35 Burst results for "Richard Nixon"

President Nixon's Big Golden Mistake

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:17 min | 2 months ago

President Nixon's Big Golden Mistake

"Okay, so my $64,000 question is why did the Richard Nixon do it? They did it by mistake. They didn't mean to go off of it, but there was a mild recession. Nixon was coming up for reelection. They had this mistaken belief that they devalued the dollar. That would improve our trade balance. That would goose up the economy. And so they went off in August of 1971. They what they called close the gold window. Because of bogus economic thinking. Which dominated sadly, much of the economic profession. They like to think they can do things better than an impersonal force like gold. So they went off of it. They made a half baked attempt to go back on it, but no one was really willing to make the effort to do it. So it just sort of fell apart in the early 1970s. Ronald Reagan wanted to go back on the gold standard, but no one around him, except for the handful of exceptions, most of the economists said no. You can't do it. And he knew that if he didn't have the support of an intellectual support, it wouldn't happen. And it didn't happen.

Richard Nixon Nixon Ronald Reagan
Getting to Know Gerald Ford, the 38th President of the United States

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:41 min | 2 months ago

Getting to Know Gerald Ford, the 38th President of the United States

"Let's dig in. This was a speech that was given by Gerald Ford president of the United States in 1977. It was January. It was his State of the Union, and I think he went ahead and took it to the State of the Union because Gerald Ford has an interesting perspective of being the only person ever to serve as president. And vice president, both, and never be elected to those offices. He was a member of the House of Representatives when Spiro Agnew resigned from the vice president. He was appointed by Richard Nixon to become vice president after Richard Nixon resigned. He taking again through the Twenty-fifth Amendment became president of the United States. So he serves as the only person to have ever served as president of this country without actually being elected. We've had some who have ascended to those roles, but if they actually served, if they serve later, they were actually president, but this was one in which he was actually appointed to the vice president's role, not elected to that vice president's role. So in moving up, it makes it makes an interesting anomaly in history. But it also sort of fits one Gerald Ford. If you look into his background, you look into where he came from. He's a midwesterner, raised in mission, Grand Rapids, went to school at the University of Michigan, played football there was a star football player. In fact, one two national titles there undefeated football teams at the University of Michigan after that went to Yale law school and then served in the United States Navy during World War II came out and began his service in the United States House where he served over 25 years before he was picked to be vice president and president.

Gerald Ford Richard Nixon Spiro Agnew United States House Of Representatives Football University Of Michigan Grand Rapids Yale Law School
The Left Went Crazy Over a 7-Hour Gap for Nothing

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:01 min | 3 months ago

The Left Went Crazy Over a 7-Hour Gap for Nothing

"It's the water. Oh, you don't believe me? Well, let's listen to a little Montage. The gravy in put together over the supposed 7 hour gap scandal. The ghetto president that they thought Obama would be is officially Donald Trump. This dude is walking like he's voting from the wire with burner phones and erasing phone records. Trump or someone administration appears to have actually tampered with the records. These White House records are not just incomplete. The gap suggests staggering and potentially willful omission. 7 hours makes the 18 minutes of erased Oval Office tape around Watergate look like a game of patty cake. Donald Trump, a man who makes Richard Nixon look like a boy scout, Donald Trump makes Nixon look like a piker. Donald Trump has acted like a mafia boss. He didn't want a record of the calls and what he was saying in those calls is anybody's guess. There appears to be a real cover up of who Trump was talking to while the mob was attacking and ransacking the capitol. What is he talking to people that were in the oath keepers or some of the other rioters that were involved in this? It looks like he made a decision. I'm going to take this offline for the next 7 and a half hours. To me, that's really compelling evidence of his state of mind. What this shows is he's staying out of sight in order not to have any record of what he's talking about. That would actually be in a real trial, something that would trigger a consciousness of guilt instruction. This clearly is a crime if it involves dishonesty in trickery. And of course, that defines the Trump actions on this. This is a very big deal. And it's just more evidence of bad faith by Donald Trump. Donald Trump and his allies wanted to remove calls from the log or they made secret calls on burner phones. Knew what they were doing was wrong and tried to hide it. Simple as that. Well, I know this won't surprise you, it turned out every bit of that was false.

Donald Trump Patty Cake Oval Office Richard Nixon White House Nixon Barack Obama
Robert Wilkie on Donald Trump's 'Real American Leadership'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:15 min | 3 months ago

Robert Wilkie on Donald Trump's 'Real American Leadership'

"Secretary Robert wilkie, welcome back to America professor. Thank you. You love you clearly have a passion for history, not just national security. As we were prepping for this show, you talked about this funny story about general Montgomery that you can share with us later. But let's go straight to the heart of the matter. It's been four weeks of war in Europe right now. I was on a British TV show at the weekend. And a conservative outlet. But one of the guests used this trope about president Trump that he was so crazy and unpredictable. My retort was, there was nothing crazy and there was nothing unpredictable. He said America first secure the border treat our allies friends and our enemies as enemies, which is what he did. So talk to us about the importance and I know you've been responding to the rally on news. Talk to us about the importance of personality in real politics. So let me just say why president Trump was in the mainstream of real American leadership. President Trump told the Europeans you have a GDP that's equal to the United States, your population is a little larger. You have lived under the good graces of the American people for 75 years. You have to pull your own weight. John Kennedy admonished de Gaulle and Aden hour. Back in 1961, he said you are living off the fat of the land. American land. So this is the president and the German Chancellor. Richard Nixon said we did not. We did not win World War II, to provide Europeans with two annual vacations. Donald Trump was in the mainstream of that thought. And this is why your point is so well taken. This is a serious business. It requires steel spine and that sounds trite. But aggressors know when they are facing someone who, yes, unpredictability in the mind of your enemy. Because of what you're doing, is essential.

President Trump Secretary Robert Wilkie United States Europe John Kennedy De Gaulle Richard Nixon Donald Trump
Dwight Chapin Reflects on His Work in the Nixon Administration

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:46 min | 4 months ago

Dwight Chapin Reflects on His Work in the Nixon Administration

"I'm back with Dwight Chapin. He's the author of the president's man, he's a former personal aide and then deputy assistant to president Richard Nixon and we're talking here about the enigma of Nixon. But let me start by asking you, Dwight, I mean, here you are now reflecting back on your earlier life where at a young age, you found yourself right there in the middle of things working with bob halderman who was the chief of staff right there with Nixon in a sense managing Nixon's day and how does that experience feel to you now with some perspective and with some time having passed? Well, it feels because I've written the president's man. It feels very familiar because I spent so much time reflecting back using archival materials, my diaries, letters that had been exchanged by with bob haldeman and so forth. So right now the feelings are very raw. I worked with a collaborator who was very helpful in that he kept asking me as we did certain things. How does that feel? And it's amazing how when you start focusing, you can count up the feelings that you had 50 years ago. For me, going back and doing this was a labor of love. I admired the man so much. And to be able to at 81 years old, have the opportunity to go back and capture these memories, capture these events and try to describe the man I knew was a real

Dwight Chapin Nixon Bob Halderman Richard Nixon Bob Haldeman Dwight
Monica Crowley Addresses the Conventional Critiques of Richard Nixon

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:12 min | 5 months ago

Monica Crowley Addresses the Conventional Critiques of Richard Nixon

"Let's return Monica. You said you're going to address the conventional wisdoms, the critiques of president Nixon. You knew the man you worked for him, please tell us the truth. So you laid out too that have been a wide circulation in pop culture and in history, which is he was paranoid and that he had a very dark side to him. I think both of those things are untrue. I will cite the famous adage Seb even paranoiacs have real enemies, which Nixon had real enemies. And many and many of them as an Ardent as the Senate and odd and anti communist, of course, he had a lot of enemies. Yes, he did. And you know why? He actually was the first modern casualty of the deep state. And I remember writing a column for the New York Post almost immediately after president Trump entered office warning him of the lesson of Richard Nixon, which is, you know what? President Trump, you were surrounded by the exact same enemies, Richard Nixon faced. They destroyed Richard Nixon because he handed them the sword. Do not hand her enemies the sword. And of course we saw what happened with president Trump. So the deep state

Richard Nixon Monica The New York Post SEB President Trump Nixon Senate
Civilizations That Most Effectively Channel Energy Win

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:06 min | 5 months ago

Civilizations That Most Effectively Channel Energy Win

"So money is monetary energy. Now just a good rule for life, civilizations that most effectively channel energy win. That's an interesting thing to think about. I want you to ponder that. That's a podcast or a radio show for a different time. For example, when the United Kingdom fought the dervishes, they had machine guns, the United Kingdom did. The dervishes had camels and horses. Whoever better used energy won that battle. Whoever was better able to use technology won that battle. Now, after World War I, almost instantaneously, when World War I broke out, almost every country in Europe went off the gold standard and went to some Fiat currency. Almost instantaneously, almost immediately. This was to help finance the war. In order to fund the war machine, they needed to get to some sort of floating or Fiat currency. They began the process of debasing their currency. Now, in 1917, America passed the income tax and also we passed something called the Federal Reserve act. This was passed by then progressive former college president head of Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson, which was the beginning stage that set the framework of the central banking system. Throughout the 20s and 30s, it became more clear that in order to finance especially the 30s to finance FDR's massive government programs, we had to further debase and devalue our currency. And finally, Richard Nixon, he kind of slammed the door on a multi decade project of ending the gold standard and transitioning to a Fiat currency by basically going outside of anything that is backed by metallic or objective or finite value and went into an infinite value monetary

