40 Burst results for "Richard Nixon"

Fresh update on "richard nixon" discussed on KDKA Programming

KDKA Programming

01:04 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "richard nixon" discussed on KDKA Programming

"Yeah, but look, look at the damage had been done The Republican states by the pandemic. Florida. You know Arizona Aquino, Texas, You got Republican governors complaining day we made more money. I just don't get it. Against their conservative nature of spending money all the time. They end up voting for this as much as a ballyhoo who look where the conservatives were going to save you money. We're going to give you a tax credit. We're going to be a tax cut. Ah, and we're not going to spend money, but they go back and spend money all the time. Military budget in budget failing businesses out bailing individuals out. All that they do it all time. Only only defense is they borrow spend and Democrats raise taxes. So you know a man so it really know what as worse barn and spending and cutting taxes because you cut your revenue and you can't provide services. For if the Flossie of Grover Norquist drowned the government into the bathtub, Basically, you know, I hate to say that that goes all the way back to Reagan. You run a depth set up so much that you start cutting till security, Medicare Medicaid. And that's a philosophy Reagan a lot of Republican following you haven't had AH, problem that had about budget since Richard Nixon Totally abandoned. Remember big? Anyone asked, but you know that don't matter. He said. No, It's that old playbook, but I never thought of feed the one of pandemic. That that's the one of the biggest thing. Real quick about binding his comments about the black community and where they are. I have to say what to think. I have Ah, Cuba friend and then forget when you said this. Cubans are Latino on Ly if there's money involved, I never get when he said that, you know, and and hysteria. L mean, you say he's cute and all you know if there's money involved were Latina If there's no money, you'll forget about it. But, you know, and also our history. Look, you know, I'm only used on another show long time ago. For the first group. I mean to say I love we have shows about black national living and you always have before black nationalist. Leo and looking out of history. A lot of that stuff was beaten out of us. You know, you know, even look at you know them, Mark basically Eagle Academy. Marcus Garvey, usually the government. The one who pretty much got that diversity out of you go to the now Movement of Philadelphia. It's always a review. If you have black that has a different opinion. You always don't be under attack. I love you, you know, And you know people like that. Think outside the box, but they're always attacked, always attack and unfortunately, I think it comes from white supremacist. And I think that black folks, we played into that because if someone has a different opinion Well, you know, you're not really telling the line even through that. You know today, you know, you know, thinking matching mess affair Calm, You know, life get crazy. So, you know, you know, it's unfortunate is part that racing history of this country. And when Bob said that he really didn't complete innocence, why's that is because, you know, government sanctioned. And also white, you know, and and unfortunately, that's even true today. All right. Thank you, sir. All right. Take care. A 66391 10. 20 is the number we have take this break will take it right now, but we'll come back with more of your calls in just seconds. Your source for everything that's nearest hearing on NewsRadio. Katie Kay, It's Jamie. Progressive Number one number two employees leave a message at the cage. Aimee. It's me, Jamie, This is your daily pep talk. I know it's been rough going ever since people found out about your acapella group matte harmony, but you will bounce back. I mean, you're the guy always helping people find coverage options with the name your price tool. It should be you given me the pep talk now get out there, hit that.

Reagan Jamie Aimee Grover Norquist Marcus Garvey Cuba BOB Texas Florida Aquino Richard Nixon Arizona Katie Kay Eagle Academy Movement Of Philadelphia LEO
Fresh update on "richard nixon" discussed on KDKA Programming

KDKA Programming

00:30 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "richard nixon" discussed on KDKA Programming

"The candy K radio, You know good being witches always. Thank you very much for making time force coming up toward the end of this little segments. We all use the term. Okay? All the time, right? I mean, we're always using. Okay. It's amazing, but many times we do it really is. But what's interesting is it had its beginning. It had to have started somewhere somehow. And we'll give you the back story on that coming up at the end of the segment first, how many Vice presidents have become president of United States since World War two. Considering now it isn't the vice president right after a two year term. Or right after president isn't able to run for a second term, but we do have Joe Biden, a former vice president, who's wanting to be president. So Jack as we look back over our nation's history, going back to World War two how many vice presidents have become president of United States? It's kind of surprising how many men you know we've actually had five vice president since World War two. Who became president of the 1st 1 big Harry Truman. Franklin Roosevelt died in 1945 in his fourth term, and Truman was this vice President Truman became president. In 1945. He was the 1st 1 and then, in 1963 John Kennedy was assassinated. His vice president Lyndon Baines Johnson, became president. So he gave the second BP to become president. After World War two. Then we had Richard Nixon, who had been Vice president under Dwight Eisenhower. Uh, he waited for president, 1960 lost, but anyway, president again in 1968 and one so there's another former vice president who became president. And then his vice president Gerald Ford became president when Nixon resigned from office in the 19 seventies. So that's four vice president to President and World War two. And finally, we have George H. W. Bush. Who was Reagan's vice president, and after Reagan's second term rotate W. Bush ran for president himself and was selected and became the fifth vice president. Since World War two to become president. The one that's a little on the tricky side, I think is the Nixon won because they granted he was the vice president under Eisenhower, but so often times we do this chain of progression. President, vice president president the vice president, but he is one that we could easily step over because that gap it's with Kennedy and Johnson presidencies, right, Nixon, By the way, I think we discussed this before Two men in our history. Who held all four of the highest offices in the land of being elected to the House of Representatives. The Senate being vice president and president in our whole history, only two people have ever done that one was Johnson with Johnson. The other's a real surprise. It was Nixon was like a louse. He was elected to the Senate. He was elected vice president and he was elected president. Maybe an unlikely guy. You would think that helped. There's only one of two people ever to hold off for those of those officers that that's kind of an amazing fact. It is an amazing fact. Considering that so often times to train a progression. I mean, not many people go outside of going from Congress to send it. There are a lot of people who have gone from being members. Of the house, and then they decide to go ahead and run for a Senate seat or from the Senate and then become pick for a vice presidential nod. Like like Joe Biden with With Barack Obama and then the opportunity go from vice president to becoming president. It's surprising that it is only to how how about this one. Uh, this week is the anniversary of the biggest celebration ever seen in America? Yeah, it was on August 14th is the anniversary is coming up August 14 1945. If I could describe it, the Bob Trout some people may remember was the famous news announcer on CBS, and he came on the radio. This is August 14 1945. There was no TV, then. Those old national radio and he was a pool reporter. He was speaking on all networks. He gave one of the most dramatic announcements in history. He came on the air, and he said it is 7 p.m. Eastern War time..

Vice President President Truman Senate Lyndon Baines Johnson Dwight Eisenhower Joe Biden John Kennedy Barack Obama George H. W. Bush House Of Representatives Franklin Roosevelt United States Gerald Ford W. Bush Congress Reagan Jack CBS America
Fresh update on "richard nixon" discussed on Dean Richards' Sunday Morning

Dean Richards' Sunday Morning

01:09 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "richard nixon" discussed on Dean Richards' Sunday Morning

"In a box. But do you have a V H f VHS player? I do play it. I do doesn't work. Think so. It's still flashing 12 you know? Well, at least that part to it that that part that part never breaks. I had a VHS player that I thought worked. And I put a tape and I want to watch something that I had recorded. It didn't work. I put the tape in and it mingled up the tape. Always did. You know, I don't know if the problem was the tape or the machine, but You know, I just thought, OK, this this machine needs to go where I keep my eight track player and well, did you have proper maintenance of the transport with the pinch roller in the cap? Stand properly clean. I don't think my pen trollers any of your business. Course I didn't know he does that. Nobody who does like, guess I'm the only one. Then you clean your pinch rulers used to with alcohol and a That's right, because the oxide from the tape comes off. That's right. And you know the parts wear out now they need to be replaced. Although that you know if you're of if your machine was mangling tape, he just went out and bought a new machine. That's all. Just probably cheaper dog right to do that if you can find one, But yes, I do still have a VHS player. At home. Well, welcome to the new feature on our show Nerds Corner, the Nerds neighborhood where we talk about nerdy things like what we usually controllers way we usually do. We do get into that. That's very yes, very, very true. Um, yeah, that was quite a night. That was quite a night in Chicago history. The 88 is 32 years now now, so that little baby that was born that night. 32 years old. 32 years old probably has his own Children by now, maybe Oh, yeah. Could well be cups fence about that. You know about that for making you feel nice and young. Phil. Also the another. This is a big anniversary date. Ah, you were talking about the dropping of the A bomb. The first night game today is also the anniversary of when Richard Nixon resigned office. It is left office. Yes, it is. August 9th, 1974. Member. That too. I have a commemorative hat from that to this. It's the opening night closing night. Okay. Even better. Think is what it says. I remember that like it was yesterday. Don't remember where you were Well. Think I may have been my job at the grocery store. Yeah. Mark? Yeah. That was my the summer after I graduated high school and was working in a mall in in Hammond didn't give a speech at night. The ground station speech was actually the night before the announcement of the resignation was on the night, a 4 August eight and then I will be leaving office and then Vice President Ford assuming office and at noon, right? And now I'm I'm unclear. I think Nixon left the White House grounds. As Gerald Ford was taking the oath or right after you know, so there was still a transition of power, a peaceful transition, which is I just remember that heartbreaking walk. I wasn't particularly a Richard Nixon fan for all that he had done. But be that as it may, it was still rather heartbreaking. See his entire family, making the walk from The White House to the helicopter. That wasn't being flown out. And then you know they they all board the plane and Richard Nixon, you know, stops at the top of the stairs, turns around and gives a kind of a victorious It's wave. Damn Well, if you recall that that V for victory wave that he did was something he started during his 1968 campaign, he did it all The time wasn't 68 or was it in the campaign against President Kennedy? John. Either way, maybe could be both of them. But I certainly remember 68. You know, at the Republican convention in Ray's doing it all the time. I remember anyone who impersonated Richard Nixon back then, which was virtually every community has They all everybody did the you know, they put their you know their hands up in the V for victory on both fingers. That was characteristic of the impersonation. Rich, little being a month E. Well, who was that other guy that did Nixon all the time? Nixon. He did. LBJ. Dark haired comedian Impressionist. He was mostly, Yeah, gets names on the tip of my tongue to come up with somebody over at somebody or other I don't know. Well, I don't know. Probably doesn't matter, I guess. But ah, another significant, another significant anniversary That's today. I was a little depressed, you know, on Saturday morning. What do I do? Early Saturday morning. You go shopping. I go do my shopping when nobody's out. Because the real men really the stores are empty. Now that they were, they were all pretty empty. That's why I liked going so early on Saturday morning because nobody was there. But literally, I think I was the only person in the grocery store. Wow. It must have been pretty early. Yeah, well, it wasn't six AM I? No, that's early for most people, but You know those of us that we kept the three o'clock in the morning? That's kind of that's like mid day that's for sleeping in for most people, but I like going to the storm, and they just opened. Everything is stocked. Nobody's in the store. Fewer people tohave to be around. I don't have to cover my groceries like I always knew I was going to say when the warmer weather is around. Do you still bring that coat? No, I don't And the summertime I bring Ah, lightweight tarp. Mesh netting. Yeah. So you still can't see through it. See what I'm buying because I don't want to be judged. But Ah, there's a sponsorship opportunity waiting to happen. Dean Richard start. Oh, boy is that it's a little nutty. I'm not sure that any client really wants to climb on them. You'd be surprised, but but nobody was in the store. But I got a little sad because while I'm in this store You know they have their seasonal isles. Oh, yeah, Sure, You know, most stores have a couple 23 aisles that air set aside just for seasonal things in the summertime. It's you know, gardening things and barbecuing things, and yesterday was the first day that I noticed that it was making a transition. Two autumnal things all really Halloween things. How well line already Halloween costumes for out number one number two. I see the Halloween costumes and I think to myself What's Halloween going to.

Richard Nixon Vice President Ford Gerald Ford Dean Richard President Kennedy The White House Phil Chicago Hammond Mark RAY John
Fresh update on "richard nixon" discussed on Guaranteeing Your Retirement with David Graham

Guaranteeing Your Retirement with David Graham

00:46 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "richard nixon" discussed on Guaranteeing Your Retirement with David Graham

"Seems it always rains everywhere except in my garden without there with the hose watering those plants and mark will tell you without water. You're not gonna have plants without plants. We want to be your I miss that guy got that I miss Mark, but it is what it is. And here's Here's an odd piece of news to start to show. Natalie, you know, and I know you have ever in there in the morning, So maybe you all over the sports stuff. But Topps Baseball has baseball cards that they give out. And they had The best selling card in the in the company's history. Come out this past week. You want to take a guess Who it wass? I do know Dr Fauci? Yes. You got that from my bed. I want one. Actually, Ideo doctor found she throwing, throwing a pitch to the catcher that wanted to go into the first baseman up, boy. I'll tell you There's something I know you don't know. 46 years ago tomorrow, something unprecedented Word unprecedented happened in America. You know what it was? I don't Richard Nixon resigned. Oh, wow. Who made his speech 46 years ago today that I resigned the following day. Greta's life go But that said, as always, that's all start off with our core message. Before we get started. It's over a huge, heartfelt text or police, firefighters, emergency personnel, first responders, doctors, nurses, health care providers that are on the front lines. Men and women in the military services who are all around the world protecting us. Where would we be without these people? Thank God we have them. And with that Now they let me ask you this Duncan Donuts. They're closing 800 stores by the end of the year. Do you like Duncan Donuts? Better their Christian proxy, Karim. I love both of them. But I do have a special soft spot for Duncan because of their coffee. Okay. You know what? You know, Being someone that lives on coffee? 23 enemy Gene pool says I need to have core from my body more than I really care, too. But But anyway that we're gonna have a great show today, I think on the line do we have Roger the Dodger is here with us today? I am here Long time jazz. I'm no talk. We sure do, Miss Hey, pal. Yeah, I sure do. I'm telling you, you know. Good Gosh, you should see me. Roger got a moustache. I gained £5. I'm getting so bored. It's not even funny, but but that being said this is what happens when when you have something unprecedented. Good. I'm glad you're there. You're going to help me answer some of the Quite email questions We got coming in today. Let me just get some commentary to start our show today. US spending. Accounts for 2/3 of our economy, and it was common knowledge it plunged almost 35% in the second quarter. Worse than American history. Usodo Seals are sinking amount levels We haven't seen since the 19 seventies. We have 40 million Americans thrown out of work. Some pretty soon might be thrown out of their homes. US job report came in were still over 10%. That's still a little higher than the great recession back in 2008. Economy is slowing. And despite all of this, Congress can't figure out what the heck to do, really. The White House chief of staff, Mork Meadows. He said he's not optimistic that a krone virus relief deal is going to be reached in the near future. And now the press is saying that you know, they don't know when and if it's gonna happen, so President Trump He said. If necessary, he'll take unilateral action and Do whatever he possibly can. But honestly, you know his his options are somewhat limited. Look. Two decades since we had the great recession. And our economy could be on the concept of born. That's even worse than it was back then, so we could have a lot of misery ahead of us and the faster that people realize what's happening. Better They're going to be in protecting themselves. The dollar value of the dollar is tacky. Look, a golden just hit a record high that's still going up. Our nation's economy is dependent on consumers, people spending money if people don't buy products services economy is not going to go over before you know, after the initial wave of this virus. The government, the Federal Reserve. They were very, very quick to act to make sure that people had money to spend and fed made sure the banks had enough money to lend, and they want to cut back on credit. That's not what they did in 2008 and two thumbs one eye and look what happened in return. You know banks. Now we're allowing people to delay their mortgages. And what have you so people don't get hurt. U S government handed out checks to people so they had money to spend great, But here's what no one seems to be asking. What's ahead. This is all short term. What the Fed US government have done is nothing but a band Aid solution and in Jerome Power Fed chairman he's already admitted he's out of bullets. You know, banks have been lenient, but they will eventually need tohave toe as people make payments, And if these people don't have work, how they're going to be able to pay and The government has given out $1200 checks to people know and You know, at the moment there are no other government checks ahead. Right now on unemployment benefits are expected. Go backto. Normal levels really soon. That's not good. How would the average person be able to spend Spend in the next couple of years what they have if they don't have a job. So don't be shocked if we see more mortgage defaults, personal bankruptcies. Some businesses air Getting in trouble is they don't have customers that the National Restaurant Association feels that almost 1/3 of all restaurants have got too close and.

