19 Burst results for "Richard Matheson"

"richard matheson" Discussed on The Twilight Zone Podcast

The Twilight Zone Podcast

07:32 min | 10 months ago

"richard matheson" Discussed on The Twilight Zone Podcast

"Editor full-time a you know like a film editor. We have someone running up physical production of our studio over physical studio et cetera. So i was able to keep all of our people on salary and I've raised over. I've raised over two and a half million dollars from space command. Since i've started being spacecom entirely my fans via kickstarter campaigns and seven investment shares of seventy five hundred bucks each and so so but the interesting thing was i realized that because everyone will stuck a moment going crazy gnarly because so many of my actors are so well known and so busy of. They're not available. It's very difficult to give them all together at one time but they were all sitting at home. You know just climbing walls because all the studios everything at shut down so i had. I came up with idea where elaine wrote a bonus to our episode space command that are actors pitching in their own homes with their own cameras so they could save but We shot the first three hours in space. Command recorded an audio prequel. But i but i had already worked out most of the for season. And i knew where all all this was going. And they're a bunch of characters. I hadn't yet introduced i. We would be so armee. Shimin christina moses in so many. Jj hurts so many actors that which is waiting and wings and now they were home so by by doing this. Two hour episode allowed me to introduce a lot of people like barbara bain. Space nineteen ninety nine is in spacemen. Now emeals grass tyson. It's an of riches. So why are episode and Our entire visual effects bag of tricks. For instance wait a scene between one of our characters who's based in atlanta. An actress meghan a castle access to play his daughter and she was in scotch one and we managed to put them together in the same living room. Even though they both starred in their own homes and were never actually politically together and so a very very fun and And then in the meantime i finished a new book called lighting yourself which is basically how people don't have to rely on the studios or the networks even the publishing houses to make their dreams come true how the internet and having video cameras in our pockets and all of that allows everyone to sort of as i say light yourself so i just finished that book and sent it off my publisher and yeah we. We didn't slowdown during the pendency. Ramped up and we're busier than ever. It's elaine. And i just celebrated our forty fourth anniversary and we write direct produce together. And it's it's a dream come true. So i'm i have no complaints and our people are all very very well healthy. Sadly mira furlan. Who was one of our test in space men who i worked with on babylon five passed away from west nile virus all things not covert and that was really a great loss and she was amazing actress in your soul. And i'm glad that we got to have her in space command as much as we did because she was kim come true. I watched some of that before online. Some of that two hour special and that there are some names in and michelle nichols was in there. Yes yes i mean. It's insane the cast. You've assembled in pristina. Moses who's on a million little things on abc currently and she plays sues daughter in the star trek episode. i did with decay. And that was her first tv role ever and she's just phenomenal and she'll be continuing in space man and also in in magic time another one of my projects and So yeah yeah. And but the now we're ramping up to do the show runners network where i'm creating six series with the creators of Farscape and the expanse and defiance and on and on. And i'm ansa doing six shows including a rod sterling series really. It's an amazing time. Yeah yes we can we can talk about. All of these. Various things is that. Is that news out there. Mark of of i got a bit of an exclusive. Can we talk about that. Why negotiations with the states. What's not lockdown. But ninety i came up with a wild. Oh which was. It's called rod sterling sampler twilight and Basically rod as you. I'm sure you know dictated all of his. Everything's script sledders folks. Everything he lounge by his swimming pool in the backyard in the morning and he'd have a little recorder any would dictate everything into the recorder. Secretary would type it up. And he'd make him directions and it was up at all of these according were lost for decades and they just discovered a thousand hours of them. In a couple of archives podge archives and so my idea was to create a new show that would be narrated by rod sterling from that material plus is a number scripts that either never got made with throwing road or or written during the live. Tv era the no one has seen since then and this would be primarily fantasy science fiction horror at plus media scripts from the others violates on writers that were not made and scripts by a new generation of writers. You know people. Like neil gaiman jemison again. We haven't we haven't earned that. But that's my idea and joe dougherty who was executive producer. I'm pretty little liars and won an emmy for thirty. something is aboard on that project with me. So he's an old friend and so i've been in communication with the ruling stayed and with their representatives. And we'll see if we can make that happen but it's definitely project i want to do and So we'll see but that's right now. It's on the list. The thing is you know this. The jordan peele twilight zone came out. And i and i really enjoyed it. But it was quite divisive with fans i think. Sometimes people find it hard to accept a new twilight zone. Dante without rod serling is also difficult because rod. Sterling really was irreplaceable. There's only one of him. And and then the writing staff he got he got three of ray. Bradbury's proteges sign. Henry were friends and ray recommended charles. Beaumont richard matheson and george clayton. Johnson also came aboard to and they became the core of that amazing writing team. That created twilights. Earl ham also came aboard. He played on the waltons falcon crest but he was a very different kind of writer. He was much more rural and was matheson. Beaumont george clayton johnson which is tackler a science fiction fantasy writers and And so they just. I mean it was just a match made in heaven and so you know. I won't script for the twilight zone. Will they brought it back in the eighties. That was an amazing writing. Staff was harlan ellison allen george martin michael tacit and so forth astray strong writing staff but very hidden this you know and the scripted i wrote. We will week away from web. Doug hayes was directed. He direct is beholden howling man many great episodes and and sensors pull the plug on it because they felt it was too hard. Edged is called nine avail. So that's one of the strips. We're going to be shooting on if rod sterling after twilight Another ost by lights on script. That i'm i'm very proud of tv sack off. Wanted to do it a few years ago and so we'll see what we what we do with it. But it'll be fun. It'll be very fun. It sounds amazing. Because i think it will probably be a lot more palatable for those people who just can't accept a modern twilight zone. This is kind of somewhere in between isn't it. You know it's it's still got.

Shimin christina barbara bain rod sterling elaine mira furlan michelle nichols meghan pristina neil gaiman jemison joe dougherty atlanta Moses kim abc Beaumont richard matheson george clayton Earl ham Beaumont george clayton johnso swimming
"richard matheson" Discussed on Hysteria 51

Hysteria 51

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"richard matheson" Discussed on Hysteria 51

"Think this was the pinnacle for him done. It was also is. This is really cool. It was written by richard matheson. Oh really if. You're not familiar with richard matheson. He wrote the book. I am legend a great book. He wrote the only good version of iowa as the different. They know everyone looks was. That's a great story. I'm going to change a completely and just keep the name i am. Legend is similar to world war z. And at the movies not bad it just has nothing to do with the bright right other than you know there's little bitty tropes it is a heady mass i am. Legends movie is closer to the book than world war z. But not much closer. The thing about i am legend in. You've had forty almost fifty years to so i don't think i'm telling any till's at school too much as you have your whole outlook on this guy. He's he's killing the monsters and he's and all of this is happening. And then you get to the end of the book you realize. He's the bad guy. He's the monster he just didn't realize it and it's this whole. Oh my god blows your mind. And they've never done that worthy shit. I see dead people matt. I mean that's the closest to that kind of reversal right. Lay you believe something you believe. Something the whole time and it's actually the exact opposite. It was a little bit you know. The payoff was very different. But yeah i. I agree with that. mathison also by the way matheson a big writer on twitter zone wrote a bunch of episodes for the twilight zone which is like one of my favorite shows of all time. So i like him for that. That's why i actually know about the dude what i didn't know. I looked him up before the episode. He wrote remember the movie What dreams may come with robin williams wrote that a he also wrote steel with became the movie real steel with wolverine the boxing robot movie. Yup really maths and wrote that crap. He wrote a story called steel. Which is what the movie was based on. Well the point is if you haven't checked. Richard matheson go check him out. His shit is good. You just said twilight zone. It made me think of this..

richard matheson Richard matheson What dreams may come with forty matheson mathison robin williams twitter iowa twilight zone fifty years one of favorite world war z. Legends wolverine
"richard matheson" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"richard matheson" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"That's that's what I was, You know, thinking it might be a good guy. Remember that movie we played that on midnight changed my husband and I back then. When I was married to this military guy. We went to a midnight viewing on Halloween, and that's when I got home. I said, Uh, honey, you got to take that blanket off the bed. It's red One theater. Did you go to to see that? It was in Bremerton, Washington. We lived in, okay? No, I wanted to tell you. You're talking about football movies. But I can't remember the name. I saw it. There was one or goal. Goldie Hawn. Five Wildcats. What Wildcats for high school. That's a good letter. You're a woman, he says. My father taught me Give me a chance. He became the coat. He did business, too. That was a good movie with her. I liked that movie. But I thought you guys are good entertainment from what's going on in the world. Thank you. That's what wait till we get on TV, You know, just, you know, take our minds off center. I don't watch TV. I listen a lot of radio and this to me. This is entertaining a lot of the old movies because I don't own a TV now, But when I go over my sister in law's or we go on vacation, we watch movies, so I So you know, catch up. Once the movies, you should go to the movie theater and see movies. No, we don't. We don't even you know, there's there's good. There's good pictures. Every once in a while that your life everything's got sex in it these days. Seems like that Iris house. Well, the new movies, they're going to be gender neutral, So you won't have to worry about that. That sounds good. Well, you guys have a good day and a blessed new year. Hope things get better. Thanks. Okay, care. We're gonna go to Elizabeth. And Pikesville now. Go to share an impact pipe, so I'm sorry. Might share in your is obviously being will change my name to Elizabeth. That's I'm sorry. That was my mistake course. All right. Yeah. You mentioned baseball movies one of my favorite baseball movies, and it doesn't come on TV very often. Is an old movie from the think late seventies, early eighties with Richard Pryor, Billy Dee Williams, Bingo, long and traveling all Stars. Great movie. One of my set. You know, Jason, two gentlemen would know it. I know James Earl Jones was in that picture played. I think it was the Hippodrome and we played that thing for a long time with a couple of months. I want to see it. I want to see it actually twice and it is an excellent movie with there's a lot of layers to it very funny. And I highly recommended if it comes on TV. Just take a break from whatever you're doing, and sit down and watch it. Very incredible. Movie mentioned the movie with Vincent Price, the last man on Earth that movies actually been they spaced on the Richard Matheson story. And it's actually been made two more times a second time with with Charlton Heston. I can't remember the name of that one. But the Omega man, right, Omega man. And the third time with Will Smith. And I know you. I know you know the name of that movie. Will Smith movie? What was the world Smith movie? I am legend. Oh, yes. Come.