United Kingdom Fiat Europe Woodrow Wilson Princeton University Federal Reserve America FDR Richard Nixon
Inflation Continues to Rise, Even With Altered CPI

Mark Levin

01:45 min | 5 months ago

Inflation Continues to Rise, Even With Altered CPI

"Inflation is rising the highest since 1982 Do you youngsters out there I want to remind you Ronald Reagan came into office Following Jimmy Carter Jimmy Carter created a horrific inflation situation Horrific We hadn't seen anything since Lyndon Johnson And Richard Nixon created a horrific inflation situation And it all results from massive government spending not tax cuts and the massive government spending You see the government can never take in enough money to cover it spending I don't care if you confiscate all the money from every rich person in the world It's not enough Try and trillions and trillions more And I've entitlement programs promises way into the future The consumer price index and inflation gauge that measures costs across dozens of items rose 7% in December from a year earlier The fastest pace since June 1982 Now just so you know the bureaucrats have tried to change the CPI So that it doesn't show the real cost of inflation but even having done that They can't hide it Now they say that was in line with economists estimates and stock market futures rose after the release Excluding food and energy so called core CPI was up 5.5% on the year the biggest growth since February 1991 Now why would you exclude food and energy

Jimmy Carter Lyndon Johnson Ronald Reagan Richard Nixon
Biden’s Lawless Vaccine Mandate

Mark Levin

01:16 min | 6 months ago

Biden’s Lawless Vaccine Mandate

"So what did Joe Biden do He and his lawyers were trying to look for any hook they could possibly find To try and impose a mandate on the private sector A hundred employees or more For any corporation The problem is it's never been done before and there are no statutory bases For such a mandate But it didn't matter They talk about lawlessness they talk about insurrections It didn't matter On the case of Schumer he talks about erections but that's a whole other story They didn't care So they took osha Occupational safe and healthy health administration It was founded under Richard Nixon Which never had any direct medical responsibility And twisted the statutory language to accommodate the demands of Joe Biden Complete and utter lawlessness by the Department of Justice my White House counsel and of course by the Department of Labor including ocean

Joe Biden Schumer Osha Richard Nixon Department Of Justice White House Department Of Labor
Dennis Asks 'Sinatra: The Life' Authors Anthony Summers and Robbyn Swan, 'Will Frank Sinatra Endure?'

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:06 min | 6 months ago

Dennis Asks 'Sinatra: The Life' Authors Anthony Summers and Robbyn Swan, 'Will Frank Sinatra Endure?'

"And I have just come across this new biography of Frank Sinatra with filled with pictures as well as great fascinating detail about his life. The two authors are Anthony summers who was a former BBC journalist, and Robin swan is also a journalist and they have written biographies of Jay Edgar Hoover and Richard Nixon. Anyway, this book is titled Sinatra the life. You can't get much briefer than that much more concise. So Anthony and Robin, I welcome you to the program. Hello there. You're both now. I'm speaking to you, you're in Ireland. Yes, that's our home base. Okay. We both brought in as you actually will gather in a moment is America Italian American born and bred. I'm from Ireland and this has been my base for years, but America in a way has been my patch as a journalist for many years. Well, welcome to America via radio to both of you. I have so much to ask you. First, I guess the first is, do you believe, 'cause I was talking about this just the other day. I finally came across didn't come across. I finally worked out my own definition of great art, music, or any other art. And that is that it will endure over generations there are two and that it endures in repeated hearings for any given listener. Will Frank Sinatra endure, I think we think so, would you agree Robin? Absolutely. I think we think so and a measure of it perhaps is in sheer longevity and endurance as a test, we worked on this book so not for the life for the past four years. And when I say work, I mean sort of 8 days a week. And that meant that 8 days a week and often far into the night, we both played Sinatra. We have two because we were writing his life. And we still like it. Now there aren't many people that you could listen to every day for full years and still be successful. And we're not

Anthony Summers Robin Swan Jay Edgar Hoover Frank Sinatra America Ireland Sinatra Richard Nixon Robin BBC Anthony
Ken Blackwell Shares How to Restore Voter Integrity

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:16 min | 7 months ago

Ken Blackwell Shares How to Restore Voter Integrity

"Let's focus on how we can best address some of the issues regarding voter integrity of what happened in 2020. I still think we need to fix 2020 and the sense of fix what went wrong in 2020 from the mail in ballots to the signature verification issues. What is the status of the election integrity fight? What is going well and where do we need to dedicate some more work? Before we in fact prescribe a fix, we have to get a deeper understanding of what went wrong. So let me just say it to you this way. In 2020, we had the perfect storm for chaos and confusion. If you go back a hundred years in 1918, we had the Spanish flu, the 1929 we had major economic disruption in 1968. We had valid across the country and our major cities and in 1974, we had the impeachment process associated with Richard Nixon in 2020, we had all of those things. And the Democrats have never missed an opportunity of chaos to advance an agenda. So what they did in 2020 was that they under the guise of relaxing because of COVID, they did away with a lot of the verification policies and practices that helped us understand their voters or who they claim to be. They also loosened the chain of custody of ballots. So as we approach, as we approach 2021, we, in fact, have to fix those things. We have to tighten the chain of custody. And that means that we can't fall victim of mass unsolicited mail in ballots. We can't allow private dollars like Zuckerberg put in play in 2020 in with a half a $1 billion in selected and targeted areas that discriminated against some voters because it allowed voter valid curing by some and not by others. And so we have to go in and we have to fix those things and we have to rebuild voter confidence in the

Richard Nixon Confusion FLU Zuckerberg
Nixon Foundation Honors Gov. Pete Wilson

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:28 min | 9 months ago

Nixon Foundation Honors Gov. Pete Wilson

"I'm up with very little sleep this morning because we had a blast. Last night i came out to california with the fetching. Mrs hewitt so that we could celebrate with three hundred of his closest friends and staff family. Admirers donors supported governor. Pete wilson's career. Originally we had scheduled this at the nixon foundation at the nixon library. And your belinda. For the thirtieth anniversary of. Pete wilson governor of california in nineteen ninety-one and of course the virus got away to postpone it to april and then we postpone it until last night which was serendipitous from the perspective of the fetchy. Mrs hewitt i as we met for the first time on the same time i met. Pete wilson for the first time. That a pete wilson fundraiser at mission bay hosted by the san diego young republicans in one thousand nine hundred seventy eight. What behind the ears. Ohio kid thinking no. This is a pretty good place. Look at all these cute girls in that went over there. And pete wilson was working the crowd the only campaign out at ten. He went ten eleven and the one that he lost was the one that i won. Because he had an event which. I met the fetchy mrs hewitt but we worked with bob wide. His longtime chief of staff and the room was full and rocking yesterday. Great reception the governor was there. Mrs wilson wilson is a star people who live in washington. Dc new gail from people's time in the senate remember peak is a marine yearly. But we be leftover that he's a marine enlisted became. An officer is older brother. Let him there as listed managed that you know break. You're on if you joined the marines. And pete did anyway right out of jail after that law school after that. Advance work for a young richard nixon running for california governor in nineteen sixty two. That didn't work out. Well for president nixon but eventually it did for the country and for president nixon pete went and became an assemblyman then. He became the mayor of san diego for twelve years. Then it became the united states. Senator for eight years and then he became the governor of california for your great governor is a great senator largely responsible along with dan. Quayle and ronald reagan for the passage of star wars sti which many credit with the collapse of the soviet union. Finally governor wilson was just in federal. He doesn't change that age. He's the same guy and there is a tribute videos. Very funny thing. They can either be terrible or great. This was great

Pete Wilson Mrs Hewitt Nixon Foundation Nixon Library California Bob Wide Mrs Wilson Wilson Belinda Mission Bay San Diego President Nixon Nixon Pete Ohio Marines Senate Pete Washington Governor Wilson Quayle
Who is K.T. McFarland, Trump's Former Deputy National Security Advisor?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:17 min | 11 months ago

Who is K.T. McFarland, Trump's Former Deputy National Security Advisor?

