to this day. I'm not sure how far it went, but I know that for a long time. Sarah thought it was her fault. I think it did cause her great problems. Over the years. She was really confused about men. She was looking for someone to love her. As a teenager, Sarah was treated for depression. Classmates later recalled that she had self destructive tendencies, experimenting with drugs and sex at a young age. At the same time, she took honors classes. Sung in the school choir and avidly participated in the Church Youth Group. It was almost as if she lived a double life. Before I continue with Sarah. Psychology please note that I am not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist, but I have done a lot of research for the show. Clinical psychologist Dr Jeff Gardir as analyzed the factors that lead people to live double lives in one interview, he stated. For one these are thrill seekers. They really get off on being able to have this double life that brings them all sorts of excitement. They get addicted to it because they're following their own pleasure principle and know at any time they can get caught, but yet at the same time. They feel that they won't get caught. He also talked about how leading a double life can make a person feel powerful. Many believe they're getting away with something. Others only fantasize about. Sarah may have been attracted to this after feeling powerless to stop her stepfather's abuse. Sarah may have also liked to flout the expectations of those who considered her a mild-mannered good girl. She tried to maintain her double life in college in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety seven, but had trouble keeping her grades up, she said. I was too interested in parties, drugs and men to do my homework or lectures. Sarah jumped out for university after a year. She got a job at a construction firm where she proved highly skilled at clerical and accounting work. She soon earned a promotion. She made enough money to support. Herself bought her own car and moved into a nice apartment in North West Indianapolis. Her mother said it was everything I dreamed of for her. But? She didn't know that Sarah continue to use drugs and seek out wild parties after work Sarah later recalled. I began buying almost an eight ball of cocaine a week. In July of the year two thousand, twenty one year, old Sarah attended a fish concert in Noblesville Indiana. After the show she wanted to keep the party going and meet a friend who felt the same way twenty two year old Richard Whole. Sarah felt good things to the music and the drugs. She was all but levitating over the ground. Her body pulsating with positive energy. She wanted it to last forever. She hoped the party wasn't going to wind down anytime soon. Suddenly, she heard a wonderful sound over the home of the crowd. It was laughter, loud and jubilant. Sarah followed the laugh until she found its source. He was a big man, casually drinking beer with a goofy grin on his face. His shirt was open exposing a big round belly. He looked like a cartoon bear. It means Sarah Smile. There was something so infectious about his laugh. She wanted to join in, so she did. That night after the Concert Sarah and Richard started talking and ended up hanging out for most of the night. Richard called it an instant attraction. As he described it, they were both flamboyant outgoing personalities looking for fun. On the first night they met they forgot to exchange phone numbers, but a few weeks later. Sarah still couldn't get Richard Out of her mind and decided to go out searching for him. She drove around the neighborhood where he worked occasionally as a bouncer at a sports bar, she eventually found him walking home and offered to give him a ride from that night on. They were inseparable. Richard said we just never left each other after that we were together and that was it. Richard was upfront with Sarah that he didn't have a stable legitimate job. Instead, most of his income came from selling drugs. Not long after he met Sarah Richard launched an even bigger drug selling enterprise with a friend twenty four year old Andrew Cataldi. Andrew Richard had known each other for years they met in nineteen ninety-five and spent some time in Las Vegas together dealing meth until Andrew was arrested. Richard fled to Indiana in one, thousand, nine, hundred nine, Andrew was sent to jail. Andrew spent the next year incarcerated in a minimum security facility in Nevada. He was assigned a work detail with the Nevada Division of Forestry. That's where he fell in love with a female inmate twenty five year old Tricia Nordmann. TRICIA had been convicted of forgery after writing bad checks. Although Andrew only had a few more months left of his sentence, he and Tricia plotted an escape together. On August, fourth, two, thousand, the both managed to run away from their work detail hiding among the trees. From there they were able to slip in among the crowds in downtown Las Vegas in plain sight. They boarded a bus at a station and left Nevada for good. Two days later. Andrew interests have reached the Indianapolis area. Andrew reconnected with Richard, who invited the couple to stay with him at his mother's house. He, in Andrew, quickly returned to dealing drugs with Richard, selling steroids and ecstasy while Andrew pedaled marijuana and meth. Sarah was supportive of Richard's business. In fact, that August. She found a house near downtown Indianapolis for them. On August Nineteenth Richard Sarah Andrew and Tricia all moved into together. Sarah later said that she knew that Andrew and Tricia had warrants issued against them, but at the time it didn't bother her. They didn't seem dangerous. She described Andrew as fine and charismatic like her boyfriend Richard. The two men were close like brothers Sarah also took an immediate liking to Tricia, calling her sweet and friendly. She later said living in the house altogether made her feel like she was college again. The only rule Sarah insisted on was that they didn't sell drugs directly from the home, but that didn't stop the four roommates from using drugs. Themselves Sarah enjoy the easy access. Everybody seemed like they were having a good time. Even, so Sarah couldn't help feeling a bit of pressure sometimes. She was the only one of the three with a real job. The normal life she lived during the workday gave her roommate's cover Sarah Lind. To their illegal activities when her mother Bonnie asked about what Richard did Sarah, responded vaguely he generates income. At the time Bonnie didn't push it. She didn't want to destroy him. With her daughter by criticizing the man Sarah was in love fled. So she stayed quiet, it was clear at least that Richard Made Sarah happy. He was attentive and sweet to her. Other friends and family read. Everyone who knew them swore that Richard Whole with anything for Sarah Jo pender. Anything. COMING UP! The happy home deteriorates pushing Sarah and her friends toward violence. Hey listeners. If you're fascinated by the mysterious and manipulative side of true crime, you will love. The stories told in the park cast original series colts. Every Tuesday step inside the minds of those who lead and followed the most controversial radical and sometimes deadly organizations in history. Go beyond the headlines discover the foundation behind notorious colts like Jim Jones and Peoples Temple the Raj Nash Movement Heaven's Gate and more, each episode of colts is full of illuminating details of their improbable origins and sinister intentions, but not all colts are from decades past. Be sure to catch the special four part series on Nexium a Modern Day pyramid scheme turned sex trafficking cold. Doomsday predictions religious beliefs extraterrestrial orders find out what really happens inside a Colt subscribed colts free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. Now back to the story. In August of two thousand twenty one year, old, Sarah, Jo pender and her boyfriend, twenty two year old Richard Whole. into a house with two of his friends Andrew and Tricia. But the group before weren't just living together. Andrew and Richard where partners in the drug dealing enterprise in downtown, Indianapolis. Though. They had only been dating about a month. Sarah head over heels for Richard. She thought they might spend the rest of their lives together. But Andrew and Tricia were different story. Although. She welcomed the pair at first there. became increasingly tense as the weeks went on. Richard Leader said that Andrew was using too much math and it was affecting his Tempur. Sarah came home one September day to find a hole in the wall Andrew had punched it. Sarah also claimed that. Andrew became abusive toward his girlfriend. She later said. He used to beat on Trish. He used to physically abuse her yet anger management problems. Making matters worse, every discussion between the roommates seemed to spark a furious argument. When Richard Seventeen. Year old sister, Tabitha was laid paying Andrew back one hundred and fifty dollars Andrew took it out on Richard. According to Tabitha Andrew would get angry and demanding about even little amounts of money. He screamed at Richard Relentlessly about his sister's debt. The arguments lasted for days soon. They spilled over and became about their drug business to. Sarah was frustrated because both men started selling drugs out of their home in violation of her one