Will Smith Elizabeth Wildcats Bremerton Goldie Hawn baseball Charlton Heston James Earl Jones Washington Richard Pryor Iris house Richard Matheson Vincent Price football Billy Dee Williams Jason
"richard matheson" Discussed on Disconnected

Disconnected

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"richard matheson" Discussed on Disconnected

"70 year old movie and now I guess I got that confused with Hill House. Yeah, cuz I know there's a new show like yeah, there's Hill House There's A Haunting of Hill House on Haunted Hill. And cuz one of these everything's haunted on him. Well, one of them's one of them's a really fucking good and Richard Matheson book. That's the first book. I read as a kid that freaked me out. Really good. Check it out Richard Matheson Haunting of Hill House. If I remember correctly. Yeah, I mean like a another show Haunting of what blind manner I heard that's good. Yeah, a lot of people that I've been other talking on Discord were on Twitter. I've been watching that get into anything right now. Yeah. I know. I'm still trying to see when I when I can sit down and watch a reddish like a really want to do that this month, it's good. Yeah. No I hear is great. But it's one of those like, let's see I prefer them a bit. But yeah, I know it has to be like I prefer the vvitch but hereditary is good. I mean different actors or different directors, you know, even like mid-summer hereditary in mid-summer. Okay, and the lighthouse that makes more sense. Okay. Yeah, I didn't really like mid-summer. It's okay, man, I saw that a long time same I start one of those. Yeah, that was a weird one because I didn't expect the such a big pack ending was kind of sad like I was going to say sucks, but I wanted to like, you know, no, I don't mean like it's sucks. Like it's bad but like yeah, yeah, that's sort of in a bad choice play poker. Did he do that? I think I think he wrote it and produced it involved in some ways. His name definitely is in the credit roll. I wish Jericho applying barking dog. We've been good. I still remember that's the only memory I have of that. Yeah, exactly. It was a bad.

Hill House Richard Matheson Haunted Hill Jericho
"richard matheson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:47 min | 2 years ago

"richard matheson" Discussed on KCRW

"Is news Project, of course, is German War for actually his news project, which he should be on the road promoting right now, and has not. He's generally give me a copy of his new book is The evolution, which sounds like it could be a title of anything you've ever written as a matter of Yes, And this is the crazy irony. Devolution is a Bigfoot book. It's It's a high tech high end ICO community. It's in the wilderness, its utopia. Then it gets cut off by Mount Rainier erupting which can really happen. I did a lot of real research with the U. S. G s about this told a real story. Certainly seen volcanoes in Washington state. Oh, yeah. And Rainier could actually blow. It really could it really could, and it could be devastating. In fact, I have a map up in my office of where the volcano would blow and who would be affected, And that was my guide for writing the book. So I write this elaborate book. And I use big foot as a way to draw people in and is the ultimate irony. I can't go up to the Pacific Northwest now to promote it. I can't go to Bigfoot's house to promote a Bigfoot book because Washington State Has a state of emergency. And that line the covered rather finished. Almost. I mean, it becomes it takes on this kind of both horrific and comic. If you pardon the expression Import in the story, doesn't it? Well, we're never. We're never done. We're always moving forward, and we have to be careful not to slide back. This is what's so scary about anti Vax er's. We're starting to see diseases crop up that we thought we had beaten. But unless they're absolutely 100% eradicated. Monsters are always lurking in the darkness, and we got to make sure to always keep the lights on. And now all these things that we were told maybe 15 years ago, we're going away like easels like polio, like cough or all reemergence. Polio is isn't a part of the world that very well to do. People from Santa Monica Love to go hiking in Ashram ing in And if there was ever a vector That's how polio is going to come back. They're going to go to those parts of the world and find themselves They're also going to find polio. And then they're going to bring it back to us. Thank you very much. I guess that I find so thinking about As you were talking about your family history. You know your father is somebody also took dystopia and made fun of it, but to remind us that it was only a heartbeat away if we weren't paying attention. Comedy is a wonderful way to talk about realist use, because if you beat them over the head too much with a lecture, you triggered the ego defense mechanism. You don't want to bore them. You don't want to scare them. Tell him a great story or make them laugh. I learned more about basic economics from that one. Chris Rock joke. I'm not talking about rich. I'm talking about wealthy than I did in Ah, whole semester in college. Of political economy When Chris Rock broke it down to Rich versus wealthy shack is rich, the white man who signs his paycheck. That's wealthy boom. I mean, I I learned more from Richard Pryor and from Lenny Bruce and from Dick Gregory than I did, and probably half of those professors that I ever imagine Muslim from Richard Matheson to, though Oh, my God, Richard, mouth of I am Legend. I can't pick up anything you've written and not think about the first page of I am Legend. Yeah. No, no, Richard Matt when it comes to me and George Romero and anything plague or horror You know, we might be students of the Bible but Gutenberg thie guy who actually got to mass produce it. You know, That's Richard Matheson. But I mean again, I was thinking about the walking plague. That could be a line from from any of massive, especially from from Mayan legend, but also that that idea and it's something that we're seeing happening in real time. This wonder have you come on and talk about this and thank you for being so generous in doing it? This is say that these kinds of plates are visited on every day that they're part of the quotidian world, and not just from some weird SciFi fantasy. This can be the problem. If we don't learn from history, it's going to come back. And we've beaten back the monsters, but they're still alive. And so that's why it's so important to always be aware and stories. Keep it in our consciousness. And we say, Oh, well. I read this somewhere. This feels more real to me now, but by making everything you do geopolitical and that that even depends. Toto, You know how much I love Harlem? Hell fighters, even part of that. I mean, the fact that you cannot extricate these things, but you can use I think bold on settling ways to tell stories in my party of your your ethos is the story still has to be. You want to sort of catch people off guard a little bit, don't you? Well, yeah, because I want to show that everything is connected. Nothing exists in its neat little box. You know, public health does not exist in a little box. Public health is part of politics as we've seen, which is also part of national security, which is also part of economics. As we're seeing, you know, for many years we invested in China because we thought, Ah, capitalism needs stability, right? You're not gonna have a cool You're not gonna have a war. You know, I could have a revolution. You know you're going to go on strike Yea China stability But at no point did we ask them? Hey, how you doing with horrible plagues and by how you do and I don't just mean Do you have enough doctors and hospitals? If a doctor does sound the alarm? Are you going to shut him down? And look at what's happening. Now we we are We might be on the verge of another recession. Simply because public health let us down. And greedy as you mentioned and greed. We didn't invest in public health here in the West, cutting the CDC cutting doctors, you know, not making sure that the average citizen is well cared for because a healthy citizenry is a productive citizen. Well, you have an administration this fighting Saddam Hussein at the same time, cutting CDC of its again just pulling all these things together must drive you a little bit crazy. You know, I think I was crazy to begin with, and it makes me saying You know what I like to think about? I go in what I call my mother's Africa model. When I was a kid right out of college..

polio Richard Matheson Washington state Chris Rock ICO CDC Rainier Pacific Northwest Saddam Hussein Africa Santa Monica Richard Pryor Richard Matt Harlem George Romero China cough
"richard matheson" Discussed on Around the World in 80s Movies