"We have so much to discuss with regards to the disasters occurring in central asia in the last two weeks. But let's start by those who may have just accidentally happened on this channel. Found us on rumble. Downloaded this podcast. Tell them a little bit about who. Kt mcfarland is when she started to get involved in national security issues. And then you'll climb to the heights of power in the white house under the trump administration starting in nineteen seventy. I was a freshman in college at george washington university and got partial scholarship and had to pay the rest of my way through school. So i got a part time typing job in the west wing of the white house and the white house situation room. Working for guy wasn't very well known at the time by the name of henry kissinger and he was richard nixon's national security advisor. So i started working part time in the nighttime typing pool for henry kissinger In the west wing and then worked in the nixon administration. The ford administration went to graduate school during the carter administration went to oxford university and then. Mit where i studied and taught nuclear weapons Then joined the reagan administration when we won the cold war Was part of the pentagon team Did one help win. The cold war got the pentagon's highest civilian award for that service. And then i retired. We'd want our cold war. My war was one done. And so i married. Had five. kids was living the good life in new york and long island and then september eleventh happened and it convinced me to get back into government because i had such a pretty extensive experience. I point so. I did And i ran for the. Us senate against hillary clinton the organ lost. Predictably but i did Get back involved in a lot of issues. And then he came. The fox news national security analysts for over a decade until i joined the trump administration Which i did at the beginning and so here. I am out of the trump administration of back on talking to import. People like you about issues. I care deeply about what your national security

Kt Mcfarland White House Henry Kissinger Richard Nixon George Washington University Ford Administration Pentagon Asia Carter Administration Reagan Administration Oxford University Long Island Hillary Clinton New York Senate United States
Sen. Cotton Responds to News of Saudi Arabia and Iran Military Coalition

Mark Levin

02:01 min | 11 months ago

Sen. Cotton Responds to News of Saudi Arabia and Iran Military Coalition

"The Jerusalem Post this is breaking Saudi Arabia has signed some kind of joint military cooperation agreement, which with Russia And Iran and Russia. Uh, are are going to be involved soon in a, uh Joint military exercises, and this is just the beginning. I think I even think in our own hemisphere south of the border of some of these Communist regime stick around when some of the others I think we're going to see this spread. So much of what we've done under both parties over more than half a century. Um, to establish our Our strength. Has just thought that it's so much of it is just melted away. I'd be curious of your of your opinion. I'm afraid you're right, Mark. You know what's happening now It's just a continuation of what happened in the Obama Biden there now that it's the Biden era, Russia had been a peripheral player in Middle East if a player at all since 1973 when Richard Nixon and Henry Kissinger help eject them from Middle East, and Obama basically invited invited him back in after the Syrian Red Line fiasco when he refused to enforce his own red line. And now you've got countries like Saudi Arabia, longstanding partner of the United States, who see what's happened with Joe Biden's bug out in Afghanistan were abandoning not just Afghans who helped us but even our own citizens, and they think they need to start cutting side deals to protect their own interests. You know, some people compared what's happened over the last week in Afghanistan. Having decided on in 1975. And remember what happened. Saigon in 1975 small foretaste of what Lay ahead, Laos and Cambodia fell almost immediately. You had the horrors of Paul Pot, then become a rouge. Cuba is sending shock troops all over the All over Latin America and Africa as well. Russia invaded Afghanistan. Um, so for years that reverberated. I'm afraid that Joe Biden's impotence and incompetence in Afghanistan will reverberate for years to come

Russia Obama Biden Saudi Arabia The Jerusalem Post Middle East Iran Henry Kissinger Richard Nixon Biden Afghanistan Joe Biden Mark Barack Obama Paul Pot United States Saigon Laos Cambodia Cuba Latin America
What Is Joe Biden's New China Doctrine?

The Economist: Editor's Picks

02:08 min | 1 year ago

What Is Joe Biden's New China Doctrine?

"Optimists long hoped that welcoming china into the global economy would make a responsible stakeholder and bring about political reform as president. Donald trump blasted that week now. Joe biden is converting trumpian bombast into doctrine that pits america against china a struggle between rival political systems. Which he says can have only one winner between. Mr trump and mr biden have engineered the most dramatic break in american foreign policy in the five decades since richard nixon went to china mr biden and his team based their doctrine on the belief that china is less interested in coexistence and more interested in dominance. The task of american policy is to blunt. chinese ambitions. America will work with china in areas of common interest like climate change but counter. Its ambitions elsewhere. That means building up the strengths at home and working abroad with allies that can supplemented economic technological diplomatic military. And moral haft much about mr biden's new doctrine make sense. The optimistic case for engagement has crumbled under the realities of chinese power led by president. Xi jinping china has garrison the south china sea imposed party rule on hong kong threaten taiwan skirmished with india and has tried to subvert western values in international bodies. Many countries are alarmed by china's wolf warrior diplomacy but the details of the biden doctrine contain much to worry about not least that it is unlikely to work. One problem is how. Mr biden defines threat because politics in washington is broken. He seems to feel that he needs the spirit of pearl harbor to help. Rekindle a sense of national purpose. That is a miscalculation it is true. That republicans jump on anything. They can as soft on china even though every time. They say that the presidential election was stolen. They do the work of chinese propagandists

Mr Biden China Mr Trump Donald Trump Joe Biden America Richard Nixon South China Taiwan Hong Kong Biden India Washington
How Have US-China Relations Changed Since 1971?

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

02:10 min | 1 year ago

How Have US-China Relations Changed Since 1971?

"With president biden now at the helm and the chinese economy predicted to overtake the us. In just a few years. How have relations between the two nations changed since kissinger's visit in nineteen seventy one. And what is the future of these two superpowers who better to ask than vincent. Knee the guardians china affairs correspondent who presented a documentary on bbc world. Service called when kissinger went to china. I started off by asking him. How nineteen seventy-one meeting came about what to some extent. It was a multi year project. Starting with both sides signaled intention of contact. This was initially conducted a very quietly and in a very subtle way beginning with the us. Calling china it's proper name at people's republic of china instead of red china or communist china and in beijing mao also wants to get in touch with richard nixon and his administration so they stay on the media's began to reduce the use of blessed capitalists. The things like this a eventually president. Nixon told pakistani president. Y'all calm and yao coundon tote chairman mao. That's the americans was serious. So that was the beginning of this contact. At in retrospect it was a very practical way of changing the course of the cold war. If you think about in the ninety sixties seventies when richard nixon came to power in ninety sixty eight vietnam. War was still a huge controversy in the us. Adding china around ninety sixty nine. There was a border war between china and the soviet union and around around autumn nineteen. Sixty nine It was rumored that's soviet union wants to to plan a pre emptive strike on china's so chairman mao at the time was really looking for a way out of this. And of course you know for nixon. I going to another communist big power. They wanted to change the triangular relationship between the us soviet union and china

China President Biden Kissinger MAO Richard Nixon Yao Coundon Vincent United States BBC Beijing Nixon Vietnam Soviet Union Chairman Mao
"richard nixon" Discussed on This American President

This American President

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on This American President

"Is there any future projects that you're eyeing future turning points that might end up being a new book or a trilogy. Well it's hard to get as close up to a major decision maker as we can get nixon ident- in its hard to repeat that So Suddenly i'm more interested in historical subjects than Topical ones because i think it takes forty or fifty years for all the materials to come out into right you know. What of course the second draft of history. So i'm not interested in writing another book about donald trump books about being written about donald trump and They're all gain to depend on second hand accounts rather than on firsthand accounts because no other president including donald trump is going to tape himself the way. Nixon did So that rules out. You know topical Uh current day topics subject for book. i can see myself writing a book about some of the historical book preps about the entire cold war rather than just an episode in the cold war. Great well michael dobbs. The book is called king. Richard nixon and watergate an american tragedy. It came out in may of this year. So it's still relatively hot off the presses. But mr dobbs thank you so much for being on our show and sharing your insights about this very important moment in american history. Well thank you so much your show and it's been a great conversation. Thanks.

donald trump nixon michael dobbs Nixon mr dobbs Richard nixon
"richard nixon" Discussed on This American President

This American President

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on This American President

"So you know that is another side of nixon The relationship with his family which is often not captured in books about watergate or biographies of nixon So in what ways are we still living in the shadow of of watergate. By thank you can draw a direct line from woodgate to the various scandals of the nixon presidency. I think this obviously vietnam was very divisive. Time in american history and it really divided the country into you know the antiwar movement and The people who now describe themselves or sarah palin describe themselves as real americans real america and You know that dates back. That idea of real america as a political construct dates back to the nixon era. So i see this as a You know there's a direct link there. I mean many of the abuses that took place in the watergate. Era were repeated during the trump period The interference with the justice department for example is is is one example and nixon was appealing to the same kind of portion of the electorate that trump later appeal to So there definitely There's definitely a connection though. I think however in a trump nixon two very different people. Nixon had a much greater sense of american history. And was you know much more serious thinker than trump particularly on foreign policy. So in some ways you know Karl marx wrote once that history repeats itself. The first time has tragedy. The second time is false and I think you know that might be a political nixon and trump in some ways. So you have written the trilogy on the cold war The big turning points. And then now you've written on the turning point of watergate and the role that had an american history. Is there any future projects that you're eyeing turning points that might end up being a new book or a trilogy. Well it's hard to get as close up to a major decision maker as we can get to nixon ident- in it's hard to repeat that So certainly. I'm more interested in historical subjects than Topical ones. Because i think it takes forty or fifty years for all the materials to come out into right. You know what of cool to second draft of history. So i'm You know not interested in writing another book about donald trump that lots of books about being written about donald trump and They're all going to depend on second hand accounts rather than on firsthand accounts because no other president including donald trump is going to tape himself way. Nixon says that rules out. You know topical Current day topics as a subject for book I can see myself writing a book about you know. Some other historical book preps about the entire cold war Rather than just an episode in the code will great. Well michael dobbs. The book is called cancer. Nixon and watergate an american tragedy. It came out in may of this year. So it's still relatively hot off the presses. But mr dobbs thank you so much for being on our show and sharing your insights about this very important moment in american history. Well thank you so much enjoyed your show and It's been a great conversation. Thanks.

