35 Burst results for "Richard Harris"

What Are the Newsom Recall Polls Saying?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:01 min | 1 year ago

What Are the Newsom Recall Polls Saying?

"Hey everybody. Welcome to this episode of the charlie kirk show with us. Today's a friend of mine and he's rarely ever wrong. In fact we had him coming on our program leading up to the election and he got almost all of his predictions correctly. Richard harris from the people's pundit and also we had you on for the georgia thing and you're the one that early said. Hey we got a problem in georgia and you're right so we're going to talk about california polls and so all right richard. Let's cut through all of the nonsense. Yes the way. It works in california for all of our friends in maine and massachusetts and florida and south carolina. It's a two part question. Yes or no recall gavin newsom and if yes then who let's start with the yes or no. Do you think that the yeses are going outnumber the nose. Yes we pulled it a couple of weeks back and we had no ahead by a little bit charlie. But let me leave this with you. The caveat here is that. I thought my share of the you know is part of poland. I thought my share of the white vote was a little bit high california's usually forty five fifty percent tops and did see other pollsters. That had him in the sixties. If you look at who's voting right now. This is why democrats are nervous. The electorate is very white. And it's and it's much older so if if the electorate and we had them at fifth we whites at fifty five but we still had the age breakdown to be pretty young so that could a two point advantage could easily be swamped demographic difference like that the problem newsom has then i was just saying this before he needs white liberals and asian voters to come out and they are the least likely to want to vote. Weitz were over. Eighty percent certain to vote when we pull them And asia voters were in the fifty s. So it. I mean it really. It goes to show you got a close race can turn into a nailbiter either way

Charlie Kirk Georgia California Richard Harris Gavin Newsom South Carolina Maine Massachusetts Richard Florida Charlie Poland Newsom Weitz Asia
"richard harris" Discussed on Down To Folk

Down To Folk

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"richard harris" Discussed on Down To Folk

"A composition by the irish author and poet. richard harris. Richard harris sprang was. Never waiting for us It ran one step ahead as we followed the dance between the parted pages and were pressed in love hot fevered iron like a striped pair of pants i recall the yellow cotton dress foaming like a wave on the ground around your knees. The burns like tender babies in your hands. The old man playing checkers by the trees there will be another song for me for. I will sing it. There will be another dream for me. Someone will bring it. I will drink the wine while it's worm and never let you catch me looking at the sun. And after all the loves of my life he'll still be the one. I will take my life into my hands and i will use it. I will win the worship in your eyes. And i will lose. It will have the things that i desire and my passion flow like rivers through the sky and after all the loves of my life. I'll be thinking of you wondering why macarthur's hark is melting in the dark all the sweet green icing flowing down. Someone left the cake out in the rain. And i don't think i can take it because it took so long to bake it. Never have that recipe again. You.

richard harris Richard harris macarthur
2 Dead, Multiple Wounded After Shootings at Virginia Beach

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

2 Dead, Multiple Wounded After Shootings at Virginia Beach

"Richard Harris. NPR news Police in Virginia Beach are investigating shootings overnight that left two people dead and eight wounded. NPR's Giles Snyder reports. Several arrests were made. Virginia Beach police chief Paul knew the gate says it was a chaotic night. We have a very chaotic incident very chaotic night in the beach, many different crime scenes, according to a police statement, the eight people who were wounded we're taking the hospitals with injuries ranging from serious to life threatening. And new to Gates is an officer was injured when he was struck by a vehicle during the initial police response, while police were investigating the initial shooting knew the gate says additional shots were fired nearby, leading to a man being fatally shot by an officer. Has been placed on administrative leave. Separately, A woman who was killed by gunfire is not believed to

Giles Snyder NPR Virginia Beach Police Paul Knew Richard Harris Virginia Beach Gates
CDC director warns of possible Covid surge as U.S. cases increase by 7%

NPR News Now

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

CDC director warns of possible Covid surge as U.S. cases increase by 7%

"Will inskeep says one thousand nine cases are starting to climb again and the nation could face another surge of people. Let down their guard. Npr's richard harris has more at a white house briefing. Well linski said that. The average daily case count of covid nineteen has recently increased about seven percent and hospital. Admissions are also starting to climb slightly about a thousand people a day continue to die. She said she's deeply concerned about this trajectory and we know from prior surges. That if we don't control things now. There is a real potential for the epidemic curve. Just sore again. She acknowledged that many americans are weary of the epidemic but she said that it is still important to take precautions. Such as wearing masks a bit longer until a large share of the public is vaccinated. Richard harris

Inskeep Linski Richard Harris NPR White House
AstraZeneca updates report, insists COVID vaccine highly effective

NPR News Now

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

AstraZeneca updates report, insists COVID vaccine highly effective

"Has updated information about its covid. Nineteen vaccine this comes after a federal advisory board complained. The company's original report was based on outdated information. npr's richard harris reports. The new data are not a lot different. Astrazeneca reported monday that its vaccine was seventy nine percent effective against covid nineteen in its latest study but a review committee complained that the figure was based on incomplete data that public scolding editor other company. Missteps that had left people unsure about astrazeneca's research. The company has now that figure to say that the vaccine was seventy six percent effective overall. Not a big difference that the figure could still change. As the company processes more data the company also says the vaccine was one hundred percent effective at keeping people out of the hospital in preventing death in its latest. Study richard

Astrazeneca Richard Harris NPR Richard
U.S. Covid-19 Case Decline Leveling Off In ‘Very Concerning Shift’ As Variants Spread, CDC Director Warns

NPR News Now

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

U.S. Covid-19 Case Decline Leveling Off In ‘Very Concerning Shift’ As Variants Spread, CDC Director Warns

"We've been seeing in new covid. Nineteen cases is starting to level off. That's the warning today from federal health officials who are worried the pandemic could once again take a turn for the worse. Here's npr's richard harris cases hospitalizations and deaths have been declining significantly for several weeks. But at a white house briefing director rochelle walinsky warned that the decline seems to be stalling. We are watching these concerning data very closely to see where they will go over the next few days. But it's important to remember where we are in the pandemic scenes are tenuous. Now is not a time to relax restrictions yet some states and localities are starting to do just that even as about seventy thousand. New cases are reported daily. health officials. Say they need more time for vaccination campaigns to take effect in order to bring that number down towards zero richard

Rochelle Walinsky Richard Harris NPR White House Richard
Doses Of Antibody Drugs Remain Unused As They Present Various Challenges

All Things Considered

03:51 min | 1 year ago

Doses Of Antibody Drugs Remain Unused As They Present Various Challenges

"The federal government says it has delivered more than 300,000 doses of monoclonal antibody drugs to help facilities nationwide. They're designed to treat patients with mild to moderate covert 19. The ideas keep those patients out of the hospital, but Many of those doses are sitting unused, due in no small part to the challenge of administering those drugs. NPR's science correspondent Richard Harris looks at to healthcare systems that have overcome those hurdles and are seeing hopeful results. Monoclonal antibodies present all sorts of challenges. They're given to people who have active infections, but who aren't hospitalized, so it's important to treat them without exposing other patients to risk. The drugs by Regeneron and Eli Lilly are also given by infusion, and that process takes a couple of hours. So when you add all this up, you know it's really a logistical challenge to deliver this therapy to a lot of people. But Dr Howard Long at Houston Methodist Hospital, says they figured out how to do that. They've opened clinics around Houston and doctors affiliated with the hospital are referring eligible patients. That is people who are over 65 or who have health conditions that put them at high risk. So at this point we're doing about 50 to 70 infusions a day, and patients are usually scheduled within a Relatively short period of time. So from the time they call into being infused, it's usually less than two days. The timing is important because these drugs appear to beam or effective early in the course of the disease. Mostly help people who aren't mounting their own strong immune reactions and, well medication sits unused in many locations around the country. That is not the case at his hospital, Hong says. Right now we're constrained more by the drug supply. They use it as fast as they get it. Any doctors nationwide aren't so enthusiastic about these drugs, though treatment guidelines issued by the National Institutes of Health say there's actually not good evidence to know whether they work. That's because the Food and Drug Administration relied on studies of just a few 100 patients to grant these drugs, emergency authorization. So these are very small numbers that under normal conditions nobody would never publish in the journal like New England Journal of Medicine. Yet this is, you know, kind of headline news. Welcome Toko bit time right. But doctors are gaining experience. Houston Methodist is now treated more than 1100 patients, Hong says. We're seeing results that are comparable to what was reported in the clinical trials by Eli Lilly and Regeneron about six or 7% of patients who are treated end up in the hospital or emergency room. He figures that without treatment about 15% of the most high risk patients could end up in the hospital or ER. Doctors affiliated with the Mayo Clinic or also encouraged by their experience. They've dust more than 2000 patients in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Arizona and Florida. Dr. Raymond reasonably has done a preliminary analysis of the 1st 1000 or so patients and finds low hospitalization rates. More importantly, there is some signal that is also reducing death. But again this our preliminary analysis we have to kind of make sure that this are all vetted by pure review. But this is what we're seeing. That's why we're happy. Unlike a clinical trial, this real world experience doesn't have a careful comparison group so doctors can't say for sure that these patients are faring better. Even so, these encouraging findings may be swaying doctors who weren't sure they wanted to refer their patients for treatment. There's nobody says patients are also becoming less skeptical. Initially, there were more declines than accept. But no, we're actually seeing more except than declines, and even though it takes a lot of person power to provide this treatment reasonably and Hong believe they're actually reducing the overall workload. Keeping patients out of the hospital. Richard Harris NPR

Regeneron Dr Howard Long Houston Methodist Hospital Eli Lilly Richard Harris NPR Houston Methodist Federal Government Hong Houston Dr. Raymond National Institutes Of Health Toko New England Journal Of Medicin Food And Drug Administration Mayo Clinic Wisconsin Minnesota
New COVID antibody treatment underway at Houston Methodist may reduce hospitalizations

All Things Considered

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

New COVID antibody treatment underway at Houston Methodist may reduce hospitalizations

"The outcome will determine which party controls the Senate. And it Bonnie Drugs to treat people with mild to moderate Covad 19 have been slow to roll out. But two institutions that have succeeded say the drugs are apparently helping people get out of stay out of the hospital. NPR's Richard Harris says that story. The federal government says it is distributed more than 300,000 doses of monoclonal antibodies for emergency use. These drugs are designed to keep people with mild to moderate illness out of the hospital. But many hospitals offended difficult to ramp up to infuse these medications. It takes staff and time and patients are infectious, which adds to the challenge. Plus the benefit is uncertain. But the male clinic says it is infused more than 2000 patients to date, and Houston Methodist Hospital says it's treated more than 1100 patients. Doctors at both hospitals say the drugs appear to be keeping people out of the hospital,

Covad Richard Harris Bonnie Senate NPR Federal Government Houston Methodist Hospital
Oxygen-Detecting Devices Give Misleading Readings In People With Dark Skin