Around the World in 80s Movies

07:59 min | 2 years ago

"richard matheson" Discussed on Around the World in 80s Movies

"You can find the link to that at that website. Stir Dot net today I'm going to be getting into the third of a four part series looking at the jaws, films of the nineteen seventies and eighties. Of course, this is a show mostly about the nineteen eighties and. And we're getting into the first of the jaws films that take place in the nineteen eighties from nine, hundred, eighty, three I'm talking about jaws three, or you can call it by its the actual title of Jaws Three d because it was released in three D in One thousand, nine, hundred three. It's a PG rated film does have some Gore sensuality and language the? The runtime is an hour and thirty eight minutes. The cast of stars include Dennis Quaid. BESS Armstrong Louis. Gossett Junior Simon mccorkell. John Putsch and Leah Thompson Joe Als is the director. The screenplay credited to Carl Gottlieb Richard Matheson and Michael Caine not that Michael Caine not the one that appears in jaws the revenge. This screenwriters last name is spelled. K. A. N. E.. We start back in the beginning of Nineteen seventy-nine Comedian Chevy. Chase. He made a joke to a couple of junior exacts at universal pictures. He joked that they should combined their two biggest recent successes of nineteen seventy-eight, and make a sequel to both of them called jaws meets animal house now while that was initially a Joke Mountain Daniels thought that actually might be a good idea so they. They casually mentioned it to their boss Universal's president Ned Tannen and the attendant thought that was kind of an intriguing ideas, so he thought he should pass it along to jaws, producers, Richard Panik and David Brown, and they immediately loved it. They thought this was a great idea because they were stuck on what to do next without Roy Scheider wanting to appear in any other jaws, movies and And without wanting to regurgitate the same formula over and over now while at lunch with National Lampoon's publisher, he had just started turning into a movie producer Matty Simmons David Brown pitched. The idea jaws meets. Animal House Simmons immediate response to this idea was I hate it and the reason why he hated. It is because he already had a follow up to animal house in his mind it. It was going to be set six years later. He did not want to screw up his franchise. Polluting it with another franchise round explained that the film this Jaws Animal House. Idea it didn't really need to tie in directly with the characters or the story from Animal House, or even Josh for that matter. It just needed to be a jaws film in comedic style of National Lampoon. Lampoon so Simmons, he started riffing. He played along. He thought you know. What would a jaws three be like? In the hands of National Lampoon? He entitled it on the spot, jaws, three people, zero or people nothing, but it's spelled with a numeral zero Simons envisioned this kind of Meta comedy about this vengeful shark who goes out hunting and killing these movie makers who are trying to make? Make another entry in jaws. He could have Peter Benchley eaten by a shark in swimming pool for the opening scene and Steven Spielberg he could get different body parts bitten off of him throughout the movie, the Real Life Studio heads could come in, and they can play the heavies, and the actors in the writers could be the good guys, and by the end of all of this. This riffing this conversation David. Brown of course found it all hilarious Simmons. He actually ended up loving his own idea that he had hated an hour before and Simon said that he would work out the details from the business side, and they left it at that flash forward two months later, universal now publicly announced their next big comedy. Jaws, three people nothing. Simmons would right the initial treatment. Treatment for this film, and he would also be the producer Zanuck and Brown would be the executive producers and national. Lampoon's editors John Hughes that John this time the John Hughes that created all of those great teen comedies of the nineteen eighties and also Todd Carol. They would both provide the script John Dante he would get the nod to direct what promised to be his first studio. And they all bounced all of these Wacky Zany ideas off the wall. They throw them all in there. In the script. Including this revelation that the sharks are actually aliens in disguise. I mean this was a real kitchen sink approach to making a comedy for their star. Simmons cast comedian Roger Bumps now. If that name sounds familiar to you, you must be a fan. Fan of spongebob squarepants because today he voices squidward tentacles on that show. Simmons at that time felt that bump us. Who was pretty much unknown? He would become the next big star. The biggest star of the nineteen eighties in the world of comedy he was set to skyrocket Stephen. I would appear as a leading man who had let himself go. They approached Mary. Mary at Hartley about a role that she could play as a studio executive, but she turned it down now at a preview screening of Blake words ten at universal Siemens became enamored of Bo, Derek in that film, and he approached her after the film and offered her the lead actress role in this jaws, three film, and within two days she came back to. To him and she agreed she would do it, so he had his leading lady set a slew of Cameo appearances would also be in the film Mel Brooks Jonathan Winters Mickey Rooney as well as those who were involved in the making of jaws. They hoped MCA President Sid Sheinberg his wife. Lorraine Gary and Richard Dreyfuss and and maybe more if they could get. Get them now at this point. It all seemed like this was going to be. An absolute can't miss effort. I mean this was a film that would be the third in the top franchise. Time jaws the second film for National Lampoon Right after the phenomenal breakthrough that was animal house, and this would also be Bo Derek's next film after becoming an overnight sensation with. With ten. This was going to be a hundred million dollar picture. They all felt the studio was very excited. As well they had locations scouted. They started reconditioning all of the sharks that were news from jaws to appear in this film in all, told universal plunk down about two or three million dollars in the pre development phase before even anything started filming Richard. Richard Zanu felt that the first script that he'd read from. Hughes and Carol was absolutely Hilarious, but he did question. There need to go for R. Rated Humor. He thought that this should be like the jaws films. PG rated in order to attract the biggest audience. The studio was also less enthused for their own reasons. They thought that the writers were making fun. Fun of the very people who may jaws much more so than they were actually spoofing the killer shark genre, which is what they thought that this film was going to be about an after five more passes, and trying to tone down this original script to make a PG rated version while also reducing obvious connections to real life people that are in the business. It also lost a lot of its original flavor, and it seemed like it was going to be a lousy marriage fraught with a lot of creative differences, overall so universal unfortunately nixed it even after all of their investment years later. Matty, Simmons he had heard that the reason why universal nixed it was because Steven Spielberg was adamantly opposed to jaws, becoming a spoof, and he felt the canceled it because they didn't want him to leave them in protest, but at the time Simmons was obviously incensed, he had wasted so much time about a year and a half of his time putting it all together only to end up with nothing, so he wanted immediately out of. of his universal contract, so he could shop this idea to another studio willing to pay the turnaround costs and universal consented on the stipulation that whatever film that Simmons and whatever studio he took it to made, they could not have a shark or any other kind of water creature in it. It had to be absolutely divorced from Jaws Zanuck and Brown the also left universal, not in protest. Necessarily they.

Matty Simmons Jaws Animal House sharks David Brown Animal House Lampoon Simon mccorkell Steven Spielberg John Hughes Bo Derek Dennis Quaid producer BESS Armstrong Louis Gore Chevy executive Carl Gottlieb Richard Matheson Todd Carol Roy Scheider Richard Panik
A little extra Time

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:54 min | 2 years ago

A little extra Time

"Welcome to catch myths and mysteries. Shyam your host kid chrome with everybody shelter in place. I thought it might be interesting to talk about time travel and with that in. Mind the paradox of time on time. Paradoxes any logical contradiction that has to do with time travel. The Classic Paradox Time Falls into the classic grandfather paradox. The grandfather paradox who's usually the screenplay turn novel then movie where the U. S. Nimitz is caught in a storm of thrush and back in time to December sixth nineteen forty one. The dilemma is what the crew knows. What's going to happen? But the grandfather paradox of time gets in the way when the past is changed. It creates a contradiction. The time traveller could do anything that did happen but can't do anything that didn't well an aircraft carrier the size of the Nimitz didn't exist back in nineteen forty one so anything they could have done would have altered the future in a big way. Fortunately the storm that sent them back in time reappeared and brought them back to their time before they could decide what to do for a little more detail watch the movie. The final countdown. I think it came out in the nineteen eighties. Should you can listen to Martin. Sheen explained the grandfather paradox. To Kirk Douglas. The topic of time travel bags of big question. How would travelers go forward or back in time? H She wells painted a picture of a time machine with his book. The time machine. It was simply a vehicle for going forward or back with little regard to the visitors passed or impact on the future or past for the past for that matter that then we have screenwriter Richard. Matheson who wrote somewhere in time and takes the issue of time travel to a new level in the movie. Christopher Reeves is a young theater students celebrating the success of his latest production when the party is interrupted by an elderly woman who break Suda crowd of well-wishers Impresa lock into his hand Luxembourg. The says come back to me long story short. He traces Salak at back. To a stage. Actress of Nineteen twelve and her summer retreat that has been restored to pristine nineteen twelve decor. He buys clothes from the era right down to the socks. He wears a pocket wash from that era than rents a room and focuses on all things nineteen twelve and remember. He's surrounded in a room and a facility that is all nineteen twelve and ZAP when he ventures back out into the hall so hours later it is indeed nine thousand nine hundred twelve and elderly woman is there and a romance began one day. It is raining so they decided to have a picnic and Gorse at some point. She asked the time when he pulls out the pocket. Watch a penny from nineteen. Eighty comes out with it and the spell is broken. Well all this talk of time. Travel's seems a stuff of fiction. The what about Deja Vu? The feeling that you've been there before or met that person before done that thing before could it be that you've visited another time and have a flash memory of the person you met. L. Let's bring it home. The was the last time that a day week or month just seemed to Fi- yet your routine hadn't changed. I can remember going to the gym a specific time day or I would meet a friend. We always did the same routine but after a year or so. We noticed that we were finished sooner than before our next meeting. We TIMED ISH. Exercise routine and the gaps between each workout. The Times were always the same yet. We would finish at different times out of that work at one meeting. We had to stop and re park our cars yet. We completed our usual routine at the same time we had established and still finished early. Not Time travel but perhaps time slip. The Earth spins at Specific Rate. Plants grow in predictable period of time. Are we humans of variable our perception of time altered for seemingly? No reason when I was in grammar school failed to complete my homework. I could still hear my teacher telling me that we all had the same twenty four hours in the day but do we. The world's most accurate clock has neatly shown how right Albert Einstein was a hundred years ago when he proposed that time is a relative concept and the higher you live above sea level. The faster you should age. Einstein's theory of relativity states at time and space are not as constant as everyday life would

The Times U. S. Nimitz Christopher Reeves Sheen Albert Einstein Kirk Douglas Salak Deja Vu ZAP Martin Matheson Richard FI
"richard matheson" Discussed on The Twilight Zone Podcast