role. She Press Richard defined a normal job, but he didn't want to give up his drug dealing business. To a piece Sarah, he eventually started working more nights as a bouncer at a local bar. However Sarah said this only increase the strained atmosphere in the apartment. Andrew grew angry when Richard Work hours interfered with their drug trade. Meanwhile. Richard Suspected that Andrew was stealing prophets, and trying to Richard, out of the business he was fed up. Apparently so a Sarah. Sometime that fall Sarah's mother Bonnie drove to Indianapolis to have dinner with her daughter. Afterward. They went back to Sarah's so that Bonnie could use the bathroom when she went inside. She found Richard and Andrew screaming at each other. The arguments started over nothing. One of them wanted to use the landline phone in the other room yet. The two men were cursing at each other like it was a matter of life and death. They held at one another at the top of their lungs. It looked like they were about to go at each other's throats. Bonnie quickly retreated outside. She took Sarah Aside and told her. The situation was no good. She had to get out of that house. Sarah agreed and told her mother that she and Richard were trying to get their own place. They just had it managed to do it yet. Bonnie reluctantly went home after the encounter terrified that her daughter was in danger. As, it turned out. Andrew Interest shower the least of Sarah's worries. She was also privately dealing with the fallout of a sexual assault. Not long before she met Richard Serra was attacked by an acquaintance, she said that around October of two thousand. Her assailant began harassing her with threatening phone calls. It made Richard Furious to see how the calls were traumatizing her. Richard wanted to buy a shotgun and go after the perpetrator, he planned the shoot, the man and the genitals in retaliation. Sarah wasn't opposed to the idea. She later recalled thinking. I really wouldn't mind seeing this guy without a penis, so he can never rape another woman again. Richard Convinced Sarah that buying a gun would be a good idea, but his prior criminal record prevented him from owning a firearm. So, seven thirty am on October. Twenty Fourth Sarah and Richard made a trip to a Walmart and South Indianapolis and bought a shotgun. The clerk recalled Sarah saying that it was going to be present for her brother. Except Sarah didn't have a brother. Even so she filled out the proper paperwork and paid with a cheque. They walked down of the story that morning with a Mossberg. Twelve gauge shotgun. The also purchased ammo dear slugs typically used by hunters targeting large prey. After purchasing the gun Richard, drop Sarah off at work. Then he drove to his nearby home town of Noblesville there. He met up with one of his buddies and they went shooting in the woods. He drove back to Indianapolis around the same time. Sarah returned from work. They stash the gun in their bedroom. That evening they went out to visit Sarah's father, Roland and her stepmother. Rolling took Richard Out for a steak dinner while the women went shopping. At point during the visit Richard stepped outside to smoke marijuana and take a hit asaid. The men had a good time, but by the time Sarah returned with her stepmother, Richard was ready to leave. Around Eleven PM, they drove back home. Inside they found Andrew and Tricia smoking marijuana. The eagerly joined in continuing until two am. At that point, it's not clear exactly what happened in the House, Sarah and Richard have told different accounts of what transpired. According to Sarah Richard Andrew began arguing about money and Richard sister things quickly became heated. Sarah claim that Richard suddenly stopped mid argument and told her to leave the house. She certainly didn't want to listen to the many l., so she walked a few blocks east to buy some cigarettes at a nearby store. She was gone for about an hour. When she returned to the House. The front door was locked. She had him brought her key with her, so she went around to the back. To her horror, she found a trail of blood between the door and the driveway. She went inside anyway. there. She found Richard carrying Tricia. Nordmann's decide body towards the back door. He had already loaded Andrew Cataldi body into his truck. Richard told Sarah that Andrew had attacked and threatened him, so he shot them both. But Richard whole as told more than one story about that night. This first account told a few days after the murders match Sarah's. He said that he and Andrew were arguing about money and their drug business. Andrew ran into Richard's room, grabbed the shotgun and threatened Richard's family. Richard claimed he wrestled the gun away from Andrew then shot him and Tricia but leader. He changed his story. He recanted everything saying it was just a cover story to protect Sarah. In fact, he claimed he was the one who is out on an errand time of the murders. He'd gone to buy alcohol from a nearby liquor store. Richard also claimed that he wasn't the one arguing with Andrew that night it was Sarah. Apparently Andrew accused Sarah of cheating on Richard Behind his back. Andrew couldn't let this stand. He confronted Sarah about the cheating on Richard's behalf when the argument escalated Sarah shot both Andrew and Tricia. Richard. Leader admitted that he owned a Glock pistol which he kept on him at all times. He knew guns well, and he said that if he were going to shoot Andrew, and Tricia he would have never used a shotgun with deer slugs. He knew it would have been too MESSI. He also said if I was going to do it. It would have been easy to lure them out to a fishing trip and do it there. According to Richard the murders weren't planned. They took him by surprise when he came home from the liquor store around three a M. He found Sarah crying on the couch, cradling the shotgun. He smelled gunpowder in the room and knew instantly what she had done. He found his friend Andrew with a shotgun wound to his chest Tricia had been shot in the head. Richard didn't believe the murders were premeditated. Sarah had just lost control. Loved her, and so he decided to help her. Regardless of what happened, Andrew and Tricia were dead Richard. Hole and Sarah Jo pender had to act fast. After the shooting a neighbor who lived in a trailer behind the House, glanced out his window in spotted two figures in the dark. They were loading something. Back of a truck. No matter who actually Shaw Andrew and Tricia both Sarah and Richard decided to cover the murders up and dispose of the bodies to gather. Syra later told police that she helped Richard because she was afraid in her version of events. He had already killed two people and she was terrified that he might do the same to her. She said she had to stick around and be loyal. Sarah felt a surge of adrenaline Korea through her. She looked into richards is and saw only grim determination. There was no time for reflection. They had to get the bodies out of the House. She ripped a blanket off the bed and wrapped it around. WHAT USED TO BE TRICIA? Then, she grabbed the dead woman by the feet while Richard lifted her shoulders. When they got to the kitchen. slipped. The floor was slick with dark blood. She grimaced dander heart raced, but she stayed upright. She kept moving toward the back door. Once they were outside. She breathed a sigh of relief. It was just a few steps to the truck. After the ease, the body into the vehicle Sarah. And Stop to catch her breath. The autumn breeze had her face. She shivered, but not from the cold. A little after three a M Sarah and Richard drove the bodies about five blocks east, the perked behind building, unloaded the bodies and left them in a dumpster. From there. They spent home and try to clean up the crime scene as best they could. The next morning at eight am, Sarah showed up for work. will she'd been leading a double life so long like her drug use. The murderers became one more thing to put out of her mind in the cold light of day. By that time Sarah had become an expert at compartmentalizing the different aspects of her life. But her behavior was still extremely risky. Forensic psychologist Catherine Ramsland has described how hiding criminal behavior can take a toll on a person's physical and psychological health. She said. The two lives are going to clash one way or the other. Sometimes they react with violence. Sometimes they will just slip away and start over somewhere. Sarah was determined to carry on as if nothing was wrong, but our secrets were about to catch up with her. Coming up Richard and Sarah's cover up unravels. Now back to the story. In the early morning hours of Wednesday October twenty, fifth, two, thousand Andrew, Cataldi and Trish. Nordmann were killed in their home. The, murder was carried out by their roommates twenty one year old Sarah Jo pender and twenty two year old Richard Whole. It's not clear. Who actually fired the shotgun that killed them Sarah Richard but both certainly participated in covering it up. After the shooting, Sarah and Richard disposed of the bodies and a dumpster, a few blocks from their house that morning Sarah went to work at her usual time. She leader claimed that the murders traumatized her. She was terrified and continued helping Richard only because she feared she would be his next victim, but that day. She showed no sign that anything was wrong. One of her coworkers