All Things Considered

02:46 min | 1 year ago

Oxygen-Detecting Devices Give Misleading Readings In People With Dark Skin

"College the common advisor fingertip Nikita Leo devices is with college that measure bound, oxygen which works in with the blood low income or and increasingly first generation students. finding their way Normally, into what people's we do homes is we sit Because down the of students, the covert 19 we pandemic. walk through the common These pulse app. We ox walk devices through can different sometimes like give schools, misleading websites readings, and though, and people even with dark like, skin help them That's according physically to a new study. do it fast stuff NPR's we're science doing correspondent all of that. Richard Harris Over the reports phone and video when Detroit's screen, hospital and started so to overflow with that's covert really patients. hard. Earlier But this while year, colleges some are patients being flexible ended up at for the seniors University around of Michigan tests and in activities, Ann Arbor the Leo and advises his doctor Michael applicants showed to Ng steer started clear treating of this writing influx about the of pandemic. largely black Every patients. teenager He wants to started write about noticing Cove in something odd about the results from the fingertip and device like just called encouraging a pulse them to, like, Oximeter. try to think about other It's things that have happened It's out in of their life this and number called And right an oxygen about those things. saturation Education value, strategist which Michael Horn gives us says an understanding the big dip in of enrollment how much at campuses Oxygen this fall is in could the blood. work to some But that students oxygen advantage. reading was sometimes They're off much when compared more in to the a position more sophisticated of being test able that to samples choose blood the college from a person's because artery. a lot of these colleges So are shooting desperate and for his colleagues them to show started up gathering and pay data for comparing most applicants. these readings The application in light skinned deadline people versus is January dark 1st. skinned people. For NPR They measured. News. How often I'm Ryan Delaney. a pulse ox reading, apparently It only took in the normal range 100 actually years. came from Major someone League with low Baseball oxygen. announced today We found it will recognize that this the happened Negro much Leagues more often as major in patients. league correcting They were black, with the organization basically calls about a long three time times this oversight often in about the game's 12% history. of the time. Apparently Move comes normal on the readings centennial were actually of the misleading, founding Shooting of the says. Negro Leagues You know, it's Back not in happening 1920. a lot. From then to But 1948. if you think about Black players how were not often allowed to play these with white players measurements in the American are taken or national leagues. If it's wrong, Author you know 12% and historian of the time. Larry Lester I think is that three called founder I'm worried of the that Negro could be Leagues really Baseball impactful. Museum. So He how has Where been do advocating you think doctors for this in moment. critical care and For years. elsewhere in Larry hospitals Lester, Welcome are to all how things Where considered. are they have this issue? Thank you for having me. I Mary don't think they're Louise aware Kelly. at all. We're When glad I to have you with create us. And these as analysis, I know, this I was has just been really a surprised. long time Shorting coming. says There are Would a you tell few previous me how you studies about this how phenomenon. you heard So the news? What specialist went through in your some head? fields may be familiar with it. He's Oh, spreading the word Have more broadly a Negro with leagues, report Google in alert the New England and Journal of Medicine, Came across he my desk suspects this morning. the reason And behind this is that the color is that of tears light of used joy that in pulse ox emitters after can 50 be absorbed plus years by skin of pigment. Dr Mentality Tool. statistics Mullen, associate they're now dean being for health recognized. equity at the University of Texas Dell Medical School So in Austin, it was agrees. a watershed This is about moment skin for me. color, not I can't race, imagine. but she's I can't concerned imagine that the impact feeling the of finding seeing that could alert. have Come on across people your who phone may and rely think on today consumer I didn't read grade that right? pulse Is ox this real? devices Finally? at home, sometimes Yes, in exactly. lieu of medical care. Pulse. Ox devices are still We mentioned a all valuable the years tool, that you she have says. been But working it's on important this. This has to look been at your the results in context. your mission has been If somebody going through has the archives coronavirus, trying to dig and through they're feeling really short of breath, and compile but they're getting all the statistics our normal because number. the statistics for the Say Negro League an have oxygen were saturation incomplete of 92 over Lost. to 96% Is that right? or more, Oh, yes. they should Before pay more attention there was an to Internet their shortness of I breath would make daily trips than what that to the oxygen library is being and measured. and read microfilmed. Shooting says these will remain Newspapers, important for hospitals particularly the black as well. newspapers But across now he thinks the country more carefully about and how to interpret make the

Nikita Leo Seniors University Michael Horn NPR Ryan Delaney Major Someone League Richard Harris Larry Lester Larry Hospitals Lester Ann Arbor NG Baseball Detroit Michigan Dr Mentality Michael University Of Texas Dell Medic Louise Journal Of Medicine
Hospitals Puzzled With How To Administer Monoclonal Antibodies To COVID-19 Patients

All Things Considered

03:47 min | 2 years ago

Hospitals Puzzled With How To Administer Monoclonal Antibodies To COVID-19 Patients

"Are starting to use new drugs that are designed to keep covert 19 patients out of the hospital. But it's not clear how well these monoclonal antibodies work, and some hospital administrators are wondering how long their staffs will be able to give this time consuming treatment. As emergency rooms and beds fill up. NPR's science correspondent Richard Harris spoke to doctors in New Mexico and Wisconsin as they launched their treatment programs. The Food and Drug Administration has granted emergency authorization to two monoclonal antibody formulations. These drugs are supposed to prevent the Corona virus from invading cells there specifically for people with mild to moderate disease who are not in the hospital. And it's not just a shot or a pill. They have to be given by Ivy infusion, a process that takes two hours or more like everything in today's world during the pandemic, our biggest challenges are around staffing. Dr. Peter Newcomer is chief clinical officer at University of Wisconsin Health in Madison. He says his hospital is giving the drug after hours in an infusion center so infectious covert patients don't cross paths with cancer patients and other vulnerable people. Special plea went out for nurses to take on yet another shift. Even as the hospital struggles with rising Covad cases, the hospital can initially handle eight patients a night. Newcomer says They started with three patients on Tuesday night. Our advertising campaign to the community when I'll come Monday and Tuesday, so we're going to see more tonight and then Philip all over slots. Real soon. If everyone who qualifies for this treatment asks for it, the hospital will quickly run out of drugs. So you w health set up a system to identify people who would most likely benefit primarily people over 65 with underlying health conditions. Will randomly pick from that pool. If there isn't enough drug to go around. It's basically a lottery type system with an allocation that is done as equitably as we can informed consent for this includes telling patients that it's not clear just how well these drugs actually work. The National Institutes of Health put out treatment guidelines, saying there's simply not enough information to know if they are effective. Company studies suggest doctors have to treat 10 to 20 patients to avoid a single hospitalization. Dr. Newcomer wishes he could tell how well the huge investment in staff time will pay off as long as we can continue to provide this treatment. We plan on it. It's gonna have to be an ongoing evaluation of what we can afford to do. From the staffing standpoint, the drugs could help hospitals if they can keep their patient loads down in Santa Fe, New Mexico, Dr. David Gonzalez is keeping a close eye on the capacity of Krista's ST Vincent's Hospital where he's the chief medical officer. We're currently entering crisis levels stage with bed capacity that's throughout the state of New Mexico. His hospital is directing people most likely to benefit from the new treatment to the hospital's emergency room for the infusions. We have a portion of our emergency room that's dedicated to cope in positive patients. Krista Saint Vincent's Hospital infused its first patient Tuesday, using one of the eight initial doses of the drug allocated by the state of New Mexico. After the hour long infusion. Nurses monitor patients for 1 to 6 hours to make sure that there are no serious side effects, and Gonzales says that monitoring continues once patients leave the hospital were able to follow the patients at home. And, uh, and a pain their vital signs and they can go through a questionnaire in which we ask them if they're experiencing specific symptoms more than 2400 medical facilities nationwide have been allocated some of these drugs. And many are like these in New Mexico in Wisconsin, now starting to figure out how to make it all work. Richard

Dr. Peter Newcomer University Of Wisconsin Health New Mexico Richard Harris NPR Food And Drug Administration Dr. Newcomer Wisconsin Dr. David Gonzalez Madison St Vincent's Hospital National Institutes Of Health Cancer Krista Saint Vincent's Hospita Krista Santa Fe Gonzales Richard
"richard harris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"richard harris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Weakened numbers are usually not as bad because data collection is is a bit. But on Sunday, Johns Hopkins reported another 133,000 cases in the United States. We heard that the total is over 11 million now, But remember, in the early days, many cases went on reported so. The real figures probably over 30 million, and Hopkins says the death toll is likely to top a quarter of a million Americans by the end of this week, and what's been the response to that? Well. The Trump administration has left most public health decisions to the state, so it's a patchwork, but many states have been dialing up their response. Over the weekend, For example, Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer issued an emergency order that puts a three week pause on law large indoor gatherings. High schools, colleges, bowling alleys and movie theaters are all being shuttered, for example. But you know, bars and restaurants and Jim's can still do some business, so it's not a total shutdown. North Dakota's governor on Friday also issued an order requiring masks indoors and warned that the state's health system capacity is strained. And when hospitals around the country fill up with coronavirus patients, what happens then? Well, that's already starting to happen. Unfortunately, for awhile, patients could be moved. Other facilities and staff could be redeployed to some extent. But Dr Georges Benjamin, who runs the American Public Health Association, says That's often not possible in rural areas, and that's where the epidemic is now spreading really rapidly. So I'm really concerned that we're going to begin going to what we call crisis standard of care where we're going to have to make this really, really tough medical decisions. About patients and I'm hoping we don't get there. But it really looks like that might very well be our future. Yeah, That means rationing care. Dr. Benjamin says this didn't have to happen if the public had been fully on board with public health measures to prevent the spread of the disease. So what can public health officials do now? Well, they can keep pleading with people to wear masks, keep it safe distance and isolate if you're sick, Dr Benjamin added one more item to his wish list. The outgoing administration now needs to very, very actively collaborate with the incoming administration. So we get our hands around this pandemic as quickly as we can. Yeah, because if I didn't administration really needs to be able to hit the ground running because you know the pandemic will be far from over on January 20th that is NPR's science correspondent Richard Harris. Thank you any time. You're.

Dr Georges Benjamin Johns Hopkins American Public Health Associa Gretchen Whitmer United States NPR North Dakota Michigan Jim Richard Harris
"richard harris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:26 min | 2 years ago