United States Duncan Donuts Government Roger Topps Baseball Dr Fauci Mark Richard Nixon Natalie Jerome Power Fed National Restaurant Associatio America Greta Karim Congress Mork Meadows Chairman President Trump White House
Fresh update on "richard nixon" discussed on The Retire Wright Show with Isaac Wright

The Retire Wright Show with Isaac Wright

00:38 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "richard nixon" discussed on The Retire Wright Show with Isaac Wright

"Isaac. Great to be with you. How are you, man? Yeah, Walter doing really well, man, you know, just trying to make it through on the tail into summer. Probably The biggest thing is is trying to moderate the amount of time I'm spending on watching the news and all of the drama filled. It's only going to increase as we go farther and farther through. A cz. We approach the election but got some good stuff for us today, and I know I know we'll have a good conversation. I have deleted a few news apse on my phone recently, so I'm in the same mode of Culling how much information is coming through? That is for sure. But one tidbit that did make it through the filter. Ah, this past week was ah little bit of Ah milestone or not so much a milestone but an interesting date in history this weekend. In fact, August 9th technically 46 years ago in 1970 for Richard Nixon. Resigned the presidency. Little history lesson for everybody, and it was effective at noon when that happened, and he'd appeared on TV the night before to announce the decision, But it officially happened on the night. I'm sure that can open up a can of worms on all kinds of election thoughts going into this upcoming fall. You know, interesting. I would say that if you think back, probably even then, and of course, the level of drama. The amount of news outlets and everything else was a whole lot more consolidated. You can still imagine how awkward and probably how crazy of a moment that was for him too. Step down. And Lord knows how many of the presidents have had issues if and or above equal or mohr than some of the things that came down from that, so we'll see how everything plays up for the election This year is going to be interesting. I think when it comes to people's retirement, their money, their assets and even their situations based upon the amount of stress and everything else is out there today. Definitely getting prepared. We've been working with a lot of families here over the summer, actually, which is typically not the case is much because everybody gets on vacations and stuff. But of course, now it's hard to go out and do much of anything. So if anybody is listening today, if you'd listen to my program for years or if this is your first time turning On the radio on hearing me Feel free to call me Isaac. Right? Right here in Richmond, Virginia, are officers local righted to 88 polite Parkway served the entire Richman measure area now been on the air now, for I guess going on about 7.5 8 years now. So for all of you there, if you have any concerns today about anything we cover 804777 99 99. Off. Always kept the phone number. Very simple. But again, it's a 777 99 99. Happy to talk to you. No obligation. No, no pressure. Just any concerns you have let us know. Again. That's 777 99 99 to get in touch with Isaac. Right. You know, the Richard Nixon moment was kind of an awkward moment for us as a country. In many ways, shapes and form and it kind of got me thinking too. On today's show, something worth talking about is you know you're in a position Isaac, where you probably have some awkward conversations from time to time. I mean, anybody who's talked Money, your finances and some of the auxiliary planning items that come along with that with family members can identify with how that could be awkward, and sometimes you're put in the middle of those situations. Oh, sure. Yet, there's always Ah, kind of look at a good adviser is also not somebody that just knows the finances but also is a Decent communicator can mediate. Maybe some friction. Let's call it between different circumstances. So, yeah, happy to talk a little bit about that. For all of you. Listen to me. This may be good for you to pay attention to because These are the areas were really a good adviser. Cancan separate themselves from the pack. Absolutely. And so I want to go through a couple of examples on the show today, Isaac where maybe you could tell us how you guide the conversations through some of these awkward situations with clients when they're meeting with you. I don't know if it changes the awkwardness. If it's a face to face visit, we're in these days happening over zoom, but Either way, I'm sure you have to kind of use your skill set is an advisor to navigate these things. So let's say, I'm sure you've been in this scenario before client wants toe remove a child as a beneficiary. On one of their accounts. Maybe something has happened internally in the family where that becomes an issue is that happened to you before? Oh, yes, you know again, These are things that maybe not necessarily happen every week. But in the past, absolutely, and there's various reasons maybe the child is a spendthrift. Maybe the situation is You know, maybe even more personal than that, In terms of, you know, maybe being disowned. There's all kinds of family dynamics and I'm going to be honest, all of us, everybody listen. Today, we all have family dynamics that can sometimes necessarily not B. The greatest eso Whenever I see somebody going in and removing a beneficiary specifically, if it's a immediate family member like a child, we normally have a chat to say Jesus is. Are you certain you want to do this? Number one number two. Dependent upon the reason. Let's say what I said earlier like being a spendthrift. Maybe there's an opportunity to create some legal documents to have that money in a place where somebody else is the gatekeeper to get money, not necessarily giving it all to that child upon Let's say the parent's death, for example, so you have to be aware that in today's world and I've seen people that have removed a child and then re added them. You want to make sure it I just want to repeat this. You want to make sure when you make a big decision like that, that you're in a place that you understand all of your options. Sometimes people get a little bit hot and heavy again. We're talking a little bit about emotions when you start talking about family member that as close as your child Something that's been maybe devastating enough to where you want to remove them as beneficiary. And if you're looking at what I would call somebody that can help moderate that conversation, maybe more importantly, Offer some ideas and things that you don't know that you don't know That's what we're here for. So fill free to call anytime. 804777 99 99. I did have somebody called me last week and again. I want to remind everybody We're not gonna put you on the air this just a one on one chat. If you leave a message, I'll call you right back Normally Monday Tuesday, but just leave me a message and let me know when a good time is to talk to you. But these air going to be some awkward moments that I think sometimes everybody's gonna have to deal with some capacity. So, Walter, I hope with what I just said, as far as removing a child Has been officially maybe that's helpful..

Isaac Richard Nixon Walter Isaac. Virginia Richmond Lord Advisor Mohr Richman
Mayors Threatens to Sue If Trump Sends Fed Officers to Patrol NYC, Chicago

Monocle 24: The Briefing

05:59 min | 2 weeks ago

Mayors Threatens to Sue If Trump Sends Fed Officers to Patrol NYC, Chicago

"Of Chicago and New York of threatened to take President Donald Trump to court if he sends government agents to police cities, trump sent federal law enforcement officers to Portland and weeks of anti-racism protests there and he's also threatened to do the same in many other cities across the nation, the move to send agents in camouflage. Camouflage uniforms has been criticized by officials in Oregon, and also by the House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Well, joining me for more on this is Scott Lucas professor of politics at the University of Birmingham Scott was good. Have you on the show now? There's a couple of things I'd like to understand here for example when these these forces were sent to Portland in Oregon. Are they working with police on the ground or they just flown in an trying to take control of the streets. How does it work when you send these offices in? In normal cases, the way that it should work is that the intervention is coordinated. With local authorities with his the political leaders, and with the leaders of security forces, including the police. That's the way it was done. The last time there was a national emergency amidst and uprising, which was in Los Angeles in Nineteen ninety-two after the beating of Rodney, King. This time is not known. Donald Trump and his inner circle, including Attorney General, William Bar and Chad. Wolf of Homeland Security. Sent in these forces, many of whom are not in March uniforms. Who are in unmarked vehicles symptomen without consultation with the Mayor of Portland Ted Wheeler without consultation with Oregon Governor Brown without consultation full consultation with the heads of police there in other words, this is close to being an occupying force brought in from Washington not to restore law and order as much as it is to try to quash these protests in pursuit of other goals and I would say the primary goal is the election of Donald Trump I. want to give out not because. I guess he's you say he's not playing to. The audience in the city is playing to. A national audience and he seems to be trying to get across his notion that. The Republicans and himself a good at standing up to questions and issues around law and order, whereas the Democrat is being held hostage by demonstrators on the streets and are unable to do anything to to to quell. Disturbances. Windows being smashed on stores, rare occurrences, but these are the things that he's focusing on. Your I mean this is not an entirely new playbook. In the nineteen fifties. You would say that your opponent supported the communist in the era of McCarthyism. Richard Nixon was very effective in the nineteen sixties and early nineteen seventies before Watergate at playing at the idea that protests were directed by extremist in by Anti American. Elements Russ he represented the silent majority. But if this is done entirely new playbook, this is definitely a new chapter. Because the extent to which Donald Trump has said that he does not recognize any check on his authority He said back in April Dirt Win Corona Virus, researching I want to take total control. He in the past week has consulted John you a lawyer. Most renowned for writing the torture memo in the George W Bush administration about ruling by decree in other words. This is not. Not An attempt to work through courts, not to work through Congress, it is to bypass every institution and to do it with this false. This false sense that the protests are dominated by violence by extremist, an anarchist when in five from the very start the black lives matter protests after the murder George Floyd have been largely peaceful, and that has been the case in Portland as well. A CRAWLER! This is in many cities are the police are being much more cautious about how they get involved with citizens on the streets, or they are deliberately trying to hold back from demonstrators fulfil of causing issues, but in the background, not from demonstrators in the background this the has in some cities like New York seen an uptick in in for example in violent crime and gun crime, so does he have a point? Point that you know there there is a there is a maybe in some cities. A crime wave is a is a bit of an emotive word. Maybe an uptick in crime. The actually someone might build to buy. It doesn't quite know how to deal with for example in New York. No, I mean we have had an increase in in shootings in places like Chicago. Atlanta and New York but you have quote upticks. As parts of regular patterns of crying growing up in this case amidst corona virus admits the tension which has been stoked by trump. It's not surprising that you might have an increase interest, but this is not due to the withdrawal of the police from the streets. There's absolutely no linked to that. The police were on the streets of New York there on the streets of Chicago streets of Atlanta, the issue that is there and has been raised by black lives matters. How do you have effective policing effective policing does mean trying to prevent shootings trying to crime, but it also means trying. Trying to do so working with the community responsibly, and not with the police acting violently, and that issue is being handled by not by trump a by state, local leaders in places like Minneapolis and places like Seattle and places like Atlanta they are trying to pursue a new type of policing that can actually deal with this with the long term, and not for the purpose of a soundbite with Donald trump screams, law and order even as he's trying to undermine it.

President Donald Trump New York Oregon Portland Chicago Scott Lucas Atlanta Nancy Pelosi University Of Birmingham Los Angeles Ted Wheeler Richard Nixon Homeland Security Professor George W Bush Administration George Floyd Russ Rodney
Newt Gingrich and the Start of an Era

The Book Review

05:12 min | 3 weeks ago

Newt Gingrich and the Start of an Era

"This feels like an episode out of like not just a recent. It's not the recent past. Past the distant past I mean newt is still with us, but this is a very different time for newt, and I think that for many people he started to really appear on People's radars outside of Georgia in the early ninety s with a contract for America, but your book predates that so the book starts in the Nineteen Eighties when you Gingrich. Is this young? Young Congressman who comes from Georgia. He's elected in Nineteen, seventy eight, and any comes to Washington ready to just tear everything down to shake things up to do whatever necessary to help. Republicans become a majority in the House of Representatives which they had not been since nineteen fifty four, and he's intent on a not listening to senior members of the Party and to really. Really taking on the Democrats in ways that they had not been comfortable with, and so he makes a name for himself very quickly, even though he's not part of the leadership in the early eighties. Okay, so you're a history. Professor Newt Gingrich Thought of himself as a history professor and was a history professor, but what exactly did he teach? How did his academic career? Career fit in with his political career well, he received his PhD until Lane. After attending undergraduate school in Emory and Gingrich wrote his dissertation on Belgian colonialism, and he wrote about how and why colonial government had failed to modernize local education and nurture an elite that was capable of sustaining economic growth, and what was remarkable about the dissertation in retrospect, which is what he spent. Spent his academic time on was that he was critical of the design of Belgian policies, rather than on the merits of colonialism, which were much less interest to him, but but that wasn't really his his main focus. I mean as soon as he gets to West Georgia College. That's his first job as a professor. He's deeply uninterested in the academic life I think in. In his first year as a professor, he applies to be the president of the university. He then wants to be share the department and he's impatient with the slowness of academia He quickly gains a thirst for the life of politics, and that's really what engages him, and in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy four. He decides to run against the incumbent in his district. District John Flint who's an old southern Democrat. What are nudes politics like growing up? Because he conservative early on, and did his conservative ideology remained consistent throughout his life. Yeah, he comes from a working class family. The family's originally from Harrisburg. His father left his mother while she was pregnant with him, so he didn't have much of a relationship with him. He is raised. primarily by his stepfather, who's in the military, so Gingrich spends a lot of his youth travelling around. He's what we call an Army Brat, and lives in different places in Europe before the family finally settles in Georgia, which is the final stop? He's a Rockefeller Republican during the nineteen sixties. He he is conservative, but he is interested in Republicans like Nelson Rockefeller and then Richard Nixon who had ambitions of building a big Republican coalition as FDR had done for Democrats in the Nineteen Thirties. He doesn't really make a hard right. Right, turn until about nineteen seventy five I'm what prompts that well. He ran for the first time unsuccessfully in nineteen, seventy, four against flint. Then he's getting ready to run against Flint again in nineteen seventy six, and he meets some people associated with the conservative movement like Paul Way Rick. Who's running these camps for up and coming Republicans and he like many young Republicans starts to become enamored with what's this conservative movement that's bubbling up in America and talking about the need to dismantle government to be much more aggressive on national. National Security and this is when he starts to shift to what will eventually be the Reagan Revolution? Would you say that his guiding principles were firmly aligned with Reagan conservatism, or were there differences there? There were differences. Gingrich for example is much more concerned about environmental issues even in the early nineteen eighties than a lot of Reagan Nights, are he? He actually takes those kinds of policies much more seriously, but generally he lines up by the time he's in the house. He believes in tax cuts. He believes in deregulation. Deregulation, he believes importantly in a very muscular approach to fighting the Soviet Union and to fighting allies in places like Central America so though there are differences between him, and and some of the hard core inner circle of the Reagan administration. Generally they line up pretty well

Professor Newt Gingrich Nineteen Eighties Professor Georgia President Trump Nineteen Thirties America Rick Richard Nixon Nelson Rockefeller John Flint Congressman West Georgia College House Of Representatives Reagan Reagan Administration Harrisburg Washington Soviet Union Flint
How did America get to its current state?

Between The Lines

05:06 min | 2 months ago

How did America get to its current state?