said she was in the best mood. I had seen her in for some time. While Sarah was at work. Richard stayed home and clean the house. He rented a carpet steamer, hoping to get rid of the bloodstains on the floor. After, he brought it home. He realized a steamer required three pronged outlet to plug in, so he borrowed adapter from a neighbor. Unfortunately, for him, the steamer did little to get rid of the stains in the end Richard. move the couch to the middle of the room in an attempt to cover the mess. That afternoon, some of Andrews customers attempted to reach him by phone to score some drugs. Richard answered instead. He told them that Andrew and Tricia had returned to Las Vegas they were technically fugitive, so it wasn't surprising that the left town all of a sudden. But Richard said they had left their drugs bind. He was happy to sell them himself. A little later, Richards little sister Tabitha showed up at the house. She intended to finally payback the debt. She owed. Andrew but Richard told her Andrew wasn't there. He had no details. Be Only said that Andrew had left with some guy. If Richard was disturbed by the murderers. He didn't reveal anything to assist her. In fact, he seemed to be in a good mood and even showed off his new shotgun to Tabitha. Not Long Afterwards Sarah returned home from Work Tabah the notice that Sarah was acting agitated like she didn't want to be there. As Tab, the Left, she thought to herself. Something's not right here. Something bad happened. Apparently Sarah and Richard felt the same way. After the sunset both started to get nervous. Richard desperately phone a friend event telling him. I'm into something I don't know I'll ever get out of. Sarah told Richard she didn't want to spend another night in that house and the pair decided to leave. Sarah drove her car about forty miles northeast of the city to the suburb of Anderson Indiana and check the couple into the march on Motel. Unfortunately for Sarah and Richard leaving the scene of the crime didn't make them much safer. Than evening, a man dumping garbage discovered the bodies of Andrew and Tricia. He called out to them when they didn't respond. He phoned the police. Detective Ken Martinez, who lent the homicide investigation said those bodies were atrocious. The blood alone was horrible. The bodies were both shot at close range. Investigators first complication arose when they couldn't immediately identify the victims police didn't find any idea in the dumpster, and they had trouble taking fingerprints apparently due to an oily substance around on TRICIA and Andrews Hands. Medical Examiners did however find several tattoos on Andrew's body. The name Tricia a grateful dead logo, a skull with a spiderweb, the number, sixty nine, a peace sign and David Sin Eagle. The tattoos were photographed and released the media. Authorities hoped that a member of the public might come forward with information about the crime. The following day October twenty six. Sarah didn't go to work. She and Richard fell too anxious. They left their motel room. Enjoy to his mother's house. who was out of town? Only Richard Sister Tabitha was also there. Tabitha later said when Rick God here the first thing he did was give me a big hug, and there was a look he had that told me things were not right. Drew was dead and I began to think they had something to do with it. Around eleven am that morning a news broadcast publicized pictures of Andrews Tattoos, appealing to the public to come forward and identify the victims. One of Andrew's customers recognize him. She immediately called the police. Once authorities confirmed the identities of the bodies. They were able to obtain Andrew in Tristesse. Mugshots from their Nevada arrest. Police canvassed the neighborhood with their pictures searching for more information. It didn't take long for neighbors to give beliefs Andrew interests address. Detectives visited the House and found it empty. The landlord told them that two of the residents were missing Richard and Sarah. He hadn't seen their car since the day before. Within a few hours police obtained a warrant thoroughly searched the house they found it was covered in blood stains. It was clear. They had discovered the scene of the crime. While running a background check on Richard the also found his prior arrest and is mother's address. Meanwhile hiding at his mother's House Richard Sarah to figure out their next steps. They talked about heading south to Florida, but they needed some money. I Richard Sarah and Tabitha the house to sell marijuana hoping to raise some funds. While, they were gone. Police arrived to survey the home. They were outside, waiting for Richard and Sarah later that. When the couple returned. The pair were quickly arrested and brought to the Noblesville police station less than two days after Andrew interest debts. Detectives had the murderers in custody. Police place the couple in separate interrogation rooms for their questioning detective Martinez later said. Sarah was ready to roll on whole right away. She was very intelligent. You knew that right away. Sarah told her story how Andrew and Richard got into an argument how she left the House and came home to find Andrew and Tricia dead. Syra tilted her head, and let the tears fall. The police officer across the table listened raptly to her words. She spoke carefully not too quickly in the back of her mind. She anticipated every possible mistake. She had to be sure she stuck to her story. The smallest detail might trip her up and get her into trouble. She was a planner and none of this was in the plan, but at the very least she could keep everything straight if she told her story. She thought she might be okay. So far she managed to stay calm and the police seem to believe her. There were drugs in her car. She might not be able to walk away without a possession charge, but murder was a stretch. How could anyone believe she would do something so heinous? She just wasn't that kind of girl. She would make sure everyone knew it. During the questioning Sarah was cooperative friendly, even a bit flirtatious. For years she had been practicing her role as the innocent charming young woman, she played her part in front of family members and Co workers after her arrest. She put on the same performance for the police detective Martinez said she tried to mentally seduce you. But, even if her behavior struck the officer, as manipulative police found her story largely credible. Richard Hole was their main suspect. He was the one with the Criminal Record Sarah had never been in any major. Officers may have been influenced by crime. Statistics criminologists have long recognized gender gap in violent crimes. Sociologists Darrel Stephens Mayer has research these gender differences for decades. His studies indicate that when women commit traditionally male crimes, they're more likely to be acting in a secondary role as the accomplice of a male participant rather than ask the leader. Richard's own statements ballet decided the officers conclusions. He didn't deny being the shooter while being interrogated, he implicated himself admitting that he and Andrew had struggled over the gun during the argument. But Richard later claimed his confession was ally. He felt he had no choice but to take the blame. If one of them was going to face the consequences, it was going to be him. He said. I've been known in Hamilton County for being dope dealer and everything else like that. Who in the hell are they going to believe me or this girl who goes to work forty or fifty hours a week at a good company in downtown Indianapolis? I made my bed and now I got a lion it. It's that simple. Richard was arrested on Friday morning October twenty seventh and charged with double murder. Around the same time Sarah took police to the motel where she and Richard stayed after the murders, they'd stash the shotgun in their room once they got to. The Motel Sarah lead them to the murder weapon and a pair of bloody pants, belonging to Richard. Police determined that the blood match that of the victims. Things to Sarah the detectives had been handed the perpetrator on a silver platter. Lee considered her to be a key witness in their crime. The expected her to eventually help convict Richard Hole. That Friday Sarah was released without charges. She went to stay with her father confident that she wasn't in any serious trouble. But the investigation wasn't over. And soon detectives would have second thoughts about the innocence of Sarah Jo pender. Thanks again for tuning into crimes of passion. We will be back. Wednesday with Part Two of Sarah. Jones Story. We'll talk about how Sarah Jo. PENDER dealt with the aftermath of the murders and turned a local crime story into a national new sensation. You can find more episodes of crimes of passion and all other podcast originals for free on spotify. Not only to spotify already have all of your favorite music, but now spotify is making it easy for you to enjoy all of your favorite podcast originals like crimes of passion for free from your phone, desktop or smart speaker. To stream crimes of passion on spotify just open the APP and type crimes of passion and the search far. We'll see you next time when true love meets true crime. Crimes of passion was created by Max Cutler and his podcast studios. Original executive producers include Maxine, Ron. Cutler sound designed by Trent Williamson with production assistance by Ron Shapiro, Carly Madden and Eric Larsen. The subset of crimes of passion was written by Christina Pam Hayes with writing assistance by Abigail Cannon. I'm leaning Hobbs. I. It's Laney again. Just reminding you to check out the podcast original colts, it explores the background and psychology behind the most manipulative and murderous groups in history. They go in-depth uncles. You've heard of the branch, Davidians the Peoples Temple and Heaven's Gate plus they cover a variety of colts that you may not have heard of subscribed to colts, free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Richard Sarah Richard Sarah Andrew Andrew Richard Sarah Jo. pender Richard Whole Sarah TRICIA Sarah Jo richards Sarah leader Richard Sister Tabitha Sarah Lind Indianapolis Sarah Smile Richard Hole Sarah Aside Andrew Cataldi Richard Out Tricia Nordmann