"richard harris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"End up on the market. That's NPR's Richard Harris. Thank you so much. Sure I'd be good to talk to you. You are listening to all things considered from NPR news. One of the nation's leading philanthropies is charging into one of the country's leading cultural debates. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, which provides financial support to NPR, has pledged a quarter of a billion dollars to reimagine the country's monuments. This is about the whole range of American stories, you know, less than a half of 1% of our Commemorative spaces Tell Latin Ex stories. Asian American stories. INDIGENOUS stories. Foundation President Elizabeth Alexander says the project will award grants to artists and organizations that will be contextualized the country's current public spaces and add new ones. Elizabeth Alexander. Welcome to all things considered. Thank you for having me on. So this is not the first time you guys have put money towards an effort like this. There was 25 million in 2018 for memorials. What about that experience made you think? OK, let's go 10 times bigger. Well, I think that this is the biggest initiative in melons. History. So definitely for us. This is major. Before I even came to Melun. I have thought forever about what stories have been told what stories haven't been told What do dominant narratives due to our understanding of history? Melon is a foundation is devoted to higher learning devoted to deep knowledge, and as we further democratize our work, as we think about what it means to be a Social Justice Foundation. The question of where and how we learn turns more and more to public space. People aren't always going to go into the university classroom in orderto learn history, but What we see around us. What is ambient is teaching us all the time. Now, One of the project schools is to relocate existing monuments. What does that mean? Because that was one of the biggest questions around this debate nationwide was kind of what do we do with these things? And where should they go? So what? Well, what does that mean to you all It's important for people to understand that the Melon Foundation is not casting across the land deciding what is to be relocated. But communities themselves do have opinions about what they live with What story it teaches and what it teaches them and their Children about themselves in their place in the world, and so sometimes community first. There would be pieces that would be moved away. Meaning if there has been, AH, movement to take something down, the local government agrees. This is grant funding that could help in that process. Yes, because it is complex, literally, even physically complex. You know, the National Cathedral If I could add one thing had stained glass windows with the image of Robert E. Lee that they put in in 1953. Civil war was long gone and lost by Ben and just a few years ago, they said, This is an impediment to worship. We don't venerate this in a space that is holy, and they decided to take them down and they haven't said. We're going to put them in a museum. We're going to do this. That or the other thing they've said we're going to think about this. And that's some deep in important work, and we're excited to be supportive of people in that process. So some of this grand will, of course, go to support artist who focus on racial and social justice right so there they will be producing new work. Can you give us an example of something like that? Well, one thing you could do that is a re contextual ization is Dustin Klein has an extraordinary project where he is projecting in color onto the statue of Robert E. Lee images of Briana Taylor of George Floyd of John Lewis of Nelson Mandela of other people whose lives we might want to commemorate. We support the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery. Brian Stevenson's equal Justice Initiative, which does many pieces, including historical research into lynchings, marking where lynchings happened in spaces where the Confederacy is memorial memorialized a museum that teaches the story of our history and then The profound cathedral that is the memorial to honor the victims of lynching and to point towards reconciliation. Elizabeth Alexander is the president of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Thank you for your time. Thank you so much for your questions. Lizzie is supported by Hackensack Meridian, John Ther Cancer Center, the only cancer center in New Jersey to receive recognition as high performing, according to the 2020, U. S News and World Report. Hackensack meridian health dot org's slash Get cancer care now. On the next All of it will get an overview of the 43rd Asian American International Film Festival with festival director Kayla Wong Plus director Harima Rose joins us to discuss her award winning film once upon a river about a Native American teenager in 19 seventies rural Michigan who sets out on a journey on the stark River in search of her strange mother. I'm Alison Stewart joined me for all of it. We visit me on WNYC. It's all things considered on W N Y. C. I'm Sean Carlson. For two nights, Members of New York City's Orthodox Jewish community have taken to the streets, a borough park in Brooklyn to protest the state's new corona virus restrictions. Officials say they're intended to stop the spread of the virus in hospital neighborhoods were covert infections are spiking. Some residents, though, say the state is unfairly targeting Orthodox Jewish communities. Today, Governor Cuomo again denied that I know These communities are upset. I know it. You still have to enforce the law can be a situation where I enforce the law Unless the community is upset. I enforce the law unless it's a politically sensitive Community to May. The governor says it's up to local governments to enforce covered restrictions. But as the virus surges again, it's entirely clear how enforcement will happen. So we're joined now by W. And reporters Glen Hogan and Yasmeen Khan, who have been looking into this Gwen. As we said, we've seen two consecutive nights of violent protests in Borough Park and now lawsuit attempting to block shutdowns in those neighborhoods. Can you give us the latest there? Right. So today, Agudath Israel of America, sued to stop the governor's executive order. And that's a group that advocates for her D Orthodox Jewish groups internationally and Cuomo's air just to remind you, you know it caps religious gatherings of 10, people in high risk areas shuts down all nonessential businesses inclusive schools. Here's a V Shefrin. He's a spokesman for good If we're hoping that that will allow attentions to stop simmering so much and that people do what they should be doing and not feel that they they they're in rebellion against the government, which is not a healthy thing. And of course, he's referring as you mentioned before to these two nights of unrest where people burned masks. There, you know, In some cases, they violently attacked a journalist and counter protesters. Shefrin says. There are Cupid's safe ways People can gather without such strict measures mandated by the state. But on the other hand, Cuomo has said there were less strict measures that weren't here too, and that's why we're in this situation in the first place, a spokesman for the governor said after the lawsuit has been filed that they're just trying to protect people from the spread of the virus. And you know, City and State Health department are detecting.

Governor Cuomo Elizabeth Alexander Andrew W. Mellon Foundation NPR president Borough Park Robert E. Lee Social Justice Foundation Melon Foundation Melun Richard Harris State Health department director government National Cathedral Alison Stewart Sean Carlson
Trump returns to Oval Office, says it's a "blessing from God" that he got COVID-19

All Things Considered

03:21 min | 2 years ago

Trump returns to Oval Office, says it's a "blessing from God" that he got COVID-19

"President. Trump has been back at the White House for a couple days now, after being hospitalized for the Corona virus, And today he released a new video aimed at showing everyone he is doing. Okay. I think this was a blessing from God that I caught it. This was a blessing in disguise. Of course, His doctors have said that he is not out of the woods yet, and they are monitoring his condition. Very closely Here to talk about the latest are NPR. White House correspondent Tamara Keith and science correspondent Richard Harris hated both of you. Hello. They also a OK Tam. Let's start with you tell us a little more about this video. So it came after Trump spent 48 hours out of public view. Once he returned to the White House. This was recorded in the Rose Garden. He emphasized that it was outside of the Oval Office and in terms of spreading it to someone else outdoors would be a safer place to film it, certainly for the staff. The message was essentially, I'm back. I feel great. He recorded it a few hours before it hit Twitter on DH just in time for the evening news. Fox News aired the whole message and White House chief of staff Marks met Mark Meadows, who was also on Fox emphasized that the president was hard at work. And I understand that President Trump talked a lot about therapeutic drugs in this video. Richard. What did you make of what he said about those drugs? Right? Well, the president's video is clearly a rush job. He talked about an experimental drug he called Regeneron. But you know, that's actually the name of the company that makes the product. Trump said he got it in the hospital, but his doctor earlier had said that he got the infusion on Friday before he went to the hospital. The president has decided without evidence that it made a big difference for him, even though he received other medications. Here's just a little bit of the video. It really did a fantastic job. I want to get for you what I got. And I'm going to make it free. You're not gonna pay for it, huh? Okay, So what exactly are these drugs like? How do they work? Well, these are antibodies that are designed to block the virus. There monoclonal antibodies they're called. It's a very promising idea. Kind of like a shortcut to temporary immunity. At least that's the concept. But the data aren't yet strong enough to get full FDA approval and indecision, too. Regeneron. Eli Lilly has a couple of products in the works, and they see most promising. For people who are just getting sick. It's not a miracle drug, but it seemed to keep people out of the hospital. Eli Lilly applied for Emergency Youth Oscar with authorization today for one of those two products that it has in the works, but FDA approval process takes time. The lowly executives were not expecting a snap decision, as the president suggested was coming in is right and we also just heard the president say he's gonna make these drugs free. I mean, what are the chances of that? Will regular Americans be able to get them? Well, that's a good question. Presumably, the federal government will subsidize this there. They've already subsidized Regeneron project to the tune of like half a billion dollars. Lily is doing it on its own dime, but but they also expect that the government will subsidize it, Lily, by the way, his eyes expecting to produce a million doses of this first product by the end of the year, so so there could be at least reasonable supply. Although it would have to stretch globally, so right, Yes. So that's sort of the butt. But, yeah, it seems as though if it could get emergency youth authorization, it could be available and potentially if the government feels like it at little or

President Trump White House Regeneron White House Correspondent Eli Lilly FDA Federal Government Richard Harris NPR Twitter Fox News Oscar Tamara Keith Lily Rose Garden President. Oval Office Chief Of Staff FOX
Trump’s medical team says he could be discharged from Walter Reed as soon as Monday

Weekend Edition Sunday

05:18 min | 2 years ago

Trump’s medical team says he could be discharged from Walter Reed as soon as Monday

"Could be headed back to the White House as soon as Monday that from the president's medical team who held a briefing today, here's a clip from that Dr Sean Connolly, speaking in front of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Over the course of his illness. The president has experienced two episodes, Transit drops his oxygen saturation, and and there there was was much much more more information information from from today's today's briefing, briefing, particularly particularly compared compared to to yesterday's. yesterday's. Let's Let's welcome welcome NPR NPR science science correspondent correspondent Richard Richard Harris. Harris. Good Good Morning, Morning, Richard Richard and Dr Carlos del Rio, an epidemiologist at Emory University. Hello, do you Are you? Well, Richard, I'm going to start with you. But let's hear first. Ah clip from Dr Brian Garbled E. On the treatments the president has received. We continue to plan to use a five day course of Rome disappear. In response to transient low oxygen levels as Dr Conley has discussed. We did initiate Dexter methadone therapy, and he received his first dose of that yesterday. And our plan is to continue that for the time being All right, Richard, What does that tell you? Well, that tells me that the president was at fifth had very least serious course of disease, and he's getting sort of the top line treatment to address it. The decks the method zone is a steroid. Drug that helps tap down inflammation, which can be a really bad sign in somebody who's immune system may be starting to overreact to the virus. So doctors have come to realize that this is actually capable of saving lives in people. This is the only drug that has actually been demonstrated to do that with Corona virus, and so they've given it to him that will really help stabilize his immune system. That's the hope and of course, the room disappear is a drug that is designed to stop the virus from mass producing itself inside the body. The FDA is authorised its use, but specifically people who are really sick enough that they need help breathing. It has now become evident that the The president's had a couple of episodes where his oxygen levels were dropping. And and at least one instance where they gave him supplemental Oxygen. So s so it looks as though he's you know, getting pretty aggressive treatment for his for his condition, which seems appropriate And surprising to me is how quickly they expect that he may actually be able to go home. Maybe as soon as tomorrow. Well, Dr Del Rio. Let's talk about that. We heard in the clip in the introduction. The doctors they're talking about the president's oxygen levels. As we know with covert 19. It does affect the lungs and oxygen. Saturation is a real big indicator about how well you're doing. So, what did you hear there? Well, you know, I heard several things that hurt that. He he was there when you need to put things together. He's initially diagnosed. He's got mild of these, like, you know, 84% of people of covert have smiled. But they made the decision to give them the one of the two call antibodies Regeneron one and that's currently being studied in people with mild disease. We don't need to be in the article. Then his options saturation crops, and the decision is to transfer into the hospital because once your oxygen saturation cross below 94%, even if it's transitory. You're immediately in the category of no longer mild or moderate, but in the category of being released and its investigations that boat from disappear and Memphis on has proven to be effective. And that's exactly what the president has received was given disappeared. He conceded that the medicine and that's where he currently is right now, Dr Florio. This's important so I'm going to put this to you all along. They had been describing The president's symptoms as mild. You seem to be suggesting that the moment his oxygen levels dropped and he was given supplemental oxygen and then put on these experimental treatments. You could no longer categorize him what he was experiencing as mild symptoms. That is correct. Correct at that point in time, the president no longer having me having mild disease. That's how he's having severe disease, and he's put in a different category. And you know, that explains why Mark Meadows was concerned as express complains why he was actually he told us you know the president. We were very concerned. You know exactly that. I think he's telling you, he was telling the truth. But then I guess the question is your your doctor. Why wouldn't the presidents of the president's doctors have explained it in the same way? I mean, we heard today. Dr Conley say that he wanted to give an upbeat assessment. But that seems at odds with perhaps what the truth may have been. That is correct. I mean, I don't want to to say you know, but I was quite frankly, very disappointed by the press briefing yesterday. I think the press briefing yesterday. What spent he was speaking like a spin doctor. He wasn't speaking like a medical doctor. And you know the job of a loss in medicine when you're doing something like this, especially when somebody who is as important as president is to is to speak the truth and to be transparent, and I think, you know, Unfortunately, we are an administration were transparency and truth has not been at the forefront of this of this response. And we're seeing even in this case when the president of the patient