"The scenes across the US in the past week or so, they have been profoundly disturbing heavenly. The protests are in response to the horrifying image of George. Floyd an African American man and Minneapolis. Police officer who killed him by kneeling on his nick for close to nine minutes to spot. He's pleased that he could not brave. Those demonstrations as we all know turned into, want him violence and destruction, not only in the twin cities, but all across American CDs. Today's are quiet and peaceful, but it's really the evenings in the night, so usually bring that fury. Those frustrations attend to boil over in the results or these fiery clashes that we've seen across the country, and of course here in New York. We've already seen dozens of people injured. Hundreds of people arrested in tonight. The expectation is that we could see more of these demonstrations. How did America get to this point? And who precisely are Antioch, the militant left wing political protest movement that part of these rights. Face because Nazis, thank. and. That is a very bad thing because harass people Lemay Organiz they kill. People hurt people. They fight people. And we're the ones who fighting back there. The second coming of Hitler for several decades America has I deeply divided nation. Just go back to the mid to late nineteen sixties when America experienced those long hot summers, protests and riots, Vietnam Rice and Martin. Luther King's assassination. The American people are deeply disturbed. They're baffled and dismayed by the wholesale looting and violence. That has occurred both in small towns and then great metropolitan centres. No society can tolerate massive violence. Anymore than a body can tolerate massive disease to me that black people are in the streets. Has Do the lives air force lead in this country? And unfortunately lead these lives by the indifference and the apathy. And a certain kind of ignorance, willful ignorance on the part of their citizens. According to British historian Max Hastings Pass guest on this show in those days quote. It seemed that rice the election and the Vietnam. War would tearing asunder the greatest country on earth. And to think is deep divisions in America have clearly grown since the sixties especially in the trump era, just think of that toxic polarization, hyper partisanship in Washington and elsewhere not to mention the crisis engulfing American cities. So. How did America get to this point? Robert DALIC is arguably America's most distinguished living presidential historian. He's author of fourteen books including on Presidents FDR JFK, LBJ, Richard, Nixon, and Ronald Reagan. The latest book is called. How did we get? He from Theodore Roosevelt? To Donald Trump it's published by harpercollins. Robert Delic joins me from Washington DC hi Bob. Hi Tom Lovely to hear from you. Great to have you on the show now they adopt is in Washington and across other use CDs, but America as I mentioned, before has experienced similar protests in violence. What do you think distinguishes this crosses? The widespread unrest in nineteen sixty I'd. Well, Tom. One of the things that distinguish did was the fact that Lyndon Johnson of course was. President then, and was presiding over the Vietnam War, which was at the center of what? Disturbed so many people in the United States and triggered so many of these. Demonstrations but Johnson had the good sense. To? Give up running for president. He was very skillful politician. Now we have a president who will not give up who would not resign and the only way we're going to get him out of office is by feeding him in the election. Night comes up and five months from now it's very disquieting situation and the demonstrations across this country. I believe on not. Simply a response to the tragic killing of that black man in Minneapolis, but it's also a protest against Donald Trump's presidency. You Know Tom. He's never reached fifty percent approval. And the going on for years he's been office. And this is unprecedented. No President in terms since we've had polling in the Mid Nineteen Thirties. Has Gone through a whole first term without ever reaching fifty percent approval.

America President Trump Lyndon Johnson Tom Lovely Donald Trump Floyd Robert Dalic Minneapolis United States Mid Nineteen Thirties Washington Vietnam George Luther King Officer Max Hastings Lemay Organiz New York Ronald Reagan
RV Rentals Booming as Nervous Vacationers Become COVID Campers

Business Wars Daily

02:24 min | 2 months ago

RV Rentals Booming as Nervous Vacationers Become COVID Campers

"Perhaps this should come as no surprise to me. Memorial Day always feels like the first day summer but it came around quietly last weekend in days gone by the holiday would mark the point when we'd start taking summer vacations and gearing up for a lot of travel. Not so much this year. With the economy just tentatively re opening so how can we get away will in our own isolated homes on wheels? Of course I'm talking about? Rv's here sales of recreational vehicles are booming dealers. Tell us so. Our rentals of our visa campers sure. Rv sales typically get a boost. This time of year is people's thoughts turned to warm days and starry nights but this summer a brand new set of customers shelling out big bucks to travel the country on four or more wheels. There people who are too nervous to rent hotel rooms or to hang out in crowded cities and do not want to sleep in tents Bloomberg is calling them covid campers. Maybe you're one now. You can't be blamed if in the past you thought. Rv's weren't cool as Bloomberg noted the height of RV sales happen back when Richard Nixon was president in nineteen seventy two but our love affair with exploration didn't end interest. Grew again a few years back. In two thousand seventeen travelers bought a half a million. Rv's and then sales drooped once more until now in March when dealerships were closed RV sales fell twenty percent Bloomberg reports but dealerships. That are now open. Can't keep up with demand camping world holdings a publicly held. Rv retailer said. The first weekend in May was the company's biggest weekend in its history. The Motley Fool reported its stock price nearly tripled since the beginning of May camping world and many local dealers are selling to cova campers like Mike Roads and his wife Carol. The couple told Bloomberg that they'd been planning summer trips to Germany and New Zealand among other places but now they don't want to stay in hotels so they put a wash on their global adventures and instead bought a thirty thousand dollar travel trailer and used a Toyota. Pick up to pull it. The skittish couple is in very good company. Only seventeen percent of Americans feel comfortable staying in hotels or resorts right now and even fewer would take a domestic flight. That's according to a late April survey by M. G. Y. Global for the. Us Travel Association. The Wall Street Journal reported. But let's say you have no. Rv experience or you have no intention of spending thousands to own a motor home. Well two big

Bloomberg RV Us Travel Association Richard Nixon Cova M. G. Y. Global President Trump Toyota The Wall Street Journal Mike Roads Germany Carol New Zealand
Trump lawyer argues for 'temporary immunity'

Jay Talking

00:34 sec | 3 months ago

Trump lawyer argues for 'temporary immunity'

"The US Supreme Court adjourns after hearing cases involving president trump the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in two cases on whether president Donald Trump should be forced to comply with congressional and state subpoenas seeking his personal financial records lawyers representing the president argued that his financial records are being sought for political and not legitimate purposes they contend that the president should be entitled to temporary immunity while in office justices raised repeated questions about previous cases were presidents Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton were ordered to comply with

Us Supreme Court Donald Trump President Trump Richard Nixon Bill Clinton
Will a Universal Basic Income finally get a real shot?

The Big Story

14:46 min | 3 months ago

Will a Universal Basic Income finally get a real shot?

"You can say one thing for the current crisis. It's given us a chance to try a lot of things that we might never have had the will to do otherwise I amongst those just giving people money okay not everyone but millions and millions of people in Canada and not forever but at least for a few months and this isn't a new idea. It's been around in some form or another for decades. You probably know it as universal basic income and you might associate it with the most progressive voices come the liberal side of the spectrum and you may also associate the opposition to it with complaints of lazy people want free cash instead of working but despite having a long history as a potential way to ease poverty and improve health. This has never been tried on a large scale or for a long time. So the people arguing on either side of it have never had enough evidence to prove their point. So it's been a political football until like with so many things. These days along came the virus and now getting money to people who need it quickly is absolutely essential governments around the world even the most conservative of them have done that and those who support or oppose that kind of policy have mostly agreed on the need for it. It's what happens next. And what we learned from that will determine if we finally give a universal basic income. A real shot. So we'll explain history of the policy small tests that we've seen on it be political behind it and whether or not it will stick around when we get out of this current mass. And we'll do that as soon as Claire gives the details on this current mess cargill is dealing with the outbreak at one of its meat processing plants. This one isn't Schambori Quebec southeast of Montreal. Sixty four workers have tested positive. There cargill had another outbreak a few weeks ago at a beef packing plant in high river. Alberta in that outbreak more than nine hundred workers tested positive. It reopened last week after a two-week shutdown also in Quebec schools in the western part of the province are set to reopen today but attendance is optional. Desks will be spaced apart. And there can be no more than fifteen kids in a classroom at a time. Ontario reported the lowest number of cases of Cova nineteen for the province on Sunday since March. Two hundred ninety four new cases. And this comes. The province reopens Provincial Parks and Conservation Areas. Although camping is still not allowed and things like beaches playgrounds and public washrooms are still off limits. And lastly schedule and is suspending the sale of alcohol in the Northern Community of La Lush to help control the spread of cove in nineteen. The alcohol store will be closed for two weeks. To prevent people from gathering. There will be support for those at risk of alcohol withdrawal as of Sunday evening. Sixty eight thousand eight hundred and forty eight cases of covert nineteen in Canada with four thousand nine hundred and seventy deaths. I'm Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story Max. Faucet is a writer and a reporter for many publications including on this project for the Walrus. Hey Max he joined our. I'm doing as well as can be expected. Which is how everybody should hopefully answer that question. These days you start by defining What is a universal basic income Broad is that term. And what does it mean? Sure so I mean you know this is an idea that's been around for some time now and and there can be competing definitions and I suspect. We'll get into that in a second but the one that I adhere to the one that you know certainly I informed Andrew Yang's campaign in the United States and that has been informing most of the conversation about UBA. Right now is It has three conditions it's automatic. It's unconditional in its non-withdrawal. So basically that means it comes every month doesn't matter who you are you get it. You could be making a lot of money or a little money and you get it. And then it's non withdraw so It's not means tested. So it doesn't get clawed back you know as you as you make more money you know. There's much conversation on you know econ twitter about various amendments and adjustments to that formula. But I think that's a good way to think about it. Can you give me a little history of it? You mentioned it's been around for a long time Has it been tried for real anywhere where to come from that? Depends on your definition of for real right. I think people look at the idea of giving people money from the government. And they think well this must be a left-wing idea but actually the first real experiments with it happened in the nineteen sixties and early nineteen seventies and it was driven by a Richard Nixon and Milton Friedman. Who is the father of supply-side economics? Yeah they saw it as a way to replace the welfare system and so they their idea of a basic income is not quite the way I just defined it. It was something called a negative income tax. And so let me. Just get a tiny bit. Wonka share the way it worked in their conception is basically they would give people a percentage of the difference between their income and defined income cutoff or like the point where they start paying income taxes so if they set the cutoff at let's say forty thousand dollars and the negative income tax percentage was fifty percent. Someone who made twenty thousand dollars a year would get ten thousand dollars from the government. They made thirty five thousand they would get two thousand and from the government so is this sort of sliding scale where topped you up up until a certain point and then it went away right. They cancelled it in one thousand nine hundred and you know the the the Reagan era kind of buried it under under Nixon's legacy in Canada. Did something called the men come experiment? Which was the Manitoba Basic Income Experiment? That was more that was closer to the basic income that that I described earlier in the one that a lot of people are talking about right now so that says that gave thirteen hundred urban and rural families in Winnipeg and don't Fan Manitoba with incomes below. Thirteen thousand dollars a year back then money. But by the time that the data was collected in nineteen seventy eight so they ran up from seventy five to seventy eight. The Canadian government kind of lost interest in and they cancelled the project. So we've had these these aborted attempts to gather a sample and it hasn't really provided any conclusive evidence In the in the American one. There's some evidence that it that it you know Negatively impacted people's willingness to go to work in the Canadian won the data suggested otherwise. But there just wasn't enough data to conclusively determine the impact of giving people money on their both on their willingness to work and on on the outcomes that the government's wanted to test. Which is you know better. Health Outcomes Better Labor outcomes better social outcomes so you know the jury was still out right. Will what kind of a sample size and study length? Would you even need to determine that because again we had one or at least something like one here in Ontario Under Kathleen Wynne. A few years ago and the next government came to power and it was immediately phased out. So you know. I don't think we got more than two or three years out of that either. So what kind of scale are we talking about? Yeah I mean to make it work. You would needs multiple cities multiple tests populations and a long duration of study. This is this is a a bold policy intervention but you need to be able to control for extenuating circumstances and factors the Ontario project. Was it had some really promising results. As it turned out there was a study group at McMaster that basically interviewed the people that participated in the program. Some of the data they had eighty percent of of people reporting better health outcomes. They were using less tobacco drinking. Less eighty-three percent said they had better mental health. They were feeling less stressed. They had a better diet And there was even interesting. Data around better labor market outcomes people were basically using the minimum income the guaranteed income to improve their jobs to look for better job. So it's disappointing that the government scrapped it after basically what amounted to one year and left us in the same spot that we've sort of always been with these things where we just don't have enough data for either side to conclusively prove that their argument is right and you know maybe not maybe now is the opportunity to kind of walk in that that longer sample size but you know the problem here is that. It's always tempting for governments to to start these programs and then abandon them or different governments to come in and cancel them. You'd need some sort of agreement by all parties that they're going to let this run. Its course and we haven't really seen that yet. So you mentioned that it's seen mostly now at least as a left-wing idea might have begun under Nixon. But certainly I think that's how most listeners would frame it as you know Whether or not you support it About the side of the spectrum that it comes from but as we've started to see government's realizing how badly they need to help people as the economy collapses during this pandemic have seen any movement On the other side of the aisle towards this kind of idea I think we've seen much more movement on on the conservative side than we have on the progressive side the beano progressives are are are very wary of guaranteed income proposals because I think you know quite rightly they remember certainly the academics who studied this. They remember that it was originally an idea that was intended to get rid of welfare and other social supports and that is always a concern that if you bring in a guaranteed income. Is it really just an attempt to shrink? The size of the state is an attempt to get rid of targeted support programs that that make people's lives better and I think that's a totally valid concern when I when I posted my article from the wall or something twitter. I got a lot of feedback from economists about that where they basically said you know. Oh here we go again. People people don't realize that this is a an attempt to slip in through the back door reduction in social programs. That's really interesting. Yeah but you know. Over the last few months we've seen a really array of conservatives. Come out and say that this is a good idea. Hugh Seagull. Who is a former senator standing red? Tory I WOULD. I would describe him as a thought leader. He's been he's been banging the drum for for guaranteed income for quite some time now but he was always sort of out there in the wilderness as a conservative suggesting that this was a good idea and he wasn't one of the ones who was saying that it should replace social programs. He was saying it should be an augmentation to them but in the states over a matter of weeks you saw people like Mitt. Romney coup is basically the Avatar of hedge fund capitalism. Coming out and and suggesting that this was a good idea that would support. Americans during the fallout from Cova and ultimately Donald Trump's government. It's not it's not a permanent basic income. But they sent a check to every American and that is sort of one of the hallmarks of a basic income. So it's interesting the degree to which we've seen conservatives rally behind this particular policy flag. I think that it is driven by shorter. Term political objectives American politicians having election. That they're looking at in November and one of the surest ways to get defeated is to be in being government while people are losing their jobs losing their homes losing their livelihood so I think it's more self preservation than a genuine change of heart but in from a policy perspective. You take the support where you can get it and you build on it from there. So you know I think advocates of a U. UB. I should take their support and and leverage it in order to build their movement if you can may be explained to me the thought behind the benefits of this applying to absolutely everyone including people who have job because that's really And we can debate in Canada versus the US for however long. But that's that's like the primary difference between what trump's government has done and what Canada's done with the baby. Yeah that's the tricky part. That's the part that a lot of people struggle with conceptually and intellectually as is the idea of giving people who don't need money more money right. Yeah and Ken Boston cool. Who is is a former adviser to Stephen Harper and Christy Clark? He's been kind of driving the bus in Canada around the need for a UB. I you know he's he is preferred that to the more targeted approach that the government has taken with Serb. You know his idea in the short term is we just need to get money into people's hands right. Now we need we need to stimulate the economy and ultimately will tax it back next year on people's income taxes that's the thing about a guaranteed income in the context of the system. We have here is if you're making sixty seventy thousand dollars a year. This is going to a portion of this. We'll get taxed back right and so it's not. It's not really free money. It's a little bit of free money and I suspect there would be some social programs that would get pulled back a little bit to to make the numbers work but you know at the end of the day. I don't think you can let the weaknesses in the policy that that might impact a few people. Override the benefits that would impact far more people. You know there's there's all sorts of data out there that suggests that a basic income would actually stimulate economic growth. There's all kinds of data that suggested improves. Health outcomes and Lord knows improving. Health outcomes would save taxpayers and the government a lot of money. Because that's where an increasing increasingly large part of our social budget is going and we'll continue to go in the years and months to come so you know it it is It's a tough idea to get past for some people that I find working already. Why should I get more money from the government but that money's going back into the economy and it stimulating economic growth that supporting jobs? It's reducing healthcare costs. You know I think there's a pretty good case for it and and you know it's one that we should be willing to explore. I am I am more than open to criticism about the cost factor that I suppose we can get to that in a second but I think we also need to look at the benefits and look a little a little bigger in terms of where those benefits accrue it. It's not just lifting people out of poverty. Although that's that's an obvious benefit it's improving people's health outcomes improving their labor market outcomes. Let's people who have a