Beauty Editors Reveal the Best Gifts at Every Budget

Art Beauty

47:49 min | 10 months ago

Beauty Editors Reveal the Best Gifts at Every Budget

"It haberman this is the rpd podcast where we tell the real truth about the fake shit and today my fabulous co-host is larger dolan. She's the founder pretty connected. She is my beauty vesti for anybody who is checked out new beady live. She's also guest editor for movie magazine. And i just am obsessed with her lara. How's it going. And i'm just obsessed with the you it's great. How're you doing ambassador. I mean i'm good. I feel like we're all festive today. Because this is our holiday show And you know before we get into that. How how are your like how how your is going. I mean all things considered fantastic. I mean i. I think it's like so hard for anybody to be like amazing but we just bought a house in woodstock and getting spend a lot of quality time with my dog and my fiance. And i'm just looking forward to being quarantined up there then. Going and spending time with my family finally for the holidays. So you know you can't help but feel the magic of the season and get excited to and i think we are so appreciative of family right now india charles. They're trying to like full disclosure. Yesterday i was like a cranky by. I woke up and i was just a cold. I haven't left my house in three days because it's just been so cold and my husband put me into place laughing. He's you know what her kimonos was like. And he's like amber you better be grateful for the fact that we wake up every day with our health each other You know there's a lot of people. This is a very hard time of year so i it really put me back in my place Not that it's okay to feel like winter blues like we we all have it but sometimes it's good to sort of ground yourself ingratitude without sounding like super cliche I don't know i feel like today. I mean i was like on a sparkly dress which helped but i certainly this is not the holidays that has any of us are used to. Oh absolutely not. Do you think your point like we have to cut each other ourselves some slack. Like we're all getting into funk's. I'm not a cold weather person. So this is a challenges. The prisoner hadn't seen the tree or the windows. I'm like oh let me go at least drive since i haven't been on the subway since march really i've written it a couple times And it's cleaning everything. But i have to go outside and we just got a peleton. It is my saving grace right now because literally shake from like i didn't go outside for three days was crappy weather and it was cold but i was riding that thing every day and i realized wow this is going to save me this winter because at least you feel like you moved. We live in like eight hundred square feet box so at least they felt like in part of metal box. I got to move around. By how many people have just raved about having the palestine. I feel like the sooner to get better because it's like we're not going the gym even if you have a building with a gym probably close. Have something like that so built on community and you're just gonna use it. So much until the world normalizes unless sets at least six months away. So what what a gift to have your gym really at home and make it fun in their app like i get notifications like do yoga doors and as crazy for it. But i'm like i every day i'm like should we get a peleton. He's like where do you wanna put it. And i'm like i don't know or chaos right now. We're renovating we're doing things. But i feel like i need it so i'm very happy that you think sweating helps like from having dog going outside. Help only was i. I took a running. And i'm i'm not a runner. Let me be clear. But i took getting out doing two miles a day right around central park. That was like the one of the benefits that came out of this hole corona virus that i stopped going to the gym and i got my but outside which is really nice but When i started to add up how much money. I was spending on the gym. I was like wow the peleton basically paid for itself and you can finance them and if anybody has chase sapphire reserve which tell me you don't do. Oh this is what the one hundred and twenty dollars a free towards the app so it basically means you get three months of the free app. What's on. I know that happened to literally the day that we got ours delivered so i was like. Wow and here's here's a real thing. My husband He's he plays athletics. He doesn't go to the gym. he's not that kind of a workout person. He plays hockey and baseball. And with all of those team. Sports being shutdown. It's been great to see him. Get on this bike and Yeah there i lower. He's gonna say this is a great thing. I wanted to bring you on today to talk about like the best gifts. So let's talk if that's like an english luxury by me that that was the best gift. Probably you could get a pilot on. Do you remember huma last year. That whole the whole advocate amount and it was a girl and she's like my husband. Got pelivan chris. Everybody was just ripping apart. I'm like if my husband bought me a polygon for christmas. I'd be like thank you just an awesome way. That sounds amazing and it's not also always about losing weight it's possibly helping just like swiftly and just your mental state like exercising so ordinance honestly i've been too much time in bed or sitting around like my or to her and like older might. Why does this and so used to being so active naturally just new york city that you really start to realize we are just sitting at home in front of my computer but you have to get a move it just so good for your joins. The best part is to they have five minute classes. Also let me tell you. Yesterday i was like. I don't really feel like doing something so i was like. Let me do a five minute stretch and you know what they who's instructors robin. I love you if you're out there if you ever listen I'm obsessed with you. She is so haase's and just get you on. This and i was like you know what i'm going to hop on the bike now and then it was like and then i did a forty five minute class to me is like they've got a winning combination. So you know what. I'm glad we were going to bring. I asked her on today. Because i was like. You know what we should do. A holiday gift piece We met each other through. Doing new beauty. Live and i was like you know what let's do something were were. You're talking about three of your favorite items for the holidays I was gonna talk about mine because we're what like ten days away from the holidays. Which means most people are gonna start shopping aid Realistically don't worry. Some of my stuff you can get quickly But i like this number one. You got a big budget. Hello todd yeah. Let's hide lows by the democrats and the little ones. It's like i mean. Listen i think there are so many great gifts right now set so i dislike encourage everybody in the beauty space like go on space. Go sephora going all to go to your favorite brands. I think everyone is really going above. And beyond the season narrowing down to three was like pretty impossible. I just picked three things at like. I feel like instantly get excited. Okay the first is expensive. They started two hundred dollars a foreign steady candle and the reason why. I'm kicking this item. And so i just got house. I got a few candles. I put them on my registry. They were literally like the engage. Wedding wedding registered literally. I can't sleep like home stuff. But all i wanted was these channels. I got a few different ones. And they're just a work of art. Like i don't even know that i'm ever gonna light. It won't what we can talk about that because it's funny when when we were discussing this Literally that day somebody was like. Hey can you help me. I need to find a gift for a client of mine. I'm looking for something high end. And i love network so i went on deportes like looking at some of the things that i came across his candle and i was like. You've gotta be effing hitting me. Two hundred i think it was like two hundred twenty dollars but in all fairness which then was funny because when we were talking about at. You're like i love these can't it was just one of those funny moments where it was like all right. I'm not far off now to me. it is very expensive. I also laugh. Because i think most people who have this will probably never in them but they're so beautiful. They are so stunningly beautiful. It's like a piece of our and the arizona to pick this one. Is i actually put it on. My stories and i have never had such a reaction to a product so