President Trump Richard Richard Richard Richard Harris Dr Conley NPR Dr Sean Connolly Dr Carlos Del Rio Dr Del Rio Dr Brian Garbled Walter Reed National Military Dr Florio Emory University Methadone White House Memphis FDA Mark Meadows
"richard harris" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"richard harris" Discussed on KQED Radio

"They continue to have headaches continued to have Malaya that continue to have this brain fog just Dunfield normally, so I suspect that you're not going to be normal and it's gonna be really hard. You have a full schedule to be campaigning to be here to be there. If he is, if he goes in that direction, and Mara Liasson that will definitely have an impact on many things. On many things. I mean, look, there are two debates coming up to presidential debates. Is he going to be well enough to attend them? They're the last two chances that he'll have to change the dynamic of this race. What about campaigning? What about just the basic message of the campaign? The president said that Cove in 19 was in the rear view mirror and you know it was it was something the country was moving past. Clearly he's not able to make that case anymore. I'm going to leave the last word to you, Richard Harris, because there's still quite a bit we don't know. And that is about when the president was infected who infected him and who he may have infected. Indeed, I mean, we saw this cluster of cases around the time of the White House event last Saturday, introducing the the nominee for the Supreme Court, and it seemed too so a lot of the disease had spread at that time, but we don't in fact, know whether the president got it. That or another time. We don't know whether he was infectious when he was sharing the stage with Vice President Biden. On the on Tuesday when they were debating together. He had events Wednesday. He had another event Thursday. And and so you know, clearly, people spread this disease before they're showing symptoms. So there's there are concerns about how widely his you know his activities have actually spread Corona virus that will still remains to be seen, and I hope we will learn more about that in the coming days. That is NPR science correspondent Richard Harris and NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson and Dr Carlos Del Rio and epidemiologist from Emory University. Thanks to you. And there's plenty more tomorrow morning on the president's healthy effects on his administration, and what it may mean for the November.

president Richard Harris Mara Liasson Biden Vice President Malaya national political corresponde NPR Dr Carlos Del Rio Emory University White House Supreme Court Cove
Trump receiving remdesivir antiviral drug as part of experimental treatment

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:48 sec | 2 years ago

Trump receiving remdesivir antiviral drug as part of experimental treatment

"Trump remains at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after testing positive for the Corona virus and showing symptoms of covert 19. He's expected to remain there for a few days for treatment that includes the antiviral drug grim death Severe NPR's Richard Harris. This drug is designed to stop the virus from mats producing inside the body. And the FDA has authorised its use, but specifically for people who are sick enough that they need help breathing. You know when it was tried in people with mild to moderate symptoms that actually didn't seem to help, But I should say that observation was based on a small sample, so we don't really know exactly where this drug is useful and a video president Trump tweeted last night, he said. He is feeling better, but at the next few days of his treatment will be the real test. The video came after contradictory messages that cause some confusion about his condition.

Donald Trump Walter Reed National Military Richard Harris FDA President Trump
Atlanta - Man arrested in Nashville for 25-year cold case murder of Georgia man

The Weekly Check Up

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

Atlanta - Man arrested in Nashville for 25-year cold case murder of Georgia man

"Nearly 26 years after the murder of the North Georgia man. There's been an arrest in the cold case. WSB is Jennifer Perry with detail. It was the longest unsolved murder case in Walker County 54 year old Jaye. Is. Richard Harris was found dead beside his pickup truck on December 22nd 1994. He'd been robbed and killed before leaving for work that morning. Now, investigators say they've arrested his former co worker, Robert Allen Mallory, in Tennessee, the G B. I says Mallory was linked to the case in 2009, but they didn't have enough evidence to arrest him until now.

Robert Allen Mallory Murder Richard Harris WSB Jennifer Perry North Georgia Jaye Walker County Tennessee
"richard harris" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:42 min | 2 years ago

"richard harris" Discussed on KCRW

"Today, the United States passed a sobering milestone in the Corona virus pandemic. A reported number of cases topped six million. It took less than three weeks for the US to add the last million cases to this tally deaths now top 180,000. Those figures are the highest for any country. Joining us now is NPR science correspondent Richard Harris. Richard six million cases is a big number. Would you put that in world context for us? Sure, Sasha. Well, there are about 25 million cases globally. So the U. S accounts for about a quarter of all reported cases and remember the U. S only accounts for about 4% of the global population. Right? So the Corona virus continues to be especially bad here. I talked to mark Lips such an epidemiologist at Harvard about this today. There are other places in the world that have many fewer cases and more open economies and better control over the epidemic. And it's important to remember these are reported cases The actual number is far higher Lips. Itch says Some of his colleagues suggest the true number of cases in the U. S. Is more like 31 million. Given that many people never got tested or diagnosed. That's highly uncertain, but it suggests it could have affected around 10% of the U. S population. As we said US death count about 180,000. Do we know how accurate that is? Well, deaths are likely to be that tally is likely to be much more accurate because you know this case has never got diagnosed to confirm. But this do get recorded in a much better manner. So still, that makes Cove in the third leading cause of death here in the U. S right now behind only cancer and heart disease. No more people have died from covered 19, then they have from accidents, which usually is the third leading killer, and here's another way to look at it. The virus is responsible for more than one in eight of all deaths. Richard. Just a few weeks ago, we were reporting about the milestone hitting five million Corona virus cases now word six million. But we're also hearing that the case count in the U. S is starting to slow down, so these things are happening simultaneously. That's right. The case got has been dropping. The second wave of Corona virus in July peaked at nearly 70,000 cases a day is now down to not quite half of that. But in that direction, Caitlin Rivers and epidemic on epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins says that is progress. Although 45,000 cases a day is still a really big number. Although some of the most hard hit states earlier in the pandemic are doing quite well, we see the outbreak moving to new areas of the country, not new in the sense that they never had covert, But we see a new intensity in the outbreaks, particularly in Midwestern states, like the Dakotas in Iowa. River says things are looking much better in the South. Texas and Florida, along with Arizona had really been hit hard this summer. But the decision to crackdown on social gatherings and at bars and the like, seems to have helped out there a lot. There is a possible upside to the high case numbers and that's that, eventually, so many people could have been infected that the disease won't spread easily, or is as easily are we getting close to that point? Do you know Yeah, That's a phenomenon called Herd immunity, and it appears that we are nowhere close. Nobody knows exactly what share of the population needs to be infected before Herd immunity becomes a factor and slowing the disease. But lips itch at Harvard says it's likely to be 40% or more. Us is far short of that mark. Even so, lips, which says that the infections to date could be actually part of the reason that the disease has been slowing down, he says, nobody really knows what percentage of Americans has already been infected with the virus. What if it's 10% of population and most those people are really immune? But that means that 10% of all transmissions that would've occurred don't occur. Because the virus spreads exponentially. A 10% cut in its growth rate is a big cut. Of course, that would really make it of what would really make a difference would be an effective vaccine. But that's still a question. Mark and Richard do epidemiologist know where this disease is heading in coming months. Well, Lips itch at Harvard says it could rise as kids head back to school and cooler weather kicks in. But rivers at Hopkins has a more upbeat view, she says. You know, it's really up to Americans collectively, along with local, state and federal governments. If we do things like where our masks and so on, we could actually really keep watching this trend. Go down. NPR's Richard Harris. Thank you. Well, we know in the covert era. Going back to school means many students logging on from home to school on a screen. NPR's John Hamilton reports that distance learning presents a special challenge for young people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Carrie Anne Wilmot son, who is 10 was diagnosed with ADHD in December. In January, his school near Dallas started him on an individualized education program. And Wilmot says it was working. He was staying focused and getting more assignments done. He had had about 2.5 solid months of support when Cove it happened. And all of a sudden it just disappeared. Instead of a school and teachers. Will Knutson had a laptop and his mom She's not just any mom. She's an occupational therapist who specializes in kids with learning disabilities. Even so, working with her own child was tough. It was a different environment for him. And he wasn't used to me asking him to do these activities and he wasn't used to This kind of work from school. Coming in the format of you know an email in his chromebook every single day, he would avoid math and writing and go straight to his favorite subjects, Science and social studies. But Wilmot says even then, online assignments were often a problem. There might be something when he opened it that was like are really pretty. Pdf that had lots of beautiful illustrations and fonts. And he would look at it and just get overwhelmed and shut the laptop and walk away. So Wilmont would get up at 6 A.m. open all her sons assignments and come up with a plan to get them done. Then she'd start her own full time job working online with other people's Children. It was a lot and at first, Wilmot didn't realize that her son was missing a critical part of school. Recess. She thought he should do his schoolwork before riding his bike. Big mistake. He was like, Mom, I need the bike ride at the beginning of my day, and he was absolutely right. Many Children with ADHD are less fortunate than Wilmot son. Caftan, eh? Cold, is a developmental psychologist with understood a nonprofit that serves people who learn and think differently. Most parents have jobs or they're looking for jobs. Most households don't have a space that they can can say like, Oh, this is now your classroom. This is a space and you will have this and nothing else will happen here, echoed says a typical home is full of distractions. There's siblings and pats and all kinds of other things going on, including parents. And so there's a lot of things that are novel and very challenging to kids with ADHD. There's no teacher in the room to counter act those distractions When I was in grade school, the teacher might actually come stand near me. And so that was the way that you know for me to realize. Like, Oh, right here I am. I'm here. Even so cold says distance learning does work Well for some Children with ADHD D. They're certainly kids where Not being around. Piers actually makes it easier for them to focus and they feel like they have a lot more control and a lot less distraction around. That's because there are so many variations of, says John Fox, a neuroscientist at the University of Rochester. He says. Brain scans show that Children with the disorder do have something in common. When we're recording these youngsters doing toss in the magnet. What we find is that there are very clear differences in the engagement off the attention circuits, Fox says. Those differences make it even harder for them to overcome the urge to use the computer for fun. A lot of kids Would a DHD are spending a lot of time on screen time and video games at home at the moment, but really struggling with the online lessons on that, of course, makes perfect sense, too, because one of the things about That kind of content is it's highly motivating, Fox says. It's hard for a teacher to compete with that. So distance learning will simply be harder for many kids with ADHD. Fox says, for Children with more severe learning an intellectual disabilities, It's just not possible for those kids. Sitting at home is a disaster, absolute disaster and we need to get them back to school, but we have to do it safely. Public health officials are still trying to figure out how to do that. John Hamilton. NPR news Now to Tennessee and a rare bird in downtown Nashville burgers and by standards are being dazzled by purple Martins. Biologists estimate more.

Richard Harris ADHD Carrie Anne Wilmot Harvard John Fox NPR mark Lips United States John Hamilton Sasha U. S Iowa Johns Hopkins Caitlin Rivers Hopkins Texas River
Targeted lung cancer treatments help reduce death rates: study

All Of It

00:49 sec | 2 years ago

Targeted lung cancer treatments help reduce death rates: study

"Officials say improved treatments have helped lower lung cancer death rates as NPR's Richard Harris reports, The trends are also driven by a decline in cigarette smoking. Death rates from lung cancer have been falling for decades. But it's been tricky to tease out how much of that is because fewer people are smoking and how much is due to improve treatment. A study in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that new drugs introduced in 2013 are playing a role. Scientists at the National Cancer Institute found that only about 20% of people who take these drugs have a long term response and the majority of people who are diagnosed with lung cancer still die within two years. But the drugs help enough people that it shows up in the death trends. Another class of drugs called checkpoint inhibitors, introduced in 2015 also appears to be beneficial.

