19 Burst results for "Richard Reeves"

"richard reeves" Discussed on The Good Fight

The Good Fight

06:25 min | 7 months ago

"richard reeves" Discussed on The Good Fight

"Podcast called dialogues with richard reeves. I've recently written a peaceful persuasion with the title. Don't roll back. Due process on campus and the piece is about title nine which is the federal law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in education but it also and most pertinently shapes the way we handle sexual assault claims and harassment in colleges. I should probably start by saying perhaps the only thing less popular to say than donald trump got this right might be donald trump. Got this right after. Barack obama got this wrong. But that's precisely the case with what happened with title nine. There were three big problems with the two thousand eleven guidance. The i was the burden of proof was set. Way too low is called the preponderance level of proof which just means more than fifty one percent more likely than not. that's pretty low given what's at stake. The second is that the guidance made the definition of harassment. Too broad in the one off. Unwelcome advances or comments could count as harassment and then third the guidance pushed what was called a single investigator model which meant essentially the same person was responsible for investigating and then deciding on the punishment for someone who was accused of a so. All three of these problems led to a series of civil lawsuits. Emily ofi who's also persuasion number as written a lot about this an old freer. Those problems were addressed by. Betsy devos in a tenure. As donald trump's education secretary after long notice and comment period issued a final rule right at the end of the trump administration in twenty twenty which did the following a gave colleges the choice about what burden of proof to level they could still have preponderance this fifty one percent but they could also choose a high level of evidence as well secondly it put the definition of harassment in line with the rest of the law which is the reeds pervasive and severe to be actionable. They couldn't be a case brought against a one off case. And thirdly backed away from pushing the single investigator model so this is clearly a halt front in the culture. Wars on kanani hope. The temperatures do cool in this area college administrators. A desperate for settled policy here. An administration should stick with the twenty twenty rule which strikes the right balance between justice victims and due process for the accused. Richard reeves piece called. Don't roll back. Due process on campus was published by persuasion to learn more about the community were building persuasion and to get similar articles directly into your inbox had to www dot persuasion dog community. Well today it's special pleasure to have such a different kind of conversation with alpha brooks art. Was the leader of the american enterprise institute for many years. He was an orchestra musician in barcelona before that. And he's now the william henry bloomberg professor of the practice of public leadership at harvard. Kennedy school he has taken a strange time in his career which is to stop thinking and talking a lot about happiness about how to build a happy and meaningful life but he grounds was reflections. Not in strange of help stuff but in syria social science and so we had a broad and deep conversation run vets informed powerful signs informed by philosophy and informed by the spiritual traditions in which office deep to really think about how to build happy and meaningful life. I gained a lot of happens from this conversation. I enjoyed it. a lot. learned a lot from it. It is a little different from our usual fair. But i think you will get a kick out of it as well offer brooks welcome to podcast. Thank you thank you for having me your show. How have you been. It's been a strange yet. But let me answer this in a substantive way that speaks to you interest. which is. I'm a big believer in psychological. Fixed points that you know. When i broke my ankle four five years ago. If you'd ask him before that how that would affect my happiness. I would have said. Oh my god. I'm going to be so miserable free mountains. I'm an active guy. I like to go and meet people go around and actually i don't think it had a huge impact on my wellbeing. I rearranged my life a little bit. I read a little bit more. Had people come to my house. I didn't think it made a huge difference. And there's some research that shows that actually people sort of wide to be a particular way and if they win the lottery or avatar will break up. It might make happy for a few months old less happy for a few months but then they sort of go back to normal. So what do you think about the psychological fixed point and can we improve our happiness despite that. Yeah that's been a big question for a lot of people during the virus epidemic. Because they thought that you know risk Everything down we're quarantining lowly etcetera and. That's going to depress mood forever. In a lot of people have found that they're actually not remarkably unhappier that notwithstanding many of the mental health challenges of people faced which is different. That's a different category different species and problems that we're talking about so basically two kinds of research that inform this. The first is the research on the set point on the baseline equilibrium level of happiness. And that's your genetic proclivity toward happiness. There's a body of empirical data on identical twins that were separated at birth adopted two separate families. Obviously they'll be really unethical if you did that for social science reasons but it happens spontaneously between the nineteen thirties nineteen sixties and they were reunited very joyfully as adults and given personality tests they found is almost every aspect of personality between forty and eighty percent genetic which i hate everybody. Here who wants to be in the united states. Hates the idea that part of your genetic because we all want to be the captain of our happiness ship but about forty eight percent depending on how you count it somewhere between forty four and fifty two percent of happiness is genetic so half half of your happiness is like your mother did make you unhappy so of the other. Half approximately half of the half is circumstantial. The stuff that you're talking about. Everybody thinks that circumstances are what's gonna make regular happiness getting raise owning lots of the right plus Nino having a child those kinds of things. That person. I love falls in love with me to then i'll finally to have. If i get into an accident they'll be unhappy to get fired from a job in all the unhappy. That's all wrong..

donald trump richard reeves Emily ofi Betsy devos kanani Richard reeves alpha brooks american enterprise institute william henry bloomberg Barack obama Kennedy school barcelona syria harvard brooks united states
"richard reeves" Discussed on NIGHTLIGHT: A Horror Fiction Podcast

NIGHTLIGHT: A Horror Fiction Podcast

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"richard reeves" Discussed on NIGHTLIGHT: A Horror Fiction Podcast

"Did not cry. I washed my bloody scratches clean in the kitchen. Sink lou at the laugh and climb the stairs to go into my room. That is door was closed. But i could hear burn debts voice through the door wide awake. Richard was to hugh me. I said talk to him. Got damaged does he. Goes down here. Do you know what time it is stole into my room and shut the door. I tore off every piece of clothing. I was wearing. Even though my body was shaking. I climbed into my bed under the covers seeking sanctuary. While my breathing came hard and deep from my lungs i had headache. The memory of midnights blood on the knife had made my stomach. Twist and i was afraid. I would be sick as i lay there. I remembered i'd left. Daddy's pocket watch lion on the bottom floor next to burn a debts bowl from the kitchen. They would be mad about that. I wanted to go and fetch them. But i couldn't move from where i lay. My eyes were closed tight but in my third eye. What daddy calls my magic. I i could see daddy leave in his room where it his best brown suit and white shirt with his brown sunday derby. He was wearing the clothes that told everyone that he was richard reeves a business owner and he was not a hard luck. Sorta man richard. You aren't thinking clearly you know what they'll do to an oddity yellow negro who thinks he can just walking and say thank of it. Richard don't be a fool. Don't get your name. Stuck in his mess. Temple is going to be all right. You want it. What about your family. What gummy latisha square. Jesus if you don't stop this foolishness. I won't be here when you'll get back. Richards read wretched. Don't go into debts. Profess love just sounded like the same old. Hate to me no matter. I'd bled midnight and the curse was broken. Daddy's ears belonged to himself again and he had his strength back. I closed my eyes smiling. The sound of that purring engine as it drove away was as sweet as the memory of laughter brother on the porch at night as christmas morning and as gentle as the stinging of mama's loving hands when she pulled my hair into type lattes between her knees the way only mama really knew how and then by magic. I it stopped. Working brothers. future was blurring and far away. Not for me to know. All i knew for sure was that richard reeves was on his way to the trial in his good suit to try to save brother. And that knowledge would last me. As long as i would live. That was last nine. That's right daddy's off to defend brother. It's trial day talking to mostly Stepmother that she still here but her words don't work anymore. Thanks letty for telling us your story. Yes and and good luck at the trial. I hope brother goes free. You best be going now. I still got some prayers to say. My magic is.