michael dobbs donald trump Karl marx Nixon forty sarah palin nixon second time second draft cold war fifty years america dobbs first time one example may of this year american woodgate second hand trump
"richard nixon" Discussed on This American President

This American President

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on This American President

"And when nixon had to Sacrifice haldeman in order to survive himself has his very tearful compensation with haldeman and he starts calling him haldeman who is belly unit his kept it distance up until then even though they're close collaborators he starts calling him my brother And he says i love you and then there's a pause and he says like my brother and i think that's a reference to one of nixon's brothers who died of toback uses When nixon was young man and this act of getting rid of holdman. Who's been with him. All these years is as painful nixon as losing his brothers from tuberculosis while he was young man. So you could use the same way that if you If you go to a shakespeare play you can see the hero suffering immensely on stage. You can also appreciate nixon suffering In this very in this period that's traumatic for the country but is also traumatic for him personally right now. How did nixon's relationship with his family. Play out in all of this. And i've heard that despite nixon's paranoia 's and vindictiveness. He was very much a family. Man what did you learn about that. Yeah i definitely think he was a family man and did the family was close to him. I mean his wife pat pat. Nixon was often portrayed in the press. Plastic pat I think that's a little unfair characterization The family stood by nixon during this period and particularly his younger daughter julie Who their tapes of conversations to nixon julie at the height of watergate and You know. Nixon is yelling at haldeman. Someone else and then suddenly julie gets on the phone trying to cheer her father up trying to pass on you know What she calls nuggets of cheery news and nixon's voice changes automatically from being irrevocable to being loving and caring. Because he's talking to julie so you know that is another side of nixon The relationship with his family which is often not captured in books about watergate. Autobiographies of nixon So in what ways are we still living in the shadow of watergate. By thank you can draw a direct line from woodgate to the various scandals of the nixon presidency. I think this obviously vietnam was a very divisive time in american history and it really divided the country into You know the antiwar movement and The people who now describe themselves. Sarah palin described themselves as americans real america and That dates back. That idea of real america as a political construct dates back to the nixon era. So i see this as a There's a direct link there. I mean many of the abuses that took place in the watergate. Era were repeated during the trump period. The interference with the justice department for example is is is one example and nixon was appealing to the same kind of portion of the electorate that trump later appeal to So they're definitely Is definitely a connection. There i think however in a trump nixon a two very different people. Nixon had a much greater sense of american history and was much more serious thinker than trump particularly on foreign policy. So in some ways you know Karl marx wrote once that history repeats itself. The first time has tragedy. The second time is false and I think you know that might be applicable to nixon and trump in some ways. So you have written the trilogy on the cold war The the big turning points and then now you've written on the turning point of watergate and the role that had an american history..

nixon haldeman toback holdman paranoia 's pat pat julie Nixon nixon julie tuberculosis nuggets justice department for example america Sarah palin vietnam trump Karl marx
"richard nixon" Discussed on This American President

This American President

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on This American President

"A man called mark felt who Had his own reasons for leaking to journalist. Bob woodward wasn't the only journalists that mark felt was talking to and So he used to have clandestine meetings. With woodward throughout the Throughout the watergate period at they would meet in a parking garage in arlington virginia in the middle of the night. Two o'clock three o'clock in the morning so mark felt was really leading a double life during the day. He was his ultra-efficient. Fbi official in charge. Pretty much of the watergate investigation. And by night he was a whistle. Blower you know betraying the very president that he was having Yeah so remarkable circumstance. Now you have probably listened to hundreds if not thousands of hours of tape. You probably know the nixon tapes as well as anybody alive. What surprised or intrigue. You intrigued you most about them. Well i think it's the insight they give to the day to day life of president and i mean most of the big revelations from the tapes have already in a trickled out in newspaper reporting. Who in books over the years. So it's not. As i mean you can find nuggets of new detail and every page of my book. Actually contains a new detail in something that would be fresh to even to experts on this period but the main thing is just the incited. Get the tapes give to You know how. A president lives his day What's it like being president to understand this from the inside rather from the outside as journalists and historians. They usually compelled to do so. We can follow nixon around the white house day by day minute by minute. Z goes from His secret hideaway. In the executive office building across the street to the oval office and then goes up to the his favourite room in the white house which that which was actually the lincoln sitting room on the second floor of the residence We can follow them around and we can listen to him. You know getting angry with his aides Having loving conversations with his daughters we can appreciate the full complexity of the man and all the contradictions. We can use like being a fly on the wall actually or perhaps a better expression would be a bug in his desk because that's where the bugs were actually planted and knew that is unique because we see the president's as he really is rather than as somebody you rather than through the eyes of somebody else..

Bob woodward hundreds second floor mark felt thousands of hours arlington virginia Two o'clock three o'clock in woodward Fbi tape double life morning nixon
"richard nixon" Discussed on This American President

This American President

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on This American President

"Satan thinking he was never on the point of pressing a nuclear button So nixon famously had a not a great relationship with the media and this was not too long after the kennedy years after president. Franklin roosevelt who The media they had a very good relationship and there were things that they actually hid from the american people about those president. So how did those relationships compare and how did it change so quickly as you said both. Fdr and john kennedy examples of presidents. Who on the whole had very good relationships with the media and were able to charm and manipulate the media and nixon certainly resented that because he wasn't a charismatic person he was rather awkward. He wanted to control everything And he'd had a very rocky relationship with the media and You know he takes it out on them. He thinks that he identifies the media with his political enemies and Is constantly thinking of reasons to Screw them bastards. In the media's he puts it Particularly once watergate gets going Very antagonistic relationship with the washington. Post where i used to work by the way And he's scheming with chuck colson Actually this is part of the first scene of the book. He scheming to drive down the price of the washington post which has just gone public in. He wants to punish the washington post for its woodgate coverage so this goes up and down and his fairly sort of you know pretty much background noise. He's Throughout his presidency and particularly the period that i'm describing So you mentioned the washington post deep throat. During this time was leaking information to them deep throat becoming basically part of the american political lexicon so what did you learn about deep throat. Mark felt the fbi number two and his motivation for leaking information to the post. Right the phrase deep throat came from a pornographic movie that was popular at the time. Starring linda lovelace so when Bob woodward was investigating woodgate. He had a secret sauce. The identity of whom he refused to disclose even though even to his own editors so they christened him deep throat. You know the man who could never be named and many years later it turned out that deep throat was the deputy director of the fbi. Aman cooled mark felt who Had his own reasons for leaking to john lewis. Bob woodward wasn't the only journalists that Mark felt was talking to And so he used to have planned to steam meetings with would throughout the Throughout the woodgate period. They would meet in a parking garage in arlington virginia in the middle of the night. Two o'clock three o'clock in the morning so mark felt was really leading a double life During the day he was his ultra-efficient. Fbi official in charge. Pretty much of the watergate investigation. And by night he was a whistle blower in betraying the very president that he was serving Yes so Remarkable circumstance now. You have probably listened to hundreds if not thousands of hours of tape. You probably know the nixon tapes as well as anybody alive. What surprise during tribute Intrigued you most about them. Well i think it's the insight they give to the day to day life of the president and i mean most of the big revelations from the tapes have already you know trickled out Newspaper reporting in books over the years. So it's not. As i mean you can find you. Know nuggets of new detail and every page of my book. Actually contains a new detail in something that would be fresh to even to experts on this period but The main thing is you know..

nixon washington post Franklin roosevelt john kennedy Bob woodward Starring linda lovelace Fbi chuck colson Fdr Satan kennedy Mark washington Aman john lewis mark felt arlington mark virginia nuggets
"richard nixon" Discussed on This American President