Canada Richard Nixon Ontario Cargill Cova United States Claire Schambori Quebec Provincial Parks Manitoba Mcmaster Twitter Winnipeg Jordan Heath Rawlings Quebec La Lush Alberta Kathleen Wynne
U.S. moves to drop case against Trump ex-adviser Flynn, who admitted lying to FBI

KCBS 24 Hour News

02:49 min | 3 months ago

U.S. moves to drop case against Trump ex-adviser Flynn, who admitted lying to FBI

"Twenty another setback for the investigation into Russia's influence into our twenty sixteen elections justice department says it's dropping its criminal case against president Donald trump's first national security adviser Michael Flynn case was brought by special counsel Robert Muller who said Flynn had lied to the FBI about his conversations with the Russian ambassador in a January twenty seventeen interview for more key CBS news anchors Jeff bell and Patty rising spoke with John dean former White House of former White House legal counsel for president Richard Nixon Mr dean thanks as always for making some time for us to your initial reaction to hearing the news today pretty surprising actually yeah I'm a little a little confusing and also the motion that was filed to dismiss says that the the line was not material to the investigation is the reason they dismissed it well when you dig a little deeper it seems like a really very material to the investigation so this is kind of a pre tax basis to dismiss the charge this is a very naive question but I don't understand how the church just could be dismissed after general Flynn has already pleaded guilty to the judge the judge Solomon may not understand that either but he he has to find the rule on that whether or not the case can be dismissed the justice department is arguing that he really doesn't have anything to rule on that once they pull the case away that there's no discretion left for the judge to decide I think the judge is going to see it differently and we're going to have more of a hearing on this influx some of this out when asked about William Barr the Attorney General who was signed an outside prosecutor to review the justice department's case that was rather unusual move was it not it's been done before but typically in charges of misconduct by somebody in the department it's not typically done in routine criminal investigations but he's done it a number he has a number of Russia probe investigations under this kind of review we also not only the use of Saint Louis U. S. attorneys got want to Connecticut looking at other aspects of the case and the shopping until they find somebody who will disagree with the way the original prosecution was brought and dismiss it are there ongoing concerns about interference in the twenty twenty election there are as as special counsel Miller testified the guy even a year ago that the heat there were ongoing efforts by the Russians to interfere with our twenty twenty election the government the executive branch is doing nothing the Congress has been leased the house had been wringing his hands about it and expressing

Miller Executive Connecticut Saint Louis U. S. Attorney Mr Dean Richard Nixon White House John Dean CBS Special Counsel Michael Flynn Congress Russia Justice Department Prosecutor William Barr Solomon Legal Counsel
Why Is American Money Used Around the World?

BrainStuff

04:35 min | 4 months ago

Why Is American Money Used Around the World?

"As of January twenty twenty Japan and China each own more than one trillion dollars in US Treasury securities followed by the United Kingdom With three hundred and seventy two billion dollars and Brazil two hundred eighty three billion according to the International Monetary Fund more than sixty one percent of the world's cash reserves are held in dollars. The euro is in for second place at twenty percent when even an economic powerhouse like China holds a trillion. Us Dollars Reserve. That's a good sign that the dollar is still considered the mightiest of the global currencies. But the dollar wasn't always the world's defacto currency so what changed before World War. Two all global currencies were backed by gold and each government. Guaranteed that it's money was good for certain amount of gold then came the Bretton Woods Agreement of nineteen forty four which created the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund and also established the US dollar as the new gold because the US held most of the world's gold supply the dollar continued to dominate during the post World War. Two boom years. A We spoke with Jonathan David Kirschner a professor of Political Science and International Studies at Boston College. Who Co edited. A book called the future of the dollar he explained the rise of the dollar order was on four pillars the robustness of the US economy the widespread belief in the American model of finance the wealth of US financial institutions and America's leading role in international affairs Kirschner said most of the world's monetary relations were orchestrated between the US and its political allies and military. Dependencies it was natural to be conducted in dollars. The Bretton Woods fixed exchange rate scheme collapsed in the nineteen seventies when Richard. Nixon took the dollar off the gold standard during a period of domestic inflation and many industrialized economies chose to float their currencies on the open market. At that time some economists began to predict the downfall of the dollar not that it would lose value but that it would lose. Its dominance as the world's de facto currency over the decades. Most of those pillars that made the dollar king of the postwar Connie have been toppled recessions stock market bubbles and the global financial crisis have revealed cracks in the American financial bottle and the US has lost some of its political dominance with many governments and corporations choosing to do business with China or Europe instead yet the numbers show that the dollar is still the currency that nations and individuals turn to as a safe harbor in economic storms. Kirschner said the ultimate reason is a simple one. The lack of plausible alternative. Not The dollar. Then what there have been periodic calls to shift more Reserve Holdings to the euro the Chinese are mb or even back to gold but the dollar still reigns supreme when countries shop for a reserve currency that stable secure and liquid that is easy to convert back to local money. The dollar is still the default in fact some countries such as Panama and El Salvador use the US dollar as their own legal tender the US government doesn't have to give approval for another country to use the dollar as its official currency. So what about a one world currency not going to happen? Kirschner says the first reason is political. There's simply no political will to have one world government or one world currency the second reason we won't see an earth dollar anytime soon or the whole world using the US dollar for their official currency for that matter has to do with an economic theory called optimal currency area. That states that a single currency only operates effectively over relatively small geographic area the size of a country for example not a continent or the world. That's because different regions might be experiencing very different economic conditions at the same time. One Country might be in recession. While another is booming. Kirschner said if you only have one money in the whole world and you only have one monetary authority which means you only have one. Monetary policy in reality different regions or countries would need monetary policies more tailored to their individual needs. That's one of the reasons why the euro hasn't supplanted the dollar as the defacto global currency the Bureau Paean Union itself is not an optimal currency area. It's too spread out. Which means that. E with authorities have to enact monetary policies that somehow serve economies in very different financial conditions like Germany and Greece.

United States Jonathan David Kirschner International Monetary Fund China World Bank Bretton Woods Professor Of Political Science Brazil United Kingdom Bureau Paean Union Reserve Holdings Official Japan Boston College Nixon Germany Europe
Mad Magazine illustrator Mort Drucker dies at 91

NPR News Now

01:00 min | 4 months ago

Mad Magazine illustrator Mort Drucker dies at 91

"Longtime mad magazine cartoonist mort Drucker has died at the age of ninety one. His daughter says Drucker fell. Ill last week with breathing issues but was never tested for the corona virus. Npr's Andrew Limbaugh says drucker drew biting caricatures of everyone from politicians to film stars in more junkers nineteen seventy cover for Time magazine which is hanging in the national portrait gallery. Richard Nixon with his big jowls and bumpy nose is raising his arms gleefully as other politicians fight dressed in gladiator gear the headline reads the battle for the Senate in two thousand Sixteen Drucker till the national cartoonist society. That time offered him the opportunity to work in color which was a new experiment for him. And that's the fun of it. All when she get a handle on what a good oddest is supposed to be and do mort drucker began working as a cartoonist at eighteen and spent half a century as a visual satirist format. His work in turn influenced several generations of younger artists. Andrew Lombardo NPR

Mort Drucker Andrew Lombardo Npr Time Magazine Andrew Limbaugh NPR Richard Nixon Senate
Is Trump abusing his power over the judiciary?

FT News

15:34 min | 5 months ago

Is Trump abusing his power over the judiciary?

"This is news in focus where we offer our insights into the stories that matter before we go any further. I want to address today. Sentencing of a man Roger Stone Roger Stone. He's become the sentencing of Roger Stone. A LONGTIME CONFIDANTE DONALD TRUMP for lying to Congress obstruction and witness tampering was mired in controversy. Over how the. Us Justice Department handled the case under public pressure from the president. Mr Stone received a forty month sentence whereas prosecutors had recommended that he serve up to nine years. This followed seven cases of presidential clemency for White Collar criminals whose convictions included extortion fraud and lying to White House officials. Yes we have commuted. The sentence of Rod Blagojevich. He served eight years in jail We have Birdie character we have Mike Milkin. Who's gone around and done an incredible job? Offer is the independence of America's judiciary under threat. Or as Mr Trump simply using the powers a lot to him on the line with me to discuss this is ed loose. Us National Editor and columnist and Cottam Schober US legal and enforcement correspondent. I let's hear a clip from president trump taken. Just a couple of days before stone sentencing. Just so you understand. I chose not to be involved. I'm allowed to be totally involved. I'm actually I guess the Chief Law Enforcement Officer of the country but I've chosen not to be involved but he is a man of great integrity. But I would be. I could be involved if I wanted to be man of integrity he is referring to is the US Attorney General William Bar but is this credible given the tweets he published before the sentencing of Roger. Stone got tell us first about the case of Roger Stone which you've covered for the F. T. Who was he exactly? What was his crime? And was the sentence particularly lenient for this kind of case. Roger Stone is a flamboyant veteran political operative in the US. His career goes all the way back to working on Richard Nixon's election campaign and he has basically been the person you call as a Republican presidential candidate. When you want to get your hands dirty. He called himself a dirty trickster and he is an expert in this sort of Makir side politics in the two thousand sixteen election. He was a sort of informal adviser to Donald Trump. And one of the things he was trying to do was make contact with wikileaks. When it became known that wikileaks had a trove of hacked emails from the Democrats to use it for political gain. The thing that he was convicted of is in two thousand seventeen when Congress began investigating. What exactly went on to twenty sixteen election? The House Intelligence Committee called on Mr Stone and asked him about some of the comments he had made during the campaign and Mr Stone lied to. Congress about who is intermediary was or who he was referring to when he was talking about having an intermediary allied when. He said that he didn't have any documents or any written materials or any taxed of his conversations with that intermediary. The sentence he eventually received was actually probably pretty in line with what other sort of white collar criminals convicted of lying to. Congress or the government have received the key issue in his case was he had threatened a longtime friend of his who was also another witness. Basically saying don't contradict my story and those thrashed included threatening his dog for example the key issue at stake was whether he was serious about that and whether therefore has sent should be jacked up significantly because he had made violent threats and eventually the judge took the view that although it was serious that he'd made violent threats. The person that he had threatened didn't actually feel like they were going to experience violence. Ed Tell us a bit more about Mr Stone. And the history of his friendship with the President and whether you think Mr Trump's tweets constituted interference in the judicial process. Yeah as I said. He's a flamboyant dirty tricks. Who GOES WAY BACK TO LATE? Six hundred seventy trump maximum in the late seventies. He was introduced to try but he quickly hit it off. They shed philosophy of you know playing to win that no method is invalid. Never apologize never explain. Stone set up with couple of other people are very well known lobby group in Washington. One of his clients was trump who was seeking tax breaks a casino. He was setting up in Atlantic City. And really they've been great friends since then so the ties between trump and stone go along way that very deep and they're often allegedly nefarious in terms of the League outlook from this. I have no doubt that trump will seek to podcastone fast opportunity. Trump's on the Guy Senate acquittal spring cleaning of his administration ruthlessly seeking out anybody who isn't very very loyal so to get rid of weather that Meghan appointees the civil savage. Anybody perceive does slightly disloyal. Not Enough is being pledged. Loyalty is a hugely important hugely. Important thing to trump and stern has shown loyalty he has not. He is not divulged things that have damaged the president. He's showing toughness. He's been very Trumpian in how he's dealt with. Franchi's accused the judge me by of being a biased judge which she's rejected this very trumpian and I have no doubt that it will culminate in at some point. President trump pardoning Roger Stern question about what trump actually did part of the reason. Roger Stone was so controversial. Was that line prosecutors involved in this case we're uncomfortable with what Mr Trump and the justice department we're doing. Can you explain that to viewers and why it was such a problem so there are four prosecutors who secured Mrs Jones conviction trial so the trial team? They filed their sentencing recommendation which was seven to nine years which there's no bones about it. That's a serious sentence for anybody to serve and then that evening all of a sudden early hours of the morning so after midnight trump tweets calling it a miscarriage of justice. He says this is unacceptable and Lo and behold the very next day the DOJ which is the US Department of Justice DOJ officials. Start saying that they agree that the sense would be unwarranted and adair kind of reverse it. The following day afternoon we see all four the prosecutors quit the case including one of them actually quits his job at the DOJ entirely and subsequently a new sentencing recommendation is put forward. Which says we'RE NOT GONNA ask for a particular sentence but it ought to be far less than seven to nine years. The idea that four prosecutors would quit a case. All at once is astonishing and it was a very serious and important moment and DOJ his trip shook the DOJ. It was a very dramatic moment in Washington and the question then was was doj senior leadership. William bar the. Us Attorney General. Was He reacting to an order from trump or was something else going on now the lion that DOJ has stuck to is that there was a miscommunication between the US Attorney's office in Washington DC and between main justice headquarters also in DC? But they're separate offices. Basically Mr. Barr says he was not expecting to see a seventy nine year recommendation. The new prosecutor brought on sat at the sentencing that the prosecutors who filed a recommendation that you good faith and thought that they had been given approval to do so and so Mr Bar said listen. This is not about trump. This is about. I think that that sentence was appropriate and I was not told about what was going on. The important thing here is whether or not Mr trump explicitly ordered the attorney general chains recommendation. It's still gets to this question about how our friends of the president being treated in their cases now it's pretty common across the US for federal prosecutors to request tough even harsh sentences. That's not unknown. You don't often see the attorney general weighing in to ask for lighter sentences and certainly DOJ policy at the moment is to prosecute people to the fullest extent of the law to secure the longer sentences possible so whether or not Mr Trump's tweets were an express order to Mr Bar that he followed a whether he was acting independently. It still gets to this question about if your friend of the president. How are you going to be treated by this? Doj while we're on the subject of Friends of the president. The other thing that happened last week was a series of presidential pardons for White Collar criminals specifically several that have connections to Mr Trump. I talk about Michael Milkin. What did he do and why does it matter that he was pardoned? Michael Milkin is to people on Wall Street a hero. He effectively invented the junk bond or high yield bond market in the eighties and then he was brought low by prosecutors and the SEC and eventually guilty to securities fraud and nine hundred ninety. He served about twenty two months in prison after being initially sentenced to ten years. Ever since then he's been rebuilding his reputation. He's a philanthropist. Now has the Milken Institute and for a long time people on Wall Street rich and powerful people have felt that he was prosecuted unjustly and deserved a pardon. The other person. Mr Trump pardon rod blagojevich is perhaps less of a popular figure in any area. He was the former Democratic governor of Illinois and was prosecuted for trying to extort a children's Hospital for campaign contributions and also trying to sell the vacated Senate seat of Barack Obama when he became president his case involves some quite lurid wiretap quotes. Where he talked about Mr Obama's Tennessee. Being a very valuable thing with various explosives and that he wasn't going to give it away for nothing. The fact that these pardons came just a day or two before Roger. Stone's sentencing is pretty mistake -able signal of Mr Trump's power to grant clemency. Whatever case that he wants so prosecutors can go after his fans and associates. Jerry can commit crimes. Judge can sentence them to however long they want ultimately. Mr Trump has under the constitution the pardon power and that was a pretty stark exercise of that pardon power on the eve of a close friend of his being sentenced. Ed Do you think we're gonNA see more interventions this spy trump perhaps related to the Mueller probe into Russian interference in the election. People like Paul Manafort and Michael Cohen. Who Manafort I think would definitely be a case for another pop and I would be very surprised if Michael Cohen Without Him. Because Michael Cohen Tablet Trump describes a rat in that inimitable. Kind of multi language that the president sometimes uses Michael. Cohen testified to Congress very damagingly against president. Trump's he's considered to be a tax cut. The thing that links you know all these Haden's whether it's Michael Milkin Rod Blagojevich Obama Carrick. Us police commissioner who was the security guard incidentally for Rudy Giuliani. The thing that links all of them is that they're pretty well connected people who've committed white-collar crimes and who have upbeat through Fox News. In some cases that Bregovic wife spoke on Fox News. He carrots by on Fox News to capture the president's attention and I think the pattern is again very trumpian thing. It's it's about. People who trump identifies with he feels as acute. Did he feels. He's fatty toxic at he. Identifies WITH OTHERS. Who fit that description again though. The role of connections and of mutual friends and a Fox as dishing platform for pardon. These are very common. There's a pattern here. How big a cause of concern is all this. I mean it's trump's use of the pardon power markedly different from other presidents will Clinton famously on his last day in office Rich Hedge Fund billionaire and friend of the Clintons Madonna to the Clintons and that caused a lot of bad blood. Clinton was heavily criticised for intervening on behalf of a friend and it stood out and I guess the reason I mentioned that is it. Was Fatty unusual. It's now completely normal. Trump has happened many many people who under the inventions of us? Pardon history wouldn't ready quantify so I think he has changed quite dramatically and just to add on. There's an interesting historical link year. Another controversial use of the pardon power in the past was George H W Bush who infamously pardoned a whole swath of former officials who are indicted in connection to the Iran Contra Scandal and bill bar the current. Us Attorney General was back then also attorney general and so Mr Bar He had pushed not just for one. Pardon of Caspar Weinberger. Who was the former Secretary of defense? He said listen. If you're gonNA pardon any of these people you have to pardon all of them. I think his quote was in for a penny in for a pound and so you may have the curious historical echo if MR trump loses later this year of his attorney general at the end of his time in office being the same attorney general at the end of George W Bush's time in office advising him on. You know who to pardon before he leaves Hamas all this been received in Washington and then around the US do people care. It's been received as many other actions by president trump being received with a high temperature reaction inside the Washington. Beltway and shrug outside the GNOMES that being trashed here in a row very significant look at the powers of the presidency. The procedures the the president uses before he acts and the conventions so that being shredded caused great angst in Washington. Dc across the political divide and almost badly registered a ripple outside of Washington. The same of course applies to impeachment. It really didn't resonate much isn't resonating match in the Democratic primaries. In places like Iowa New Hampshire and so I think this is far far lower. It may be it should be different than ideal while but it registered FAFA LOA on the vote says right of than than even impeachment.