richard reeves Richard latisha square hugh headache richard Richards Daddy mama letty
"richard reeves" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"richard reeves" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Removed from service. Stroman, who stepped down from the postal Service after D Joy took over says while there is enough capacity at most postal facilities, TTO handle more mail. There could be some problems at specific locations where, for example, only a single sorting machine remains in place. You have no backup. And it may take hours. They could take days to fix that. And if that happens in the middle of election, what is the impact on the election Did Joy established an election male task force, which met late last month. Among its members, is Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson, who says she's concerned about actions taken in her state by the Postal Service. Including the removal of 26 mail sorting machines, changes themselves and the messaging around that the crest coverage of it and all the controversy has created a scenario where there's confusion among voters about the reliability of what previously wass. A scene is a reliable way of voting this fall. Benson says she hopes the Postal Service will help restore voters faith in the reliability of their operations as the election approaches. Brian Naylor. NPR news It's all things considered on WN. My C I'm Sean Carlson. It's been three years since President Trump signed his signature tax reform bill, and since then, Democratic politicians from both New York and New Jersey have been complaining about one particular aspect of that legislation. How much money people can deduct from their pre tax income. But a prominent expert says local Democrats obsession with the so called salt deduction is downright undemocratic. And we're talking about the party Democrats. So joining us is Richard Reeves, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. He wrote in The New York Times this week that repealing the salt tax cap will overwhelmingly benefit the ultrawealthy and not the middle class. Ostensibly who Democrats want to be helping. Welcome to W N BC Richard thank you for having me on. Let's just give some background here. Assault stands for state and local taxes. Can you just give an example? Or say a New York City household? That makes $100,000 a year? How did the salt tax work before 2017? And how does it work now? So right now, you obviously paying your taxes to the federal government. You're paying state income taxes on you'll be paying your local government largely through property taxes and well. And what the deduction allows you to do is to say to the federal government will look, I've already paid all the tax tow the state and my local government. So I'm going to deduct that against my federal income tax. So let's say, you know, you take the family of 100 K. Let's say that they pay $3000 off state income tax. And let's say that paying $10,000 or property tax to the local government. That's $13,000 they're paying in state and local taxes. What it means is they could cut their federal tax bill by, say, three or $4000. So what it's doing is reducing howmuch money having to give to the federal government. If you're having to pay a lot to your state and local government on what the 2017 tax Bill did was it said, Okay, you can do that up to 10,000 year, So I put a cap on how much you can claim. So for the family we just talked about who were previously able to put $13,000. They could only put $10,000 so they're federal taxpayer Will theft will go up. So the tax policy center says that if the U. S lifted that that salt cap nearly all of the benefits 96% would go to the top 20% of earners, can you talk more about why that is? Yeah. So the more tax you pay the state on the higher your property tax than the bigger the value of that deduction is right. And not just the sky was the limit before the cat was introduced, you know, you could just keep claiming and claiming it didn't matter. However much you paid in state income tax or local property taxes. You could claim all of that. So what That meant was that people who had really huge stay income tax bills and very big property taxes were able to claim a lot back from federal government. By imposing this $10,000 cab. Those very rich people talk. I'm not able to do that. The tax policy center calculations are not lifting the cap, which is what Democrats are pros. Ng would mean attacks cart of about $150,000 a year to the top 0.1% on attacks Kind of about $25 a year. Of those in the middle 60 on so it really is kind of laser targeted, helping those who have the highest incomes and the biggest property taxes so back to our original point here, then many Democrats in our area again say that the salt tax cap hurts Blue states, the most Here's Governor Cuomo talking about in February of 2019 thes were states that were already contributing more to the federal government. And now they receive less, and they contribute even more service. Is Cuomo wrong? There? I think he's framed. It wrongly says These are states that pay more money to the federal government, right? The States don't pay any money to the federal government. The people in the states pay more money to the federal government. And so what is effectively saying is, there's a lot of rich people in New York right And as a result, they're paying a lot of income tax. And so all he's really saying is that there are certain places in the U. S. Where lots of rich people live. And New York is one of those. And so if you want a progressive tax system, then rich people pay more tax. If most of the rich people live in one place, then that place is going to be paying mortar, the federal government. So why are Cuomo and Governor Murphy and Senator Schumer Speaker Pelosi? Advocating for something that will benefit their wealthiest constituents. The most that's again seems very undemocratic in spirit. I think these politicians are trying to look after their people if you like the people that live in their states, their cities, and that's an understandable impulse. I also think it's quite clear that part of the motivation for the Republicans in passing This changes. It was kind of precision targeted against affluent voters in liberal areas who are disproportionately the very people who are donating to and and supporting democratic candidates. But but also it is because it was part of Trump tax bill and I think we shouldn't make tax policy based on what we think the motivations of people were. You know, sometimes good policy is past for bad reasons, And sometimes you're bad policy is past for good reasons. The real question we should be asking here is it's not good tax policy or not is very important that if you're trying to build a long term coalition to tackle the really entrenched deep inequalities in our society And it's a bad start to begin with a tax cut for the richest Richard Reeves, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and director of its future of the middle class initiative. Richard, Thanks so much for joining us. Thanks for having me. This program is.