This American President

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on This American President

"You talk a little bit about nixon's drinking and use of medication. What's the story there. Right a lot has been written about nixon drinking. And i want to put it into perspective Suddenly the late at night. Nixon typically like to unwind and he would do so with a few clauses of wine or whisky That didn't happen every night but did happen quite frequently. He had trouble getting to sleep so he used to take In a sleeping pills and other medications and they would interact with whatever. Alcohol was taking And it didn't take many drinks to get nixon slurring. His words and sounding set of pretty drunk and there are occasions on the tapes When you he clearly is drunk But you i wouldn't say it's a nightly occurrence in the speech. The president was out of control I mean it's on a spectrum. I mean some some days he was in he would abstain completely had a big event coming up and some nights he would just take one or two drinks and then occasionally when at critical moments he suddenly drinks too much. See you get you know the whole range of of Him being out of control and when he was you know out of control the people like kissinger and hold them would know you know just to ignore his orders. Basically postpone implementation of the orders satan. He was never on the point of pressing a nuclear button So nixon famously had a not a great relationship with the media and this was not too long after the kennedy years after president. Franklin roosevelt who The media they had a very good relationship and there are things that they actually hid from the american people about those presidents. so how did those relationships compare. And how did it change so quickly you know as you said both Fdr and john kennedy examples of presidents. who on the whole had very good relationships with the media and we're able to charm and manipulate the media and nixon certainly resented that because he wasn't a charismatic sort of person he was raw woke. Would he wanted to control everything And he'd had a very rocky relationship with the media and You know he takes it out on them. He thinks that he identifies the media with his political enemies and is constantly thinking up to Screw them bastards. In the media's he puts it Particularly once gets going Very antagonistic relationship with the washington. Post where i used to work by the way And he's scheming with chuck colson This is part of the first scene of the book. He scheming to drive down the share price of the washington post which has just gone public in a he wants to punish the washington post for its woodgate coverage so this goes up and down and his fairly sort of you know pretty much background noise throughout his presidency and particularly the period that i'm describing So you mentioned the washington post deep throat. During this time was leaking information to them deep throat becoming basically part of the american political lexicon so what did you learn about deep throat. Mark felt the fbi number two and his motivation for leaking information to the post. Right the phrase deep throat actually came from a pornographic movie that was popular at the time. Starring linda lovelace. So when a bob woodward was investigating watergate. He had a secret sauce. the identity of whom he refused to disclose even though Even to his own editors they christened him deep throat. You know the man who could never be named and many years later it turned out that deep throat was the deputy director of the fbi..

linda lovelace Mark one john kennedy Franklin roosevelt Nixon first scene nixon both two drinks many years later washington post chuck colson bob woodward number two kennedy washington american
"richard nixon" Discussed on This American President

This American President

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on This American President

"Richard is as much as anything a portrait of a court of the ruler and his coaches. Who of course include henry kissinger chuck colson john dean Spiral near the vice president You know the whole gang of them and they're all different people in they interact with nixon in different ways. How would you characterize his relationship with henry kissinger and what would what was the impact of that relationship on watergate. Well it's interesting because kissing was nixon's national security adviser and they you know were a team but they also rivals because nixon suspected Largely correctly of kissinger playing a double game. of leaking to the press leaking to nixon's enemies and with the goal of making kissing jessica himself. Look more look smarter And being the architect of some of these Some of the big foreign policy initiatives including the opening to china A nixon didn't want kissinger to get all the credit. And when john lewis gave him the credit for some of these foreign policy initiatives. Nixon was furious so that was actually one of nixon's main motivations in installing this tape-recording system that he would be able to show when he came to write his memoirs that He had been the driver of from policy. Initiatives not henry kissinger kissinger for his part was very adept. flat era and psychic fant. He would play on nixon's vanity and tell nixon that he was the greatest president ever and that he this watergate thing would be forgotten in history and nixon would go down in history as a great foreign policy. President nixon liked that he liked to be flooded but at the same time he was in a pretty much aware of the game that kissinger was playing and The some would. I find hilarious moments on the tapes when nixon is running down kissinger and even one moment when the talking about going off to camp david for the weekend and dixon says we'll take kissinger along with us and then a couple of minutes later says no no. Henry's too much of a pain in the us. We won't take it so kissinger was disinvited. But you know that reflects this raw strange relationship between the two of them. That's probably one of the milder things that that's documented as far as nixon talking about somebody. Yeah he was certainly an equal opportunity. insult of people And he you know uses a lot of swear words and He typically refers to the media for example a sons of bitches bitches bastards son of a bitches you know just a typical right expression for nixon right now. You alluded to vice president. Spiro agnew People remember him as the first vice president to resign. What was their relationship like. And there was talk of agnew becoming president potentially with the watergate scandal so that play out for nixon well. Nixon often talked about agnew his best insurance policy against assassination and later against resignation because he calculated that wants people figured out that if they got rid of nixon they would get agnew That would Restrain them and so you know they sometimes He sometimes talks about his resignation. And then he his own resignation and then he says to one of his aides. You won't act you and the aide says of course we don't want to agnew and so that is always the reason for nixon himself to stay on. Now agnew himself was facing his own troubles during this period..

nixon kissinger henry kissinger henry kissinger kissinger chuck colson john dean Nixon john lewis Richard President nixon agnew jessica china dixon Spiro agnew Henry david us
"richard nixon" Discussed on This American President

This American President

04:34 min | 1 year ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on This American President

"And if you want a drink draw the connection further on. I can see that link to the kind of people who support Donald trump. so you're saying that it was personal with nixon all the way from the start. He identified with that silent majority even before his political career. It sounds like i think it began as personal. Of course then it became political because he saw it as a way of making his political career. And you know he from very his first. Political campaign was An anti he flung anti communist epithets that his democratic opponent. So he you know. It was very savvy in using that and exploiting those political ideological divisions we were in the middle of the cold war that period To make a successful political career so nixon wins reelection nineteen seventy to one of the greatest landslides. History forty nine out of fifty states yearbook focuses on the first one hundred days after his second inauguration. So what's so pivotal about that time. Well i think that. I chose that period. Because you know although the subtitle the book is nixon and watergate. The real story is the unraveling of the american presidency or of one american president and the way in which you know in a very short space of time a politician can go from being top of the weld reelected by one of the largest if not the largest popular vote margin in american history to struggling for his political life and that happened to nixon in those first hundred days after his second inaugural site begin with the night of his second inaugural actually will the night preceding his second inaugural and i go all the way through to the end of april nineteen seventy-three when he's forced to part company with his two closest aides. John alec men and bob haldeman Which is something as painful to him as the loss of his two brothers from tuberculosis while he was still a young man. I mean it was a personal crisis for nixon. And this is really a you know. Psychodrama a personal and political psychodrama. The nixon went through. But i actually then take the story up until july nineteen seventy-three which follows those early congressional hearings and most important the revelation of his secret taping system and his decision not to destroy the tapes. He could have destroyed the tapes. I think when he took the decision not to destroy the tapes although he didn't realizing realize it he was sealing his fate as president because when those tapes became public then It was discovered that he had himself ordered the cover up woodgate and he was forced to resign as president. But that's a different phase that's sort of political constitutional legal phase of the watergate crisis and i was interested in the personal psychodrama. Of the watergate. Crisis and the unraveling of the nixon presidency. In fact the unmaking of the president was is what. I was interested in there being. You know a series of books by teddy white. The called the making of the president and i was interested in the unmaking of the president. So could you take us into that decision to not get rid of the tapes to not dispose of them. What was how did that psycho drama play out. Nixon's mind over that decision right. But this is in july of nineteen seventy-three nixon thinks that he can completely control the tapes And that they all his personal property and he can do whatever he wants with him and he won't. His intention was that he would use them for his Memoirs and preps leak them selectively to bolster his own case so that is mindset his aide..

bob haldeman John alec Donald trump Nixon nixon two brothers july of nineteen seventy forty teddy white first one fifty states nine end of april nineteen seventy- second two closest aides cold war second inaugural hundred days american
"richard nixon" Discussed on This American President

This American President

05:04 min | 1 year ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on This American President

"We can get inside the room which it was impossible for reporters to do at the time of course at least directly right so having done this cold war series you've become basically one of the big cold war historians. What led you since With all the literature out there in watergate. What led you to this story in particular. But i'm interested in turning points in history and all my code will look at specific turning point seven the collapse of communism the cuban missile crisis which was perhaps the ultimate turning point in history because the world could have been destroyed obviously and six months in nineteen forty-five which looked at the genesis of the cold war and how To allies turned into cold war enemies. So you watergate. And the full of richard nixon. The forced resignation of richard. Nixon is another big turning point in modern american history that i wanted to examine but as also attracted by you know the incredible archival material that is now available. I didn't think that it's ever gain to become possible. Be possible again to get such an intimate close up. Look at an american president particularly in american president facing a very grave crisis an exist essential crisis in nixon's case Then we have with nixon In the period that. I'm looking at him. And this is because of his tapes and a whole lot of other material including audio. Diaries tip tapes made by the people. Various investigations memoirs. I mean whenever gain to get this with another american president so that allows one to write the book. In the way novelist might or array. Playwright might Which was in a very exciting for me. Yeah so there's this image that people have of nixon as this lonely. Socially awkward person What did you find out about him. that may have differed or reinforced. What that images. And and how did someone like him. Rise to the highest level of american politics right well. Nixon was very contradictory. Sort of person. I mean he was alona and while the oakwood He was born to pull struggling. Quake parents out in california and his as he wrote himself actually in his own name wa. His parents were the two most opposite. People you can imagine. His father was arrestable angry. Punish the boys Harshly his mother was a very pious cuenca and she subjected them to the silent treatment so within nixon's Own personality you can see the personality of both his parents. I mean he says anga and his resentments certainly reflect his father's personality but is introvert nature and his ambition reflects his mother's personality and his mother's expectations for him. I think what about his background born to a poor quaker family from california. What about that stood out to you. Well he you know was a self made man and He had everything that he achieved in life. basically was the result of his own hard work and strivings and Know he also writes about this. He talks about the some of the resentment he felt growing up. And this being a you know. A focus for his energy Even at college shouldn't he That was elite debate social Social group in at whittier college. And he founded a group of jocks Based on the football team of which he was a member the was. You know trying to an alternative to this Rather stuck up College fraternity So he always identified. Right from other years with the have nots in america and Which he later called the silent majority. So i see a direct link from His early experiences growing up to his Behaviors politician and if you want to draw the connection further on i can see that linked to the kind of people whose support donald trump. So you're saying that it was personal with nixon all the way from the start..