National Cancer Institute New England Journal Of Medicin Richard Harris NPR
"richard harris" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"richard harris" Discussed on KCRW

"The same is what you would get in a lab or better. Their test isn't likely to be on the market until the end of the year, which seems like the distant future considering the pace of the epidemic. But Martin says precision has a place in controlling covered 19 2 That's really able to target the very early a symptomatic stage, which is super important. If you want to prevent spread. It's unlikely that there will be one single testing solution. But what exactly the blend will be is a work in progress. Richard Harris. NPR news This is NPR news. 8 42 This is Casey AR W News. I'm Matt Gillom. But Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted unanimously in support of a strategic plan to craft anti racist policies and practices to help black and other people of color in L. A county. This is unusual motion. It's unprecedented and its language. The trust has to be that the, uh the status quo, Uh, being left unattended is simply no longer acceptable. That's county Supervisor Mark Ridley Thomas. Speaking with case here. W about his motion, he said. Every county department would now have to address explicit structural racism, whether it's police abuse or unequal health outcomes. Under this plan, he said the public Health Department would have been required to collect Corona virus data by race and ethnicity from the onset of the pandemic. It will say, in effect that no longer would it be acceptable to ever have. Uh, testing that done at this level without demographic data, which is the way this began, and therefore it was done and correctly. Emotion directs county officials to create a strategic plan to prioritize physical and.

Supervisor Mark Ridley Thomas Los Angeles County Board of Su NPR public Health Department Martin Richard Harris Matt Gillom
"richard harris" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:22 min | 2 years ago

"richard harris" Discussed on KCRW

"House Armed Services Committee had a host of questions today for Defense Secretary Mark Esper and Joint Chiefs of Staff General Mark Milley. Questions covered what the role was of the National Guard during recent protests, and they covered reports of Russia paying bounties for the Taliban to kill Americans. NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman joins us with details. Hey, Tom. He also writes, so let's start the National Guard. I mean, there have been lingering questions over how they were used on June 1st in Lafayette Square in Washington, D. C. What did Esper and really say about the role of the guard that day? Well. They defended the role of the National Guard. The same guard troops were there to support civilian law enforcement and we're in what they called a static position. They didn't take part in clearing the park of peaceful protesters, Guard troops, they said. Are used to dealing with any civil unrest, supporting local authorities on a variety of for a variety of reasons, And they said it's a better alternative than using active duty forces as president. Trump had threatened. And is it clear who was actually calling the shots that day? You know it's not clear else, And that's really surprising neither as for normally knew, who gave the order to clear the park. But again, the guard was working in support of civil authorities. Justice Department as well as the Park police were apparently someone within those organizations gave the order. Now the Pentagon is doing what it calls an after action report on the guards rule in D C and also elsewhere around the country, including Training and equipment. Now. One issue in D. C was also a guard helicopter flew low over protesters in the wash from the blades swept them up in debris even tour some limbs from treason. The report's expect to determine why that happened. Okay, well, the other story I want to ask you about is reports of a bounty program in Afghanistan, where Russia was reportedly offering up cash sums to Taliban fighters to kill Americans. Why don't we know about this so far? Well, it did come up. Both Esper and Milly said the Pentagon has not corroborated reports of the bony program from the intelligence community, principally the CIA. The Pentagon is still looking into that, and they see no evidence that any Americans were killed. As a result of this supposed program. But general, Milley pointed out, and he's done multiple tours in Afghanistan that it's long been known that Russia was aiding the Taliban with training and equipment. Shorty ported meddling since 2013 or so. And also this is something I saw in the ground myself when I was in Helmand province a few years back with my producer, Monica if Stati Ava Thing is, Milly did go on to say the American troops there are at the highest level of force protection, and he said, there's not much more they can do at the ground level. This issue of Russian bounties is MME or something for top political leaders. Let's listen. The issue is higher than that The issue is at the strategic level. What should or could we be doing at the strategic level is their diplomatic and informational on economic of the sanctions of the dead marshes. Are their phone calls, other pressure those sorts of things, and I could tell you that some of that is done, Uh, are we doing as much as we could, or should? Perhaps not interesting. He's saying that we probably are not doing as much as we could or should. So, is that language? Actually being echoed by the White House at the moment, Absolutely not. The White House criticized in New York Times, which broke the story about the supposed bounties. Taste to criticize him for revealing classified information in the president just dismissed the whole story as a hoax, and he said it was on ly to damage me in the Republican Party. But the Pentagon again Is looking into this taking it very seriously. And clearly, as you just heard, General Milley was much more forceful on Russia than anything we've heard recently from the White House. And if it's true, these bounties Millie said he would be an outraged general. That is NPR's Tom Bowman. Thank you so much, Tom. You're welcome. Also. Scientists say they have identified an enzyme that could help explain how exercise Khun slow or even reverse some signs of aging in the brain. Exercising a bottle is not around the corner, but it's not out of the question, either. NPR science correspondent Richard Harris took a break from reporting about the Corona virus to look into this intriguing suggestion. Scientists were surprised to discover a few years ago that brain function doesn't have to get worse. And worse as we age solve. A lady's research was inspired in part by a finding that parts of the brain can actually re grow even in older people. Just because you have an old brand doesn't have to stay that way, and one of the best known interventions that has a benefit on the brain is exercise. The problem is that the elderly are frail. Many of them can't physically do. The exercise for Leda and his colleagues at UC San Francisco have been on the hunt for factors in the blood that air boosted by exercise and that Khun improve mental performance. Can we actually then transfer the benefits of exercise without actually having to do the physical component of the exercise itself? Then how report in science magazine that they think they have a great lead? My sou exercise produced lots of a liver enzyme called G p l D one. And when the researchers revved up production of this protein in mice, nerves grew in part of their brains and the animals perform better on mental tasks in a maze exercise causes this protein to be produced in the liver goes into the blood that sort of damp in certain aspects of inflammation. And then the result of that is that you actually have improvement. In cognitive function in these older mice. The research team also looked at a group of older people who exercise more and there again, they found more of this enzyme. So the same thing is true Inhumans. If you're more active, you're producing more of this protein, and it's sort of circulating your blood. Now both aging and exercise are extremely complicated systems involving all sorts of components that interact in complicated ways. Validity had to think hard about whether a single protein could really have a big effect. I was definitely surprised that one protein could could have that much effect. But when I started thinking about it, Okay, it's one approaching. But really, it's changing. You know these other 100 protein, so I think that's why scientists are nowhere near understanding the complex relationship between all these interacting parts. Bradley Wise is at the National Institute on Aging. There's a long step between identifying this enzyme and making me a pill out of that. This is one piece of the puzzle. But the team at UC San Francisco is eager to see if they can find their way to making a medication out of there now patented Discovery. Lolita says the discovery at least suggests a path forward. We don't have that, you know, exercise pill right now. You know, this lets us know that that I think is a viable thing to pursue, but we're not there yet. You know, my mom gets really excited. She was like, Oh, exercise that about on like we're on our way. But we're not. We're not there yet. I wouldn't rush out to make GPL d one and give it to people Bill Freeman, researchers aging at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation and at the VA in Oklahoma City. He's excited about the new findings, but cautions that almost nothing is known about the potential downside of tinkering with this enzyme in the complicated system, it effects. There's a lot more research done, and in the meantime one of the things that we can all do Is exercise we can we have that within our own power and exercise has all sorts of health benefits beyond the brain. So if this ever does become a medication, it would be most helpful for people who through injury or old age simply can't exercise on their own. Richard Harris. NPR news This is NPR news. Hit a 6 29 here, A K C. R W Greater Ella.

Pentagon Russia NPR Taliban Tom Bowman National Guard Mark Esper General Milley Afghanistan White House president Khun San Francisco Richard Harris Milly Mark Milley House Armed Services Committee Washington
Federal Officials Turn to a New Testing Strategy as Infections Surge

1A

00:53 sec | 2 years ago

Federal Officials Turn to a New Testing Strategy as Infections Surge

"Federal health officials hope to begin an intensive testing campaign in southern states to help identify young people who are driving the new surgeon Corona virus. Case's details from NPR's Richard Harris Federal Corona virus Testing's Our Brett Giroir says he's talking with officials in Florida, Louisiana and Texas about mounting a huge increase in testing running a month's worth of tests in just a few days. Populace of testing over a few days. Could help to identify a lot of the under 35 year old asymptomatic. That may be spreading the virus. Your losses. It's really hard to use the standard technique of contact, tracing to identify people who are spreading the disease, but showing no symptoms. The hope is that at least some of these people could be identified through wide scale testing and then isolated to help slow the spread of the Corona virus. Cases of covert 19 continue to accelerate, especially in Southern states.

Brett Giroir Asymptomatic Richard Harris NPR Florida Louisiana Texas
Fauci and top health officials testify before House

Morning Becomes Eclectic

00:45 sec | 2 years ago

Fauci and top health officials testify before House

"Federal health officials told lawmakers on Capitol Hill today that they have not been asked to slow down corona virus testing despite president trump's comments to the contrary and here's Richard Harris reports trump made his comment at a political rally in Tulsa the White House said he was just kidding but trump told reporters today that he doesn't kid even so top public health officials testifying at a house hearing say they are pushing hard to increase testing not decrease it here's Dr Anthony Fauci a top scientist on the White House coronavirus task force to my knowledge none of us ever been told to slow down on testing that just is a fact testing in contact tracing operations have been improving but officials acknowledge they are still trying to expand these measures to rein in the

Donald Trump Richard Harris Tulsa White House Dr Anthony Fauci Scientist President Trump
"richard harris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"richard harris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Richard Harris NPR news it's been more than two months since large parts of the country began staying at home to avoid the corona virus Americans are getting antsy now two thirds of states are re opening businesses but a new NPR PBS newshour Marist poll finds that most are concerned about a second outbreak and they don't expect life to return to normal for at least six months one to dive into the findings in peer senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro is here to medical Hey there thanks for having me all right so this question that is that I wake up with every morning with when can we get back to normal it sounds like this is on a lot of other people's minds what do they say they think will happen yeah it sure is and two thirds of Americans though say that they don't expect their daily lives to get back to a normal routine for at least six months there's a pretty big partisan divide on this though Democrats and independents are far more likely to say that they think it'll take that long or longer Republicans have a little Rosier view and are less likely to think it'll be that long maybe it's not surprising given president trump urging states to reopen some even outside his own federal guidelines and we think conservative protests in state capitals wanting business is back open town at Lee circle you back to this fear of a second outbreak that is something we have heard a lot of state leaders highlight in terms of why they're being cautious about re opening how worried are the people you talk to about it well Americans across party lines are very concerned about the real possibility of a second outbreak especially considering there's no vaccine yet no proven treatment again we're seeing pretty big partisan divides ninety three percent ninety three percent of Democrats say that they're concerned or very concerned about this happening a second outbreak but just fifty seven percent of Republicans are the most concerned word Democrats African Americans women and Latinos less likely to say that they were concerned were Republicans white men without a college degree those in the silent or greatest generation and those who live in rural areas and by the way those two groups sound a whole lot like the bases of both parties meanwhile we are now inside of six months from the election the presidential election what did our poll finds in terms of how people are thinking not necessarily about how the corona virus will affect who they vote for but the way in which they want to cast their vote well you know vote by mail is getting a lot of attention and you have more people now saying that they want to vote by mail instead of in person fifty percent said that they want to vote by mail if their state allows it only thirty eight percent said that they want to vote in person realize that a quarter of voters in twenty sixteen voted by mail so this is double right now again we have a partisan divide majorities of Democrats and independents say they'd prefer to vote by mail if they can but a majority of Republicans say that they want to vote in person we can expect that there will be more states that look into expanding vote by mail because of the pandemic and we've seen some of that today you know president trump going after Michigan and Nevada places that are looking to expand vote by mail he was attacking them because of absentee ballot applications that went out in Michigan today and you know going after Nevada whatever Republican secretary of state and they have primaries coming up that are going to be all male and this is raising a lot of concerns about what could be the legitimacy of the election in November indeed NPR senior editor and correspondent dominical.