Donald Trump President Trump Roger Stone Justice Department United States Mr Trump Attorney Us Attorney William Bar Congress Washington Rod Blagojevich Michael Cohen Roger DC Mr Bar Senate Mike Milkin Michael Milkin
Roger Stone sentenced to 40 months for obstruction, witness tampering

Wealth Creator Radio

02:38 min | 6 months ago

Roger Stone sentenced to 40 months for obstruction, witness tampering

"The sentencing recommendation from justice department prosecutors is seven to nine years in a federal penitentiary on average a convicted rapist in this country serves four and a half years in prison so you know something is amiss almost immediately president trump tweeted his outrage targeting the prosecutors a short time later four of them quit that because great joy in The New York Times and Washington post to organizations that are devoted to injuring president trump what in the middle of the chaos is William Barr who then told ABC news that Mr trump's tweeting about active criminal cases makes it hard for the AG to do its job whereupon fox business channel finder Lou Dobbs question bar's loyalty but an attorney general's loyalty is to uphold the constitution not to any human being so now the president and the Attorney General R. well let's use the word on settle and they didn't have to happen all president trump had to do was wait until Roger stone is sentenced and then issue a pardon presto Mr stone to go bowling with us that very night but waiting is not Donald Trump style confrontation is if you read my book the United States of trump you know the president always relishes the fight but a battle with William Barr is not like the dust up with the week former Attorney General Jeff sessions bars not a man to be pushed around and he does not want his professional reputation solely the crucial Dorham investigation into federal corruption is under way and president trump would be well advised to stay out of all justice department business and let those chips fall Mr trump should also understand that the national media is heavily invested in diminishing William Barr because she fears what the dorm investigation might break the president would be foolish to help his enemies marginalize the Attorney General who could expose disturbing FBI corruption that damaged Donald Trump finally president Richard Nixon tried to manipulate the justice department and that finalized his

Richard Nixon FBI Dorham Attorney Lou Dobbs ABC Washington The New York Times Justice Department President Trump Donald Trump United States Mr Stone Roger Stone General R. William Barr
Trump Impeachment Trial Winds Down With Closing Arguments

Overnight re-air of day's programming

07:34 min | 6 months ago

Trump Impeachment Trial Winds Down With Closing Arguments

"But we begin with the latest on the Senate impeachment trial and tomorrow's Iowa caucuses the first contest in the race for the democratic nomination the Senate narrowly rejected democratic demands for witnesses but pushed off a final vote to acquit president from till Wednesday the day after he addresses Congress on the state of the union let's bring in Kevin Cork reporting from the president's retreat of Mar a Lago but the latest Calvin Chris just three more days before the White House can finally peers the cloud cover of what they've considered the brazen partisan process the single party impeachment of the president of the United States laughter Monday's closing arguments senators final remarks and then finally Wednesday at four PM the vote on the two articles of impeachment and barring a political earthquake the president's expected acquittal one by the thinnest of definition say defined Democrats still reeling from the Senate's fifty one forty nine vote rejecting demands for additional witnesses if the president is equated with no witnesses no documents acquittal will have no value wedged in between Monday's resumption of activity on the Senate floor and Wednesdays historic vote is the president's state of the union address Tuesday evening theme the great American come back the president is expected to focus on what the White House calls the blue collar economic boom lowering overall healthcare costs and safe legal immigration in a speech sources tell fox news will be both positive and optimistic I tone in sharp contrast perhaps to its we sit overnight by the president shortly after midnight in which she accused Democrats of using the impeachment process as a blazingly political process to damage the GOP and lose their chances Chris in twenty twenty Chris Kaman Cork reporting from Mar a Lago Kevin thank you they are I spoke about the Senate trial with a member of the president's defense team Alan Dershowitz professor emeritus at Harvard Law School and author of the new book guilt by accusations this is George with let's start with the Senate's decision by a vote of fifty one to forty nine not to call witnesses the Republicans have the votes so they won but is there a legal justification a legal reason for not calling evidence when there is substantial new evidence yes as I argued to the Senate if somebody were accused of the crime of abuse of power or dishonesty something it's not a crime what you do is you make a motion to dismiss on the other side has no we want to introduce evidence no no no no you can't is use evidence if there is no legitimate indictment here the articles of impeachment did not charging impeachable offense so the right answer is to dismiss it and cut it off right there no amount of witnesses could have changed that okay but the top Democrats in Congress Nancy Pelosi the house Chuck Schumer in the Senate say that the failure to call witnesses is going to put a taint on any of the weather listen to sure this country is headed towards the greatest cover up since Watergate but he will not be quite as you cannot be acquitted if you don't have a trial of course you can be acquitted if you don't have a trial if they don't charge you with illegitimate crime it's the fault of Nancy Pelosi and the others for failing to charge an impeachable offense they're going to say they say he's never going to be truly acquitted because you didn't have witnesses who didn't have new evidence he dismissed it before you even really got to hear what the facts were in a criminal context it would be cool victory a great victory here if they have been charging the fans then maybe he hasn't been acquitted but he also hasn't been charged he's in exactly the same situation you should have been in had they done the right thing and not impeach him at all you've created quite a controversy with something you said in the Senate trial here is which is sad and here's some of the blood does which he believes will help him get elected in the public interest cannot be the kind of that results in impeachment if you can identify something as president that's in your public your political interest and say that's the national interest they're all bets are off is what I don't understand right you have made it clear new and I went out at last week on the question of you say that to be an impeachable offense it's gotta be a crime criminals like behavior of kin to treason and bribery that's what the constitution means when it says treason bribery or other high crimes and get into this question of whether or not the president thanks his re election is in the public interest because you seem to be implying that somehow that gives them an extra level of immunity no no it doesn't I was asked the question by a senator the question was does quid pro quo matter and my answer is it matters is what the president it is illegal or wrong but if the president is something completely waffle the fact that part of his motivation may have been to help his election cannot be the quid pro quo that's what I said I never said I mean and I don't believe that a president can do anything if he thinks it is national interest look I supported the impeachment of Richard Nixon he thought that the five crimes he committed our own national interest these folks have totally distorted quite deliberately because they saw that I was having an impact on some of the senators so they deliberately distorted what I said and said even if it's criminal what the president thinks is in the best interest it can't be an impeachable offense nonsense I never said it was three journals as I never said it New York times says I never said it and the fact that Schumer and shifts and CNN say I said it doesn't make it true again I don't even know why intense is an issue and why you got into it as I was but but my point is the activity has what you say is the case if it's criminal or criminal like activity that it can be impeachable if it's not criminal activity it doesn't matter what the motive the example I gave I said there are three levels of motor the sample I gave the president says I'm not giving you money you crane unless you give me a million dollar kick back of course that's criminal and of course he goes to jail Abraham Lincoln said the troops owned Indiana vote for Republicans in the election was that impeachable no matter what it was well it doesn't matter to me but it managed to shift and medicine to the people on the other side they were focusing on motive I was responding to them I didn't put that in my original speech because you're right but I was on the floor to respond to constitutional arguments question and it was wrenched out of context you seem pretty upset about I was very upset about that because it is has has hurt me people think I actually believe the president like Nixon can do anything he wants is exactly the opposite of what I've been teaching arguing in as a civil libertarian believing in the fifty years how dare they deliberately and willfully distort my position and then not give me an opportunity to respond all rights forget impeachment from asking you this and maybe a little agree to do it or not but a thought experiment Alan Dershowitz citizen do you find it troubling problem out at that residence with Lincoln anyway forget is not about I'm not saying it's criminal his support

Iowa Senate President Trump Congress
Testimony coming? Abrupt acquittal? Trump trial edges on

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 6 months ago

Testimony coming? Abrupt acquittal? Trump trial edges on

"The Senate votes tomorrow on whether they will be witness testimony as Democrats are demanding war in abrupt end of the trial with the president's expected acquittal which is more likely today the focus is on trump lawyer Alan Dershowitz arguing yesterday that a president who believes his reelection is in the national interest is essentially a mute from impeachment for whatever he does in support of that idea Dershowitz now says he was misunderstood but Adam Schiff and Democrats pounced that argument if the president says it can't be a legal fail and Richard Nixon was forced to resign but that argument may succeed here while Democrats argue the president must immediately be removed both from office and the ballots White House counsel Patsy Bologna's warning of the consequences they would tear us apart for generations Sager make on the at the White House

President Trump Alan Dershowitz Adam Schiff Richard Nixon Patsy Bologna Sager White House Senate Donald Trump
How Did White House Press Briefings Go From Daily to Done?

BrainStuff

05:23 min | 6 months ago

How Did White House Press Briefings Go From Daily to Done?

"Brain. GRAINSTUFF Lauren Bogle bomb here in January of Twenty Twenty bestselling novelist Stephen King and Don winslow took to twitter to make a surprising pledge. They offered to donate two hundred thousand dollars to charity. If Stephanie Grisham the Press Secretary for President Donald Trump agreed to take questions from the full White House. Press Corps for one hour. You're in the White House. Press briefing room. The offer reportedly was rejected by Grisham. WHO's since taking the job in June of two thousand nineteen has yet to hold even one former former White House press briefing? Her views expressed an interview with these sinclair. Broadcast Group is that the briefings are unnecessary because reporters get opportunities to put questions to trump himself sometimes over the roar of the presidential helicopter on the White House lawn for the time being at least the trump administration has abandoned what had been in an important part of White House. Press Corps is routine dating back to the late eighteen hundreds before the official position of White House. Press Secretary even existed. That's when President William McKinley. Kenley set up a workspace in the White House for reporters and sent his first personal secretary. John Addison Porter to give the correspondence what the White House Historical Association notes. where I'm I more or less regular briefings? The White House press briefing gradually evolved into a formal event from the time of president. Herbert Hoover in the late nineteen twenties and early thirties. He's to Linden Johnson's tenure in the mid to late sixties White House press secretary's held twice a day briefing sessions in their own offices according to Martha Joint Kumar Book managing the president's message the White House Communications Operation Richard Nixon though no fan of the press still thought the briefings were important enough that he had a swimming pool torn out so that he could convert the space into a meeting room for briefings. That area is now known as the James S. Brady press briefing room in honor of president. Ronald Reagan's press secretary who was seriously wounded during the attempt. On Reagan's life in Nineteen eighty-one during Bill Clinton's time in the White House in the nineteen nineties. Press Secretary Mike. McCurry decided to allow the daily press briefings to be televised that practice continued until the trump white house began barring cameras from briefings in two thousand seventeen before discontinuing them altogether. Oh we spoke by email but former C. N. N. White House correspondent Dan Lowthian who spent five years covering the Bush and Obama administrations. He said I think the briefings were useful full for a number of reasons. First of all it was an opportunity to get the White House response or thinking on an issue on camera rather than a written statement it allowed us to gang up on them around a question they might have been trying to avoid showing them dodge. An answer is sometimes the news briefings also put statements on the record for later. Comparison finally finally every now and then there would be breaking news and as happened after Osama bin Laden was caught lots of great details even if some turned out not to be true. Lowthian Dan who went on to found little park media and to become a visiting scholar at the School of Journalism at Northeastern University recalls that the format for the briefings was fairly constant. He said there was a certain order to who got called on briefings always started with the Associated Press and ended with a thank you from the Associated Press once in a while the press secretary would mix it up a bit but it usually happened around the same time each day and questions from the first two rows came in order. We also spoke by email with Tom. Tom Jones a senior media writer for the POYNTER Institute. A journalism education organization. He said while it's true that the president and his representatives often make themselves available bowl in informal settings such as the White House lawn. It's not the same as press. Briefings the format of shouting out questions under the sound of a whirling helicopter is not conducive to asking complicated policy questions nor pertinent. Follow up questions. The frenzied free for all of these much too brief informal interviews make it much harder to get into the topics. What's that require nuance and specifics? It's so much easier for the president to brush aside or ignore questions. He doesn't like when he's walking along the White House grounds when he or one of his representatives representatives are standing behind a podium a controlled setting they must face the questions that require long substantive answers as opposed to the one or two short sentences that suffice in those informal formal settings let view essentially is shared by a group of thirteen former White House press secretary and Foreign Service and military officials who published an opinion in peace on. CNN's website in January of twenty twenty calling for trump to restore the regular briefings in their view. Having to prepare for briefings helps the government to run better letter. They wrote the sharing of information known. As official guidance among government officials and agencies helps ensure that an administration speaks with one voice telling one story however compelling it might be Lowthian also sees the apparent end the briefings as unfortunate. He said it's a valid criticism that some reporters others use briefings to showboat. However I think when covering the White House briefings aren't important function that allow the public and reporters to maintain daily connections? Sometimes it's routine information other times. An odd question from the back of the room can turn into the story of the day even so Lowthian says journalists who cover the the administration will find a way to get stories he said this new normal might be unfortunate but not paralyzing. Reporters are in the business of getting information whether it comes from the mouth of his spokesperson or sources all across the beltway.