New York Postal Service Richard Reeves Governor Cuomo Brookings Institution senior fellow Jocelyn Benson NPR Michigan Sean Carlson Stroman D Joy Bill The New York Times Brian Naylor
"richard reeves" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"richard reeves" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From NPR news. It's been three years since President Trump signed his signature tax reform bill, and since then, Democratic politicians from both New York and New Jersey have been complaining about one particular aspect of that legislation. How much money people can deduct from their pre tax income. But a prominent expert says local Democrats obsession with the so called salt deduction is downright undemocratic. And we're talking about the party Democrats. So joining us is Richard Reeves, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. He wrote in The New York Times this week that repealing the salt tax cap will overwhelmingly benefit the ultrawealthy and not the middle class. Ostensibly who Democrats want to be helping. Welcome to W N BC Richard thank you for having me on. Let's just give some background here. Assault stands for state and local taxes. Can you just give an example? Or say a New York City household? That makes $100,000 a year? How did the salt tax work before 2017? And how does it work now? So right now, you obviously paying your taxes to the federal government. You're paying state income taxes on you'll be paying your local government largely through property taxes and well. And what the deduction allows you to do is to say to the federal government will look, I've already paid all this tax tow the state and my local government. So I'm going to deduct that against my federal income tax. So let's say, you know, you take the family of 100 K. Let's say that they pay $3000 off state income tax, and let's say they're paying $10,000, or property tax to the local government. That's $13,000 they're paying in state and local taxes. What it means is they could cut their federal tax bill by, say, three or $4000. So what it's doing is reducing howmuch money having to give to the federal government. If you're having to pay a lot to your state and local government on what the 2017 tax Bill did was it said, Okay, you can do that up to 10,000 year, So I put a cap on how much you can claim. So for the family we just talked about who were previously able to put $13,000. They could only put $10,000 so they're federal taxpayer Will theft will go up. So the tax policy center says that if the U. S lifted that that salt cap nearly all of the benefits 96% would go to the top 20% of earners, can you talk more about why that is? Yeah. So the more tax you pay the state on the higher your property tax than the bigger the value of that deduction is right. And not just the sky was the limit before the cat was introduced, you know, you could just keep climbing and claiming it didn't matter. However much you paid in state income tax or local property taxes. You could claim all of that. So what That meant was that people who had really huge stay income tax bills and very big property taxes were able to claim a lot back from federal government. By imposing this $10,000 cab those very rich people at the top. I'm not able to do that. The tax policy center calculations are not lifting the cap, which is what Democrats are the pros Ng would mean attacks cart of about $150,000 a year to the top 0.1%. A tax cut of about $25 a year to those in the middle 60 on so it really is kind of laser targeted, helping those who have the highest incomes and the biggest property taxes. So back to our original point here. Then many Democrats in our area again say that the salt tax cop hurts Blue states. The most Here's Governor Cuomo, talking about in February of 2019 thes were states that were already contributing more to the federal government. And now they receive less, and they contribute even more service. Is Cuomo wrong? There? I think he's framed. It wrongly says These are states that pay more money to the federal government, right? The States don't pay any money to the federal government. The people in the states pay more money to the federal government. And so what do you expect to be saying is, there's a lot of rich people in New York, right? And as a result, they're paying a lot of income tax. And so all he's really saying is that there are certain places in the U. S. Where lots of rich people live. And New York is one of those. And so if you want a progressive tax system, then rich people pay more tax. If most of the rich people live in one place, then that place is going to be paying mortar, the federal government. So why are Cuomo and Governor Murphy and Senator Schumer Speaker Pelosi? Advocating for something that will benefit their wealthiest constituents. The most that's again seems very undemocratic in spirit. I think these politicians are trying to look after their people if you like the people that live in their states, their cities, and that's an understandable impulse. I also think it's quite clear that part of the motivation for the Republicans in passing This changes. It was kind of precision targeted against affluent voters in liberal areas who are disproportionately the very people who are donating to and and supporting democratic candidates. But but also it is because it was part of Trump tax bill and I think we shouldn't make tax policy based on what we think the motivations of people were. You know, sometimes good policy is past for bad reasons. And sometimes you're bad policy is past for good reasons. The real question we should be asking here is is that good tax policy or not is very important that if you're trying to build a long term coalition to tackle the really entrenched deep inequalities in our society And it's a bad start to begin with a tax cut for the richest Richard Reeves, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and director of its future of the middle class initiative. Richard, Thanks so much for joining us. Thanks for having me..

New York Governor Cuomo Richard Reeves Brookings Institution senior fellow NPR New Jersey The New York Times Bill Trump President Assault theft U. S director Senator Schumer Speaker Pelosi
"richard reeves" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"richard reeves" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Recalling the death of George Floyd was killed off into the ground by police A. B. C.'s Richard reeve watches as several buildings were set on fire there including a police precinct there is quite a large crowd here but we did hear from fire units earlier but as far as I can see I do not see anyone from the fire department yeah the in depth team coverage this morning continues WSP special right reporting on a protest March planned for Atlanta today judge please death isn't the only one that people are wanting justice for so today they'll be a March not just focusing on him but also the killings of Ahmad operating Glynn county and Breanna Taylor in Louisville so he borrowed is helping to organize today's justice press March and she tells channel two action news everybody's ready for change and ready to get together this peaceful marches set to step off from the state capital at three this afternoon and end in centennial Olympic Park Atlanta police chief is among those stunned at the events in Minneapolis my colleagues and I are appalled with what has occurred to George Floyd we fully expect for the officers to serve prison time they've earned it chief Erika shields says it's hard to believe a man can be suffocated by a cop in broad daylight with other officers standing by watching these officers didn't just fails cops they fundamentally failed as human being she says this is something that would never happen in her force shields praises the diversity in her department says they openly discuss racial issues reporting live bill patio ninety five point five W. S. B. temperature at six oh one seventy degrees I'll tell you how big a storm chance in five minutes I'm meteorologist Kirk mileage ninety five point five W. S. B. drive this morning and I Judy five circling the city tell incidents on the enter or the hour just watch for construction crews working their way at the work zone in and out of traveling to duty by the eastern western Georgia four hundred miles apart but a ninety five point five W..

George Floyd A. B. C. Richard reeve Atlanta Ahmad Breanna Taylor Louisville Minneapolis Judy WSP Glynn county centennial Olympic Park Atlant Erika shields Kirk Georgia
"richard reeves" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"richard reeves" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Voice of New York radio station we have sixty seven degrees it's buggy at one o'clock good morning I'm Steve greenfield a Minneapolis police precinct is burning as protests over the death of a man as he was arrested growing increasingly violent overnight ABC TV affiliate KSTP is there reporter Richard reeve near the dangerous scene as flames spread to nearby buildings are people behind us were just kind of watching silently taking pictures shopping scene we have a police station on fire and you have a business on fire the precinct is where four officers involved in the death of George Floyd had worked before they were fired dozens of black lives matter's protesters also gathered in Union Square last night following that deaf men of color who was of course handcuffed when the John you know the story an officer was injured in Union Square when the demonstrator through it can and the person is at least one of forty were taken into custody also last night president trump was called in to speak with W. O. R.'s Buck Sexton he was asked what he thinks of the city right now during the pandemic I'm very sad with what I see in New York I've known New York that's where I grew up that said place I just love and when I look at those streets it looks like they're Baron and you got to open it up you got to get going you gotta just move you can't you get a break this city people are leaving the leaving for Florida leaving for other places the city is going to be broken it's got to start having signs of life the president is expected to make an announcement today about the U. S.'s future with China with whom he's not happy the Republican National Committee is pushing for a full in person convention in North Carolina the RNC chairwoman row to the cook governor Roy Cooper with potential safety guidelines that they would put in place the letter asks Cooper to approve of the guidelines and inform them of anything else that must be met there's been a standoff between Cooper and president trump over holding the convention person amid the corona virus pandemic the president has even threatened to file like a different venue if North Carolina won't allow full attendance the news is sponsored by the ad council there's no guidebook to adopting a team but that's okay because you don't have to know it all to be a perfect.