Richard Harris
The FDA Tightens the Rules for COVID-19 Antibody Blood Tests

All Things Considered

00:54 sec | 2 years ago

The FDA Tightens the Rules for COVID-19 Antibody Blood Tests

"The food and drug administration is reining in the loosely regulated tasks they're supposed to identify people with prior exposure to the corona virus NPR's Richard Harris reports how the FDA now plans to tighten its standards these blood tests identify antibodies which indicate past exposure to the coronavirus the FDA initially set a very low bar for these antibody tests the main requirement was that developers weren't supposed to claim that they were authorized by the FDA for more than a hundred has flooded the market some of dubious value so now the FDA has set to minimum standards for these tests manufacturers will also have to seek emergency use authorization for the test within ten days of putting them out on the market the FDA says twelve tests have already been granted this authorization which is a lower standard than full approval scientists don't know whether someone with antibodies is actually protected from the

Richard Harris FDA
Antibody study suggests coronavirus is far more widespread than previously thought

Live from Here with Chris Thile

04:34 min | 2 years ago

Antibody study suggests coronavirus is far more widespread than previously thought

"Blood tests to detect past exposure to the virus are starting to hit the market but as NPR's Richard Harris tells Steve Inskeep of morning edition even test that claim to be more than ninety percent accurate will often miss the mark one of the tests supposed to do well the test cannot be used to diagnose the disease instead they identify antibodies that appear in your blood about a week after you've been infected he said about is a part of your immune system's reaction to the virus so I just do not know the weather people with antibodies are definitively protected from the disease and if so for how long but that hope that prospect is really driving a lot of this excitement so for example I talked to Deborah Vander gassed and tipped in Iowa she runs a daycare center for children with developmental and behavioral disabilities they're a lot like little kids everywhere we laugh about you know the the sanitizing everything because you know the three impacted justice two seconds later center gassed is eagerly awaiting the rollout of the blood test in her county she thinks about her staff who are being hyper vigilant not to spread the disease if some of the people I have already been established to have antibodies they wouldn't have to go home and I sleep for two weeks they can continue working she says the test isn't available in her area but it is starting to take off nationally Dr Jeremy Galbraith runs a mobile medical service in Austin Texas he says he got a supply of antibody tests made by a major Chinese manufacturer he's already run a few hundred tests in the last few days we you know also the test for people who may have suspected that they had corona virus back in February or March when testing with a nasal swab PCR was very limited Gabbar says he only test people when he has other evidence that they might have been exposed if they had an illness that sounds like it could have been coronavirus and they have a positive antibody test then it's very likely that this is a what we call a true positive that they indeed had come in nineteen the testes using boasts a specificity of ninety nine percent which means it only falsely says a blood sample has antibodies when it doesn't just one percent of the time but despite that impressive statistic a test like this is not ninety nine percent correct and in fact in some circumstances could be much much worse that's because of this counter intuitive fact the validity of a test depends not only on the test itself but oddly on how common the diseases in the population you're sampling it is kind of a strange thing Dr Gilbert Welch is a scientist at Brigham and women's hospital in Boston hi antibody test is much more likely to be wrong in in the population with very little code the Greeks Boettcher Richard I think we need to slow down here why with the accuracy of a test depend on how common the disease is in a population yeah that it's surprising but here's a simple way to look at it say you are running a test it gives five falsely positive results in a hundred people sounds like pretty good odds right but yeah but consider this Steve if five percent of our population is infected then you run the test on a hundred people you should get five true positives but you also have those filed false positives well says there's no way to know which is which the test will be wrong half the time half the people will be falsely reassured so it's basically a coin flip and it gets worse the food and drug administration does not regulate these tests but the White House coronavirus task force set in informal standard they're supposed to have no more than ten false positives per hundred if you were to use a test that meets that standard in a population where only one percent of the population had been infected with rotavirus a positive result would be wrong a shocking amount more than nine times out of ten and you can see that one way to limit this problem is to focus on populations with the disease is more common Dr Jordan laser a pathologist at Northwell health on Long Island New York says it would make sense to start with health care workers should be wonderful for health care workers to know their immune status and give them just a peace of mind even so laser says it would still be a mistake to rely on these results definitely don't use these tests to change your practices in terms of personal protective equipment definitely do not become more comfortable in doing your job and taking care of complications it really would be more of a psychological benefit but you know these tests can still be incredibly useful as long as individual false positive results don't matter and one situation with that is the case is serving a broad populations and in fact these tests will be used to figure out just where

NPR Richard
"richard harris" Discussed on Iron Advocate

Iron Advocate

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"richard harris" Discussed on Iron Advocate

"This the most important thing that I think it has to be. Grounded in what's import? So meaning. There are a lot of highs and lows in our profession. But if you're grounded. In this sort of goes back football as well and being an athlete is that if you're grounded in, you know the people that love you. GonNa love you record. And, so if I focus on having deep meaningful relationships. That I'm less concerned about. The highs and lows with the practice and more concerned about whether or not I'm doing those things that I believe are consistent with the person that I wanted to be. And so. I think that's been an expiration, but I can tell you that. Early on I was particularly concerned about winning, losing that everything booth down to winning and losing if I was if I wanNA case, and I felt great about myself I lost the case I did. And I realized that that sort of episodic. Relationship! With myself was unhealthy. And so as part of as part of my maturation. Spiritually and. Emotionally. I have sort of. Pare that down to. My. Clients are those people that want to have deep meaningful relationship with. My family and friends whom I care about. They care about me when loser draw. And, so I'm less. I wouldn't say but I'm less moved by the outcomes on any given incident or any given case a rich. Was it difficult to get littler Mendelson to buy in on this right because at the end of the day it's their clients. You know I understand there. You're getting them to buy enough. and has it happened? It hasn't happened all end, but yeah. I'm still getting them to buy. Okay tell us about that process. How does So I advise I mean so part of my role expect. co-chair of the jury practice group complication. Group is that I often will triage case lawyers. We sort of have a mandate while you're within one hundred and twenty days before trial, you need to talk there either me or my co chair.

co-chair Pare Mendelson football
"richard harris" Discussed on Iron Advocate

Iron Advocate

04:09 min | 2 years ago

"richard harris" Discussed on Iron Advocate

"And so. The author of degrading has another one called great by choice. Great was probably the first one that I would say gave me a blueprint. In terms of how the best leaders lead. And so. They're. Particularly disciplined particularly routine oriented but they. Develop a way of going about their business in self your diary. Where they're doing a post mortem after each in every event, and so I tried to apply back into the practice of law so every single case good. Or otherwise I'm doing a postmortem to see if I could do something. And so I'm constantly evaluating my performance relative to what my client and I discussed. But also am I growing in my craft. And so I'm constantly doing that. Self evaluation so I, continued that process even when I was in the Public Defenders Office and then I tried to see if I could go to a larger platform to improve my craft into kind of represent the kind of clients that I wanted to represent in so each and every way. It's always a look in the mirror to see. How are you doing relative to where you would like to go? And argue improving in a way that's meaningful that you're getting the best out of yourself. Some constantly competing against myself, so let me ask you about the postmortems you reference, be referenced. You Played Football University of Marilyn, and that competitiveness I'm hearing comes into everything you do, and and you know all of us here were were public defenders in trial trial lawyers, so we all feel that. How do you? Do The post mortem. And analyze your performance at the same time. Don't get sucked into. The inner critic that can take down because I see a lot of lawyers unable to do a post mortem, and to be very clear about their own performance, and about taking the good and the bad. They focused so much on them what they didn't do right that they in the end..

Public Defenders Office Football University of Marilyn
"richard harris" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:42 min | 2 years ago