The Twilight Zone Podcast

08:02 min | 2 years ago

"richard matheson" Discussed on The Twilight Zone Podcast

"It's about the inner world of emotion. I like to think that after all these years of doing this show I at least have a sense of rod sailing and the man he was. I have no such insights into ray Bradbury simply because I don't know enough now if you go to mark Zicree last interview on this. Show that my friend Brandon. Did he says that. Ray Bradbury's philosophy. Was that the answer to everything is Love. So it's quite hard to take when you read or hear the vigour with which he goes after sailing about the plagiarism matter. And if you check how Jason and Sonny Bronx documentary. The way he talks about Rod. Sailing is is very disappointing. Is Very old manatees point. Clearly he has health issues and he's struggling but I do remember watching that. I'm being quite dismayed by this situation. Now I'm not here to demonize Ray Bradbury but I do feel that the values that we all associate with Rod serling you would have precluded him from plagiarizing ray Bradbury's wake now throughout the twilight zone. We have head these accusations from people other than Brad Brie free and when we actually hold the wake up to the light and have a look at it. We realize how unfounded the accusations tend to be. And we've also oh head of Rudd sailing closing down the open submission policy on the twilight zone to God's against accusations of plagiarism. So to plagiarize ager is arguably one of the most famous science fiction. Writers in the world at that point doesn't really make sense now. Another friend Andrew. Schneider Schneider wrote to me before. I put this APP so together and he made me aware of the electric grandmother but he also made me aware of another instance where Bradbury was very vocal about an adaptation of his way Andrew Rights. I will note that the twilight zone wasn't the last time bradberry savage to final final TV production of one of his own scripts. BRADBERRY CO wrote descript for a three part miniseries adaptation of his book the Martian in chronicles which aired in nineteen eighty and his co screenwriter. Richard Matheson Andrew goes on the following is from the IMDB Trivia section on that mini series for disclosure. I wrote this entry though. Have long since forgotten the original source of the information and he writes writes. The mini series was originally scheduled for release in September nineteen seventy nine as a major kickoff to the nineteen seventy nine eighty season thousand. Unfortunately it fell victim to some negative publicity from Ray Bradbury himself. Although Bradbury had worked with script writer Richard Matheson in adopting his book to the small screen. He was less than thrilled with the final production at one point shortly before the mini series scheduled. Release Police Bradberry fads himself the sole representative of the production at a press conference when one reporter asked him what he thought of. The miniseries responded candidly boring. NBC Soon shelved a mini series and did not air until January one thousand nine hundred eighty now. I Admire Ray. Bradbury is honesty. I admire the fact that he hasn't your sugar coated because it says work and he didn't like the add up tation so he said it. But it's also indicative of the factor. Ray Bradbury did seem to have quite a temper on times. I'm what I also found to be a a little troublesome. Is that two stories in the eighties. Twilight zone based on bradberry short stories and one of them. The banning mad was adopted apted by a writer and director called JD. FAGEL SIN and although bribery wasn't directly involved in the production of you most definitely approved grieved ave and on the website bradberry media Darko. UK There is a quote from one thousand nine hundred eighty. Six early. Says it was very good. It was written and directed by a friend of mine. I got him the job I fought for him. He did the script and I told the people at the twilight zone that I wanted him to director and I was in New York on my way to Europe when he called me. They don't want me to direct. He said I'll just back off. I said I only sold a script so you could do it. So get the hell off the phone and go tell them you're going to direct it or else that's the end. You got to fight for yourself off. He called me back an hour later and said I got it and I said thank God I screamed you. You've got to believe in yourself. He called me many times afterward to thanks for being fan so he knows what friendship is now also on that same page. It says Fagel sin has known bradberry for nearly two years. He is and says the Bradberry taught him writing. I had met him through a PBS film. That I did a civil war movie. By Ambrose Beers a mutual friend suggested that I show it to ray and he offered to mental me and still does actually and fatos use of the banning months story came about through his attempt to develop and sell a different and Sala g series of his own called strange dimensions on bradberry authored and the banning man to adapt apt so although strain dimensions never came to be Vegas incentive scripts to James Crock who's producing the new twilight zone and Allen Brennan who was story editor of the new twilight zone said that the script had theatrical dialogue that no one ever speaks outside of a ray Bradbury the story so that kind of backs road sailings take on the adaptability of Ray Bradbury's wag also Fagel and sat on that site. What what I did with raise approval was cut out dialogue that went on longer than a need to establish whatever effect it was supposed to do? It was more of an editing job as well as putting it into tally play form now. bradberry was very happy with this adaptation of the banning man and clearly fagel son has looked for his approval on any goods to dialogue. So it does suggest bradberry is very protective and sensitive to changes to his work for the screen and of course he has the right as the creator of the way but also in the eighties. Twilight zone is a story called the elevator. That from what I can tell was actually written by Ray Bradbury based on one of his own on produce short stories now. The reason season that I mentioned these is that I find it quite troubling to be honest because by the time the twilight zone came around Rhode sailing had passed away but regardless of this the twilight zone is show the eighties twilight zone is his show. The two thousand twilight zone is his show and so is the latest version. Yes the creators are different but they are playing in his son box. So Ray Bradbury to be attacking sailings character in one breath but then to come back to his show after he has passed away. That doesn't quite sit right with me because has had been a gesture of posthumous reconciliation. Perhaps I would be more accepting of it. But bradberry continued to make these occasional Hazna comments about sailing after these adaptations. What's your assessment of the whole thing you know did bradberry genuinely feel that sailing was plagiarised or was the more to the now facing bredbury genuinely felt slighted?.

Ray Bradbury Bradberry Richard Matheson Andrew Rod serling BRADBERRY CO Brandon writer Fagel mark Zicree Schneider Schneider Rhode director Richard Matheson Brad Brie UK Rudd Jason bribery Andrew Rights New York
"richard matheson" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:52 min | 3 years ago

"richard matheson" Discussed on WGN Radio

"I don't mean to contradict I don't mean to contradict but I am legend it's based on the novella by Richard Matheson and it's and it was also mated to a movie called the omega man starring Charlton Heston they are like they're supposed to be van as a world overrun by vampires but the in the in I am legend they play them like there's obviously after that like drinking blood or yeah there is little talk at all like Bela Lugosi how much better that little people in black caves running around god help me to get to you but yeah that's a good example of of you know the the post apocalypse thing and and it works fairly well the horror movie I am legend is is kind of been notoriously difficult to adapt even though I do like earlier adaptations of it like the omega man which every have you seen the omega man hello everyone I've maybe it's like well Charlton Heston ideas from the stuff of course remember had minutes of his greatest lines from so like green it's people but that's like opposed the part like you're near towards the edge of it I think there's a lot of touchdowns based on what we're dealing with today were like the environments getting ruined in the wrath is getting too hot there's no food for the people we'll get there yeah I have I always like to think the horror movies and especially like when you get a like horror sci fi say more about the current the say more about the present day than it does about the future it's a reflection of what we're afraid of now so say alien for example you know it's it's this fear of fear of the unknown of space in nineteen seventy nine we were still pretty unsure about what was out there you know we had gone to the moon we were released it's starting to explore but there is this fear about what was happening in the the reaches of space and so we were we get alien you get terminator is less of a horror movie but it still has elements of you know computing is moving really fast all of a sudden we're able to do all these amazing things of technology but there is a fear what do you take over yeah what happens when they look like Jack Austrian dudes and come after you for well you got to go back in time and you got to take a chunk out of it yeah and you know give birth to your own commanding officer because it's a loop it's a it doesn't make it right you got to go back and have like the kind of the org chart you gotta get a white board I could figure it all out when we come back from this break we are going to talk a little bit about is some of the other was whether it's like this the look really gory movies or even rob zombie hits in a guy that we're going to actually get a chance to interview the next couple months and if he has your musical person is a young artist on the musical side in into a rock star but also is a huge fan Natalie and to the point of liking but also creating some of the entertainment as well so quick break we'll be back with more is staying here.

Richard Matheson
"richard matheson" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"richard matheson" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Episode which are quite scary a lot of it has kind of a Campinas element it's not that scary any didn't last what happened why where to go wrong do you think I mean there's a lot of great things about it yeah what will I mean any time Darren McGavin is wearing that seersucker suit it's worth watching yeah it's magic you know he's always going to make the call Koscheck character get up and dance for you so yes yeah the there there's always something wonderful but as for where it went wrong you know you can have to separate the two movies in the series because the two movies are done by Dan Curtis and the teleplays were written by Richard Matheson you know you kind of have the a team in there and then when they went to a series the first thing that went wrong was that the universal broke a promise to Darren they they had been there only agreed to do it if you could be the executive producer on the series and this is so they promised to me could and then they broke that promise and they assigned one of their own producers to be in charge of it and this created sort of two armed camps and is no way to do it here this is the thing is to start with that kind of division and it wasn't the fault of the producer who is a very good producer and a very good nice man size sure mac and the very talented because you look at his credit and you know if they had just put sighing charge you from the beginning and not made any promises to Darren it might have been a different story but Darren would acted kept acting like he was the producer you know especially down on the set and sites Mr ran the production aspects in the writers room and so right there that was one problem another problem was that it was a it was sort of treated as a as an ugly stepchild on the universal lot the high end theory that got the best road riders in the Best Director is in the best production values was Columbo Columbo is making a lot of money and then there were a lot of theories in between the two you got all the way to the bottom rung and that was nice Dr so nice talking to you know it had a lot of young writers on it writers who did some really good work on it but they were starting their career right Bob Zemeckis made his first sale to the night stalker I didn't know that is this it because he looked around the universal lot and said we have no he and his writing partner Bob gale he said you know we have no shot at selling to these big shows like Columbo.