nixon Nixon richard nixon anga richard california whittier college football america donald trump
"richard nixon" Discussed on This American President

This American President

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on This American President

"And i was able to find out a lot of things that i didn't know at the time as a reporter and it's a little bit like that with this nixon book that you know those of us who grew up during that period Had one experience but now because of all the material that has become available including The president's tapes We get quite different view of nixon a much more intimate view. We can get inside the room which it was impossible for reporters to do at the time of course at least directly right so having done this cold war series in you've become basically one of the big cold war historians. What led you since With all the literature out there on watergate. What led you to this story in particular. But i'm interested in turning points in history and all my code will books look at specific turning point seven the collapse of communism the cuban missile crisis which was perhaps the ultimate turning point in history because the world could have been destroyed there obviously and six months in one thousand nine forty five which looked at the genesis of the cold war and how world war two allies turned into cold war enemies so watergate and the full of richard nixon. The forced resignation of richard. Nixon is another big turning point in modern american history that i wanted to examine but is also attracted by you know the incredible material that is now available. I don't think that it's ever gained to become possible. Be possible again to get such an intimate close up. Look at an american president particularly in american president facing a very grave crisis an existential crisis in nixon's case then we have with nixon In the period that. I'm looking at him and this is because of his tapes and a whole lot of other material including audio. Diaries kept tapes made by other people. There is investigations memoirs. I mean. we're never going to get this with another american president so that allows one to write the book in the way..

richard six months Nixon world war one thousand nixon two allies cold war watergate five war one american missile crisis nine forty cuban
"richard nixon" Discussed on This American President

This American President

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on This American President

"Nixon was reelected as the thirty seventh president of the united states. Although he has never been considered one of america's most charismatic presidents he won one of the greatest landslides in american history he defeated democrat george mcgovern in forty nine fifty states and had a wider margin of victory in the popular vote percentage than anything enjoyed by theodore roosevelt. Dwight d eisenhower. John f kennedy ronald reagan and barack obama nixon had reached the pinnacle of his career. And yet this record breaking campaign had also planted the seeds of a spectacular downfall that june a group of operatives were arrested after a burglary into the democratic national headquarters at the watergate hotel in time it was revealed that these operatives were connected to nixon's reelection campaign and that nixon had personally conspired to cover up the entire affair. The watergate scandal would go onto consume nixon's second term. In the end. Nixon would resign in disgrace on august. Ninth nineteen seventy-four four. Despite his numerous accomplishments fairly or unfairly the scandal would define nixon's place in american history. Richard nixon and watergate continue to fascinate the american people in today's episode. We are pleased to have. Michael dobbs author of the new book king. Richard nixon and watergate an american tragedy to discuss this fascinating event in presidential history Our guest today is author. Michael dobbs he is the author of the new book king. Richard nixon and watergate an american tragedy and he is a historian. He's written the famous cold war trilogy which i highly recommend in fact actually one of the first books i ever read in college was down with big brother. The fall of the soviet empire which covers one of the most fascinating periods of our lifetimes. The fall of the soviet union. He's also written the book. One minute to midnight. Kennedy chris chef and castro on the brink of nuclear war and also the book six months in one thousand nine forty five from world war two cold war and right. Now we're in a cold war series and so you're of the perfect author to have here a very excited to have you on. Just because i read your book so many years ago and i enjoyed it and here. You are with the new book on president. Nixon and watergate. So thank you for being on the show. Well thanks so much. richard Down with big brother was my first book. So i'm pleased to find somebody who read it and enjoyed it yeah. It was assigned reading in comparative history. Class when i was at uc san diego and so it was one of those first books that i read and enjoyed it a lot so i feel like this is full circle right here yeah well. Let's captures What i've tried to do in my books which is to you know what is a reporter. I focused on the first rough draft of history. And then i've moscow during that period of the collapse of communism when i came back to the us. I wanted to write something more in depth second rough draft of history of second draft..

Michael dobbs Nixon theodore roosevelt Dwight d eisenhower six months Kennedy richard second draft first book John f kennedy ronald reagan second term george mcgovern america nixon world war two cold war one thousand One minute second rough draft first rough draft watergate
"richard nixon" Discussed on This American President

This American President

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on This American President

"On november seventh nineteen seventy-two richard. Mille house nixon was reelected as the thirty seventh president of the united states. Although he has never been considered one of america's most charismatic presidents he won one of the greatest landslides in american history. He defeated democrat. George mcgovern in forty nine out of fifty states and had a wider margin of victory in the popular vote percentage than anything enjoyed by theodore roosevelt. Dwight eisenhower john f. Kennedy ronald reagan and barack obama nixon had reached the pinnacle of his career and yet this record breaking campaign had also planted the seeds of a spectacular downfall that june a group of operatives were arrested after a burglary into the democratic national headquarters at the watergate hotel in time it was revealed that these operatives were connected to nixon's reelection campaign and that nixon had personally conspired to cover up the entire affair. The watergate scandal would go on to consume nixon's second term in the end. Nixon would resign in disgrace on august. Ninth nineteen seventy four. Despite his numerous accomplishments fairly or unfairly the scandal would define nixon's place in american history. Richard nixon and watergate continue to fascinate the american people in today's episode. We are pleased to have. Michael dobbs author of the new book king. Richard nixon and watergate an american tragedy to discuss this fascinating.

nixon Dwight eisenhower john f Kennedy ronald reagan barack obama nixon George mcgovern america watergate hotel theodore roosevelt richard Nixon Richard nixon Michael dobbs
The Speech Richard Nixon Never Gave

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:45 min | 1 year ago

The Speech Richard Nixon Never Gave

"On july twenty fourth nineteen sixty nine neil armstrong and buzz aldrin became the first humans to walk on the moon during their time walking on the surface which only lasted about two and a half hours. They received a phone call from the president of the united states. Richard nixon for purposes. That will soon become obvious. I'd like to play the entire clip free now. And don't worry it's not very long kneeland is talking to you by telephone from the oval room house and this certainly has to be the most historic telephone. Call ever made from the white house. I just can't tell you how proud we all are what you have done for. Every american this has to be proudest day of our lives and for people all over the world. I am sure that they to join with americans and recognizing what an immense speak. This is because of what you have done. The heavens have become a part of man's world and as you talk to us from the sea of tranquility it inspires us to redouble our efforts to bring peace and tranquility to earth for one priceless moment and the whole history of man. All the people on this earth are truly one one in their pride in what you have done and one in our prayers that you will return safely to earth. The call caused some controversy. People objected to using the moment to put the emphasis on a political leader. Democrats were upset. Because nixon had only been president a few months and most of the apollo program had been developed under the kennedy and johnson administrations nonetheless. The controversy was rather minor and soon forgotten. The speech however wasn't the only speech that was prepared in the lead up to apollo eleven the nixon administration was thinking about what they say in their phone call to the astronauts nixon speechwriter. William safire was contacted by an astronaut and was warned about something that they should be prepared for in a new york times article nineteen eighty-nine where sapphire was a columnist for years. He wrote quote. Frank borman our liaison with the astronauts brought the image making You wanna be thinking of some alternative posture for the president. In the event of mishaps the blank looks at this techno jargon he added like what to do for the widows suddenly we were faced with the dark side of the moon planning death if it came would not come in a terrible blaze of glory. The greatest danger was that the two astronauts on the moon would not be able to return to the module in that event with no rescue possible. The men would have to bid the world farewell and closed down communication preparatory to suicide or starvation.