New York reporter Minneapolis Roy Cooper North Carolina Republican National Committee China president Florida Baron Steve greenfield Buck Sexton W. O. R. trump officer John Union Square George Floyd Richard reeve KSTP
"richard reeves" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"richard reeves" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Of Floyd snack A. B. C.'s Richard reeve is there as crowds around the third precinct building in Minneapolis Minnesota a lot of merchants in the area have put up plywood over their doors and windows because they don't want more destruction we spoke with a guy who owns a sushi restaurant about a block away from the precinct you know he said I have real mixed feelings about this I I feel bad for what happened to this man who died but at the same time you know folks came to my restaurant and smash the place up let's set down Wall Street funhouse stocks did yesterday let's check in with A. B. C.'s dairy all big stocks closed broadly higher despite some discouraging reads on the economy the Dow soared five hundred fifty three points the nasdaq rose seventy two when the S. and P. closed up forty four not much green in the latest beige book the federal reserve's latest snapshot of the economy shows business in the nation's twelve regions were down from the last check in mainly due to the impact of covert nineteen Boeing is cutting about twelve thousand jobs through layoffs and buyouts with several thousand more jobs expected to be cut over the next few months as the aircraft maker deals with the downturn in travel because by the corona virus pandemic the company will lay off more than sixty seven hundred workers this week with over fifty two hundred employees taking buyouts discount home products retailer Tuesday morning filed for chapter eleven bankruptcy the fifth major retailer to do so since the start of the pandemic.

Richard reeve Minnesota A. B. C. Boeing Minneapolis
"richard reeves" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"richard reeves" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"News update on America's trucking network this is news radio seven hundred WLW traffic and weather news radio seven hundred W. L. Cincinnati Kentucky governor AT this year's says wearing a mask should not become a political issue this is a three o'clock report good Thursday morning I'm a carpenter breaking now team coverage of the covered nineteen pandemic begins with seven hundred Suzanne Duval Fisher said wearing masks seems to have caused arguments masks have somehow become this division amongst people and yes they're not comfortable yes they can be hard to breathe from yes they keep people from seeing your beautiful face but they protect people this year reported one hundred twenty seven new code nineteen cases on Wednesday that brings Kentucky's total number of cases to nine thousand seventy seven the governor also announced six new deaths bringing the state's death toll to four hundred I'm Suzanne Duval meanwhile Indiana has seen a big increase in the number of residents seeking mental health services during the covert nineteen pandemic Dr Jennifer Sullivan secretary of family and social services says more than twenty one thousand claims were made for mental health telemedicine services in March and April this indicates a few things one this is a needed service to it is needed even more now and three access to mental health via this modality is decreasing barriers and improving access to care Indiana also sold the greatest use of the anti overdose drug naloxone it was used more than thirteen hundred times last month the most on record seven hundreds palm now the latest traffic and weather together and looks like no major delays or accidents this go round on the freeways and side streets however if you do see an accident four two one six three nine seven album his forecast from the advanced dentistry weather center from social distancing in pre screening patients to appropriate PP our focus remains on safety learn more at no fear dentist dot com slash patient safety chance of rain at daybreak a morning low of sixty six now on our Thursday partly cloudy rain likely again in the afternoon seventy nine at night mostly cloudy low sixty five more rain and storms on Friday bringing severe weather station on nine first warning chief meteorologist Steve Raleigh news radio seven hundred WLW rain continues heavier downtown right now all sixty nine degrees news a service of progressive insurance if you know someone who's died of covert nineteen you are certainly not alone the U. S. death toll today surpassed the one hundred thousand mark and it's almost a third of the global death toll on Twitter the president making no mention of the pandemic of the country passed the one hundred thousand deaths milestone instead tweeting about what he calls the greatest political crime against him with the Russia investigation his rival Joe Biden's moments in our history so Graham so heart rending there forever fixing each of our hearts share grief today is one of those moments Andy field ABC news Washington the ongoing tally by Johns Hopkins University finds that more American lives have been lost to covert nineteen in less than four months then in the years of the Korean and Vietnam wars combined health experts say that number is likely on the conservative side and that it is certain to rise Terry Alden or ABC news let's head to Minnesota another night of protests during air turning violent I should say in Minneapolis as demonstrators called for the prosecution of those four police officers in the death of a man in their custody Monday night the incident was caught on video numerous videos that show officers subduing George Floyd who was handcuffed with one officer pressing his knee into the back of Floyd's neck A. B. C.'s Richard reeve is there as crowds surrounded the third precinct building in Minneapolis a lot of merchants in the area.

America
"richard reeves" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"richard reeves" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Six forty two eighty two your timing is crucial so please get this done the following is a paid program W. O. R. is airing in this program constitutes neither an endorsement of the products offered for the ideas expressed we have sixty four degrees cloudy skies at midnight good morning I'm Steve greenfield a Connecticut college student wanted in connection with two murders is in custody helping to reports of tortillas in Hagerstown Maryland say they've arrested Peter Manfredonia the Connecticut man accused in several crimes including the deaths of two men the university of Connecticut student had last been seen walking along train tracks in east Stroudsburg Pennsylvania Terry Alden or ABC news some city leaders are calling for the arrest of Amy Cooper the white woman who called police on a black man in Central Park while she was with her on leash dog controlling it by yanking a neck collar around meanwhile the city's health commissioner Demona Gordon said her office sent Cooper later asking her to cooperate in a potential pre complaint intervention process and our hope is to through that process work with her to understand the impact and the effect of our actions and to come to some kind of resolution now since the incident Cooper has apologized and she should voluntarily surrendered her dog to the animal rescue from which she adopted it she has been fired from her job at Franklin Templeton investments Hooper says she's also been receiving death threats a Brooklyn funeral homes getting sued by distraught family members after bodies were discovered in U. haul trucks Louise Warner reports multiple lawsuits leveled against Andrew T. quickly funeral services say bodies of loved ones who passed away from corona virus were grossly mishandled the funeral home was shut down by the state after the gruesome discoveries were made but not before horrified families made repeated enquiries and were finally forced to view the remains to other Brooklyn funeral homes were named in the lawsuit Liz Warner W. O. R. news wave of New Jersey business owners may go against governor Murphy's corona virus related order and re open next week thousands including these owners have joined a Facebook page called New Jersey business coalition opening June first really did not want to do this we we were trying our hardest to go through the right channels if you can just get some dates on the board immediately at least you could put this to rest for a few years given no timetable on when nonessential businesses can open their physical locations customers there are many postings on a Facebook page about re opening everything from gyms to nail salons and barbershops governor Murphy says certain corona virus related health data must be met first before businesses get the green light to re open a second night of protests yesterday turned violent in Minneapolis as demonstrators called for the prosecution of four police officers in the death of a man in their custody Monday night the incident was caught on video and it shows officers subduing George Floyd whose hand cuffed with one officer pressing his knee into Floyd's neck A. B. C.'s Richard reeve was at Wednesday night's protests as crowds surrounded the third precinct building in Minneapolis a lot of merchants in the area have put up plywood over their doors and windows because they don't want more destruction we spoke to the guy who owns a sushi restaurant about a block away from the precincts you know he said I have real mixed feelings about this I I feel bad for what happened to this man who died but at the same time folks came to my restaurant and smash the place up and making headlines hotel and casino owner Dan Rick Stevens is offering one thousand free one way tickets for tourists to come to Las Vegas.