White House Press Secretary President Trump White House Historical Associa Press Corps C. N. N. White House Dan Lowthian Associated Press Stephanie Grisham Twenty Twenty Donald Trump Ronald Reagan Secretary Official Osama Bin Laden Lauren Bogle Twitter Herbert Hoover
Impeachment trial: Senate rejects Democrats' calls for early witnesses in late-night debate

Total Information AM

02:01 min | 7 months ago

Impeachment trial: Senate rejects Democrats' calls for early witnesses in late-night debate

"If and it was almost two in the morning when the U. S. Senate called it quits Senate is adjourned after a day of partisan battling over the rules for president trump's impeachment trial in Switzerland this morning Mr trump delivered a blistering review they had no case it's all a hoax it's a con job like Jeff he's a corrupt politician CBS to chip Reid says Democrats got a chance to lay out their case as Republicans fought off efforts to subpoena documents we will not permit the American people to hear from the witnesses and they lie and lie and lie and lie closing in on one AM house impeachment manager Jerry Nadler blasted the president's lawyers executive privilege as a shield not a sword it cannot be used to block a witness who is willing to testify it's embarrassing the president's counsel's would talk about this today the defense shot back the only one who should be embarrassed Mister Nadler is you for the way you've addressed this body that exchange drew a rare rebuke from Chief Justice John Roberts I do think those addressing the Senate should remember where they are the call for civility came after thirteen hours of debate president trump complete and total obstruction makes Richard Nixon look like a choirboy the president has done absolutely nothing wrong Democrats say it is crucial to hear from witnesses including former national security adviser John Bolton we are ready to call our witnesses the question is will you let us but the White House council says they had their chance they ask you to do something that they refused to do for themselves and then accuse you of a cover up when you don't do it in the end the Senate's Republican majority blocked all eleven democratic amendments to subpoena White House officials and other agencies for documents and the rules passed with two hand written concessions Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell made early on first that each sides opening arguments would be spread over three days instead of two and second the houses evidence would be automatically entered into

U. S. Senate Switzerland Mr Trump CBS President Trump Mister Nadler Chief Justice John Roberts Richard Nixon White House Council Mitch Mcconnell Jeff He Chip Reid Executive John Bolton White House
Facebook to remove deepfake videos in run-up to 2020 U.S. election

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

01:30 min | 7 months ago

Facebook to remove deepfake videos in run-up to 2020 U.S. election

"Ahead of this year's presidential election. FACEBOOK is facing pressure to do more to combat fake content on its platform now. It's promised to take down videos identified as so-called deep fakes marketplace's Nova Safa joins me now live with more on this new policy Nova. I want to better understand here. What is a deep fake video? What exactly is facebook banning? Yes so these are videos that use artificial intelligence and machine learning tools else to basically alter reality making people appear to say things they never actually set. So Barack Obama using Nick Senator for example Richard Nixon. Doing a comedy routine facebook says says the test is if the average viewer can't tell video as fake. It'll take it down so another type of deep fake. By the way is a this is a quote from facebook material that merges replaces or superimposes content onto a video. Making it appear to be authentic. So they'll take that stuff down to now. Despite pressure facebook has been hesitant tint when it comes to regulating its content change of direction here. Well it's a step in a direction that they've been pressured to take because they're defining finding deep fake videos quite narrowly. Here's videos that you simpler manipulation techniques aren't affected by this ban for example. There was a Nancy Pelosi video that went viral aware. Her words were slowed down a little bit and made her sound like she was drunk. At least that's what people were climbing. Well that was a simple manipulation and facebook says that can be fact checked and policy. She was actually saying what she said. So those videos aren't going to be banned

Facebook Nova Safa Barack Obama Richard Nixon Nancy Pelosi Senator
"richard nixon" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

05:18 min | 8 months ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Bush presidency I'm not sure you would have had the Obama Presidency so the impact. Each of those presidents had on the next election is immense following his resignation then there is the the slew of legislative reforms that came out in a way to try to restore the public's confidence in their elected officials and and You know to rebalance the power of the executive office. Do you think that The reforms put in place for the ones that we needed. Well you know the some of it worked some of did NABY ASLI Restricting campaign contributions worked for a while. Now that's gone with the Supreme Court decision. People in groups and corporations can donate endless amounts of money and had put more money into politics. So in that sense there's a failure It's not something you can correct with laws. I think it's something you can correct with. WHO's the person who's president? So what's a a biggest leadership lesson that you take from Nixon's presidency that the presidency is a sacred wintrust that it's not something. The person who is president owns or is entitled to that What needs to accompany that offices grit deal of humility? He listened to enough of those tapes and and what is important is the dog that doesn't Bark to my knowledge. No one ever says. What does the country need? What would being good it was always about? Nixon settling scores his political standing and future. How could be leveraged? I think we need to the presidency's not about the president. The presidency is about the the execution of the Constitution and laws within the defined framework in the interest of the people in the country. You never met Nixon. Do you wish that you had or do we try Carl Bernstein and I tried but we never got close and he was quite angry at our stories. And and that's you know that's under stand of bull team ever get. Do you ever get tired of of him. I'm studying him thinking about him. Having your own life story so intertwined turned with his. It's something Tired I'd because they're all there's always new material and tapes MM said new dimension to Nixon so the ultimate lesson is history is never over spirit of history. Never been over in the end this episode by asking current Washington Post executive editor Marty Baron for his reflections on how the legacy of the Nixon era. I still reverberates newsrooms. Today I hear all the time from people in the public who refer back to what the Washington posted in the era of Watergate and are calling upon us demanding that we do the same kind of work that we hold our politicians accountable and we dig beneath the surface and we keep digging and we'd be persistent. Those events actually inspired a whole new generation of journalists people of my age group To get into the field in the first place I think it also sharpened the definition of what are our core. Mission is certainly one of our most important core missions and that it is that we are supposed to hold powerful individuals and powerful institutions accountable in many things to this week's guests Mardi bearing and with enormous gratitude Bob Woodward original music for the podcast by listener and next week we will be discussing Nixon's vice president who took office upon his resignation Gerald Ford and finally just out of curiosity do any of you want another podcast when this one is over and thinking about whether we I should do one and if we do what it should be so if there's anything that you're dying to hear as kind of a season to I would love to hear your thoughts. Thanks you can email me at Lillian Dot Cunningham at wash post dot com or you can reach me on twitter and instagram accounts at presidential presidential underscore w. p.. Thanks for listening..

Nixon president Carl Bernstein Gerald Ford Obama Washington Bush vice president Supreme Court executive Lillian Dot Cunningham Washington Post Bob Woodward MM twitter Marty Baron executive editor instagram
"richard nixon" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

12:00 min | 8 months ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Willingness to lie the feeling that everyone's out to get him and to me. It starts to sound really similar actually relate to some of the descriptions of his predecessor President Johnson the most important part that is similar stories that both Johnson Nixon wanted to overpower people and everything control everything. So that's an example people of that for Nixon like an example even early in his presidency of that paranoia and his desire for control a it was Christmas nineteen. sixty-nine Nixon had been president almost a year. And he's going over to the staff offices in the executive Dave office building next to the White House and he he sees that lots of people have pictures of John F. Kennedy on their desk or more on the wall and A goes beserk and orders that Butterfield to get rid of these pictures and and replaced them with Nixon and I kinda thought maybe this was a bit of an exaggeration and then What what one of the things that happened? Butterfield wrote a memo to Nixon about how he got Nixon's pictures to replace the twenty two Kennedy Hindi pictures that he found in some cases where the president had personally signed it to them and in in the memo The heading is sanitation of the staff office sanitation. And if somehow getting rid of Kennedy pictures was cleansing operation credibly bazaar and Butterfield had worked working on this and get investigate. People try to you know they were worried about whether these people were loyal to Nixon and so forth and if if he could have relaxed in realized there was just a lot of goodwill even Democrats felt for him he couldn't find a way to leverage that goodwill to his advantage it was. We're GONNA get him and then when he was reelected in seventy you too you know he said No. We're really going to get people. It's going to be pay back time and this this is what's sad component of all of this was very little joy in being president Joy was actually kind of the heart of our Theodore Roosevelt episode. Someone who seemed to take a lot of joy in being president but yes in Theodore Theodore Roosevelt took a lot of joy in living Nixon did not his butterfield told me we went through dozens of vowers of interviews about his experience. And he'd never really told it before there are scenes on comes to mind where Butterfield is riding in the presidential helicopter with Nixon and the Verse Lady and Pat. Nixon says Oh Dick Doc. Let's go up to New York. Christmas is coming. We'll take the girls be a good time. We'll go to show and Nixon. Is there writing something out on his yellow legal pad just totally ignores and she keeps going. You Know Dick you know kinda nothing now in in Butterfield was just astounded and horrified. That there wouldn't be the kind kind of yes dear. Let's talk about it or we'll consider. It was just closed off his own wife now. Same time their documents in the Butterfield archive that show. Nixon knew how to play to people's Egos and there's dinner at Camp David that was recorded. You Find Nixon's able to talk to his cabinet in in in a very human almost humorous way and play on the rigo and but he would then drift back into the automatic pilot. Uh of anger mode it was that sense of isolation that sense of a personal crusade to do things to accomplish things at the end of the day. Six thirty at night Nixon would leave the Oval Office and walk over to his. Is Private yet another office in the executive office building. That was more casual and he be there would have dinner alone and and and writing things out on the yellow legal pad now. You're president of the United States. You'd think he'd want to go with his family Roy which he didn't WanNa do too often he can talk to anyone in the world right and you would think he would have some more curiosity about that. But he wanted to be alone in the end and Butterfield described and other people were for Nixon. Yes and going into that private office. He had an aide have his feet up and his jacket on. And it was just this sense of Chill out enjoy it and and look for for what good you can do for people now to his credit. Sometimes he did on some things but again. It was this tribe. Evan this paranoia in this score-settling attitude but the couple of redeeming Connie He did some things in foreign foreign policy though into China was significant knee. Leveraged it I would even say brilliantly the same moot relations with the Soviet Union he had some domestic pluses creation of the Environmental Protection Agency and so forth. So there were things in all of this illegal corrupting in ugly debris that that are quite positive and quite strong in quite human but That Pales Sir. So do you feel like you have a sense of why he wanted to be president why he wanted power in in the first place and he wanted to to be president in part to show people He resented deeply the eastern Ernest. stablishment the people and he talks about this on the tapes. The people who had all the people who had it handed to them he wanted to be a renowned leader also and he did not perceive or have a system or relationships with anyone who could Kinda tell him. Hey you know what's going on in this presidency. Let's see if it's running off the rails and finally off the cliff. You Is National Security Advisor in Kissinger you see the time and time again Kissinger kind of Fawning the sync offense to Nixon An and Kissinger was smarter than that and would try to steer things his way but he he would never overtly late to my knowledge challenge Nixon and say no way. Would we try to do here. There is a memo that butterfield. Butterfield gave me what I call Zilch memo on top secret document. Nixon wrote a handwritten note Kissinger about the bombing in Vietnam. AETNA and said we've done it for three years and achieved Zilch. It's been a failure doesn't make sense and then you look at the record. And at that point this is January of Nineteen seventy-two justice. Nixon is beginning to run for reelection. It is dropped three million tons of bombs in Southeast Asia. And he says it's accomplished nothing. It's been a failure doesn't doesn't make sense. Accomplished Zilch was stunned. When I read this and then you look and you see that in seventy two? He intensified the bombing and the tape. Show that it was in large part done. Because it showed how Tuffy Afi was in the polling showed the public wanted more bombing and toughness and he even though he knew it was not effective active. He still did it just for the look of it. Yeah and I'm in. That's it's an equivalent corruption to Watergate. And and that to me. When I saw last year was a stunner I thought you know how could you have lost your way that you would do that? And essentially killing thousands of people in Cambodia North Vietnam clouds to put down a political marker now presidents sentenced. Don't like to lose wars but realism needs to overtake that at some point and you need to say. Asu Commander in chief. What are we accomplishing in her? Her we killing people with purpose. But do you feel like has changed the most about Your understanding of Nixon. The more the record comes out the these butterfield documents in his stories stories and more tapes. They still haven't released all of the tapes. Believe it or not The story gets worse rather than better better. So maybe before we even get to Watergate in particular nineteen seventy one is the publication of the Pentagon papers. That's also the year he started at the Washington Post Straight. Could you describe and what the climate was like to be in journalism at that time and and already sort of what friction there was lies between the Nixon administration and the press it was substantial and you could feel it in the air head contempt for the press. Ask because they'd be. They seem to be after him. He also worried The people could find out who he really was. He was concealed legal person. At one point. He says In one of these tapes of the problem is we've been to open with the press and of course.

Johnson Nixon Butterfield Nixon administration president President Johnson Kissinger executive John F. Kennedy Dick Doc Joy Theodore Theodore Roosevelt Southeast Asia Washington AETNA Soviet Union Theodore Roosevelt White House Tuffy Afi
"richard nixon" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

02:49 min | 8 months ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Hi Can he do that listeners. I'm Alison Michael's my colleague. Lilian Cunningham created the presidential podcast back in two thousand sixteen to explore. We're in forty four episodes legacies and lies of each American president. And this week. We're sharing three of them. The stories of the three American presidents to to fees impeachment before President Trump episode. You're about to hear is about President Richard Nixon. He was the first and so far only person to to resign the presidency technically. He wasn't impeached but he left office. In nineteen seventy four when he realized he was about to be impeached for this episode. Louis interview journalist Bob Woodward yes the same Bob Woodward who helped break the Watergate story about Nixon's life his presidential traits. And what it was that led to his downfall downfall in office to hear more of episode than each of the American presidents checkout presidential on your favorite podcast platform or at washingtonpost dot com slash presidential the dental. Now here's the story of Richard Nixon the day he resigned he said I e called all of his aides and friends and family to the West Wing of the White House just before he left down the hill copter couple of hours before he actually left office through resignation and he he had his wife and daughters and son-in-law's there and it was a rambling talk about the grievances. He felt built. His mother wasn't treated right. His father was poor and then at one point he raised kind of with his hand. The and indicated. This is why I called you all here. And then he said always remember others may hate you But those who hate you don't win unless you hate them and then you destroy yourself. It was the heat that was the poison that destroyed him and his presidency and at that moment to his is credit he understood it. That's Bob Woodward one of the Washington Post reporters who uncovered the Watergate Scandal Dole that brought down Nixon's presidency and William Cunningham also with the Washington Post and this is the thirty sixth episode would've presidential.