"richard harris" Discussed on KQED Radio

"For that I'm joined by NPR's science correspondent Richard Harris who's been following this story so good to have you here pleased to be here so earlier today president trump and top administration officials held a press conference to update the public on their response to the pandemic what's the big takeaway from that briefing well the most actionable piece of information at least for some people is that on Monday travellers from the UK and Ireland will also be prevented from coming to the United states that expanded travel ban from other parts of Europe and US citizens and permanent residents can't come home but they will be screened at airports when they arrive and then they'll be asked to self quarantine for fourteen days the president also said he's considering restricting some travel within the United States which would be a huge deal if that happens but the military in fact announce that they are asking their personal to do that today the president's recent contact himself with people who are exposed to the corona virus what more do we know about that well it's interesting the news conference started out only after someone from the White House medical office went through with the remote thermometer and make sure nobody was running a fever and it turns out one person was in that person was sent away that testing will apparently be standard going forward for White House visitors the president has you mentioned had some contact with people who later tested positive for the corona virus said he was tested last night after sort of in that idea previously he said he'd also try to stop shaking hands which he keeps doing it said that that's a hard habit for a politician to break though so here are some questions that I think a lot of people have been the first one is something that I think the president may be confused about as well I mean earlier this week the president sent a tweet that seem to compare corona vies to the common flu he tweeted that last year thirty seven thousand Americans died from the common flu were as only twenty two people have died so far from the corona virus at the time he sent that tweet and he made a similar point at today's briefing but what about that I mean what does the science say about whether that is a valid comparison I think that's a misleading comparison though there are some similarities the corner virus spreads like the flu it's airborne and can be transmitted from surfaces which is why people are telling you to wash your hands all the time then symptoms are similar and most people don't get too sick from either disease but here's the big difference the case fatality rate for the corona virus is much higher maybe around one percent we don't really know flu kills about thirty thousand people a year and if this virus into being as widespread as the flu it means that could kill ten times as many people or more so you know maybe in future years once a lot of people have been exposed it won't be that nasty but where we are right now that you know it it's looking like it could be a really very very serious disease was particularly vulnerable for people with serious underlying medical conditions are at the most risk because there is able to fight off infections older people fall into that category just because your immune system sort of declines as you get older but most deaths among people in their seventies and beyond to have these underlying health problems people with diabetes and other conditions like that aren't like as what more likely to catch the virus but they're more likely to have serious consequences if they do I can I ask you about that because I mean he's is is you know fairly common in populations of clean across age groups why would that be why would people with something like a condition like diabetes be more vulnerable well in the case of diabetes people have weakened immune systems if they have diabetes for one thing also once somebody with diabetes get sick it's harder for them to control their their medical condition so as a result the ramifications of getting sicker stronger and and and and we've heard a lot about why these extreme measures are being put into place that's to flatten the curve so to speak what does that mean and why is that so important well right now the number of cases is just rocketing up we had something like five hundred at the beginning of this week and I just checked in were well over two thousand cases as of today if it keeps going like that hospital simply won't be able to keep up you know so the idea of flattening the curve is to spread out those new cases so that they can come into hospitals at a more manageable rate that means slowing the spread of the virus which is reason that sports events are being suspended that schools are being closed and that people are being told to work from home if they were going to have on the cinema but before we let you go Richard we've heard a lot about the testing issue in the United States a lot of people have criticized the United States for very slow response around testing what is the specific issue that they're talking about and why does that matter and is anything being done about it yeah well I think the technology is finally here too big test manufacturers have systems that contest thousands of samples at a time and they can do that quickly and they just got FDA approval of last couple of days in the U. S. but you know the real problem is that the infrastructure is not there to get people's samples to those to those to those testing systems and and so you know even though LabCorp and quest diagnostics are stepping up their ability to go out there and and and and sort of deliver those tests and run them what's the get them back to their labs the problem is figuring out how to do that and and and you know I think that's a that's a major problem that really needs to get sorted out that is NPR science correspondent Richard Harris Richard thank you pleased to be here so we're gonna talk more about the testing issue with a person who knows quite a bit about it Dr David a Kessler was the commissioner of the food and drug administration from nineteen ninety to nineteen ninety seven which means he has advised both Republican and democratic administrations and he is kind of to join us now in our studios in Washington DC thank you for being here at an appropriate distance I do want to mention okay so so let's get the disclosures out up front you have just been asked by former vice president Joe Biden to advise him on the ground of our situation but as I said you've served in both Republican and democratic administrations and as you've also said this is not a partisan issue but you posted an op ed in The New York Times titled how to fix the corona virus testing mass in seven days as briefly as you can could you just pick up on rich's point why is there a mess what's been the breakdown so far without testing we're flying blind without we don't have any antiviral to slow the epidemic we don't have a vaccine all we have is to take people who have the virus and isolate them both to quarantine them but that entire system is if you look at the CDC guidance it says isolate to quarantine confirmed cases but how can you know whether some one is a confirmed case without a test so so so now your suggestions about what should happen now you said that the title the pieces how to fix this in seven days what are your specific suggestions to understand how testing occurs yeah it's it's really pretty basic yeah a throat swab a nose and nasal swab it has to be done with somebody in protective gear that Hastert set sample has to be put in a bio hazard box that box has to be in a special shipping container and that has to go to a lab that can run that test and the result gets back it is very simple managerial quick question we now have labs throughout the country they can run about twenty six thousand samples the day and that's increased substantially but we gotta be able to get people access I spent hours yesterday trying to get one patient tested if I had touched I mean have a trouble doing it you can imagine the average person it's a basic managerial problems I think the administration gets this they said tomorrow they will at five PM announce where the locations are but we gotta be able to get a testing system up and running about people who need it can get it so we can say to them you have to be isolated you have to be quiet so the White House has now as you just mentioned brief the public on New Albany public private partnership that would screen people who need to be tested online and then direct them to a location where they could get the test the administration says additional details will be provided tomorrow afternoon but from what we know so far is this the right move if I watched them say that and I applaud it now they have to deliver maybe it would have been great you know I don't want to look back I just want to get this up and running this can be up and running throughout the country in a matter of days if there's the right focus we'll see can they deliver I don't know I hope you're right there's nothing better than I wish you know that the that they succeed so that the president has said that only people who are symptomatic should be tested he's obviously not a medical you know expert but is that the correct device so far from people who only heard that I spoke to public health officials in two different states yesterday and I got different answers to that a very basic question if if your confirmed case and I have been in contact with you should I get tested that was the question I asked just to be clear I'm not but just to be clear okay and and and this the CDC house to give very clear advice all who come in contact with somebody looking for cash today just self quarantine or should they be tested there are the the advice is conflicting right now so the messaging is still too confused okay that will keep us posted on that was Dr David a Kessler he is a medical doctor he's teaching at the university of California San Francisco he's a professor and he was the FDA's commissioner from nineteen ninety to nineteen ninety seven after because I think you so much for coming in and please do keep us informed about your best guidance here you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news support for KQED comes from another planet entertainment.

NPR Richard Harris president
"richard harris" Discussed on The Cashflow Show

The Cashflow Show

03:18 min | 3 years ago

"richard harris" Discussed on The Cashflow Show

"Like to push his <Speech_Male> converting <Speech_Male> those bigger companies <Speech_Male> into not just <Speech_Male> receiving information <Speech_Male> but actively using <Speech_Male> the system to <Speech_Male> at <Speech_Male> Sedna through to this <Speech_Male> of contracts <Speech_Male> and build <Speech_Male> a network themselves <Speech_Male> My <Speech_Male> Lot of these companies <Speech_Male> we spoke to <Speech_Male> public sector <Speech_Male> company <Speech_Male> relatively recently <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> in London on <Speech_Male> they have our property <Speech_Male> portfolio. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> They have <Speech_Male> they have about <Speech_Male> thirty guys. Guys <Speech_Male> internally <Speech_Male> managed all <Speech_Male> their properties and <Speech_Male> then they have seventeen <Speech_Male> thousand subcontractors <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> internally. <Speech_Male> They haven't baked complex complex <Speech_Male> sweat <Speech_Male> false management system <Speech_Male> which <Speech_Male> works well for thirty <Speech_Male> guys but for <Speech_Male> the seventeen thousand <Speech_Male> subcontractors. <Speech_Male> It's back to emails. <Speech_Male> It's back to <Speech_Male> sending text messages passages. <Speech_Male> It's back <Speech_Male> to chase them for job. <Speech_Male> She's had <Speech_Male> chasing frame <Speech_Male> voices <Speech_Male> on it Administrative <Speech_Male> Nightmare so <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> think that the kind of <Speech_Male> companies that we you <Speech_Male> want to <Speech_Male> to target is what <Speech_Male> is the big companies. The <Speech_Male> facilities manages <Speech_Male> the construction <Speech_Male> the council's <Speech_Male> who do have <Speech_Male> lots of contractors. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And who need to manage Sean <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> By <Speech_Male> the opportunity <SpeakerChange> for <Speech_Male> us <Silence> <Speech_Male> As well <Speech_Male> I mean is even with. <Speech_Male> The trays is plenty <Speech_Male> of companies out. There era <Speech_Male> bishop companies are <Speech_Male> are looking to grow <Speech_Male> instantly <Speech_Male> which anorectic law of interest <Speech_Male> and yes <Speech_Male> in a lot <SpeakerChange> of companies. <Speech_Male> Come aboard <Speech_Male> good excellent <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> obviously when people who <Speech_Male> who are tier <Speech_Male> two and who <Speech_Male> fit into <Speech_Male> the other categories <Speech_Male> that you mentioned previously. <Speech_Male> Where <Speech_Male> do they find you? <Speech_Male> Where do they find <Speech_Male> cafe? Where <Speech_Male> do you have have <Speech_Male> a website? It's <Speech_Male> social <SpeakerChange> media. <Speech_Male> How do people get of <Speech_Male> you as we <Speech_Male> have The <Speech_Male> copy website so <Speech_Male> a copy dot com <Speech_Male> has <Speech_Male> them confined to through <Speech_Male> Google Search <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> job. <Speech_Male> She's electronic <Speech_Male> job. She saw workforce <Speech_Male> management <Speech_Male> around <Speech_Male> the APP stores <Speech_Male> the Iran <Speech_Male> issued so <Speech_Male> again. We look for appeal. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <hes> wet foot <Speech_Male> punishment up sheets <Speech_Male> as I <Speech_Male> enjoy <Speech_Male> On there <Speech_Male> so he's that you spend <Speech_Male> it. Yeah Ok. <Speech_Male> P Y <Speech_Male> auto <Speech_Male> fair <Speech_Male> is social <Speech_Male> media as well so <Speech_Male> yet. We're on a <Speech_Male> twitter. I <Speech_Male> O K on <Speech_Male> the school. Ip <Speech_Male> Cohen look <Speech_Male> for as their limited <Speech_Male> facebook doc <Speech_Male> but yeah <Speech_Male> yeah aspect of websites <Speech_Male> that the key <Speech_Male> a <SpeakerChange> copy dot <Speech_Male> com excellent. <Speech_Male> Thank you very much <Speech_Male> for that. So <Speech_Male> Richard Harris <Speech_Male> CEO and Co <Speech_Male> founder of Oak Happy Happy. <Speech_Male> Thank you <Speech_Male> very much for joining <Speech_Male> us. Here on the cash flow. <Speech_Male> Sean thank you <Speech_Male> yeah. It's been a pleasure <Speech_Male> having you and hearing <Speech_Male> all about Your Business <Speech_Male> and your growth <Speech_Male> and your proposed <Speech_Male> expansion <Speech_Male> and we wish <Speech_Male> you all the best in the future. <Speech_Male> Thank you <Speech_Male> thank you very much <Speech_Music_Male> anyway. Thank <Speech_Music_Male> you for listening to <Speech_Music_Male> another episode of the cash <Speech_Music_Male> flow show. It's <Speech_Music_Male> really appreciate your <Speech_Music_Male> joining us. <Speech_Male> If you've enjoyed what <Speech_Male> you've heard today <Speech_Male> would like to hear more <Speech_Music_Male> than please subscribed <Speech_Music_Male> by your chosen <Speech_Music_Male> podcast provider <Speech_Male> and do <Speech_Music_Male> be notified when new <Speech_Music_Male> episodes are released. <Speech_Music_Male> If if <Speech_Male> you wish to like comment <Speech_Male> subscribe <Speech_Male> leave a message <Speech_Music_Male> or follow us <Speech_Music_Male> on social media. <Speech_Music_Male> Please do so <Speech_Music_Male> as we would love <Speech_Music_Male> to hear from you <Speech_Male> so until the next time. <Speech_Male> Take care from everyone we <Speech_Male> wanNA cashflows. <SpeakerChange> Show <Speech_Music_Male> Goodbye <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Sir. <Music>

London Sean twitter Google Iran facebook Cohen Richard Harris Co CEO founder Oak
"richard harris" Discussed on The Cashflow Show

The Cashflow Show

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"richard harris" Discussed on The Cashflow Show

"Technological advancements but businesses often find themselves in a position where using an APP is something that they're unfamiliar Nia with today's guests in Twenty fifteen decided to take that big leap of faith to create their own commercial app the businesses if you want to know more about life life in and around silicon roundabout then join us on the other side. Look forward to seeing you. Hello and welcome. I'm Clayton and coke and I'm also the host for the cash. Cashflow show the radio show disguised in the shape of a podcast. But with so much most would be interviewing someone inspiring from the business world and finding out how they started in business with their trials and tribulations were and how they intend to grow their business in the future we will also be finding out about what they do in this space. Spare time as well as asking them to a film and the favourite single or album and to share their reasons for doing so so why not join us at the cash flow show show. It's not just a radio show. It's a whole new way of doing business. Hello and welcome to the cash flow. Show my name's Clayton M. Coke and today's guest guest is Richard Harris C. and co-founder of oh capi. And if you have not heard of Okapi before then I think the best thing thing for us to do is allow Richard to tell us all about himself and the company. He's CO founded so welcome. Richard to the cash flow. Sean Tie Clayton thanks. I'm I'm here. You're most welcome for me. This is quite an interesting subject. I'm always interested in APP. Some always looking them out and I'm always trying to find that things that make businesses and business processes work a lot better. I don't have any skills any technological skills or told whatsoever but I like the way that they run. Can you just tell us a little bit about you and business that you co founded. Yeah certainly a copy is is actually a lot more than than just piss a whole platform.