"richard reeves" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"richard reeves" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"And storms on Friday bring your severe weather station on nine first warning chief meteorologist Steve Raleigh news radio seven hundred WLW some very light spotty rain continues seventy three degrees if you know someone who's died of covert nineteen you are certainly not alone the U. S. death toll today surpassed the one hundred thousand mark and it's almost a third of the global death toll on Twitter the president making no mention of the pandemic of the country passed the one hundred thousand deaths milestone instead tweeting about what he calls the greatest political crime against him with the Russia investigation his rival Joe Biden for moments in our history so Graham so heart rending there forever fiction each of our hearts share grief today is one of those moments Andy field ABC news Washington the ongoing tally by Johns Hopkins University finds that more American lives have been lost to covert nineteen in less than four months then in the years of the Korean and Vietnam wars combined health experts say that number is likely on the conservative side and that it is certain to rise Terry Alden or ABC news well a second night of protests turning violent in Minneapolis's demonstrators called for the prosecution of four police officers in the death of a man in their custody Monday night the incident was caught on video that shows officers subduing George Floyd who was handcuffed with one officer pressing his knee into the back of Floyd's neck A. B. C.'s Richard reeve is there tonight as crowds around the third precinct building in Minneapolis a lot of merchants in the area have put up plywood.

George Floyd Terry Alden ABC Andy Russia Steve Raleigh chief meteorologist Richard reeve officer Twitter Minneapolis Vietnam Johns Hopkins University Washington Graham Joe Biden president
"richard reeves" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"richard reeves" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"From ABC news I'm Terry Alden or protester escalating over the death of an unarmed black man in police custody in Minneapolis where George Floyd was arrested demonstrators throwing rocks and bottles at law enforcement a store in the area is on fire A. B. C.'s Richard Reeves says officers responded with rubber bullets flash bombs and tear gas a lot of merchants in the area have put up plywood over their doors and windows because they don't want more destruction we spoke with a guy who owns the the sushi restaurant about a block away from the precinct you know he said I have real mixed feelings about this I I feel bad for what happened to this man who died but at the same time you know folks came to my restaurant and smash the place up hundreds marched through downtown Los Angeles smashing the window of a police cruiser the officers involved in Floyd's arrested been fired law enforcement sources tell ABC news that Peter Manfredonia is in police custody in Maryland the college student suspected in two murders and a kidnapping in Connecticut it's taken less than four months for the U. S. death toll from covert nineteen to reach a grim benchmark former vice president Biden releasing a message marking the more than one hundred thousand Americans dead from covert nineteen there are moments in our history so Graham so heart rending there forever fixing each of our hearts Mr Biden's been critical of the president's pandemic response citing a Columbia University study that claimed a one week earlier social distancing order could have saved more than thirty five thousand lives in the field ABC news Washington the threat of severe weather postponed NASA and SpaceX is launching a manned rocket to the international space.

kidnapping Columbia University ABC NASA Washington Mr Biden Graham vice president Connecticut Terry Alden Maryland Peter Manfredonia Los Angeles Richard Reeves A. B. C. George Floyd Minneapolis
Political historian-commentator Richard Reeves dies at 83

NPR News Now

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Political historian-commentator Richard Reeves dies at 83

"Author political commentator and historian Richard Reeves has died reeves released his first book on then president. Gerald Ford in nineteen seventy five. Four years later he began a weekly column reefs on. Jeffrey confirmed his father's death. Telling the Associated Press's Dad died in Los Angeles and had been in failing. Health Reeves was a frequent commentator on pbs and even appeared on the tonight show with Johnny Carson other books included President Kennedy Profile of power and President Nixon alone in the White House. Richard Reid was eighty three years old.

Richard Reeves Gerald Ford President Nixon President Trump President Kennedy Profile Richard Reid Johnny Carson Associated Press Los Angeles PBS White House Jeffrey
Political historian-commentator Richard Reeves dies at 83

NPR News Now

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

Political historian-commentator Richard Reeves dies at 83

"Political commentator and historian Richard Reeves has died reeves released his first book on then president. Gerald Ford in nineteen seventy five and four years later began a weekly syndicated column Reeve Son. Geoffrey confirmed his father's death telling the Associated Press. His Dad died in Los Angeles and had been in failing. Health Reeves was a frequent commentator on PBS and even appeared on tonight show with Johnny Carson. His other books included President Kennedy Profile of power and President Nixon alone in the White

Richard Reeves President Kennedy Profile President Nixon President Trump Gerald Ford Reeve Son Johnny Carson Associated Press Los Angeles Geoffrey PBS
"richard reeves" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"richard reeves" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Brucie James order of fifty ninth in Peoria you can't miss it were at the Walgreens and we have hundreds of people showing up making all kinds of amazing donations Jamie and we have the choir from Sandra day o'connor singing Christmas carols and your face down beauty all banding no not really everybody's attention a few minutes ago as you be pulled up and there was a line of people with arms full of diapers and things bombing from that as you be to fill the boxes it was like a clown car I didn't know you could fill many stop it really as as this week I talked to deanne who brought all the steps she said her daughter had been shopping for a couple of weeks because they knew this event was coming up and they have been stuffing the S. U. V. chat you know the guys a few minutes ago I had an opportunity to meet a lady by the name of John who sitting next to me here and John I had the the most amazing story to tell me she want to go in and she wanted to buy twenty five dollars worth of things and she took my arm because of you sight impaired I nine and and I said Hey I'll double your money and so we we went in and we bought some stuff but tell everybody why this is so important to you this is important to me I was what made you fourteen ties eighteen years old in foster care for take away from my parents and child abuse and the reason your sight impaired is because that abuse right because if you use I developed harder selfless as well which is water on the brain and I've had many many trees to drain fluid while I'm up to fifty four Richard Reeves and now rand all due to you know just try to be was so you know first hand.