Darren McGavin Koscheck Dan Curtis Richard Matheson executive producer Mr Director Columbo Columbo Bob Zemeckis Bob gale partner
"richard matheson" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

12:06 min | 3 years ago

"richard matheson" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"And welcome back. Our final segment with Mark Zicree. Marc will space. Command qualify for a TV EMMY or a movie Oscar category TV, EMMY, George I would love to have an amazing gorgeous, gorgeous statue bribery, one one for the Halloween the TV movie of that. I've got three regional Emmys for news over my career. And they are so cool. It's great. I love that stuff. Holding globe. And all that stuff. It's neat. Let's go back to the calls. You ready for some more? We'll go to Mason Texas Stevens with us on coast to coast. Good morning. Stephen good morning. Good to have your with us. Mark. I have a question. Why does why did? Twilight zone Goto hour long episodes on season four, and how did you think about the whole hour long episode? We not funny because originally when rod conceive ransoming conceiver twilight initially thought it was going to be an hour show any actually wrote up four pilots twilight zone before the show got actually picked up and the first three of those that he wrote were our scripts the plainly decided it would be a half hour. But once he started doing it as a half hour. He realized that was the perfect length for the show, and he was very adamantly against it being standing to an hour. This is something CBS is doing in that period in the early sixties. They did with gun smoke. They did it with the Hitchcock. So and so they thought they might be able to a large the audience by expanding twilights onto an hour. So they took so long deciding that they only gave it really I of season the fourth season with eighteen episodes, and they were an hour long. Twelve I really didn't work as well. As our math, Richard Matheson, Charles Beaumont and surly Earl hammer the major writers on twilights all had one good hour episode age, but at the end of the season evergreens that needed so back for half. I was dragging at. Though, there's a great hour long episode called on Thursday for home the stars James Whitmore and rod Serling wrote it, and it's it's great. It's terrific episode. But then for the fifth season fifth and final season. They went back to our thirties were actually twenty two weren't they actually closer to like twenty seven. They're only they're only fewer commercials back then those days. Now, don't they do? But the back then they mostly most was the episode. And you know, he he did he have a cigarette when he came out. Yeah. You know, it's like he had a cigarette as much all the time. And he was a feel four pack a day. Smuggle got him in the long run. Died of complications from open heart surgery. And you know, he would he really looks older than he was he died at fifty. And which is the new thirty amazing. The boy he got a lot done in the time. He had assured that he he pleaded more and his time than most people do at ninety amazing. Let's go to Travis in Omaha Nebraska. Hey, I think that's a home. Johnny Carson number. Isn't it? Travis. Travis Willis doing well. Yes, sir. Yeah. I I had a couple of questions. The Mark, sir. Yeah. I heard you talking about the movie that you're making is is it just one movie it's going to be a serious serious. And in fact, the first hour, I've I've YouTube channel called Mr. sci-fi anyone can subscribe to and that's free. And I put the first hour faith and on on my channel, actually, watch it. And in fact, we shot a scene with initial Nichols today. We'll be putting posting from that. So it's it's a twelve hour season. And we visited the show is going many seasons multiple seasons like at least five years, and so we're just rock and live. I've been the first eight hours of the twelve hour season and also plea quell. And so I'm by by the next few months, the entire twelve hours. And then we'll just we'll just shoot all of it and and share with our audience, and it's the new way of doing television, and then our audience just you finances. They buy shares they've gone kickstart. Interesting money our way, and that'll be potsy part of one thing this is because I have my own studio. I can do a network quality show for much less. Money than the network Homar God because for instance, that Star Trek discovery is over ten million dollars. Nets game of thrones is over fifteen fifteen million dollars an episode is one show. Yes. Yeah. One hour, and but base command can do it so far as I mentioned my audience is giving me a million dollars. And with that. I was able to shoot the two hour pilot and forty minutes of the second to our story and we're moving forward. So as I mentioned we'll be starting to kick starter campaign on Monday. And if anyone wants to buy shares space, they can Email me, Mark Zicree gmaiLcom. And and I can send them all the information. It's and people around the world are buying shares. It's it's a completely new way of doing television. But but I really love it. Because I write it. I cast it I shoot it. There's no, you know. You know, the the cast is one full cast of amazing science fiction actors like Bill me like the Jones and Robert mccarter Furlan those box lighter in the shell Nichols. If I went to a network and said, can I have this cast? They say no, you have to use an actor was just on some hitch show on the CW who can't act or whatever that's not the CW, but they get the network at sale you get castle. You don't. And and I don't wanna have that over my head. Another question. Travis. Yeah. I heard him talking about spirituality, like they went to spoil, and they have to greet the level of spirituality. Yeah. I think that the thing to focus on for your project. I'm in artists myself. And I I've done a lot of monster type aiding and stuff like that that I'm really really bad Sifi so often listen to coast to coast over the years. And you know, I just like hearing Lynn somebody think creative processes like this. Yes. And and you know, when when I talk about spirituality, it's I you know, I'm open to what? Whatever someone's personally are. But I think if if time this is at the heart of that, then you're not gonna go wrong. I think you know, I I, you know, I I mean Jesus, of course, I'd love one another I believe that. And you have to be a Christian, you can get Buddhist or Jewish like, I am or or or even agnostic or I mean, kind kindness is what you do. It's the golden rule, and there's a version of the golden rule pretty much in every every faith or and every culture, and it's basically just kind of your family because of you love and be kind on the street. You know, if someone's trying to get into a parking spaces a garbage can blocking them Auburn across the street and move the garbage can and it's just putting that into practice your life and small ways and has a ripple effect. You know, Robert Davi Mark have. Yes. We're close friends with them. So if you ever need him in any of those episodes, let us know we'll get you in touch with them. Thank you. Thank you for that. He's got one of those faces that everybody recognizes of course, of course, let's go to Rick truck. Driving New Hampshire. Welcome to the program. Hi wreck. Go ahead, sir. Oh, thank you for taking my call. I get my good conversation tonight. A couple of questions. Please, sir. Twilight zone. I used to say got that twirly little thing in a white. Yes. Yeah. Are you still using that that fame and your stare do show that all yeah? On the new twilight on they're using ritual fame, and that and those those motifs you have other. So I kinda they're they're gorgeous. Yeah. That's bring. Yeah. Bring a lot of people the tension to the black hole. You know? Did you believe aliens? When you first started writing ear here of stress, if you believe in any case space off creatures of any kind. Definitely intelligent life in the universe. And you know, I don't really go beyond that in in saying, what's what's real? And what's not in terms of UFO's or any of that? But but I think that life probably throughout the university. Now, no planets are on pretty much every star. And so I think life is going to be throughout the universe. Just like very fertile fields grows all sorts of crops. Thank you wreck. Appreciate I feel like I'm committing a sin. If I watched the new twilight zone episodes, I wouldn't go that far. But it's definitely. It's not the old show. It's not what's really was able to pull off. I mean, you know, it takes such a lot of great people coming together and just the right way to make magic happen. You know, it's something catches fire, and it's lightning in a bottle and rod sterling certainly accomplished that anymore because he works hard to possibly could any pulled it off. And it's an amazing amazing thing. I just you go back to those vigil shows, and there's just their gills. They're amazing. Let's go to beaver Utah marines with us. Hello maria. Go ahead. Are you familiar with? But stock have the next generation, Marcus. For that show. Okay. It was. So that was fit in called trouble trouble. Oh, yes. Of course. That's a classic. That's a great. So that was the only ritual Star Trek series. And I was written by David Gerald who actually went to college with my wife. My wife read that script in the first draft. And and I I know David very well. In fact, I saw not not long ago, and it's a great shooting the shell Nichols house. She played until there was a bowl of triples on hundred or so it's really fun. Really really fun episode. Guy. So well, David, Gerald. You know, a all Mark yet. You have to have they're my heroes. These writers are just wonderful. I mean that's enough. I wouldn't win search for them, and they became friends and mentors. And you know, they were just just really brilliant writers. What's the reaction? But in Hollywood about the way, you're doing space command dating when I meet with never executives and executive at Netflix, which I did a few weeks ago there what I'm doing. And and they really admire the fact that I can raise money for my audience that got millions of fans around the world, it's significant and and the people who are cleaning series, you know, with the shoulders network that I'm not creating where I'm gonna create six new series with six major, Chevron, and these are people who've done the greatest hits in television. And when I invite them to come aboard they want to because they want the freedom that this offers. They want the feed them. That they can write what they wanna right. They can say what they wanna say. They can there's one show that we're gonna be creating where we can each have all these wonderful actors that we that we love there's an actual name Barbara Bain who was on mission impossible is based on t ninety nine and offend my nose. Right. A row for role for her and why not super do a game show. I've never done. I wanna redo the what's my line show. Yes. That was such a great show. I love that shows that cool. Yeah. I mean when you look at it they in the EU had ten times to get it. Right. If you had ten wrong answers, they flip over the cards, and they, you know, tell the person what his occupation was or whatever. And they they were each woman was five dollars when the card that was just on the lead as they hit the sponsor's name across the front of the desk that the four panelists were sitting at. Was brought to you by some perspiration company. They had that splattered across their all time television. It's great. I love the fact that YouTube has a lot of those shows where you can go back and watch the old Kennett scopes from the fifties. And it's just that was just watching Alfred Drake in kiss me Kate and Kenneth scope of of broadcast was on live in the fifties. So it's it's a I think YouTube, I think the internet is such an enormously powerful and wonderful thing, and it can be it can have negative sides. Of course..