Kneeland Oval Room House Nixon Administration Buzz Aldrin Neil Armstrong Nixon White House United States Frank Borman William Safire Kennedy Johnson Sapphire New York Times
G. Gordon Liddy, Watergate Mastermind, Has Died at Age 90

Pacifica Evening News

01:57 min | 1 year ago

G. Gordon Liddy, Watergate Mastermind, Has Died at Age 90

"And a radio talk show host after emerging from prison, died today at the age of 90. His son, Thomas Lady confirmed the death but did not reveal the cause of the event. To say it was not related to covet 19. Lady, a former FBI agent and army veteran, was convicted of conspiracy, burglary and illegal wiretapping for his role in the Watergate burglary, which led to the resignation of President Richard Nixon. Spent four years and four months in prison, including more than 100 days in solitary confinement. Years later, he said, he'd do it again for his president. After his release Lady became a popular, often provocative radio talk show, as you also worked as a security consultant, writer and actor, but he was outspoken and controversial, both as the political operative under Nixon and as a radio personality. Letty recommended assassinating political enemies, Bombing, a left leaning think tank and kidnapping war protesters. His White House colleagues ignored such suggestions. But one of his ventures, the break in at Democratic headquarters at the Watergate building in June of 1972 was approved. The burglary went awry, which led to an investigation a cover up and Nixon's resignation in 1974. Lydia, former FBI agent, An Army veteran, was convicted of conspiracy, burglary and illegal wiretapping for his role in the escapade. It was also convicted of conspiracy in the September 1971 burglary of defense analyst Daniel Ellsberg Psychiatrists who leaked the secret history of the Vietnam War known as the Pentagon papers. Watergate conspirator G. Gordon Liddy dead

Thomas Lady President Richard Nixon FBI Democratic Headquarters Nixon Watergate Building Letty Lady Army White House Lydia Daniel Ellsberg Vietnam Pentagon G. Gordon Liddy
"richard nixon" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"That <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> are close to indistinguishable <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> from you'll videos <Speech_Male> where the subject <Speech_Male> is shown saint something. <Silence> They never actually said <Speech_Male> as <Speech_Male> a demonstration of <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> their technology. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> They decided to bring <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the life. The speech <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> which richard nixon <Silence> <Advertisement> never gave <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the video shows <Speech_Male> nixon sitting at <Speech_Male> a desk delivering. <Speech_Male> What would be a televised <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> speech complete <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> with a network interruption <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> from cbs. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Which would have been used at the time <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> can watch the actual <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> deepfake video at <Speech_Male> moon. Disaster <Speech_Male> dot org. <Speech_Male> I'm now going <Speech_Male> to play the speech. Which <Speech_Male> thankfully <Silence> <Advertisement> was never given <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the reason. I wanted <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to play the actual <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> clip of nixon talking <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to the astronauts on the moon <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> was so that <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you could compare the two <Speech_Male> head to head <Speech_Male> so without further <Speech_Male> ado the entire <Speech_Male> deepfake <Speech_Male> of richard nixon <Speech_Male> announcing the deaths <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of neil armstrong <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and buzz aldrin <Silence> <Advertisement> on the surface <SpeakerChange> of the moon. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Good evening <Speech_Male> my fellow. <Speech_Male> Americans <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> fates forbade <Speech_Male> that the <Speech_Male> man who went to the moon <Speech_Male> to explore <Speech_Male> in peace <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> will stay on the moon. <Speech_Male> The rest <Speech_Male> impeach. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> These brave <Speech_Male> men. <Speech_Male> Neil armstrong <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and edwin auburn <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> know <Speech_Male> that. 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Search <Speech_Male> will not be <Speech_Male> denied <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> but these men <Speech_Male> with first <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and they will remain <Speech_Male> the former us <Speech_Male> in our hearts <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> for <Speech_Male> every human being <Speech_Male> who looks up at <Speech_Male> the moon and the nights <Speech_Male> to come <Speech_Male> will know <Speech_Male> very some corner <Speech_Male> and other work. <Speech_Male> That <Speech_Male> is <SpeakerChange> rapper <Speech_Male> man. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> Good night <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> executive <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> producer of everything <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> everywhere. Daily <Speech_Male> is james mcculloch. <Speech_Male> You associate <Speech_Male> producer. Is thor <Speech_Male> thomsen <Speech_Male> remember. Leave a five <Speech_Male> star review to get <Speech_Male> your review read on the show. <Speech_Male> They can be left at <Speech_Male> apple podcasts. Podcast <Speech_Male> republic or <Speech_Male> wherever you listen to the <Speech_Male> show. Also <Speech_Male> you can help support <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the show over at patriotair <Speech_Male> dot com <Speech_Male> patrons can get <Speech_Male> merchandise like t shirts <Speech_Male> and hoodies as <Speech_Male> well. As having direct access to provide suggestions for future episodes.

"richard nixon" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"They received a phone call from the president of the united states. Richard nixon for purposes. That will soon become obvious. I'd like to play the entire clip free now and don't worry it's not very long. Neyland buzz i talked to you from the oval room at the line house and it certainly has to be historic telephone. Call ever made from the white house. I just can't tell you how proud we all are what you have done for every american. This has to be the proudest day of our lives and for people all over the world. I am sure that they to join with americans and recognizing what an immense feet. This is because of what you have done. The heavens have become a part of man's world and as you talk to us from the c. a. tranquillity. It inspires us to redouble our efforts to bring peace and tranquility to earth for one priceless moment and the whole history of man. All the people on this earth are truly one one in their pride in what you've done and one in our prayers that you will return safely to earth. The call caused some controversy. People objected to using the moment to put the emphasis on a political leader. Democrats are upset because nixon had only been president a few months and most of the apollo program had been developed under the kennedy and johnson administrations nonetheless. The controversy was rather minor ends soon. Forgotten the speech however wasn't the only speech that was prepared in the lead up to apollo eleven the nixon administration was thinking about what they should say in their phone call to the astronauts. Nixon speechwriter. william safire was contacted by an astronaut and was warned about something that they should be prepared for in a new york times article in one thousand nine hundred nine where sapphire was a columnist for years. He wrote quote frank. Our liaison with the astronauts brought the image making up. You wanna be thinking of some alternative posture for the president. In the event of mishaps the blank looks at this techno jargon he added like what to do for the widows suddenly we were faced with the dark side of the moon. Planning death if it came would not come terrible of glory. The greatest danger was that the two astronauts once on the moon would not be able to return to the command module in that event with no rescue possible the men would have to bid the world farewell and closed down communication preparatory to suicide or starvation. It would hardly advance the cause of space exploration to force a half a billion viewers and listeners to participate in the agony of their demise. I prepared inappropriate statement about men who came in peace and stayed to rest in peace holding it in my desk drawer in case of tragedy unquote fire wrote the speech but never submitted after nixon left office. The speech was sent with other documents to the national archive years later. Safire wrote about his role in the apollo eleven landing in how he wrote the plaque which the astronauts left on the moon. The speech he wrote in the event of a disaster was found and widely circulated fast forward to the year twenty twenty a team of researchers at mit working on artificial intelligence and the ability to create deepfakes deepfakes videos..

nixon administration Neyland nixon white house william safire united states kennedy Nixon johnson sapphire new york times frank Safire
"richard nixon" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

05:18 min | 2 years ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Bush presidency I'm not sure you would have had the Obama Presidency so the impact. Each of those presidents had on the next election is immense following his resignation then there is the the slew of legislative reforms that came out in a way to try to restore the public's confidence in their elected officials and and You know to rebalance the power of the executive office. Do you think that The reforms put in place for the ones that we needed. Well you know the some of it worked some of did NABY ASLI Restricting campaign contributions worked for a while. Now that's gone with the Supreme Court decision. People in groups and corporations can donate endless amounts of money and had put more money into politics. So in that sense there's a failure It's not something you can correct with laws. I think it's something you can correct with. WHO's the person who's president? So what's a a biggest leadership lesson that you take from Nixon's presidency that the presidency is a sacred wintrust that it's not something. The person who is president owns or is entitled to that What needs to accompany that offices grit deal of humility? He listened to enough of those tapes and and what is important is the dog that doesn't Bark to my knowledge. No one ever says. What does the country need? What would being good it was always about? Nixon settling scores his political standing and future. How could be leveraged? I think we need to the presidency's not about the president. The presidency is about the the execution of the Constitution and laws within the defined framework in the interest of the people in the country. You never met Nixon. Do you wish that you had or do we try Carl Bernstein and I tried but we never got close and he was quite angry at our stories. And and that's you know that's under stand of bull team ever get. Do you ever get tired of of him. I'm studying him thinking about him. Having your own life story so intertwined turned with his. It's something Tired I'd because they're all there's always new material and tapes MM said new dimension to Nixon so the ultimate lesson is history is never over spirit of history. Never been over in the end this episode by asking current Washington Post executive editor Marty Baron for his reflections on how the legacy of the Nixon era. I still reverberates newsrooms. Today I hear all the time from people in the public who refer back to what the Washington posted in the era of Watergate and are calling upon us demanding that we do the same kind of work that we hold our politicians accountable and we dig beneath the surface and we keep digging and we'd be persistent. Those events actually inspired a whole new generation of journalists people of my age group To get into the field in the first place I think it also sharpened the definition of what are our core. Mission is certainly one of our most important core missions and that it is that we are supposed to hold powerful individuals and powerful institutions accountable in many things to this week's guests Mardi bearing and with enormous gratitude Bob Woodward original music for the podcast by listener and next week we will be discussing Nixon's vice president who took office upon his resignation Gerald Ford and finally just out of curiosity do any of you want another podcast when this one is over and thinking about whether we I should do one and if we do what it should be so if there's anything that you're dying to hear as kind of a season to I would love to hear your thoughts. Thanks you can email me at Lillian Dot Cunningham at wash post dot com or you can reach me on twitter and instagram accounts at presidential presidential underscore w. p.. Thanks for listening..