Peoria Walgreens Sandra day Richard Reeves Brucie James Jamie deanne John I twenty five dollars eighteen years
"richard reeves" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"richard reeves" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"And I wanted to talk about like, how did how did growing up eating only salad, not knowing if you'd be victim, and playing for welfare affect the way he thinks today, you know, this, this hearing about these people moving around through different social strata. I was listening to a lecture pie. Podcast today that was talking about the data of the statistics people move. I thought that didn't happen so much in this country. But there's a lot of movement up and down. Well, yeah. There's a really interesting book by Richard Reeves at Brookings institute called dream horrors. He's an English British I'm not I whenever anything listening. English and the reason that's relevant is because people think that British society is, is, is rigid and static. But his argument is that below that there there is a glass floor at the eightieth percentile but it's not the one percent that, that creates rigidity American socioeconomic strata it's the twenty percent. Like if your kid's at the top twenty percent if your kids are going to college, they're gonna marry other kids, go to college. They're gonna have kids who are going to go to college. Right. And they might not be rich. But they're both gonna have professional jobs, if they want them, and they're not gonna miss any meals, but people below the eighth percentile are going to they're going to worth health. They're going to have worse credit being pours expensive, and there's all these downward pressures on, on poor people to keep them poor. And so his argument is that really that's the issue that there's not as much mobility's. We'd like to think there is, you know there's a lot of different theories around it. I do think I had bought in. Wholeheartedly into that. But when you really look at the statistic, you'll be surprised. Yeah. The mobility I it just the movement. This just people move around, and don't stay in poverty very long, generally there, there's a tiny percentage of get stuck in poverty. Right. But generally people move out of it. Well that experience and we don't need to debate. I mean, I'm, I'm open to the data either way. At at my fingertips. I love to read it. But what's interesting to me, is okay. So what does that do to, to, to the whit to the decisions you make about money? Does it make you? If you grow up poor, do you have the scarcity mindset, abundance mindset? Do you spend wildly because you get more satisfaction out of the things that you buy do spoil your kids, because you want them to have getting's. You don't have or do you hold back from them, because you want them to know the same hunger that you knew as at and weird? How very the responses, right? Yeah. I mean, in money is one of the, the strongest motivators we have in our lives. It's like sex or, or status or symbol, you know, but I don't I didn't see a lot of people out there, talking about money in this way. I saw people talking about how to make money at invest money or how to save money when you're growing up. No just means today in the in the podcast verse. That's what people talk about have talking about the technology. Yeah. So are you are you gathering sort of a consensus kind of feeling about this or sense of it? Well, I mean, there's common themes that come up yard mentioned a couple which kind of interesting. Yeah, but you know, I interviewed Ron Lieber from the New York Times. He's your money calmness. New York Times wrote a book called the opposite of spoiled, which I highly recommend reading, and it's all about how to teach kids values through the lens of money, and he talks about, you know, teaching them enough nece, and the difference between wants and needs and spending saving giving jars and all that kind of stuff, but he really put a lot of thought into you'll what are the ways the kids think about money. What are they what, what are they curious about, and how do you use their curiosity to channel them to make to figure out how to make their own decisions how how to decide between two things from which they can't have both right how to how to how evaluate trade offs in -tunities cost? And that one was really was, was was a really interesting conversation. I interviewed a woman named Chanel. Reynolds, who whose husband was hit by van and, and killed..

Ron Lieber Richard Reeves New York Times Brookings institute Reynolds twenty percent one percent
"richard reeves" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"richard reeves" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"How the American upper middle class is leaving everyone else in the dust. And why that's a problem, and what to do about it Richard Reeves, welcome to on point. Thank you for having. And thank you for listening so patiently there, just the Russ notes here about five thousand more questions. One could have asked. But what's your what's your initial reaction to what you heard him say about his concerns about the system and how to fix it? Wow. I have to say, I think this is this is a big moment when you're seeing the most successful capitalists questioning whether capitalism is delivering I think that's potentially a really important moment. We can we can talk about some of the shortcomings of Mr. Dios analysis. But nonetheless, I think the in the same way that ain't gonna progressive area, you need people who have been benefiting from the current system to be to be stepping up and talking about it. It's it's an old moment. It's a bit. Like, a very successful athlete. Standing up and saying I'm not sure the rules of again. Serena Williams, saying oh, the rules of tennis, even as the triumphant. And so it is odd an important for that reason. Because what you're seeing is. I think a group of people coming to realize that actually capitalism and the pro-market forces and many of societies have been too successful to politically successful. They've actually kind of succeeded. In many ways beyond their wildest dreams in shaping the policy environment, the engineering to uses phrase in such a way as to create these skewed results and the negative consequences. And and so actually it is there is an important kind of wakeup moment here, which I think is a sort of hangover of the hubris the was around and this little eighteen ninety s and probably up until the great recession, which was a left right hubris. Really? Which is you know, Mark. It's great capitalism solve problems..

Richard Reeves Serena Williams Mr. Dios Russ tennis Mark
"richard reeves" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"richard reeves" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Our clients who are teachers or firemen and whether we've contributed to their wellbeing. They would say that they would contribute their knowledgeable about how up investment managers operate. I think it's almost like saying bankers. You know, you could say. That bankers are a problem. Well, they're a good manners. And they're bad bankers. And let just like they're good car dealers in their bad guard dealers or there's good any doctors and bad doctors. And I think that to make generalization about how a particular industry is operating is not a good thing. No, I don't like that sweeping generalization. And I think the same would be I think any other group if I re. Made a sweeping generalization of that they were sort of bad or whatever would take offense, and we'd all be offended at that. So no, I won't. I think it's it depends out people operating, and if you look at it, most institutional investors, these pension funds endowments and foundations have excellent teams for evaluating how those people are operating. I would say there's a personal risk when when I decided whether I would speak out at this. It's not in my interest to speak out about this. I it becomes a high profile thing it's a net negative in the person lead to speak out about this. I feel deeply attached to this issue. And I feel that a lot of people who are in my position don't speak out about these issues because they don't want to you know, they want to take a low profile, and I felt that difficult to do. So I, you know, that's my perspective on the hedge fund industry or what I'm doing. Well, Ray Dalia is the founder of Bridgewater. Associates and co chief investment officer and co chairman as well review. Thank you so much for joining us today. Mark. My pleasure when we come back. We'll talk with Richard Reeves editor of a series in the guardian about broken capitalism. Lost to chew over this is on point. This message comes from on points sponsor WB. You are presenting kind world a podcast that explores how a single act of kindness can transform a life. New episodes of kind world are available every Tuesday on apple podcasts..