Travis Willis YouTube Mark Zicree Robert Davi Mark David Gerald EMMY Stephen Mason Texas Stevens Marc CBS Johnny Carson bribery Barbara Bain James Whitmore EU Richard Matheson New Hampshire Nichols Jesus
"richard matheson" Discussed on We'll See You In Hell

We'll See You In Hell

04:11 min | 3 years ago

"richard matheson" Discussed on We'll See You In Hell

"He's got this silk shirt unbutton down to like his, you know, his his ribcage. Yes, he's got like dark sunglasses on his, hey us. It's your big night. I heard you killed. It's like crazy. And you're like guys, this is so stupidly cliche. And by the way, if this is the club, you want to portray if you wanna show that the fact guy that belches misogynistic that goes on stage is horrible things is the star breakout guy in this club. That does really well every week will then you can't make the club. Look like a fucking artsy ballroom where? Where the most alternative show in town would take place. It doesn't make any sense. It's like people are in suits in the audience. You know, it's it's a it's a strange. Fuck. It was like the Cotton Club or something. Yeah. It looks like it's like a weird. Like theme attic, it just doesn't work. I don't know if they were trying to make it look weird. Like you six it's it just doesn't work the director did Sanjin Pero, which is a very beloved black mirror episode. And that the look of that was just fantastic. It was the one set in the eighties, and it was very eighty thousand eight hundred songs on the soundtrack at cetera. Which episode is it about which the two women. It's like a lesbian love story that goes back to the eighties. I don't remember. It's great. But he I don't know if it's the CBS stink on it or what? But there's just like this nothing feels cool about it. I it's hard to put a finger on it feels like a CBS show. I mean, I can't fault. Anybody working on the show for that CBS is going to get their fingerprints all over the thing. Yeah. But I mean, just no part of this connects it just makes no fucking sense. And again, the end at the end twist is very cool. But it's not enough to save the episode. And then the final punch this episode again, no offense to the writer. It's just complete completely fucking ripped off of one of the most famous har- movies of all time. I mean, just just complete literally somebody just being like, we're just gonna do the thing from that movie at the very very end. And you're like. What guys you why did you just do that? Because it doesn't even in the movie that I'm referring to. And I can't say it's going to spoil the ending in the movie that I'm referring to this thing at the end makes sense because it goes along with the concept of the movie at the end of this thing, it doesn't make any fucking sense. Right. There's no foreshadowing, I it's just it's just crazy. It's crazy. And you've got you know, he's like he becomes famous over three days or something. Like, that's the thing. I couldn't tell my is this supposed to be a time lapse because it seems like three sets after he realizes what does work on stage. He still keeps opening what the same joke that always bombs, and you're like this doesn't make any fucking sent say that really stuck in my to every time. He started with that terrible joke. I was like God damn it. It's an annoying watch. It's a really irritating. Watch. Because you just have to keep hearing this joke, and I don't know, man. So that was up sewed one. I that being said I did not go into episode to with any sort of excitement. I was rolling my eyes before even hit play. And I will say this at the top episode to re-instill my faith in the show. I enjoyed it. It kept me on the edge of my seat. I it made much more cohesive sense to me, it's still tried to do a little too much. But it, but at least landed the plane episode new is called twenty thousand terror twenty thousand feet nightmare at thirty thousand feet and wasn't that the shattner one then the lift gal wants classic, Richard Matheson story. Yes. And it was the shattner one, and then it was remade as the lift gate. One little inside info Matheson. Here's what I find confusing. Matheson hated the lift Galvin he hated it. Because he was like they have nice little nods..

CBS Richard Matheson Galvin Cotton Club Sanjin Pero director writer thirty thousand feet twenty thousand feet three days
"richard matheson" Discussed on Fusion Patrol

Fusion Patrol

04:29 min | 3 years ago

"richard matheson" Discussed on Fusion Patrol

"Ooh. Yeah. Yeah. Has to be. That's like that's what he does all day. So at least got to do is to go hunt. Vampires you start in the beginning of the day, you make sure your home safe at night, I'm gonna it's perfectly reasonable anyway, who's tally. The you mentioned earlier that there is ten minutes of setting the story up. I gave a brief lurk, but not enough of a look to found a satisfactory answer. I think that in nineteen seventy seventy-two the typical length of a TV episode after you've stripped it of commercials was about fifty minutes if I'm not mistaken. This was very strange in my mind in that you have the the bits where Norlisk calls is publisher. And they talk about how bad it is. Or how I can't do it. You gotta hear these tapes. And now, I gotta talk to you. I gotta talk to you today. So then they have the whole bit where he goes down. And he sits around waiting for lunch and nothing happens. And then he calls, and we Norlisk ignoring and we see then we seem go back, and it's like a week later, the publisher context Norlisk attorney, and he tells the attorney to look into. To it. And so the attorney looks into it, and then the Terni catches up with publisher days later, apparently, you're right to be worried. I found in the whole stuff about writing up and down on the cable car, and and and go into the club. And and and then finally the publisher goes to Norlisk place, and and starts to process now this movie was one hundred seventy two minutes long. So if they could just kill twenty two minutes with the framing stuff, this would effectively be about what one episode of the New Orleans tapes as TV series would be like probably have about the same pacing. You know, what they would have to cut it up under normal normal circumstances, which is another tip off that they're probably going for a pilot that in the big number one in the number two on the tape. But anyway, this one was written issue by William F Nolan. You familiar with him? I don't. I am not Richard Matheson, who did the night stalker was famous TV writer short story, novelist. Concentrated a lot on horror stories he'd written the movie duel, which I think you owe. But yes. Star Trek stories. He's written says, we'll leave if Nolan also a multiple award winning horror SCI fi writer, also Star Trek the twilight zone, he and George Clayton. Johnson did Logan's run. And I mean, the novels on then William Nolan wrote the rest of the novels. He's he's won countless awards. He's won. Are. He's written comedy things. I guess he's got a Sam space series, which is sort of a comedy science fiction detective PI sort of thing. He's done biographies. I know he's gonna buy of Dashiell Hammett out there. So there's there's a connection that popped in my brain. When I was thinking about the the writing. It's like, oh, yeah. He's definitely trying to do the old PI pastiche there with a gun metal sky and all that kind of stuff. I mean, the guy has got a ton of a ton of work behind him. It's not it's not bad. I'm the premise of the story is I grown when they said, oh, the blood's been drained out of the body after admit that that was the one part in the story that that I just really it has to be a blood drain. Traders. Well, it's back tonight. Stocker it's like, it's another blood draining thing, and yes, they had a good reason for it could reason for it from the in universe story kind of which I thought was novel though, I don't need it to survive. I don't need to vibe. It's like I'm have to make this blood body for this demon. I mean, okay. That's that's the kind of weird stuff I can expect. I I appreciate it. It was as ambi- go. It wasn't your standard zombie wasn't your standard vampire it. It had all the marks. I I thought it was a decent premise for this supernatural story. It. 'execution perhaps it was definitely tweet for jump scares Danker..

William F Nolan publisher Norlisk Dashiell Hammett attorney writer Richard Matheson New Orleans Norlisk place Stocker George Clayton Johnson Logan one hundred seventy two minute twenty two minutes fifty minutes ten minutes
"richard matheson" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