everybody was like. Oh my gosh. I want one so bad. I love it and yes. It's expensive but i feel like a nice handle starts fifty dollars. You kind of bring up you. Can't we use it like this. They've sony different patterns imprint. You put it on your bookshelf. And you're just like can have it forever. So i think from that aspect like would you rather four nice campbell's one four necessity. I i love it. I feel like i've got a lot of glade candles. Those are like four ninety nine. They're not the same thoroughly not Do you know are they soy. Do you happen to know. Probably most of them are so now that they go. Because i'm like a canister full the ones that aren't soy so i had a great. I was actually an expensive candle that somebody bought me. Last year was burning at a beautiful ludwick. I loved it and one day. I looked at my white cabinets and like everything looks really dirty and wipe them. I realized soot everywhere. So my sister-in-law actually told me that soy candles don't do that so from sunday forever. Which is another place where i love to get gifts. They have like a wit cutters. So i think you do have to follow instructions. And i do. It's like even with some like like nicer nest handles what i love about. This one is just like the finish in the top. Because i find like it's not see through because let's see through as soon as you've finished burning now i always have like black sit around the edges or not able to like from makeup brushes or do something really chic with it. So that's why. I went with this your point. If you're looking for a nice client gift. Like i knew two hundred fifty dollars to sell high but like no one's gonna be like. Oh i don't want that or like it's just such a lovely. It feels like a present Is a guest. And as one of the things like. I said World's do they them do now. They just launched blue mercury retain other so there some of the other bigger ones. I mean obviously this is totally non sponsors. I probably should have google than done. A ton of recent like neiman. Marcus as the net Marcus probably does. Have you know the net Wrapping when you get a gift from not just feels like a like will arrive feeling like money again. Where are you going to get yours next. Yes so my high end thing which You've heard me talk about before again. is the dermot flash so i love closer but there's hair here which is gross I love this thing. It's one hundred ninety nine dollars you can get it at Dermot flash you can get it at sephora. I don't think they sell them at ulta but A couple other online retailers essentially. This is a micro derm abrasion device for your face. I love this. I feel like he gets off. All that velez hair and I tell people all the time. Like if you want smooth makeup this to me is the thing that i love. I buy the refills for them. From sephora like whenever sephora has their sales they have like a refill pack. Because it comes with razors. I don't have it. Actually i do. I have here economies. Like hopping right. So you're supposed to use each razor once and listen. I called my lady shaver. Because that's essentially what you're doing you're shaving your face The hair won't quebec Thicker and the refills. Are i feel like you use one. It's a one time use. Only they save us at once a week. I am not particularly harry person. But i think i use mine every two to three weeks i guess love it i feel like it. It gets rid of the dead skin cells and then everything just lays super flat and smooth. So yes i. This is my. This is my high luxury beauty amazing product. I actually went to their original launch. This is actually the one amber picked. Is there newer version. I think it came out like one or two years ago because their original great but this one is like so much more elevated. they kind of like worked out. All these like the grip is better at super tehran's and for anybody goes and gets dermot planning done. This is your dermot planning alternative. You in durham penny literally. Just take the dead skin cells at exploits and it just like it's not it's it's not like any sort of it's not uncomfortable at all and it just Each baas all that like layer. And i i'm with you. I do not be like once a month or two so you really need and a just at the end like they give you a face wash products us and it just like takes off that dead layer of skin when you're doing your makeup or skin care. Everything's just lower here. He looks so smooth. It really does like shocked by how much air comes off. Like you hear in places that you don't even know you had hair. It's not like a heady bear yet. It's hilarious when you do that like just like little. It's like a hairball of just like fine hair. Like everywhere on your face but are you. Do you feel like Like are you generally like a harry person. Do you find like like. I don't have a lot of my mom's asians. I think that i get that like well. I'm armenian so. I feel like i should be naturally have harry but for some reason. I'm like very lucky like my mom and who is like is not area. I definitely have some. But like i don't even need to use this for my like here. Removal like i use it. Like i said richard serra months but i don't see grow back everything superfine that comes in also i think as you get older for me at least like i feel like my here has gotten thinner like i really don't have. Ads remember being so conscious his school. And maybe it was just because i was a teenager but now like why. I don't really have that. We have air knowing communal. And i certainly don't have as much i don't either and you know what probably yes. I think it was like a little bit of both i when we first started getting hair. It's like oh and now you're like please just a hair. Just stay wherever. Ken accepted her face. So but if you get a lot of herring as like i mean i definitely use it in between like my brow my hairline. Just make sure everything's sort of like defined in you know it definitely will take care of a hairs by all means it just like the upper lip i mean and here. I noticed that the most is like if you get along the jaw. There's something when you're looking at somebody you don't look at somebody and say well. They've got a lot of villas hair. Volunteers very fine peach fuzz. But when you take it off people look. God looks great. Everything will glowing. Because it's just smooth right. It's just it's just smooth user tab whenever i'm doing around by forehead. I always cover my eyebrows because that would be a fortunate it will. It can take off your eyebrows so definitely. Be very cautious of that I that's a smart. I feel like i should put like my finger finger your little zone that like. I'm very safe about that. Because i am very paranoid about yet. You don't wanna you don't wanna take I've learned void. Wouldn't take to off your because it looks a natural. You just gotta be careful. But it's great for a year around the chin perfection. That was my big. If you if you have somebody that you need to splurge on That's a great gift So next up mix to are kind of similar price. but i'm going to go beauty blender on they've really cute sachs. This is the rocket to fall as it actually includes three beauty blunders when in the classic pink yellow and green and then two little so cleaners. I think this is forty nine dollars. But they've cute little like ornament looking beauty blenders for twenty dollars it just like a fun range of price points. I just feel like people when they used for so. Everyone loves beauty blender. It's such a game changer. When it comes to makeup application you can use a dry or is. I recommend it wet. You just literally. I put some water on it and you just squint your hand. You'll see you don't need like a ton of water. You'll see it like puff up in size and then you're good to go and i liked put my foundation on my hand then kind of use it from there a bit and i mean. They're just so fun at like twenty dollars like is it comes like Ornament packaging. They do a good job and it's just like a fun secret. San love it gift by its had we had ran on here The founder of fiji blender and i also dare make up a cleaner. That ditto yet graze the. I use it for my brushes so i use it for all of my brushes and i have this Kind of rubbery has a little rubber. Is that that brush today have onto the beauty has a little one you're talking about the sigma which we also talk about Navidi live i love signals like a big they different sizes but like silicone so around. I don't even feel like a makeup brush. Clean it's a pad and basically it's got different grips of different angles. You can really like getting your brushes. If it's a more thick brusher certain parts of it that you can like work a little harder and it's just like suction cups to your like insensitive to sink. Yeah we my in their makeup brushes gamma sigma will just going to throw the urban lake view bunder. They do have a little one. That comes in but anything that just keep your products being because i feel like we have enough with germs this era and used to wash makeup brushes with like don or or dish soap Which i thought was great. For never again the beauty blender. So i am a convert with that and the sigma pad. I think i have like the knockoff version. One from abbas on amazon so But it's yet silicone pad get the sigma want. I guess and it six in and it. I mean everything is clean. Yeah no i agree like the soap is amazing accurate from my brush. If you are using brushes you