Richard Reeves Ray Dalia chief investment officer apple Bridgewater Mark founder editor chairman
"richard reeves" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

12:21 min | 3 years ago

"richard reeves" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Welcome back to the Rick Unger show. Now, if you are a reasonably frequent listener, you know, that income inequality in America is a favourite topic on the program and today will be no exception. Joining us to talk about what we can do about. This problem is Abraham Unger. He is actually Dr Abraham Unger. He is a senior research fellow at the Kerry institute for government reform and an associate professor and director of urban programs at the department of government and politics over at Wagner college on Staten Island here in New York, a welcome to the program. Thanks good to be here. All right. So I read a piece that you had written in the hill over the weekend, which I thought was interesting. Let's begin the conversation by giving you an opportunity to lay out what you see as the primary problems that are causing this this time that we're in where there is such despair. Gaps between what the income is of that. Upper one percent, let's say and the middle class the hardworking middle class. Well, the gap is actually between the twenty percent top twenty percent. Eighty percent. We get the one percent as a a leftover from the occupy movement of you know, eight or nine or even ten years ago, but there's a scholar from Brookings, a think tank in Washington that talks about the top twenty percent, Richard Reeves, a book called green borders, and he argues very persuasive that those who have made it into the white collar workforce. Earning Alexei, comfortable, six figures and above but have four year, college degrees and can transmit their wealth through things like unpaid internships, which only a few can afford exclusionary zoning, which keep neighborhoods in a certain way, just for a certain income bracket. Top twenty percents all the way to the top one percent that is actually hitting the wealth as well. As all the social capital, meaning the networks that preserve that wealth and increase it over the generations. And there's a very simple reason, I've come to the conclusion after a couple of years of research on this matter that we've reached this. Tremendous disparity, which means the middle classes dropping out twenty percent upper-class eighty percents middle class but dropping into lower middle class or poor. And the reason is basically that salaries especially for those who don't have for your degrees. But even including some of that coach simply happen kept up with the cost of looking we hear about employment being stronger than ever before. Which is true, by the way, employment is increasing. We hear about more jobs available. So you'd think there'd be more money available. But there's that gap right now jobs what we're getting for our jobs again, especially among those who don't have four year college degrees. But then still some professionals who do. Aren't keeping up with the cost of living pretty much it. It's a great point. And we've talked about this frequently how some people out there get all excited because they see a nominal wage increase in that three percent or a little better area. But when you look at the real the actual wage increase. It's nothing it doesn't keep up with inflation. And I think that this unfortunate Meam is driving people to to not understand the problem that we have. But but let me ask you this. How do you? And you know, one of the things you recommend in your article is the solution to this. You say that it's going to take an effort by both government and business business is going to have to recognize their social responsibility to pay a fair wage. I I will tell you I found that well all due respect slightly naive. Because what in the world is going to suddenly dry business. I mean here they are operating in a really good solid economy. And yet they still will not pay working class Americans a reasonable wage. What do you think is going to force them to do that? Well in the article, I appreciate your comment about naivety. But I tried to cover that base as it were by saying something about public pressure on on corporate America, and however naive that might sound as a New Yorker, we did experience that I think successfully from where I sit as a researcher here in New York regarding Amazon so public pressure does actually matter by the way. I. It shouldn't be regularly. I'm going to jump in. And just okay go, and I'm going to disagree with you. Because I don't believe was public pressure that scuttled the Amazon deal. In fact, I have the polls, and and the people who were even people who may not have benefited from the Amazon deal Latinos who these these jobs, we're going to be higher paying jobs, Latinos and African Americans and then everybody I mean, they were deeply in support of the deal Latino community Hispanic community. Eighty percent wanted this deal to go through black New Yorkers in a large majority wanted to go through the people. You're wanted the deal. It was the politicians who kind of caused problems now. No, I mean when I speak on the ground. I do this work in New York on consulting urban economic development the numbers. Yes. You are. Right. There were some folks who expected jobs out of this. But a lot of New Yorkers, and they made their voices heard to their representatives just respond to their constituents realize that the jobs that were gonna come in to that particular facility. Unlike. The one in Staten Island, which is warehousing, but the one in Long Island city was going to be hundred fifty thousand bucks or more a year for white collar professional and whatever residents were left as well. As a lot of local nonprofits, you're concerned saw gentrification being expedited to the point where they'd be priced out pretty quickly. Numbers accurately reflect well, I'll tell you why am I disagree because when I agree with your number on on the size of the value of the jobs that were coming to Amazon, but when you bring even over a ten year period twenty-five thousand well-paid people into an area. What's going to happen restaurants begin to flourish? There are suppliers. There are supporters all of which opened up the opportunity for better paying jobs for those people who might not be literally directly hired by Amazon, we used to think that and there was a scholar. Name Richard Florida who talked about the culture class in the nineties and early two thousands who made that point and he was in the vanguard of what you're talking about. Which is jatropha -cation. However since twenty thirteen even Florida feeding Richard Florida has recanted in the following way. Turns out that studies show since you know, five six seven years ago that when you put in those restaurants, and all those nice new retail outlets that that you talk. About when neighborhoods change because of a facility like an Amazon white collar office space coming in the hiring is usually from within. And let me give you an anecdotal example. But to bring home the point Williamsburg Brooklyn is an example of this sort of the classic of de industrialized area that became like that who do you think it hired as a barista in a coffee shop in Williamsburg Brooklyn, someone from the projects if you still remain or a young kid out of a private what perhaps the state's college. But a young college educated kid who was looking for that first job either in corporate or nonprofit America typically the hiring from within the court that is gentrifying. There is no trickle down to the broader city alchemy. I'll take your hiring. I'll take your point on that. Because I'm going to believe you research, but it is still jobs, but let me go back to how you exert this public pressure. That's kind of how we got off on that tangent. I wonder how you do that. Because I have yet to run into particularly speaking about large employers. I'm not sure the rules in the same for small employers. I have. Yet to see them. I mean, occasionally you'll have a situation we're going back to Amazon they will cave into the campaign by by Bernie Sanders to get their their base salaries up to fifteen bucks an hour. That's great. But I look at WalMart and all the carping and complained that I've done myself about how we're paying for their employees healthcare through Medicaid 'cause they don't pay them enough. We provide food stamps, the most basic thing human being goes to work for WalMart can't be convinced to pay enough to their employees that they don't need food stamps. How do you pressure? Those companies when we know that so much of America needs to go shop at WalMart because the prices are low. Well, I'm not a believer in regulation. So I'm going to take that off the table. Unfortunately, it hamstring small business more than big business. So I'm not gonna go that route which would be the easy way to go. Just regulate more and tightening noose around, you know, corporate America's neck a little bit more. I don't think that's the way to go. So it doesn't help anyone it doesn't. It certainly doesn't help jobs creation. So I'm gonna fall back on saying. Yes, public pressure. There has to be a certain when I say social responsibility, the blame can't all be on corporate America, people seem money. They're going to go for it. I think also the public and the blue collar workforce has to take responsibility and become more socially active. There wasn't moving once in this country to unionize hiding route when you don't have unions anymore. How the heck do you do that? Right. Well, through the vote, obviously through the kind of pressure that I saw as a New Yorker on Amazon. There are ways to do it. The kind of that got in. I'm not necessarily a fan of every position of every new member of congress. But at least we saw an upsurge in political involvement in civic engagement, we with the Sanders campaign. I may not agree with everything he says, I think something viable says aren't viable nonetheless. At least there's something going on there. And by the way, I also don't think there's so much difference between the Sanders and Trump campaigned in terms of where they were coming from back in two thousand fifteen and twenty sixteen that's another conversation in terms of being anti-globalists. So where do you want? The bottom line is go ahead public pressure has to happen. Go ahead. I was just gonna say we're kind of out of time. But I did want to ask you this. Do you see a role for government as you say, you don't think that regulation is the way I understand that argument? Is there a way for government to pressure business? Even though they are not in a position to tell them what they should or shouldn't be paying employees beyond maybe minimum wage. What can the government do to further this along? So here's the true pronged. What I mentioned in the article two prong bipartisan approach, which is on the one hand exert tremendous public pressure on corporate America to pay a fair wage, but gauge that wage based on the region where the jobs are. So there's a factory in North Carolina that might be different than a factory and upstate New York, Massachusetts, engage the salaries to the cost of living in the areas where corporate America finds itself that's number one. So that's a very specific kind of way of looking at margin doing some economic analysis, but beyond that, I actually think so after progressive piece of of my approach. The more traditional approach. I take I'm trying to avoid the word conservative here. 'cause I wherever you wherever you've labeled in this day and age and what they might indicate the more progressive approach. I mean, excuse me, more conservative approach would be to deregulate. I think you offer even corporate America. Even though I think it helps small businesses more a little bit more deregulation. Maybe they'll feel they have a little bit more breathing room. And then there'll be no excuse it's a kind of inverse pressure pressure with a handshake or a hug. They'll have no excuse to say what we've got all these compliance needs. Bill have a little bit more money to spend on your workers. If we deregulate deregulate. Public pressure. I'm going to take issue with that for two reasons. Number one. We gave them a nice break when we lowered their tax rate. And okay, fine. We were we were sold that that was going to mean higher wages for employees. It did not it has meant more stock buybacks which benefit the shareholders and management who holds stock options are outright shares of stock. We have given them according to the president a lot of deregulation. I don't see them responding to that to you. I think the deregulation hasn't gone far enough, especially in the lending area and the compliance for banks Bill Clinton be regulated successfully in the nineties. Reagan did it to some degree in the eighties are began the trend..