12:39 min | 3 years ago

"richard matheson" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"That I interviewed said that he was driving along the state route is a route travelled, many many times, you know, exactly how long it would take him from point a to point b and he said on this particular occasion, he's driving along and suddenly notices that things. Look familiar anymore. He hasn't gotten off the road taken any diversion that everything has been the last eerie look to it and the further he does he notices that things are missing there. No cars on the road. There's no telephone poles there. There are no animal sounds. There were no environmental sounds. There was an eerie stillness, and he starts to get a little worried because now he's looking at his watch. And and he knows where he should be on a route. And he's not there. He's like somewhere else. And he starts to think. Well, did I get off the road without realizing it, but it's a very eerie lap landscape. This is reported quite often in these times slips, no sound absence of people absence of animal, and he just keeps drivers doesn't know what else to do. And then all of a sudden it breaks out into it. Melania says a road and you're rise it as destinations but he's like ours late. He's had unaccounted time law and the thing suddenly looks normal. Every rattled by this experience. And he mentioned it to smother a truck drivers that he knew and found out that other truck drivers had had similar experiences as well. So what is it about this? Kilian stretch of the road. And these road stretches reported all over the place where people stop being in what they feel is ordinary reality normal reality. And they they go through a passage into a weird reality. And then suddenly come out of it. The the roadside diner or hotel that no longer exists. This is not a haunting. It's not seeing ghosts from the past. Is people come across something out on the road. They have real, but bizarre encounters with people the roadside diner, for example. Might be a case of people dressed in very old clothing, ridiculously low prices on the menu that seemed to be decades old they get served food. They eat it. They pay a ridiculously low Bill, but things seem to be very odd. Nobody interacts with them very much, they leave, and then they try and find it again because they're so puzzled by it all they'd like to have the experience over again, and the place simply a Spanish in some cases. They discover they've done some research that there used to be a place for decades and decades ago, but it doesn't exist anymore. I don't think this is a haunting. I think these are cases of things and activities still going on in an ever present timeless scape of of eternal now. And we have these incursions into them more reasons. That we don't know in circumstances that we can't explain Rosemary rod Serlin from the twilight zone and writer, Richard Matheson wrote in episode called little girl lost in it was about two parents who woke up to the cries of their daughter. They entered her roam the find out that she had vanished. But they could still hear her crying. Where are you? Mommy. Daddy in the little girl fell into a time slip, and they have to figure out how to go in and get her and bring her back. Is is that sorta what you're talking about? Absolutely. That's a perfect example. In fact. Time a lot in that particular episode. I remember the first time I thought and aired me this sort of thing might happen as a little girl sleeping in her bed. And suddenly a doorway to another dimension. In in in the story. It's the fourth dimension of time opens up and she falls into it. And this doorway is closing. So the urgency in the story is that they have to try and and get her back before the doorway closes. And she's permanently trapped in this alternate reality, which they succeed in doing. And then soon as they get her out a doorway closes and the place in the wall behind the bed where they could fix their hands. Is now follow. And that could be happening where people go into these time slips time warps and it closes and they can't get back ever again. I believe that these sorts of things happen. About the cases where people come back, and they say that they've had some strange experience that they they can't explain but from an eastern mysticism perspective there's no linear time anyway. And and, you know, even the scientists say linear time is a construct in our reality. And frankly, we would be in chaos without it. We wouldn't be able to organize ourselves beyond this concept of linear time is they stainless timeless landscape where everything happens in an ever present. Now, and it never stopped. It's all is happening. And the if there are other dimensions parallel worlds, then we have a more complicated. Picture we're not only are other things happening in an ever present. Now, but version of them different versions of our reality are happening, and we might. Slip into a different era in our own reality. But also in a parallel world, as well, which may happen to some of these people who feel that the landscape has changed in a very odd way. It doesn't look normal anymore to them. And I do think that these things are happening on a more frequent basis now. Now, our time slips different from general time travel. Well in time travel, we have a similar situation, but it's an intentional deliberate thing can we send ourselves in time. Now, here's an interesting thing about the time slips, George is that people rarely go into the future. They seem to go into the past or into a parallel present that's similar to but different from from our own. And maybe that's because in our linear time concepts. The future hasn't happened yet the past is fixed. And so we only move in one direction. But in the in the concept of time travel, would we have the ability to go anywhere in time. Like HD Wells' time traveler, his famous, and then could you change could you change history? If you do that. Well, here are here's where all the paradoxes come in and one of the most famous, of course is called the grandfather paradox. Right. And and it's the idea could you go back in time to kill your grandfather before your father is born. And if you did that would you cease to exist, well in this reality would, but that doesn't mean that you would not exist in another reality. And so I think that we just by the very active time travel we start to alter reality. And he would not come back to the presence that you left because the time scape would have shifted. Now. I remember remember some years ago, I interviewed someone who had lost a child in an accident. And they were. Very keen to find out if it would be possible to go back in time to warn the young man and do not do something that would result in the accident that led to his death. But they seem to think that if they could do that everything would be exactly the same only. He would still be living in the present. But it was not the everything would have shifted entirely. They would be in a completely different reality. So these are some of the things that we grapple with and also could we even survive time travel, and if you did it how would you do it? When you go through a wormhole, for example. Would you need a machine? Would you need a machine or could you project yourself with consciousness, there's radiation and wormholes could you survive the radiation with your molecules be affected wormholes open and close, and if you went through one would you be able to get back so the mechanics of time travel are very uncertain. However, scientists have been able to send particles back in time, and there have been experiments for years with success in that regard, a a sort of retro causation. So if the ideas if we can do it too particles, we should be able to do it to larger solid objects. But what would happen to the object with disintegrate what it is packed with a change in some way? And we don't know the answers to those questions Rosemary, Ellen guy Lee with us. Her latest book is called slips in time and space. Her website linked up at coast to coast, AM dot com. Called visionary living. We will take calls next hour with Rosemary as we'll talk about your dreams possession and extra systems contact with the dead as well. Right now, we're talking about her time slips and. When you make your call next hour, if any of you have had people friends that have merely disappeared and they're gone. Check in with us as well river, how prevalent is that? Were they just disappear. You know, it's hard to say, George because we we only hear about reported cases. And there may be many many more cases that go unrecorded for a variety of reasons. But there been so many documented cases of missing persons that have no rational explanation, you you can't assume that they've all been victims of accidents are fault foul play. Or maybe they've wanted to disappear for a variety of reasons that something else has to be going on. And then of course, we have the the case of the UFO contact east who often report missing time, they they have an encounter with his ship or with beings. And they discover hours or in some cases days of of missing time as a result of that. There have even been speculation that ET's are. Our from our own future. They might even be human beings. We got deformed or something. Exactly coming back from the future to to do something that they have mastered time travel. And if that would be the case, then are real our own reality would be subject to shifting and change all the time. There would be disturbances in in the fabric of of time and space because this is how we organize ourselves without the concept of time. We literally lose her place in space when we come back and just moment with Rosemary Ellen. Golly. We will talk about possessions and extra systems. Couple of her. Other books include the encyclopedia of angels talking to the dead Christmas. Angels calling upon angels as well. In when we take calls next hour. She'll chat with you..

Rosemary George Rosemary Ellen Rosemary rod Serlin Melania Kilian Richard Matheson writer Wells Ellen guy Lee
"richard matheson" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

15:56 min | 3 years ago

"richard matheson" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"I can lecturing research ghosted horsing mysterious creatures today with some friends who are going to take us to a place called Santa Kate, which is famous were taunting activity Bigfoot and dogs. So we're hoping to get some action there. That's exciting. That's exciting. So jobs with you too. And everybody's ready to roll. Oh, that's right. We'll be leaving later today. You've got a new book out called slips in time and space. Let's talk a little bit about that. And then later on tonight, Rosemary, we'll get into extra systems possession contacting the dead. And and all that. But when you talk about slips in time, what is time slip. What is that? This is a spontaneous experience where someone is out doing something. It's usually outdoors. They're walking someplace driving, and some way the landscape changes in an Erie sort of way. And they find themselves else looks like reality ordinary reality. But it's not like, and these experiences are often Ravitz berry off of people because they feel that they're caught up into something very worn an unknown like they're they've been trapped in kind of a, and they don't know how to get out of it. And they may encounter people that are dressed in very odd clothing. They may have a no encounters with people at all the landscape, maybe eerily absent, and then suddenly everything clears and they're back in ordinary time. What if it doesn't clear they stuck? Well, I do think that some of our tastes of permanently missing people may be attributed to time split that. You know, we have people reported missing when they've gone out hiking, and guess certainly accidents can happen or a foul play. But people seem to vanish on trips they're out hiking or driving. They're never seen again, and perhaps they've gone into some sort of a time war that there's no exit from. I gotta get you together with David Politis when you come back to the states Rosemary, who of course, as you know, as written a number of books about people who who are just disappearing in our state park systems. And I've always suspected if they weren't beamed aboard some UFO that maybe they're walking into another dimension. Or a time slip like that. I think that we're experiencing an increasing number of the times have been recorded with unusual frequency since post World War Two. And in fact, people have speculated that the atom bomb did something to our reality. Unleashing our experiences with UFO's and time distortions and a whole host of phenomena. But we're hearing about them more and more now, and we're certainly in an era of mass exploration of other realities of expanding consciousness, and all of these factors are contributing to changes in our own reality that could involve time if you are watching someone who slips into a time slip. If you were watching them from the back looking at them. What would you see can you kind of describe it for us? Well, no one has ever described it seeing someone disappear. We we've had some cases where people are just sort of gone out of sight for a while the pay would probably just kinda vanished. Now what characteristics? They don't happen in all cases. But they happen in a lot of them and individuals describe a shift in the landscape. There's a sudden miss there's a sudden Spong and people feel invalid in this fog. One of the cases that I researched the woman inter family had gone to Ireland and they were at a sacred site, and they had all sort of gone their own ways just doing some exploring and she felt a fog cuddly, come around her and for her family. She just simply disappeared for two hours. She didn't feel that two hours laps. She felt that she lives in the sponsor minutes, and she heard voices from the past, and she was sort of having a mystical experience. And then suddenly the fog lifted and she she saw someone from her family. And and her children said where where are you? We've been looking all over for you. We thought you've got lost. And she was very puzzled by that. Because she hasn't really moved. And by not doing that. This this Mr. this slip. You you just like kind of like fall into it. It's it's something that seems to occur in an environmental space. And these are a spontaneous experiences. There are geographic areas where he thinks recorded with some frequency. Maybe some weird warp in our reality. Where did you spend some more likely to happen? For example, another area that I research was a stretch of road and West Virginia that is known for weird things happening truck drivers experienced a lot. And one of the drivers that I interviewed said that driving along the state route he traveled many many times exactly how long it would take him from eight two point B, and he said on this particular occasion, he's driving along. And suddenly he notices that things. Don't look familiar anymore. And he hasn't gotten off the road taken any diversion. But everything has been the last year, we look to it and the further he does he notices that things are missing. There are no cars on the road. There's no telephone poles there there. No animal sounds. There are no environmental sounds. It was an eerie stillness, and he starts to get a little worried. Because now he's looking at his is watch. And he knows where he should be on a route. And he's not there. He's like somewhere else. And he starts to think. Well, did I get off the road without realizing it, but it's a very eerie lap landscape. This is recorded quite often in these times slips, no sound absence of people absence of animals, and he just keeps driving doesn't know what else to do. And then all of a sudden it breaks out into the low rise it as destinations but he's like ours late. He's had unaccounted time law and things suddenly look normal. Every rattled by this experience. Any mentioned it to smother a truck drivers that he knew and found out that other truck drivers had had similar experiences as well. So what is it about this curious stretch of the road? And these road stretches reported all over the place where people stop being in what they feel is ordinary reality normal reality. And they they go through a passage into a weird reality. And then suddenly come out of it. The the roadside diner or hotel that no longer exists. This is not a haunting. It's not seeing ghosts from the past. Is people come across something out on the road. They have real, but bizarre encounters with people the roadside diner, for example. Might be a case of people dressed in very old clothing, ridiculously low prices on the menu that seemed to be decades old they get serve food. They eat it. They pay a ridiculously low Bill, but things seem to be very odd. Nobody interacts with him very much, they leave. And then they try and find it again because they're so puzzled by it all they'd like to have the experience over again, and the place simply a Spanish, and in some cases, they discover they've done some research that there used to be a place for decades and decades ago, but it doesn't exist anymore. I don't think this is a haunting. I think these are cases of things and activities still going on in an ever present timeless scape of of eternal now. And we have these incursions into them more reasons. That we don't know and circumstances that we can't explain Rosemary rod Serling from the twilight zone and writer, Richard Matheson wrote in episode called little girl lost, and it was about two parents who woke up to the cries of their daughter. They entered her roam the find out that she had vanished. But they could still hot hear her crying. Where are you? Mommy. Daddy in the little girl fell into a time slip, and they had the figure out how to go in and get her and bring her back. Is is that what you're talking about? Absolutely. That's a perfect example. In fact. Time a lot in that particular episode that I remember the first time I thought and it scared me that this sort of thing might happen as a little girl sleeping in her bed. And suddenly a doorway to another dimension. In in in the story. It's the fourth dimension of time opens up and she falls into it. And this doorway is closing. So the urgency in the story is that they have to try and get her back before the doorway closes. And she's permanently trapped in this alternate reality, which they succeed in doing. And then soon as they get her out the doorway closes and the place in the wall behind the bed where they could stick their hands. Is now follow. And and that could be happening where people go into these time slips time warps and it closes and they can't get back ever again. I do believe that these sorts of things happen. About the cases where people come back, and they they say that they've, you know, had some strange experience that they they can't explain but from an eastern mysticism perspective there's no linear time anyway. And and, you know, even the scientists say linear time is a construct in our reality. And frankly, we would be in chaos without it. We wouldn't be able to organize ourselves beyond this concept of linear time is a stainless timeless landscape where everything happens in an ever present. Now, and it never stops. It's always happening. And if there are other dimensions parallel worlds, then we have a more complicated picture, we're not only are other things happening in an ever present. Now but versions of them different versions of our reality are happening, and we might. Slip into a different era in our own reality. But also in a parallel world, as well, which may happen to some of these people who feel that the landscape has changed in a very odd way. It doesn't look normal any more to them. And I think that these things are happening on a more frequent basis now. Now, our time slips different from general time travel. Well in time travel, we have a similar situation, but it's an intentional deliberate thing can we send ourselves in time. Now, here's an interesting thing about the time slips, George is that people rarely go into the future. They seem to go into the past or into a parallel present that's similar to but different from from our own. And maybe that's because in our linear time concepts. The future hasn't happened yet the past is fixed. And so we only move in one direction. But in the in the concept of time travel, would we have the ability to go anywhere in time. Like, h g wells is time traveler, his famous, and then could you change could you change history? If you do that well here, here's where all the paradoxes come in and one of the most famous, of course is called the grandfather paradox. Right. And and it's the idea could you go back in time to kill your grandfather before your father is born. And if you did that would you see to exist, well in this reality would, but that doesn't mean that you would not exist in another reality. And so I think that we just by the very active time travel we start to alter reality. And he would not come back to the presence that you left because the time scape would have shifted. Now. I remember remember some years ago, I interviewed someone who had lost a child in an accident. And they were. Very keen to find out if it would be possible to go back in time to warn the young man and do not do something that would result in the accident that that led to his death. But they seem to think that if they could do that everything would be exactly the same only. He would still be living in the present. But not that everything would have shifted entirely. They would be in a completely different reality. So these are some of the things that we grapple with and also could we even survive time travel, and if you did it how would you do it when you go through a wormhole, for example, would you need a machine, but would you need a machine or could you project yourself with consciousness, there's radiation and wormholes could you survive the radiation with your molecules be affected wormholes open and close, and if you went through one would you be able to get back? So the McCann. Annexe of time travel are very uncertain. However, scientists have been able to send particles back in time, and there have been experiments for years with success in that regard, a a sort of retro causation. So if the idea is if we can do it too particles. We should be able to do it to larger solid objects. But what would happen to the object with is silly great? Would it change in some way? And we don't know the answers to those questions Rosemary, Ellen guy Lee with us. Your latest book is called slips and time and space. Her website linked up at coast to coast, AM dot com. Called visionary living. We will take calls next hour with Rosemary as we'll talk about your dreams possession and extra systems contact with the dead as well..