President Richard Nixon Bob Woodward president Lilian Cunningham President Trump Alison Michael Washington Post White House William Cunningham Louis
Democratic debate: Candidates call Trump impeachment 'global Watergate'

NPR News Now

00:57 sec | 8 months ago

Democratic debate: Candidates call Trump impeachment 'global Watergate'

"Seven of the candidates running for the Democratic presidential nomination gathered in Los Angeles last night for the debate it was Co hosted by the PBS Newshour and Politico NPR's Jessica Taylor reports one of the first topics to come up was impeachment. All of the seven candidates on stage said they supported trump impeachment. Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar compared to Ukraine scandal that forced the rare constitutional. Move to the won intro former president Richard Nixon to resign Watergate. This is a global Watergate in the case of Watergate a paranoid president facing election but for dirt on a political opponents own. He did it by getting people to break in this president. Did it by calling a foreign leader to look for dirt on a political opponent. Kluber Char will be a juror in the Senate trial of whether or not to convict trump and remove him from office. She'll be joined by her fellow. Senators Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren who also debated Jessica Taylor. NPR KTAR news

President Trump Jessica Taylor Senator Amy Klobuchar Politico Bernie Sanders Richard Nixon Los Angeles Senate Minnesota Elizabeth Warren Ukraine
"richard nixon" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:50 min | 8 months ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Richard Nixon resigned before it could happen to him but by the end of this week it is likely to happen to president trump I'm doing that's where fox news the president tweeting that he does not deserve to be impeached because he did nothing wrong his latest tweet include some derogatory nicknames he calls the house speaker crazy Nancy says she is finding it harder to defend shifty shipped house intelligence committee chair Adam Schefter because Nancy's teeth were falling out of her mouth he says on fox news Sunday congressman Schiff focusing on the president's behavior that is likely to get impeached use of his office is abuse of his power to attempt to get an ally to help him cheat in the next election sacrificing our national security undermining the integrity of our elections the second charge obstructing Congress I think this may be the most serious of the articles because it was would fundamentally alter the balance of power and allow for much greater misconduct in the chief executive the country the rules committee meets Tuesday to lay the groundwork for the impeachment vote by the full house and that is expected on Wednesday or Thursday with the Senate trial expected after the first of the year fired FBI director Jim call me also on fox news Sunday discussing the inspector general's report on the start of the launch of the Russia probe PFT I was accused of treason of illegal spying of tapping Mr trump's wires illegally of opening up resting his without justification of being a criminal conspiracy to unseat defeat and then on see the president all of that was nonsense I think it's really important that the inspector general looked at that working people your viewers and all viewers understand that's true but he also found things.

Richard Nixon president Nancy Adam Schefter congressman Schiff chief executive Mr trump fox Senate FBI director Jim Russia
"richard nixon" Discussed on Not Guilty

Not Guilty

16:13 min | 9 months ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on Not Guilty

"After Cox's departure Nixon dispatched the FBI to the special prosecutor's offices where he ordered. They guard all the materials. The investigation had seized anyone remaining in the office. Working on the Watergate investigation. Kevin was told to take their personal belongings and leave from that point forward. FBI agents were charged with ensuring. No Watergate Watergate. Evidence left the building. The events of that evening were dubbed the Saturday night massacre and the public backlash rush was immediate and immense Nixon had previously been accused of meddling in the Watergate investigation but now the American people all were seeing his interference. Play out live on their televisions. Suddenly what once seemed like hearsay. Were now credible allegations allegations. A new word started circling the investigation impeachment coming up Nixon. Send deals with the fallout of the Saturday night massacre now back to the story in the fall of nineteen eighteen seventy three. US President Richard. Nixon adamantly refused to turn over recordings from the Oval Office. He even went so far as has to force the resignation of the top. Two members of the Justice Department after firing Special Prosecutor Archibald Cox Nixon felt melt the weight of the public backlash on October. Twenty third nineteen seventy-three while under immense pressure. He finally agreed to release some of the Oval Office tapes. And when Acting Attorney General Robert Bork appointed a new special prosecutor. Leon Jawara Ski. Why Nixon didn't intervene no matter what barriers Nixon put in their way? It was clear now that the investigation was going to continue. As planned on Saturday November Seventeenth Nineteen seventy-three Nixon spoke at the Associated Press US Managing Editors Convention and addressed the Watergate affair. I have never obstructed justice and I think too that I could say that in my years of public life that I welcome this kind of examination because people have gotta know whether or not their president's Crook. Well I'm not a Crook Nixon. Nixon insisted that the White House tapes would prove he wasn't a crook and that he did not know about the Watergate break in before it happened. He also claimed he never offered executive clemency for any of the burglars. He emphasized that he didn't learn. Until March twenty first nineteen seventy-three that cover up was underway four days after Nixon's address it was announced that one of the white eight house tapes had an eighteen and a half minute gap. This gap occurred during a conversation between chief of staff. Bob Haldeman and and President Nixon three days after the June nineteen seventy-two break in Nixon claimed he didn't know what was talked about during these missing being minutes but it was clear that it occurred right as the conversation turned to Watergate Rosemary. Woods the President Secretary. We took the blame for the missing audio. She said she was transcribing. The tape when she answered a phone call she thought she hit the stop. Button on the tape tape-recorder but instead must have pushed record when she answered the phone she had kept her foot on the pedal that controlled the playback. This action allowed allowed the tape to be recorded over however because she believed the phone call was only five minutes long. Rosemary couldn't account for the additional thirteen and a half minutes of missing content and when investigators asked Rosemary Woods to reenact the accidental erasure. She physically couldn't every time woods reach to answer the phone. Her foot lifted from the pedal and the machine stopped. The evidence of wrongdoing on the part of the president was building and the public's calls for impeachment grew in response the House of Representatives authorized the House Judiciary Committee to begin their own investigation in February of nineteen seventy I four while the Senate Select Committee looked at policy changes and the Justice Department looked at criminal charges. The thirty eight member House Committee Committee was tasked with investigating potential impeachment. They would spend the next several months determining if there were any grounds to bring charges urges against the president. If they did it would only be the second time in. US history that president was impeached. Meanwhile Special Prosecutor Leon Joie warshafsky obtained seven new indictments from the Watergate. Grand Jury on March first. I nineteen seventy four among those charged. Were campaign director. John Mitchell chief of Staff Bob. Haldeman and aide John Ehrlichman Richard. Nixon wasn't indicted though the grand jury named him a CO conspirator with a trial looming. Leon Gorski needed those White House tapes. If they contained the conversations John Dean claimed they had the evidence necessary to convict frustrated that the president was not cooperating. Jure ski issued a fresh subpoena for sixty four more tapes. In April of Nineteen seventy-four seventy four Nixon's first. Instinct was to continue refusing to comply but his advisers urged him to fall in line. As has it was he'd already been suspected of obstructing justice if it appeared that he was stonewalling the president would risk losing the support in Congress. He was relying on to avoid impeachment. So on April Twenty Ninth Nineteen Seventy Four. Nixon agreed to a compromise. He would release edited transcripts of forty three conversations. The resulting transcript was more than twelve bove thousand pages and it revealed what Nixon claimed all along. He didn't know about the Watergate. Cover up until March nineteen seventy the three and he had no part in it. But these transcripts weren't good enough for your ski so he continued to pursue the subpoena in court. The House Judiciary Committee also rejected the transcripts and issued their own subpoena in May in response..

Archibald Cox Nixon president prosecutor Watergate Rosemary Woods House Judiciary Committee Watergate Rosemary White House US House Committee Committee Oval Office Bob Haldeman FBI Justice Department Leon Jawara Ski chief of staff Kevin Robert Bork John Dean Associated Press
"richard nixon" Discussed on Not Guilty

Not Guilty

12:57 min | 9 months ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on Not Guilty

"The Senate Select Committee investigating the Watergate scandal. Oh was determined to uncover how high up the chain. The cover up went did heard several testimonies that inch closer and closer to the truth but the next witness former White House counsel John Dean would lead them straight to the Oval Office on Monday. June twenty-fifth Nineteen seventy-three dean sat down at the table facing the committee alone. This was a market change from the previous witnesses. Who had their attorneys next to them? Dean was sending a message. He was going to tell the whole truth regardless of the consequences. Dances Dean told the committee that he didn't believe Nixon fully understood Watergate or the cover up before he went any further. He wanted on the record that he believed. Nixon should be forgiven for whatever role. He may have played but rather than taking questions from Senators Dean announced that he was going to read a two hundred forty five page prepared statement outlining the Watergate break in the documents started with those early meetings with g Gordon Liddy and continued to the day that Dean was forced to resign as White House counsel in Dean Statement which took an entire day to read. He admitted he was present for the initial meetings. Jeb Magruder described but at the time Dean told Liddy he wanted nothing nothing to do with his outlandish gemstones scheme and if the campaign went through with it he didn't want to know so when the plan to break into the Watergate or gate building was discussed deem simply wasn't there. He heard nothing about the matter until the break in actually happened. Dean testified that.

John Dean Senate Select Committee Watergate Nixon Gordon Liddy White House Jeb Magruder Oval Office twenty-fifth
"richard nixon" Discussed on Not Guilty

Not Guilty

14:57 min | 9 months ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on Not Guilty

"Wherever you're listening? It really does help last week. We examined the investigation investigation of the nineteen seventy-two Watergate break in and the subsequent trial of the men caught in the act however the case wasn't closed after those proceedings defendant James mccord revealed that there were more people involved in the break in than those put on trial this week will explore floor the subsequent investigation which tried to answer the famous question. What did the president know? And when did he know it and finally finally. We'll look at the outcome that sealed. Richard Nixon's legacy as possibly the most complicated. US President in American history..

James mccord Richard Nixon president President US
"richard nixon" Discussed on Not Guilty

Not Guilty

01:58 min | 9 months ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on Not Guilty

"The Committee of Seven Senators and seven lawyers were charged with the formidable task of investigating the nineteen seventy two presidential presidential election for signs of wrongdoing. This included the break in the Democratic National Headquarters in the Watergate office complex a scandal so notorious that it had simply become known as Watergate households across America tuned in to watch the testimony live. You've aired start to finish by the public broadcasting service at the beginning of the Senate committee hearings nineteen percent of Americans thought Richard Nixon accent should be removed from office by the end. The number would increase to fifty seven percent. seventy-seven-year-old roll democratic. Senator Sam Ervin put on his reading glasses and opened the proceedings with a statement in an even tone. He told the packed. Act Room that the hearings were beginning in an atmosphere of the utmost gravity and that weight was felt by the many onlookers. The Large Hall was nearly silent as the first witness took his seat. The Senate Caucus Room had hosted other historical investigations like like the Teapot Dome Scandal. And the attack on Pearl Harbor it was a fitting backdrop for a hearing that would help end a presidency. How should we determine a person's guilt do we? Defer the evidence discovered by police or the verdict reached by jury. And what happens when the evidence and the verdict. Don't line up. Hi I'm Vanessa. Richardson and this is not guilty. Apar- cast original each week. We look at complicated criminal cases that test the limits of innocent and.

Senator Sam Ervin Democratic National Headquarte Senate Caucus Room Committee of Seven Senate committee America Pearl Harbor Richard Nixon Apar Large Hall Richardson fifty seven percent seventy-seven-year nineteen percent
"richard nixon" Discussed on Not Guilty

Not Guilty

14:55 min | 9 months ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on Not Guilty

"On June twenty-fifth the former FBI agent found himself on the other side of the interrogation table from agent Angelo Landau. Leno asked Baldwin. What he was doing in the Howard Johnson hotel he expected Baldwin Wind? Dodge the question but he didn't Baldwin much to lanos surprise was willing to spill everything he knew. He told Leno that the June break in at the Watergate wasn't the first he was also there in May to act as a lookout while bugs were planted in the Democratic National Channel Headquarters Baldwin lived at the hotel for the next few weeks to monitor the wires. His orders were to transcribe anything that came through through but the mission was a failure. One of the bugs didn't work correctly. And the other only picked up mundane things like Chit Chat and the the scheduling of hair appointments. What Baldwin and the men were looking for was financial information? They wanted to know where the Democratic National Committee obtained funding if there were any special interest groups or foreign countries financing the DNC's campaign efforts. It would be a major scandal handle and a leak to the press could secure the election for Republican incumbent Richard Nixon Baldwin told Landau that the second breaking again on June seventeenth was orchestrated to fix the original transmission device. Plant new ones and take photographs of financial financial documents. And the man who supervised the job was named Howard Hunt on the night of the break in Baldwin sought three men pull up to the Watergate complex. He didn't think much of it until the sixth floor. Lights flickered on the men dressed in street clothes walked down the hallway and two of them went out on the terrace using his walkie talkie Baldwin called hunt. He asked if there people were dressed casually or in suits hunt replied suits Baldwin radioed back back. Then we've got a problem. The three men were of course the plain clothes metro police officers before Baldwin knew what was happening hunt ran into the hotel room where he kept watch. He told Baldwin to wipe the place down to get rid of fingerprints and take all the electronics chronics to James mccord's house. He advised Baldwin to get out of town agent. Leno considered Baldwin story for a moment. He was confident. Baldwin was telling the truth but he was also pretty sure that Howard Hunt couldn't be the real mastermind behind the break-in so so leno kept pushing. He asked Baldwin if he knew anyone else. Orchestrating behind the scenes Baldwin knew that another man worked with Howard Hunt George something. He only met him once. Leno pulled out a picture and slid it across the table. Was the man in the photo. George Baldwin knew immediately. Yes it was George Gordon Liddy and employees of the committee ready to reelect the president special agent in charge Kunkle was right. The investigation didn't point at the CIA. It led to the committee to re elect the president this immediately caused a roadblock. FBI policy dictated that agents needed permission to interview anyone connected to the White House. Unfortunately disapproval could take days and would slow the investigation to a crawl. Not only that the White House would insist that one of the administration's lawyers sit in on all interviews with staff agent Leno. Oh New people wouldn't speak freely with their employers attorney in the room but this didn't keep agent Leno and his colleagues from from making progress on the investigation on Thursday June twenty second the money trail heated up the secret service had finally Lee traced the brand new hundred dollar bills found with the burglars. The cash went into circulation at a bank in Miami. The same bank where cuban-born been born burglar Bernard Barker was a client when the agents pulled Barker's records they found that checks from the CRP had been deposited it'd into his account days after the deposits Barker withdrew thousands of dollars this was a jackpot for the FBI. I agent Angelo. Llano stayed in the office late that night to type up his daily report he outlined the excellent work the team had done following the money trail real and wrote that they were going to continue down this path and they wouldn't stop until they uncovered who in the White House had funded the Watergate break in. They were getting closer lanos sent the report to FBI. Deputy Director Mark Felt and acting being director Patrick Gray. unbeknownst to Leno Gray then sent the report to the White House. Every step of the operation was being monitored by the very people the FBI was investigating and they were growing anxious. Leno's report was correct the the FBI was getting uncomfortably. Close to the truth. Something had to be done and quickly Nixon's top the aide John Ehrlichman and his chief of Staff Bob Haldeman knew who to call they summoned. CIA Director Richard Helms and deputy director Vernon Walters to the White House for a meeting. Ehrlichman and Haldeman explained to the CIA directors that because the the men arrested at Watergate had links to the CIA further inquiries into the case would divulge matters of national security. They stressed I the FBI had more than enough evidence against the five burglars and the two masterminds Howard Hunt and George Gordon Liddy the investigation needed to stop with those seven men or risk broaching a security issue Haldeman ordered the CIA director's to tell the FBI why to back off but director Helms known for his uncanny ability to conceal emotion flew into a rage the White House would not manipulate him. The Watergate break-in had nothing to do with the CIA and he knew wit he refused to undermine the agency's reputation by lying to the FBI. And though Helms didn't say it to Haldeman and Ehrlichman he had already spoken to. FBI Director. Patrick Gray the morning of the burglary Helms not only told gray that the CIA wasn't involved. He urged him to look at the link between James mccord. Howard Hunt and the advisors to the president? He'd already gone around the White House entirely with Helms refusing to play ball. CIA Deputy Director. Walters decided to bite the bullet bullet he agreed to step in and call. FBI Director Gray agent Angelo Leno and his colleagues colleagues leashes were suddenly pulled by the FBI director. It seemed every move they made was met with a directive to stop or a to wait. Leno grew frustrated. And he wasn't the only one Earl Silbert the federal prosecutor assigned to oversee the grand jury. We went to Llano to ask what was holding up the case. Why wasn't the investigation moving forward but Lando could only say would Patrick Gray told him the CIA claimed national security was at risk Silbert joined Llano and other agents in pushing back against the restrictions and and eventually Patrick Gray relented the investigation was going forward whether the CIA liked it or not? When Gray called Deputy Director Walters to let him know walters admitted he didn't see any connection between Watergate and the CIA and because because of this he wouldn't stand in the FBI's way any longer? The investigation was back on track. Coming up the F. B. I. Probe Heats up now back to the story after a break.