America Amazon New York Bernie Sanders Dr Abraham Unger Staten Island associate professor and direct Rick Unger Richard Reeves Richard Florida WalMart Bill Clinton Wagner college Brookings senior research fellow department of government Alexei
"richard reeves" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

05:52 min | 3 years ago

"richard reeves" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"Field trips. Lauren rich. Public's. There would be like what a year. Really? Yeah. Yeah. So I'm just telling you the field trips over the twelve years of I seem to remember that you didn't hate school. Daryl. The last time we talked because and I we we're all collie hated school. I sucked school sucked was horrible ways. So glad I dropped that. When I did I was holding me back. Sure. I wish I had left sooner. Luckily, when I was in my twelfth grade year, I was able to basically get out with what they hold it as externships program where I was actually able to leave school and get credit. Pretty sweet. I mean, I I got I went out two years two years early. Yep. Got my GD immediately. Boom, you're in the market waiting join the workforce. And then, you know, I I, you know, I went to college in the later on when I can you know, could afford it. And they would take us to in Sarasota where I grew up. They would take us to the John Ringling museum. Remember heard of the Ringling Barnum. Brother, Bailey brothers. Barnum and Bailey Ringling. All right. So there's all museum with a bunch of boring ass crap. They walk around. Paintings. I just I'm sorry. I I get art now like, but when I was a kid who was just the most boring thing, and I'd still think it'd be bored to tears in. But it was for your enrichment. Make you the one thing that bored me was when we would go to the symphony. God that's snooze awful. And the other was one of those things they took us to an opera or something like that. Yeah. At some point. So that's so the idea of enrichment is stuff outside of school. This is stuff that parents had their kids. Go into boy scouts is a good example of continued to be rich to be a boy scout being I should say scouts of America. Didn't they changed? It's no longer voice voice couch are actually being sued by the girl scouts or the boy. Scouts. Hold on. The boy scouts are claiming to basically have a copyright on the word scouts and the girl scout they're saying. No, no, we've been using that word for a hundred years. Yeah. You can't take that after one hundred years, right? But continuing they did stunt they did change from the boy scouts. I think it's like BSA something where the BSA based off of boy scouts of America. But they're just not calling it that anymore. Continuing on that says, but of course, it's not just dollars and cents. It's also a matter of letters and words of fluid parents talk to their children, three hours or rather three more hours per week on average then poor parents which is critical during a child's formative early years. That's why as Stanford professor, Sean Reardon explains that rich students are increasingly entering kindergarten much better prepared to succeed in school than middle class students, and they're staying that way, it's an educational arms race that's leaving many kids far far behind they say, it's depressing but not nearly so as much as this, quote, even poor kids who do everything right? Don't do much better than rich kids who do everything wrong advantages and disadvantages in other words tend to perpetuate themselves. You can see. In the above chart, and they have a chart I will post on the social media. So people can look at it based on a paper from Richard Reeves and Isabel Sawhill presented at the Federal Reserve. Boston annual conference which is underway or was at the time. And they show here. The percentage of poor college graduates that wind up being in the top twenty percent versus the bottom twenty percent. And they also show the rich highschool dropout in the top twenty percent bottom twenty percent and the same percentage or in the bottom twenty the next quintile. Percentage of what are in the bottom? Sixteen percent of poor college graduates and sixteen percent of rich highschool drop-outs bottom twenty percent of income earners. I see the rich high school dropouts that should just be failures at life are as successful as poor kids. Vic new everything you got to go to college and this and that. Rich is a suggestion here is that the right thing to do is to go to college, which of course, total Bs so on its face. This is garbage. But it's not wrong in that. Rich people have more money to spend on their kids. And maybe they're more likely not in all cases, because there's certainly plenty of rich parents that ignore the hell out of there trying to the idea that just because you're rich means you care about your kids isn't necessarily try which again, interesting to note here that the same percentage of poor college graduates and rich high school dropouts her in that bottom twenty percent of income earners. That's interesting. And then on the other end fourteen percent of rich high school dropouts or the top twenty percent. Well, they did very well the high school dropouts, and it's also more likely that the rich highschool dropout will be somewhere in the middle. All right. There's more on the way here, you've got more story. And apparently in other news the boy scouts are bankrupt. According to not boy scouts scouts BSA. That's what they're calling themselves. Now more on the way. It's free talk live. What's up everybody baba here? And have you been watching the markets have even seen the crumbling of the walls? Come tumbling.

Lauren rich BSA Bailey Ringling America John Ringling museum Sarasota Barnum Boston Federal Reserve Isabel Sawhill Sean Reardon Stanford professor Richard Reeves twenty percent two years one hundred years fourteen percent Sixteen percent