can do like a dawn soap. I think is a little bit easier to get to just because of the nature of how they're like shape but beauty blender. There's so much foundation in it that's whole plants water bringing it into like helping you really do that. Flawless applications. You really want like a good makeup leaner specifically fares To really get clean cleanup people. I see gross. Be blenders sometimes take cases you now. There was like a whole thing i remember. We talked about iran but there was like this article that came up. It was like your beauty. Blender can kill you and what they found like. Yeah most people like that beauty. Blenders can can have bacteria if people don't wash them. So can your makeup brushes like if you're throwing stuff into your makeup bag like it's kind of it yet it's gonna be gross cleaner makeup. Brushes i try to remind people sometimes in social media. When i'm doing it right like so it's once a week. That's fine it's you know. I generally my foundation brushes. I do a lot more often but You know cleaning makeup brushes. usa. We're spf in cleaner makeup russia's another psa. Which i feel like. I don't know why people are so i. I don't get it where masks. We should add that. I love you and this is not people will see this Laura my my list. Which i've been getting for everybody because i wear them on people of the mash teens. You're pretty connected. Mass genes are in spain. So i have them in all different colors. And i wanted to say last night my neighbor It's been kovic. We don't really bump into each other. But i bump into my neighbor last night and he had on this. You're you're like it was like the The black plastic he mass gene is that connected. He's like yeah. I know lord we anyway had a moment because there's so recognizable started. What twenty dollars at the one that you're talking about that's our dylan. Plastic james. it's funny. We launched him for kids in adults but they are by far the most popular with adults. 'cause we have it in black and like a royal blue and it's super light and we actually you're holding our classic nikki long in the many which are like what put us on the map and lots of two and a half years ago and obviously started. Kobe mask Exists so everyone went crazy for them but we discovered a week the men's market the kids marquette. We needed to kind of diversifier option. Cheek on you. You know so. We were chic. And i have this to the goal. I have with With my i. I do like if i am doing. This is my fancy. This silk mass of her goings were fancy. But we're just And people stop. Where did you get them yet. And i'm working as a necklace. I actually have this secret in sharm. We did a little collaboration. And they have the swarovski crystal and you can literally take it off the clip and put it anywhere where it has a mass janet. Put it up at the top. So it's really send you want their singing and the white ones a double for sunglasses. Because i'm like the sun last queens that we try to make them very multifunctional so that one. Hopefully the day comes when this is over. You can still use your products. I don't know. I feel like i might never give mass again because it's been a while since i've been sick and i really appreciate that but the other thing. I wanna say great about these that because my husband's like i dunno. I dunno if i to wear girl it was but look watch when you go to a restaurant. It's sitting on your chair. It's not you know you don't put it down on the table. You don't put it out the door you if you're walking somewhere like if you don't need to wear you can do you want but i'm going to change his mind. That's why we really worked hard in the last month to launch a lot of man's when we thinner and we really survey die so there was the black plastic one. There's something called the charlie one which is like skinny snakeskin. One we now have it in guyana. I this one he does. He's got is what he uses. Now we have. Is that the black one or is it silver. Let's good so that one is really good for guys. I feel like they don't feel too truce of we a chain version of that. And then we have the black dylan which you saw on your neighbor. Which makes me so happy. I get taxed all the time. Indiana jones like. I saw somebody with your chain which chatted mine on in like honestly any sort of like happy. Good news twenty in such a blessing. Whatever i see here that it's like the of funds over by mets chain or bonded. I say girl. I'm really proud of you because the hard like people will stop me in the street at a woman's mistreat. She's like excuse me Cat i was like here. we go. She's like ordering them on the spot because they are. They're they're chic and it's what twenty two dollars. I mean the you thirty six along with. There's a really twenty to dollars and again you know it's so hard i think to find items you want right now. Anything us wanna shop. We can't really go in store and you what's been to treat yourself but really wants to be affordable high-quality fun and now we've it's mass chain to make people's lives easier and makes me so happy that that major lewis it well because i was like i. I want this on the list. And you know what i don't really like to. I feel like I most of the time now. I'm in sweatpants like i. Don't give a f. I am out in like sweat. Pants and socks are Sneakers rather Wanna have this on. I feel really elevates. Might look because it looks like okay. I go from being kind of a slob to being like high fashion leisure. Does that make sense of the same way. I live with my joggers. Like i put on like leggings either. Do like tight fitting clothes. I heard those spaces ever talks using stinks slugging zainal which one's the fo looking leather run. Okay the full leather. I want i was looking at the felt. Leather cameron's amber stop. I needed my. Because i have like ten thousand pairs of leggings. Learned any of them to be. That's like wearing fitted clothing right now. But i was like okay black friday. I've always wanted these. I see them everywhere as let's do this and it was like look means something that's not cotton and you know question. How what do you think is the latest date that people can order these. They're gonna get shipped out so we're fast Within twenty four hours because we get that question a lot you know the only thing that can hinder it is the post office. I think that they you know and never be asked like been. I've had challenges getting things. We've been very lucky. But we try to be so buttoned up on our end because we know what it means must of the emails man like you ship that there and do a gift card like what do you want me to like a slow note from you. Like what do we need to do to help you get your percent. But we've so far have been very fortunate But you've got one out of every two hundred. Orders is doomed to the no of course the agnostic to get out fast. 'cause i i that's like listen for that price point. It's like such a chic gift that like you can send to pretty much anybody and say hey speaking of the mail that mail people. I don't know if you do holiday tips or but Technically the usps isn't supposed to get cash cash. But what like a cute thing if you need to get like a gift for like your kids teacher or for You know your mail person male woman Or man You know it it's gorgeous. I love it. Yeah it is fun givens. That's why we also want so many of our thinner savings when you just showed my materials covering on a mass chance but yeah we did do like the plastics guy. Something like this for post post workout so light it makes it really easy to just take it on. It will work with those disposable. Both of these will. This comes in black which Although i think covers run i above wearing color and now we're styling or mass in our own of people were fashionable like amber nine today but in their normal lives. Like you've got options. I think if you are going to like holiday party of its virtual like we are right now and you want to be like chic. It's fun to like have accessories on our future swing with family or your pod or whatever. The cool kids are calling these days with a group. You know it is nice to have it and it just for me. It's like a security blanket. Like sometimes i don't even take it off like i put my mass chain on like i don't even feel it with the white one like the other day i went to take john o. Eilly filming something. And i was like i'm so not used to. It was like a mask on dislike right down my stairs. But i was like shocked for a second. We leave ours. Here's the we leave ours hanging by the door so like we'll swap out a clean one and it's right there by the door so when we take her keys we Yeah i honestly cannot read about this enough. And i cannot tell you how many people are like. Where'd you get that from. I need this And also just another reason. I love that the wintertime wearing a mask right. Now is actually a godsend for new york. Windy days oh yeah. I agree. ami's kind of help keep waited. Okay so people can get them. Where pretty connected dot com pretty dot com slash or just dot com. You'll see a little shop button We're on c. Or an amazon rupture should feel dot com Yeah so yeah. I think amazon. Yeah we did it because you know amazon. Such an important tool and people are just a place that people like to shop at their card so that is a newer thing for us since at sees more vibe with being smaller business but we just realized that to really make it extra easy