"richard nixon" Discussed on Not Guilty

Not Guilty

02:07 min | 9 months ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on Not Guilty

"June seventeenth nineteen seventy two thirty three year old. FBI Agent Angelo. Leno was was getting his boys ready for their morning baseball practice when his phone rang. It was fellow agent. Ernie beltre their boss wanted Landau to head. Over to the DC Metro Police Department. Five men had been caught red handed burglarizing an office office at two thirty that morning. They refuse to talk to the arresting officers while Leno was technically on call that weekend. He usually worked counterintelligence. A burglary didn't really fall into his purview. He told belter to call in the criminal agent on duty. Instead he had plans plans with his kids Landau hung up and turned his attention back to his family. But hardly a minute past before the phone rang again this time time. It was his boss Special Agent in charge Robert Kunkle and Congo insisted Landau go down to the police station as Llano pulled out of his driveway. He had no way of knowing what was ahead of him. This was no ordinary burglary. No he was about to uncover the biggest American political scandal of the twentieth century. How should we determine.

"richard nixon" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on Why Is This Happening? with Chris Hayes

"On the podcast for awhile. When I am not alone because we take emails at the with pot gmaiLcom. The inbox faithfully maintained by one Tiffany champion. And we have been getting lots of requests to talk to Rachel meadow. Because every wants to Dr chromato- here angel motto and watch Rachel motto and be around Rachel motto and bask in the reflected light of ritual motto because she's such a incredible person and incredible storyteller. And so we have this amazing occasion to do it. Because Rachel has his fantastic new podcast out. You may have heard of that as well. It's called bagman. And it tells the story of the scandal around and subsequent downfall of Spiro Agnew. Who was the vice president for Richard Nixon? And what's great about this podcast is it's a it's a serialized podcast new episodes out every two. Tuesday, telling the story that at one level just in the public record of they have broken new ground and discovered new things that have never previously been reported. But it's also one of these. It's a crazy story in American history that because it happened essentially imperil with Watergate was wildly overshadowed. Both in the coverage at the time in the history book because everyone looks back, and it's like Watergate Watergate Watergate like all right? The vice president was also preposterously corrupt and criminal and because Richard Nixon was posthumously corrupt and criminal you spend less time thinking about the ways in which beer Agnew preposterously corrupt and criminal. Although as you will learn in the podcast bagman. The ways in which he was criminal and particularly the ways in which he attempted to subvert the Justice department investigation to himself bear, some really really strong historical parallels to what we might be seeing unfold before is today in the air of Donald Trump. So I got to sit down with Rachel and talk about a bunch of stuff talk about bagman talk about the. Ways in which there is a historical resonance between what Spiro Agnew was up to back then in his own criminal enterprise in his attempts to obstruct Justice and covering the scandals. We see unfolding today in the Trump administration. And then we kind of out a bit about. Our relationship and friendship, which goes back years and years and years, she's been at your friend and also a mentor and someone I look up to and someone I've learned so much from we kind of cover all of that in this conversation. There is no like, you know, new mind-blowing piece of data for me to introduce to you. It's just me and Rachel maddow's talking about Spiro Agnew scandal and covering the news. Enjoy..

Spiro Agnew Rachel Rachel maddow Rachel meadow vice president Richard Nixon Watergate bagman Donald Trump Justice department Dr chromato
William Friedkin: 'The Exorcist'

It Happened In Hollywood

04:05 min | 2 years ago

William Friedkin: 'The Exorcist'

"Hi, I'm Seth Abramovitch senior writer at the Hollywood reporter. And I'd like to welcome you to it happened in Hollywood. It's a new podcast. I'll be hosting with the help of my good friend. Chip pope. Hi there. That's me. I'm chip I'm a TV writer and a pop culture enthusiasts in each episode. We're going to be taking a journey backwards and time and revisiting some of the wildest chapters in Hollywood history iconic films zeitgeist TV shows infamous lawbreakers and just the random weirdness that color the place. We call LA La Land. Yes. And we think that you'll find in Hollywood the more things change the more. They stay the same. And that's what this show is about on each episode. We're going to be going to a key figure in whatever topic recovering and interviewing them. And then after the fact Seth, and I will comment on those prerecorded interviews, so let's get right to it. Welcome to the first episode of Hollywood. All right. Let's do some scene setting its December nineteen seventy three Richard Nixon one month before told a room full of reporters in Orlando, Florida. I am not a crook. Well, I'm not a crook. And in movie theaters. Cross the nation. Robert Redford, Paul Newman were playing crooks in a blockbuster hit called the sting. Then this thirty eight year old wonder canned Billy freed Ken comes along riding high. Having just won the Oscar for the French connection in seventy two. I love that. He's thirty eight year old wonderboy because the industry in nineteen seventy three's run by nine year olds he's young blood at thirty eight. He is he's whippersnapper and -ticipant for his chosen follow picture to French connection is at a fever pitch. His choice was the exercise. I now this was a big budget adaptation of smash hit novel about a little girl who gets possessed by the devil. The film was plagued by infighting delays. It went way over budget. He acted kind of crazy firing people left. And right people thought there was a curse on it yet. There was supposedly occurs. And there was all kinds of reports that this thing is going to be disaster. But when it finally came out, it became the all-time record breaking movie from Warner Brothers at the box office and went on to become one of the most admired and imitated horror films of all time. It's interesting that you should mention the sting because that was just like nostalgic entertainment that took place in the thirties. Whereas the exorcist was very edgy movie. Very hard are a hard arm and pretty much almost an ex. I mean, this is like a cold bucket. A holy water in the face of a pew Besson. Girl. I mean, even the Hollywood reporter this very publications seemed genuinely shocked by it in its review, they called it, quote, an abomination, and quote, and they call it the wretched excess of the year, but at the same time, they also suggested that it may be the most frightening movie ever made and forty five years later, it's still pretty much lays claim to that title of scariest movie ever made this week's special guest. We have the man responsible for making it. That's right director, William freakin. What throw the talk to this guy? He was great. He was absolutely wonderful. I didn't know what to expect. I thought he might be lawf- the wall get some of the films. He's made forget his age eighty two. I didn't know what we were going to get. But he was such a nice guy was just a thrill to sit at the feet of a master filmmaker.

Hollywood KEN Seth Abramovitch Chip Pope Writer Reporter La La Land Warner Brothers Richard Nixon Robert Redford Oscar Florida Fever Orlando Paul Newman Billy William Freakin Director
"richard nixon" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"It was issued under. Seal, there are a lot of there's a lot of speculation. About how this could be addressed from. A legal standpoint and what, sort of jeopardy this puts the president, in when you think about previous kind of political and legal crises that come out of the White House mainly with with Bill Clinton. And Richard Nixon we had these two threads these two narratives one being political one being legal and They were deniable from the president's standpoint in both counts until they touched really and in every case they touch with Nixon and Watergate with. Clinton and Lewinsky and whitewater, and this was, the week that, they touched with, Trump So you want to talk about the legal situation that faces the president right. Now whether his. Legal team is kind of up to the challenge there's not a really a lot of sense of confidence right now in his current legal team with Giuliani, kind of sense that he has not been well well suited him they're also political considerations to be made in the. Impact of this has on the mid-term as you as you raise this and whether this. Changes the conversation particularly the ones that Democrats are having The house in house races but also. Senate races. And I want to talk about the difference between, the, way that say Chuck Schumer in the. Senate might have. Some of his candidates in the Senate who are facing tough reactions in Trump country, might be a little shy to dive into issues of impeachment, versus say Nancy Pelosi how she's going to direct her troops in a house where this is going to play probably a lot better in blue parts of. The country Matthew. Phillips what a week thanks so much for wrapping it up for us thanks guys you're listening to.

president White House Senate Bill Clinton Trump Richard Nixon Giuliani Chuck Schumer Nancy Pelosi Phillips Lewinsky whitewater
"richard nixon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Professional experts these are nonpartisan merit jobs who rise up through the system so that was in the nineteenth century but wasn't there an overhaul much later around the time of richard nixon richard nixon in particular was very wary of civil servants he thought they were out to get him he was paranoid about the subject and internally inside his white house created an instruction manual which was a list of of techniques they call them ways to try to marginalize civil servants one of the things was to monitor people give them grades on the basis of whether they seemed loyal to nixon and they also came up with methods something they called the the new activity technique by which they meant you create a new activity that looks meaningful but is in fact meaningless and then you can assign hundreds or more staffers to that and basically sideline him take him out of commission and that was one of the things they did and when that came to light as a result of watergate congress passed a new round of laws that were really intended to try to protect civil servants and really truly protect the tax payers interest so that you didn't have president's pushing large numbers of government employees into meaningless work he spent months talking to civil servants it's not usually the considered the sexiest kind of politically wedding in washington but nevertheless what are the ramifications of so many open jobs and so many dissatisfied civil servants in one bureaucracy after another in dc well that's the thing that i found really fascinating about this look you know civil service is the kind of thing that operates below the radar screen it definitely doesn't make much traction on twitter every day but that's where the real meat of government goes on that's those are the people who are preparing to deal in complex negotiations with foreign countries these are the people who are deciding what kind of information gets out to the public and what is ultimately sideline what sort of debate they have all kinds of issues and what's become clear when you talk to enough people is there's tremendous pressure right now on civil servants ever since the trump administration took office pressure on them to do things that in many cases they feel is inappropriate that's designed.

president washington richard nixon richard nixon twitter
"richard nixon" Discussed on The How-To Heretic

The How-To Heretic

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on The How-To Heretic

"Where richard nixon is from so that's gratulations is the is the patron saint of those killed in accidental catapult discharges and and anyone who has ever self described as a greengrocer then and then to announce so thank you so much amber good luck with done and then i'm going to announce that we were we were so shocked here in mormon country by the lds church breaking up with the boy scouts which was as much as sacramento as as tap water in wonder brad when kids so i asked twitter to come up with the best name for the new the new boy scouts the mormons themselves would charter yes the mormons are making their own boy scouts and they don't need anybody for help and shut up and we're taking our ball and going home no gazer girls are nothing right so so i would like to announce the winner of that is is our friend on twitter at little lowy who was was the first of many people to come up with what the three of us together judge was the funniest one which was the new scouting for the church of jesus christ latterday saints will be called the brigham young so congratulations to to lil lowy little lowy on twitter i will i will give you your conditional one week use of saint oh good that is that is saint licketysplit of of era mathea of course this is an older saint original and look at split is the saint of floppy disks and wondering where where it all went at at the end of the day right so congratulations to all of our newly sainted people we've really really grateful for your support yeah use them well and wisely as you go forth in in your in your travels and one more one more person you you have written a heaven for one mr tucker or ms tucker or a person named tucker so tucker tucker became our heaven level patron right after we went on hiatus for a week so tucker you've waited for this for a little while and i think you're going to find it was not worth the wait so.

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"richard nixon" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"You is an ironic chant it only came when the poets were getting destroyed and the game was out of reach the joke was that richard nixon sucked at football but one thing you was small physically he was five nine hundred forty five pounds then shoulder and he just doesn't look like a football player and he was to make matters worse nixon was an offensive lineman a position in which being scrawny is a serious limitation because in order to be good at it if to intimidate and physically overpower your ponant nixon was also a klutz he drop things he was completely closeted he was so uncoordinated literally according to be fell down nixon was useful to the team during practice but mostly the tackle dummy for the other players richard nixon was the worst possible football player imagine the years nixon spent warming the bench for the whittier poets had a profound effect on his life one big reason for this was his coach a man named wallace newman who's known to his players as simply chief my coaches in american indian chief newman he was a perfectly remarkable man and a great leader and i learned a lot sitting by the coach and the bench learned about football learned about life more than anything nixon did or didn't do on the field it was his relationship with chief that ensured that football would leave a lasting mark on him there's no such thing as a good loser only a loser chief would tell nixon also you must never be satisfied with losing you must get angry terribly angry about losing richard nixon took those words to heart and chief kim respect nixon stubborn resilience in the face of inevitable failure coach liked having him around because he had he had guts grit nixon once said the chief drilled into him a competitive spirit and deter.

richard nixon football wallace newman whittier kim respect five nine hundred forty five p
"richard nixon" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

03:06 min | 2 years ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"David roaming there is a theory that great men have large heads and prominent features think of charles de gaulle and his nose lbj and his years fdr and his jaw and by this standard if no other richard nixon had reached greatness his head was enormous is jowls and ski jump knows were just as cartoonists had always portrayed them is 'yes dark and penetrating most striking of all was his voice a deep rumbling bosso prefer n'dow rather like an avalanche in the distance metz from an essay that michael quarter wrote for the new yorker in 1994 korda was among other accomplishments in positions for many years the editor in chief of simon schuster and richard nixon was one of his celebrity authors court is relationship with nixon was productive if not exactly warm nixon didn't tend to like media types understandably where people he considered intellectuals but a 1989 quarter was invited to a dinner in saddle river new jersey where the president and mrs nixon live most of the years after their exile from washington that's the night that quarter recounts in his essay nixon mine host here's dillon baker reading for michael court story with gregg stir as richard nixon within a mile or so of a new jersey commercial strip full of many malls and service stations nixon's house was tucked away as secretly as shangri law behind the high dense growths of trees and hedges it was impossible for any casual intruder defined rather like any number of coal to saxon belair but without palm trees nixon staff had presented me with careful instructions on how to reach the house but it seemed a little puzzled that i was driving myself they're puzzlement became clear as i pulled up before the entrance a row of limousines to one side made it evident that nixon's gas tended to be driven by chauffeurs i had driven my silver porsche the courtyard was a black top space big enough for a goodsized motel the security people at the door seemed uncertain what to make of the car though weather because it was frivolous or foreign i wasn't sure inside i found most of my fellow guess milling about in the entrance hall looking suitably solemn i recognize robert atp lanao a large jovial looking man who had been in the limelight as a nixon backer and personal friend during watergate there.

michael quarter goodsized saxon belair gregg michael court dillon baker nixon mrs nixon president editor in chief David fdr charles de gaulle washington saddle river simon schuster richard nixon lbj
"richard nixon" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"richard nixon" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"The the richard nixon i emphatically enthusiastically used the take down the antiwar movement the the hippies and and and they tried to use heroin to take down the civil rights movement and at the same time that some would argue that heroin was being promoted in our inner cities by by a republican policies may be not heroin certainly cocaine were you know of a ollie north and richard nixon and all these guys you know bringing excuse me a ronald reagan uh you know bringing bringing coq back when they take the weapons down to the contras and all that kind of thing but i you know there's there's not a specific you know law that i know of that could be widely used outside of the conspiracy laws the thing that the thing that concerns me the most in the united states right now are are the laws on conspiracy if you an eye joe uh had a conversation in which i said to you hey joe uh you know it's illegal across the street uh against the light or in the middle of the street it's called jaywalking um but let's do it let's plan on getting together thursday and jaywalking and you said okay cool will do that let's we'll do a red the middle fourteen street um there in washington dc even if we never did it that is that discussion is conspiracy to commit a misdemeanour conspiracy to commit a misdemeanor is a felony so having that conversation could land both of us in prison for a fairly long period of time um it's perhaps the most extreme example i can give but the conspiracy laws in this country are and the money laundering laws also which which have been expanded now to include if few profited from a criminal activity and in some cases even if you didn't know is a criminal activity you are guilty of money laundering so you know there are there are a couple of of laws that are in my opinion used uh more aggressive than they were designed to be or should be by answering your question joe yeah yeah okay i would just wanted to tell you i also rigged up book you were talking about earlier in the.

richard nixon heroin cocaine united states money laundering civil rights ronald reagan joe washington