Nixon president Carl Bernstein Gerald Ford Obama Washington Bush vice president Supreme Court executive Lillian Dot Cunningham Washington Post Bob Woodward MM twitter Marty Baron executive editor instagram
"richard nixon" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

12:00 min | 2 years ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Willingness to lie the feeling that everyone's out to get him and to me. It starts to sound really similar actually relate to some of the descriptions of his predecessor President Johnson the most important part that is similar stories that both Johnson Nixon wanted to overpower people and everything control everything. So that's an example people of that for Nixon like an example even early in his presidency of that paranoia and his desire for control a it was Christmas nineteen. sixty-nine Nixon had been president almost a year. And he's going over to the staff offices in the executive Dave office building next to the White House and he he sees that lots of people have pictures of John F. Kennedy on their desk or more on the wall and A goes beserk and orders that Butterfield to get rid of these pictures and and replaced them with Nixon and I kinda thought maybe this was a bit of an exaggeration and then What what one of the things that happened? Butterfield wrote a memo to Nixon about how he got Nixon's pictures to replace the twenty two Kennedy Hindi pictures that he found in some cases where the president had personally signed it to them and in in the memo The heading is sanitation of the staff office sanitation. And if somehow getting rid of Kennedy pictures was cleansing operation credibly bazaar and Butterfield had worked working on this and get investigate. People try to you know they were worried about whether these people were loyal to Nixon and so forth and if if he could have relaxed in realized there was just a lot of goodwill even Democrats felt for him he couldn't find a way to leverage that goodwill to his advantage it was. We're GONNA get him and then when he was reelected in seventy you too you know he said No. We're really going to get people. It's going to be pay back time and this this is what's sad component of all of this was very little joy in being president Joy was actually kind of the heart of our Theodore Roosevelt episode. Someone who seemed to take a lot of joy in being president but yes in Theodore Theodore Roosevelt took a lot of joy in living Nixon did not his butterfield told me we went through dozens of vowers of interviews about his experience. And he'd never really told it before there are scenes on comes to mind where Butterfield is riding in the presidential helicopter with Nixon and the Verse Lady and Pat. Nixon says Oh Dick Doc. Let's go up to New York. Christmas is coming. We'll take the girls be a good time. We'll go to show and Nixon. Is there writing something out on his yellow legal pad just totally ignores and she keeps going. You Know Dick you know kinda nothing now in in Butterfield was just astounded and horrified. That there wouldn't be the kind kind of yes dear. Let's talk about it or we'll consider. It was just closed off his own wife now. Same time their documents in the Butterfield archive that show. Nixon knew how to play to people's Egos and there's dinner at Camp David that was recorded. You Find Nixon's able to talk to his cabinet in in in a very human almost humorous way and play on the rigo and but he would then drift back into the automatic pilot. Uh of anger mode it was that sense of isolation that sense of a personal crusade to do things to accomplish things at the end of the day. Six thirty at night Nixon would leave the Oval Office and walk over to his. Is Private yet another office in the executive office building. That was more casual and he be there would have dinner alone and and and writing things out on the yellow legal pad now. You're president of the United States. You'd think he'd want to go with his family Roy which he didn't WanNa do too often he can talk to anyone in the world right and you would think he would have some more curiosity about that. But he wanted to be alone in the end and Butterfield described and other people were for Nixon. Yes and going into that private office. He had an aide have his feet up and his jacket on. And it was just this sense of Chill out enjoy it and and look for for what good you can do for people now to his credit. Sometimes he did on some things but again. It was this tribe. Evan this paranoia in this score-settling attitude but the couple of redeeming Connie He did some things in foreign foreign policy though into China was significant knee. Leveraged it I would even say brilliantly the same moot relations with the Soviet Union he had some domestic pluses creation of the Environmental Protection Agency and so forth. So there were things in all of this illegal corrupting in ugly debris that that are quite positive and quite strong in quite human but That Pales Sir. So do you feel like you have a sense of why he wanted to be president why he wanted power in in the first place and he wanted to to be president in part to show people He resented deeply the eastern Ernest. stablishment the people and he talks about this on the tapes. The people who had all the people who had it handed to them he wanted to be a renowned leader also and he did not perceive or have a system or relationships with anyone who could Kinda tell him. Hey you know what's going on in this presidency. Let's see if it's running off the rails and finally off the cliff. You Is National Security Advisor in Kissinger you see the time and time again Kissinger kind of Fawning the sync offense to Nixon An and Kissinger was smarter than that and would try to steer things his way but he he would never overtly late to my knowledge challenge Nixon and say no way. Would we try to do here. There is a memo that butterfield. Butterfield gave me what I call Zilch memo on top secret document. Nixon wrote a handwritten note Kissinger about the bombing in Vietnam. AETNA and said we've done it for three years and achieved Zilch. It's been a failure doesn't make sense and then you look at the record. And at that point this is January of Nineteen seventy-two justice. Nixon is beginning to run for reelection. It is dropped three million tons of bombs in Southeast Asia. And he says it's accomplished nothing. It's been a failure doesn't doesn't make sense. Accomplished Zilch was stunned. When I read this and then you look and you see that in seventy two? He intensified the bombing and the tape. Show that it was in large part done. Because it showed how Tuffy Afi was in the polling showed the public wanted more bombing and toughness and he even though he knew it was not effective active. He still did it just for the look of it. Yeah and I'm in. That's it's an equivalent corruption to Watergate. And and that to me. When I saw last year was a stunner I thought you know how could you have lost your way that you would do that? And essentially killing thousands of people in Cambodia North Vietnam clouds to put down a political marker now presidents sentenced. Don't like to lose wars but realism needs to overtake that at some point and you need to say. Asu Commander in chief. What are we accomplishing in her? Her we killing people with purpose. But do you feel like has changed the most about Your understanding of Nixon. The more the record comes out the these butterfield documents in his stories stories and more tapes. They still haven't released all of the tapes. Believe it or not The story gets worse rather than better better. So maybe before we even get to Watergate in particular nineteen seventy one is the publication of the Pentagon papers. That's also the year he started at the Washington Post Straight. Could you describe and what the climate was like to be in journalism at that time and and already sort of what friction there was lies between the Nixon administration and the press it was substantial and you could feel it in the air head contempt for the press. Ask because they'd be. They seem to be after him. He also worried The people could find out who he really was. He was concealed legal person. At one point. He says In one of these tapes of the problem is we've been to open with the press and of course.

Johnson Nixon Butterfield Nixon administration president President Johnson Kissinger executive John F. Kennedy Dick Doc Joy Theodore Theodore Roosevelt Southeast Asia Washington AETNA Soviet Union Theodore Roosevelt White House Tuffy Afi
"richard nixon" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Hi Can he do that listeners. I'm Alison Michael's my colleague. Lilian Cunningham created the presidential podcast back in two thousand sixteen to explore. We're in forty four episodes legacies and lies of each American president. And this week. We're sharing three of them. The stories of the three American presidents to to fees impeachment before President Trump episode. You're about to hear is about President Richard Nixon. He was the first and so far only person to to resign the presidency technically. He wasn't impeached but he left office. In nineteen seventy four when he realized he was about to be impeached for this episode. Louis interview journalist Bob Woodward yes the same Bob Woodward who helped break the Watergate story about Nixon's life his presidential traits. And what it was that led to his downfall downfall in office to hear more of episode than each of the American presidents checkout presidential on your favorite podcast platform or at washingtonpost dot com slash presidential the dental. Now here's the story of Richard Nixon the day he resigned he said I e called all of his aides and friends and family to the West Wing of the White House just before he left down the hill copter couple of hours before he actually left office through resignation and he he had his wife and daughters and son-in-law's there and it was a rambling talk about the grievances. He felt built. His mother wasn't treated right. His father was poor and then at one point he raised kind of with his hand. The and indicated. This is why I called you all here. And then he said always remember others may hate you But those who hate you don't win unless you hate them and then you destroy yourself. It was the heat that was the poison that destroyed him and his presidency and at that moment to his is credit he understood it. That's Bob Woodward one of the Washington Post reporters who uncovered the Watergate Scandal Dole that brought down Nixon's presidency and William Cunningham also with the Washington Post and this is the thirty sixth episode would've presidential.

President Richard Nixon Bob Woodward president Lilian Cunningham President Trump Alison Michael Washington Post White House William Cunningham Louis