Richard Harris C. Clayton M. Coke Sean Tie Clayton silicon roundabout Okapi co-founder
"richard harris" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"richard harris" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Survive this process Richard Harris NPR news you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news four people are dead and six others wounded after a mass shooting in Fresno California the shooters are still at large and the community is now coping with the aftermath Fresno police chief any hole provided this detail about the crime earlier today what I can tell you this this was not a random act it appears that this incident was a targeted act of violence against this residence joining us now is member station KQED is Alex hall to not related to the police chief Alex covers California's Central Valley Alex I want to start by getting more detail on what authorities are saying about the shooting what have you learned so far the attack happened at a residence in southeast Fresno just before eight PM on Sunday it was at a party where family members were watching a football game and some of the family members were in the backyard that's where the shooting started right now authorities have confirmed that for individuals have died three at the scene last night and then later on at the hospital another died in surgery six individuals were taken to the hospital and two are still there they're in stable condition and those victims what have we learned about them the coroner's office has released the names of those killed the victims are seat levy at twenty three years old a Fresno who is a famous singer in the manga community P. Ave ing thirty one years old a Fresno koosh young thirty eight years old a Fresno who lived at the house where the shooting took place and collapsing tower forty years old a Fresno all of the victims were adult men of mom or of other southeast Asian descent as we mentioned earlier the shooters are reportedly still at large who the police looking for well we know from the police that the gunmen entered the backyard through an unlocked side gate where a group of men in the family were watching the football game as of now we don't know a lot about the shooters although police said that they believe that they were males part of the reason is that it was really dark in the backyard so dark in fact that witnesses said when the shooting started they only saw flashes of light but chief hall did say that authorities believe there were in fact two shooters at least two judging from the shell casings that were found at the scene and at those individuals either fled on foot or perhaps in a vehicle given with the police chief said about this being targeted what is the community reaction been well I think a lot of people are feeling really scared this is a large community of Mong families in this neighborhood in southeast Fresno where the shooting took place when I was at the crime scene last night neighbors seemed really shaken they describe this as a quiet calm community that recently has seen several instances of gun violence but that was something new so they were really surprised that this was happening people are really worried about safety especially with the Mong new year celebration coming up right after Christmas there's gonna be huge event here in Fresno next month with people coming even from outside of the area so that's something that people are looking ahead to and concerned about and Fresno police even said that there could be fears of retaliation in the community but do they have a motive I mean what's the spring that well so the thirties have hinted at the possibility that this could have been gang related a chief anti hall said that there have been several recent incidents in this community in this region that he said indicated an uptick of gang activity in the area but he was clear that please don't have reason to believe the shooting is connected to that up tick he said Fresno P. is establishing an Asian gang task force to respond to this and just simply that gang violence is something that police are not ruling out that Alex hole from KQED reporting from Fresno thank you thank you you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news and this is ninety point three K. AZ.

Richard Harris thirty eight years twenty three years thirty one years forty years three K
"richard harris" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:17 min | 3 years ago

"richard harris" Discussed on KCRW

"Survive this process Richard Harris NPR news you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news four people are dead and six others wounded after a mass shooting in Fresno California the shooters are still at large and the community is now coping with the aftermath Fresno police chief and the whole provided this detail about the crime earlier today but I can't tell you there's this was not a random act it appears that this incident was a targeted act of violence against this residence joining us now is member station KQED is Alex hall to not related to the police chief Alex covers California's Central Valley Alex I want to start by getting more detail on what authorities are saying about the shooting what have you learned so far the attack happened at a residence in southeast Fresno just before eight PM on Sunday it was at a party where family members were watching a football game and some of the family members were in the backyard that's where the shooting started right now authorities have confirmed that for individuals have died three at the scene last night and then later on at the hospital another died in surgery six individuals were taken to the hospital and two are still there they're in stable condition and those victims what have we learned about them the coroner's office has released the names of those killed the victims are seat lead twenty three years old a Fresno who is a famous singer in the manga community P. Ave ing thirty one years old a Fresno koosh young thirty eight years old a Fresno who lived at the house where the shooting took place and callous and how forty years old of Fresno all of the victims were adult men of mom or of other southeast Asian descent as we mentioned earlier the shooters are reportedly still at large who the police looking for well we know from the police that the gunmen entered the backyard through an unlocked side gate where a group of a man and a family were watching the football game as of now we don't know a lot about the shooters although police said that they believe that they were males part of the reason is that it was really dark in the backyard so dark in fact that witnesses said when the shooting started they only saw flashes of light but chief hall I did say that authorities believe there were in fact two shooters at least two judging from the shell casings that were found at the scene and that those individuals either fled on foot or perhaps in a vehicle given with the police chief said about this being targeted what is the community reaction been well I think a lot of people are feeling really scared and this is a large community of Mong families in this neighborhood in southeast Fresno where the shooting took place when I was at the crime scene last night neighbors seemed really shaken they describe this as a quiet calm community that recently has seen several instances of gun violence but that was something new so they were really surprised that this was happening people are really worried about safety especially with the Mong new year celebration coming up right after Christmas there's going to be huge event here in Fresno next month with people coming even from outside of the area so that's something that people are looking ahead to and concerned about and Fresno police even said that there could be fears of retaliation in the community but do they have a motive I mean what's the spring that well so a thirties have hinted at the possibility that this could have been gang related achieve ND hall said that there have been several recent incidents in this community in this region that he said indicated an up tick of gang activity in the area but he was clear that please don't have reason to believe the shooting is connected to that up tick he said Fresno P. is establishing an Asian gang task force to respond to this and just simply that gang violence is something that police are not ruling out that Alex hole from KQED reporting from Fresno thank you thank you you're listening to.

Richard Harris thirty eight years twenty three years thirty one years forty years
"richard harris" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:54 min | 3 years ago

"richard harris" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm David green and I'm Steve Inskeep the centers for disease control and prevention is expected to issue a warning today antibiotics are more frequently failing to kill germs millions of people are at risk tens of thousands of Americans die every year as a result now scientists are fighting back using the principles of evolution here's NPR science correspondent Richard Harris the usual response to these antibiotic resistant germs is to look for new drugs but this perpetual arms race between bacteria and drug developers is problematic for one thing it costs a lot to develop these new drugs and they don't usually pay for themselves at a meeting last week in Washington DC industry officials were bemoaning that one pioneering company recently went bankrupt as a result their sales were nowhere near enough to recruit just the operating costs let alone your investment expenditures ever seen that time and time again with other companies that's Greg Frank at an industry group called the biotechnology innovation organization he says it's not only a crisis for the industry but for public health we're not developing nearly enough products to stay ahead of resistance and many of those are going to reach the market those that do are right now destined to fail and so we would be very dry pipeline is only gonna get worse the industry is trying to convince the federal government to provide big dollar incentives to keep this enterprise a float but in who read at Penn state university argues there must be a better way to fight these super bugs other than engaging in an endless arms race with them most people are looking for new drugs and new drug targets war record dog no successor thing all that is important work but the heart of the problem is the evolutionary process it generates the resistance in few scientists are focusing on that most basic problem to find out of the box solutions he is an exception one idea since bacteria are more likely to involve resistance if they are exposed to antibiotics for a long time why not try limiting the does at least for people with healthy immune systems often times in many situations the muse system kicks in and it kills the bugs and cleans them out so all the drugs need to do is buy the immune system a little time so that's the most all be a situation where we don't need the drugs to finish off every last blog we just need the drugs to Mike is healthy again in late I mean systems take care of us another idea is to hit germs with several drugs at once the way to broken Los's is treated psychologically it's a but scary putting all of your for a parent to one ratio meant on the other hand it can work very effectively have preventing the evolution of resistance and so instead of just using dry guy in that files and then drug be in that files and then drug C. using IBM's singles together can stop any of them filing another evolutionary biologists working in this area is he Rick Schulenburg in Kiel Germany one idea than we are particularly interested in so sequential therapy that is giving different antibiotics in rapid sequence state switching every twelve or twenty four hours so the environment for the Germans always changing and we know from evolutionary theory thought this makes it very difficult to any organism to add up fast with these conditions he's tested that idea successfully in Petri dishes and is now gearing up to test the concept in humans the point phone so we as a military ball just want to make is that whatever kind of treatment we design we need to take into account hoping to your evil one of these nontraditional ideas came up at the meeting in Washington DC last week Sheila Connelly is V. P. of research at a small company called synthetic biologics in Maryland they're developing a counter intuitive drug an enzyme that actually destroys common antibiotics like penicillin the idea is to give these anti antibiotic pills to people who are getting the antibiotics injected directly into the bloodstream and are enzymes states in the guy and it's not absorbed.

David green Steve Inskeep twenty four hours
"richard harris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:56 min | 3 years ago

"richard harris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"NPR news I'm David green and I'm Steve Inskeep the centers for disease control and prevention is expected to issue a warning today antibiotics are more frequently failing to kill germs millions of people are at risk tens of thousands of Americans die every year as a result now scientists are fighting back using the principles of evolution here's NPR science correspondent Richard Harris the usual response to these antibiotic resistant germs is to look for new drugs but this perpetual arms race between bacteria and drug developers is problematic for one thing it costs a lot to develop these new drugs and they don't usually pay for themselves at a meeting last week in Washington DC industry officials were bemoaning that one pioneering company recently went bankrupt as a result their sales were nowhere near enough to recruit just the operating costs let alone your investment expenditures ever seen that time and time again with other companies that's Greg Frank at an industry group called the biotechnology innovation organization he says it's not only a crisis for the industry but for public health we're not developing nearly enough products to stay ahead of resistance and many of those are going to reach the market those that do are right now destine to fail and so the very dry pipeline is only gonna get worse the industry is trying to convince the federal government to provide big dollar incentives to keep this enterprise a float but in to read at Penn state university argues there must be a better way to fight these super bugs other than engaging in an endless arms race with them most people are looking for new drugs a new drug targets war record dog no successor thing and all that is important work but the heart of the problem is the evolutionary process it generates the resistance in few scientists are focusing on that most basic problem to find out of the box solutions he is an exception one idea since bacteria are more likely to involve resistance if they are exposed to antibiotics for a long time why not try limiting the does at least for people with healthy immune systems often times in many situations the muse system kicks in and it kills the bugs and cleans them out so will the drugs need to do is buy the immune system a little time so that's the most obvious situation where we don't need the drugs to finish off every last blog we just need the drugs to you Mike is healthy again in late I mean systems take care of us another idea is to hit germs with several drugs at once the way to break Eleusis is treated psychologically it's a but scary putting all of your for a parent to one Richmond on the other hand it can work very effectively at preventing the evolution of resistance and so instead of just using dry guy in that files and then drug be in that files and then drug C. using I. B. and C. all together can stop any of them filing another evolutionary biologists working in this area is Henrik Schulenburg in Kiel Germany one idea than we are particularly interested in so sequential therapy that is giving different antibiotics in rapid sequence state switching every twelve or twenty four hours so the environment for the Germans always changing and we know from evolutionary theory this makes it very difficult to any organism to add up fast with these conditions he's tested that idea successfully in Petri dishes and is now gearing up to test the concept in humans the point on so we as evolutionary ball just want to make is that whatever kind of treatment redesign we need to take into account hoping to your evil one of these nontraditional ideas came up at the meeting in Washington DC last week Sheila Connelly is V. P. of research at a small company called synthetic biologics in Maryland they're developing a counter intuitive drug an enzyme that actually destroys common antibiotics like penicillin the idea is to give these anti antibiotic pills to people who are getting the antibiotics injected directly into the bloodstream and are enzymes states in the guy and it's not absorbed into the blood so.

David green Steve Inskeep twenty four hours