on in our consumer. We should opened a bigger audience but also just ordered iraq. Maybe from pretty connected is always wonderful. Then we got full control to okay so my last one is because we met at new beauty in your beauty is actually the most amazing place to find beauty products. They actually have a beauty past program. Where every friday you sign up you get a free product that you can just pay for shipping. You can sign up web. But they're connick test tested which is beauty subscription service. It's twenty ninety five plus shipping. You can do a yearly subscription in. It's like you get six tubes and inside. You're guaranteed to get eight products this month though for november was insane it's nine products plus a bonus and they have a product who doctor dentist froze sunday. Riley docket cut of the values over two hundred dollars against for twenty nine ninety five. Got co lab dry shampoo which i love as brandon actually launched in. Us last year amusing. If you're looking for a good dry shampoo we've got event thermal water. In this month's my lights are bright but is is the most ill like beauty sampling subscription program. Because like you said it's full-size full-sized. Yeah for twenty nine bucks. It's awesome the i mean. I think each one of these like dr brand product. That's more than twenty nine. This is way more than twenty nine dollars on his own. And you're also getting you know addict this new lip product. You get doctors nobile. Which i'm super curious evans started using this product. But i've been seeing oliver mate grandpa's and that's what i love about. New beauty is that you're getting a few classic things you like. The brands you know in lobbying. Why and then you're getting to try new brands and you're like oh maybe i don't know what it syncs with Cloud web cc. Cream is that. I wanna see like. I'll try to not fall in love with like there's a good discovery element to them and every month. It's like every other monday so exciting to see. What is emma nino. You gave us It's a hand sanitizer. So it's like practical interest in its berry. Skincare focus which likened like hair or makeup. It's not like all just one category really mix it up and i like that too because Listen i'm new beauty and again this is not being sponsored by them We met there. You know we do. The new video live in extranets coming up in not jack up sorry february so right in time for the holidays but the products they'd they'd pick are really results focused. So it's not like oh. This occurred her own Was an ad doing this. They're like these are ingredients use products that are gonna work I yeah. I can't speak enough in for twenty nine bucks. It's such a cute at it comes into beautiful package to e and like if you get something like this with all these products Thirty dollars and someone's opening it. It's still means over two hundred dollars in products and yet tamara's point like everything's editor. Curated they are. They include a book on what it is why they love it. How it works like it's really fun especially your beauty lover and you want to really understand what ingredients why should using who it's four and sometimes lets. You might just want three out of the eight and you'll get the others so fun disturbance kings. It's got great stuff ambers like the super host of the newbie lives and it's so fun. Because a lot of the brands you seem has to build who the founders come up on those show when she's interviewing them. You're talking about the new products coming out and just had that like they're just like the ultimate beauty experience. I feel like from magazine to gifted advanced to like product. They really do a good three. Sixty of just like peleton. They've got a really good community. So thank you all those people who have supported us not just here at our beauty We also actually had a doctor's zeon here. So i know her product line. It's finally now in sephora launching. Her stuff is awesome by the way. Haven't tried it things. I've heard like i really am always trying thousand things. But they have the high acid impact ceremony. That just has me like all over. I love like an instant plump. Like and lobbied medicine. Because i'd like to throw to make as mark acids on those things just touch up during the day on mike back from a real fast just loved liked that something that instant plumping And yet she's really. Her product line is really made for You know to deal with Immunology so whether you're stressed and breaking now or You know if you're just getting older and your hormones are changing She's got something for everybody. My last thing is An amazon product super people heard the show. You've heard me talk about this years i just order them for myself And so that they're the epi elegant tape pronounce it I like if you go on amazon. You search this. And i'll try to have links to all of this stuff in the youtube description but it comes right now Six sets of gloves and sit Six sets of socks for twenty dollars. How cute are these little stocking stuffers or to just say thank you for a hostess gift or for yourself excessive fees you put them on. It's like the gloves you get the nail salon. I take them with me. When i travel that will happen. One day again Actually i haven't tried the they just out with these intensive repair and gloves from super psyched. But you put him on it super clean. I do wanna get out of the shower And you know. It's just a very inexpensive really nice little luxury to take care of yourself. Wellness have you ever tried Avin try that one. I've tried different versions. And i love them. I think anything with the glove. It just makes. i'm also like not getting managers and pedicures right now for the first time in adult life so for me. I'm like bring on the baby bring on the like. I have like a little drawer. Blake mass hand has formats. And i'm like all i've i've used were expensive i of these and here's why i really liked this particular brand They it's so simple more. Brench do this on the gloves. They have like a little tab. Yeah unlike shut it up because were about twenty minutes and that we've product isn't signing on some of the more expensive ones. It just just like a plastic gloves. But you're kind of open here same thing with the. Booties the. Have this little sticker tab so whoever you are out there at the l. you got my business because of this one little saying that that makes it easy komo around and doing stuff in the gloves aren't gonna slide. Also but i've been noticing that more of the foot lines have updated a sticker sticker thing is just like key it just like you said and you take personal. I just took it out of the package. I hate when i do the same thing. With like the mass. I hate when i take it out. And all of a sudden slime stripping out. There's none of that can you see. It's like super clean and then you can put them on. It's like they've mastered a desire. Is that that little tab yet but you can then stick so. It's a nice tight fit. Does it explicitly just doing the softness than that may take. It is like i do fleet ones where my feet starts appeal. And it's really scary looking. And when i haven't been they have appealing one which i just found out when i was like re searching today to find out the price of this which i think try. I haven't tried baby foot. It is. I don't think disgusting but is does it work so again. Yeah so there's baby foot. I just tried to one from star skin cheo. Here's what i'm going to tell you about. How long lead them on is going to determine how much skin comes off like. How much did sells you need now. Obviously i had had a pedicure in so long that i was like okay so i tried to start it appealed but it wasn't as shopping when i did a before i had more says on my feet last year when i did it But yeah they tell you. I think it fifteen to twenty five g give you a range in the You're gonna leave it on. But what's crazy. is you do it. Then you're like okay. Nothing happens it just standard and you kind of forget about it and then literally a week later your feet starts feeling. And you're like oh yeah. I totally forgot did that. You just read just long enough for you to forget soon. You're gonna wanna wear socks yet. The one from star skin was not too drastic. I did have led some peeling but it was actually lovely that it was light just because just needed like one or two layers off without that whole like getting my foot scrubbed at the pedagogy. I was this new shower which i shower. League wants replaceable. disclosure But i did notice when. I showered alva. Sudden appealing was more drastic. Almost like ignited it To be a little. I heard i heard that with like the be by. I guess we'll have to try this and now is the time of year to do that when you're not in flipflops in sandals But somebody said that like you need to they recommend soaking your foot and i don't have a bathtub. I've just got a shower so But you really need to like it just takes like legacy too. I think what you're they're reacting to. How much law. Like the first time the day before donald too long It wasn't bad thing just feels so and you're wearing shoes. You're worried about like sun. Exposure like you should be in the summertime because you do get but like it's nice. I really appreciate it. I mean again. It's like every three to six months. I don't think you have to do it like a crazy amount. But my feet definite if you'd like houses weaker noticing