Rosemary rod Serling Erie West Virginia Ireland David Politis Spong Richard Matheson writer George Ellen guy Lee two hours
"richard matheson" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

03:26 min | 3 years ago

"richard matheson" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"I'll say that much. I'm not opposed to that idea. I mean, I haven't I can't think of a modern Dombi movie that doesn't have where a bite from his ambi- turns you into his way, shape or form. Yeah. Agreed. Yeah. So okay. So we have that their main goal dead undead. They eat human flesh. That's death sole thing that they're driven by and they're infectious or being zombie infectious. For sure. So this doesn't mean that we that. We just described is this modern zombie which was born in nineteen sixty eight when night of the living dead was released which is kind of funny actually, considering that the words ambi- is never used in the movie. Yeah. But that's so typical and I feel like all zombie movies. Now do that because they did that. And it really bothers me like in Walking Dead. Why can't they just call them? Some what do they call them the walkers, the, blah, blah, blah, or a bite or something good? It depends on the group every sort of group that that runs around has their own name. Realistic. Everyone knows it's a freaking zombie. Well, so I think in later later movies in between that time they were called. Yes. And a lot of them. So annoys me. Well, it was actually so Jorge Romero only used the terms like ghouls or flesh eaters when he made this movie, and he didn't really encounter the terms ambi- until critics started using it when describing the film to really only then when he was like, oh these ours like and he had taken clearly from zombie fictions. But I think it sort of he put to into together after the fact, so he didn't know he was making these ambi- movie until after it was already made. Well, no, I don't think that's necessarily true. I just don't know if if he would have called them zombies or brand new creature because he did definitely take from zombie fascinating film. Okay. So okay. So if you haven't seen the movie which Aaron and I've just watched it yesterday for research. The plot. Revolves around a group of people hiding out in a house somewhere in Pennsylvania as reanimated corpses. Doodo radiation accident swarm around the house, his movie effectively began or created entire new sub genre of horror movie Romero and his co writer. John Russo drew from a bunch of sources as I mentioned for inspiration, including his ambi- called white zombie which I'll talk more about later, and I am legend the book by Richard Matheson about a plague of vampires, but neither living dead was something really brand new in many ways. This was the first movie to depict zombies as flesh-eating as outnumbering people as not controlled by an outside force as being contagious and a government struggling to maintain control. This was a far cry from the early depictions of zombies in Hollywood movies, this movie in many zombie movies that followed us. As as a metaphor for whatever was really threatening society or humanity such as unchecked consumerism, the violence, Vietnam war or the resistance against America, the threat of nuclear war, racial inequality. And so on. In modern zombie movies. Zombies are used to expose the true nature of humanity..

Jorge Romero Dombi John Russo Richard Matheson Aaron America Pennsylvania writer
"richard matheson" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"richard matheson" Discussed on 600 WREC

"They die. They became these entities. Electro-magnetic entities, and there's an entire electromagnetic universe out there, and they're all energy beings. And it's without a body. And it's very different. He tried to describe this. I think it's that kind of thing not specifically that but that whatever is next seems to be number one subject to your personality. And what you think it's going to be if if you see the movie, what dreams may come or read the book by Richard Matheson? Here's an indication that we would make our own heaven and hell, and that's certainly a possibility, and we kind of hear that a little bit from the mediums as well. The one thing we do here from means the world over which is interesting. Is that people have this kind of life review almost like the movie defending your life, and they get faced with the things they did. Right. And the things they did wrong. So the very bad people people who've done bad things have to come to terms with things they did bad. And that is for some people might be a kind of hell, right? I was going to say is that where religion created the word hell to try to scare people to be good. Well, the word probably comes from the Norse. There was a Norse goddess of the underworld Hella and her territory was hell, and there was Haiti's, of course, in many cultures around the world. There is a form of an afterlife that is positive in one that's negative. The Greeks had the Elision fields and they had partner s and they had the general underworld. But it was all all the underworld. I mean Elision fields or even under- world, they weren't above and heavens or something. So there there is a need for human beings. Explain the unexplained we've always come up with stories to explain these things and religion.

Richard Matheson partner Haiti
"richard matheson" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"richard matheson" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Licko magnetic universe out there, and they're all energy beings without a body. And it's very different. He tried to describe this. I think it's that kind of thing not specifically that but that whatever is next seems to be number one subject to your personality. And what you think it's going to be if if you've seen the movie, what dreams may come or read the book by Richard Matheson? Here's an indication that we would make our own heaven and hell, and that's certainly a possibility. And we kinda here that a little bit from the mediums as well. The one thing we do here from the world over which is interesting is that. People have this kind of life review almost like the movie defending your life, and they get faced with the things. They did. Right. And the things they did wrong. So very bad. People people who've done bad things have to come to terms with the things they did bad. And that is for some people may be a kind of hell, well, I was going to say is that we're religion created the word hell to try to scare people to be good. Well, the word he'll probably comes from the Norse where there was a nor Scotus of the underworld Hella and her territory was held. And there was Haiti's, of course, in many cultures around the world. There is a form of an afterlife that is positive in one that's negative. The Greeks had the Elision fields, and they had partner s and they had just the general underworld, but it was all all the underworld Elision fields even underworld they weren't above and heavens or something. So there there is a need for human beings to explain the unexplained. We always come up with stories to explain these things and religion has or can. And certainly cases some cases certainly has taken beliefs. People have extended them in ways that allow the.

Richard Matheson partner Haiti
The Haunting of Hill House review

Overdue

01:38 min | 3 years ago

The Haunting of Hill House review