leg. Yeah so like you know when your feet need that pedicure. It's gray inexpensive. Quick way to just like. But i'm sure the Very comparable the ones on the market. And i think baby really like it to surface and people love each even instagram. The most disgusting looking back now growth. A lot of brands have come up with great ones. So there's like more of a market you can probably gonna amazon. Get your breath you know. They're fun to do. I fully support it. So can i ask you like. Is there anything that you really wanted for christmas. I wanna palatine now. You just want to know. I mean look my heads and like the furniture game now in terms of things. I've cut down so much in makeup. I feel like. I have so many fun test. Tube skin care products to tries or been like a little. I'm trying to almost like tunnel vision. But i have to say. I did shop pretty drastically for me on black friday sales for so i was like. Oh that's been thing i want. you know. i found like i was surprised by huguet. Get okay besides that. Besides the spank pants. Is there anything else that you are like. I ordered a lot of like little things for small businesses. Like this girl's really cute girl on instagram. stuff rescues and. I'm like by dogs rescues this year. These new t shirts. I heard that handles like restaurants style. So i got a teacher from her. This i'm yours. Alison disease cute beanies. Were some of those like a lot of underwear for american. Calvin klein like i was kind of like going. A little bracket on the banks would also get some stuff from sunday forever. Because that's just easy gifts for the holidays of these cool like equalize stickers. I want one for myself in case. What else did i get og zoo. Oh i love odd i. This is a year of like way more practical. So practic on your brain lights. I'm like i want like. I like easier gathering light. My friend is not boring. that is professor. Take everything is like making my life. Easier versus like the more indulgences things You know even. I more stuff right and like i just think there's so much clutter in. I'm just been trying to declutter my life. Now that i'm home so much. Normal on notice is running around. But now mike and i've always been that person's like i wanna trip like i want to have an experience. That's a little bit of a challenge right now so you get to. Pj's some key sets. I got like fun really basic. Thank you We see on black. Friday what's your list. We were in philadelphia. And it's like shopping. I went to the mall. I don't know this year on a little bit overwhelmed. The problem is to also like my dad. Everything that i want for myself. I buy for myself. My husband has the hardest time because he's like. Oh i was gonna. I don't have the patience if i wanted. I want right now. And i'm just making up for myself but this year like in terms of like clothing and everything i i am not going anywhere. You know So i got some workout clothes. I asked my husband. Britain new new shoes. 'cause we just got the bike and my spin shoes are like fifteen years old and yet and like stuff for the house and then we. We paid off something for mortgage. How romantic is that. They did get love. I did a lot of those like attic drainage from amazon. I bought like the leg. You put like a booty all the way up your leg not not and massages your leg than i got one for my knee. Then i got the like gun. One that used to like on we got one. I got this other one of amazon. In which told me that had different like heads you could put on it and it was a little more compact because i want for my leg bought like sports injuries so those were like my funds splurge but again yes exactly may come these cool cases you can take him sent this to me. We had it out last night because the polygon this one is from. Yeah i picked six hundred bucks. Let me you. She got persona non amazon. I that might be the one that different heads comes with. It comes with like around with yup. Yes yes i bus version of that. And i was like having so much fun. He's like. I can't get a massage right now. Banning all like half off around one hundred bucks. And i was like you know what as much as Like a cheap one. Now you get this thing forever. So i'm trying to find things that like. Make me feel and those will be but i'm also like a sucker for like those amazon like instagram ads. See something like oh. Maybe i do need that. Like cruel light thing that moves with your camera your phone newbies like i see you. Pj or maybe do that. Like i get really i. I'm a huge fan of I love their pajamas with their super. Expensive let me tell you. I went in the gap is doing knockoffs right now. Not not the gap is doing equally saw. I wanna say to like an taylor as blown me away. There is like there. I've never found More of their fashion forward pieces online you. Pj really like. I don't know they have so much good stuff right now. That the gap. Because i was like what is it was all like two fifty now fifty dollars. Yeah just our. I was like. Oh my god and add. And it's fifty percent digital forty percent off. And i was like i was young Because i feel like the answer. I was talking about my girlfriend like ann taylor. Banana republic the. They will go through waves. J. crew words like somebody like bang an out hot fashion items. And then it's like rah larue. Business casual type clothes and i feel like i shopped the opposite of that. I'm getting out mike. The pg's in the like not had had been for ten dollars in these like she and whatever people are like. Where'd you get an taylor. Haw and i'm like yeah. I think all the non hillary in taylor stuff but there's a lot of it but you just he and i'm not knocking at stuff. Just not my personal like cheese. Dial business casual. But i find like the most is. I like jokes. Used to go there previews when they had them be like. You need like me kidding. I bet we met each other. One of those is good previews. oh their professor music. And i'm always like you need to have a different name like just an i mean they'd have lost. But i find that. Similar van taylor my brain like they need to have one. That's like this is the fashiony stuff because it is so good at it so untrendy by jogger immediately tailored or something or does it taste shopping favorites names. 'cause that's where i'm There's a legacy that a lot of it. It's just like hidden within their cousy sweaters in like author. some i was looking at cousy. That's my other thing for this season there is this woman on oetzi. Her name is nina niche. She's in serbia. I believe Makes these handmade Crash i hope my girlfriend her anyway. She makes these like these handmade alpacas slippers like little. I i take a while to get here. Not because she doesn't ship them out because of what's going on right now with covert. I hope it here. But i ordered them for like so many different people. Because they're so cute and cozy fashionable and like now. She's doing these like a durable center so or or adorable shoes but she has some. They're like queen detailed. they're super cute though the software things ever had i live for. I'd say i think it's a great place to shop. I always find like even. I love like evil. I things like google blind. They'll be like tons of options. slipper. It's it's so fun to just see like someone was wearing this metro the coins Zammit of it. And i was like. Oh yeah like little like i find. Setv such a fun place to shop. And i love supporting out those little brands like it's just wonderful and now we can get your read on there to thank you and by the white girl i love i love. I saw the charms on their today. As it good for you. I love that you are just taking everything evolving Thank you so much for being on laura just you know. I hope that people with all of her honest sort of gift stuff. I i wanted to give people some ideas you know because it's it is it's like a hard time of year and sometimes it's really just hard to shop for people so it's like what. What are the things that you and i really love getting get the i always tell people get a gift. See that way people can just swap it out like you try to find that you like if you're going to a place like a sephora They'll find something else. They want like barron. You know there's really not. I might get me a cvs gift. Cards might feel like i feel like cvs trader. Joe's like the motor were amazon. Like all three of those. You're gonna find something amazon. Just really cute things right now. To where if you order gift cards they come in like little like little packaging like little different singers like a snowflake that like you can reuse for stop so so many options out there and what a lot of amazon prime's can actually do your shopping two days before christmas. There's a shot in stark. You may get time for all of you that your gifts arrive in. But i think everybody also understands. Hopefully everyone just be with their families and save virtually you're in some formats and happy. He's amber. I'm so happy to be spending this time with you. Happy holidays girl congrats in your house. Enjoy thank you so much. You guys have questions. Each one is. She is a style and beauty. Expert always send. You can find her on instagram at pretty connected awful on our website pretty on semi questions. Pillow rb podcast primary on instagram and facebook at rpd. Podcasts pennants. always. We will see you next tuesday our last show.

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