35 Burst results for "Richard Harris"

"richard harris" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

05:17 min | 2 weeks ago

"richard harris" Discussed on Accelerate!

"Sales training for sales hacker. And he's joining me today. On sales enablement episode, Seven ninety-five Five Tabah conversation about well sales training. To one of my favorite topics because I believe it's one of the areas in sales where there's the biggest room for improvement. So rich and talk about as the world around us has changed at least temporarily, if not forever, what impact will have on how we should train sellers nuts important for many sellers because what they do on a day-to-day basis has changed in ways are perhaps unexpected so now the question is how to enable them to succeed. We're also digging into a topic that least is more important than sales training in terms of being central to the success of individual sellers that is how we train and enable frontline sales managers. Now, this is vitally important subject, the generally ignored in sales because on average I don't believe salespeople can improve any faster than their manager improved, so you'll be hearing more about this in my conversations with guests upcoming episodes all right. All this and much much more, but before we get to Richard I wanNA, remind you to subscribe to this podcast sales enablement with anti-bomb wherever you listen to it, and if you subscribe with, certainly appreciate it if you could also give us a review about how we're doing in the form of review. Thanks also, lastly, if you haven't connected with me and Lincoln please do that Lincoln slash in slash real handy, Paul that's right. There's only one real all. Let's jump into it. Richard Welcome back to the show. Thank you so much any good to be back. Yeah sets been too long. I think it's fair to say. I appreciate it I but I'm also very grateful. Did you came on Scott Night Circuit Sales? So we appreciate you coming on, and and even you can just give it some gassing advice. We appreciate it so. You guys. You guys do a great job. Thank you. Thank you so congratulations. The last time we spoke to on the on Your Business Endeavor. That's half of thank you with ranking. Ed, that's pretty. That's pretty sweet. I got I got. I'm trying to get there. It's nice to be a role model. Yeah. Yeah No, it's. It's been great absolutely great so. Where have you been? Served sheltering in place. So. shelter in place in in Moraga California outside San. Francisco, East Bay for people who are listening. Sort of near Burke between Berkeley and Walnut Creek. If you know the area, I lived in Moraga. You did did I did. I'm not sure I remember talking about before but. I One thousand nine hundred eighty. Yeah. Yes long long time ago, but Yeah. Yeah, that's great. That's really great. Where are you now? So I've I've spent the first ninety days of shutdown in New York City Manhattan. And just yesterday my wife and Escaped from New York you remember that film. And we're back in San Diego so. I mean I know this is completely off tied to what we're going to talk about. But how is New York? That just must've been crazy nutty. I tell people unless you're in hospitals. You're really. Getting really see all the drama and the hospitals were jammed and overflowing, especially in a we live in Manhattan's there, and but especially in the other boroughs Queens Bronx, Brooklyn things are much more dire than Ben in Manhattan. How did you? How did you just go down the elevator thirty floors if you looked in? Like that was like all I'll wait for the next one or you just dramatic risk Beckley exactly so the same thing is true here highs in San. Diego where we live so eleven high rises that. Now the rule is leave your apartment. You have your mask on and you're right. One family. You elevator so it takes. It takes a little longer to to get down. To the lobby or to come up, sometimes that people are are very good about it. Hand sanitizer stations all over and so. Yes a community, people people do a pretty good job and that was true New York. I mean for the most part people were. Wearing the masks and staying public transit and and Now it's. Moved into May and people see the. The opening, coming man people, starting to be a little, less careful, a little bit concerning but Do People do a pretty good job, and that's true here in San Diego as well, we'll cool. What are we? What are we really going to talk about today? You know. I thought we talk. Serve about what what you see. The role of sales training one thing is the role of sales trainings are in the next normal, because seems like an opportunity to serve to. A reset to some degree bright. or in evolution menace, I call recipient evolution. We started the show with the mission. Saying look is far purposes. We. DEFINE SALES WON'T AS ENABLING sollers with the the knowledge, the skills the. Tools the.

sales training Manhattan Richard San Diego San Moraga New York City Lincoln Berkeley Francisco Beckley Moraga California Paul Ed Diego Walnut Creek Brooklyn East Bay Ben
"richard harris" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

01:43 min | 2 weeks ago

"richard harris" Discussed on Accelerate!

"So in reps start their day. They'll never again wonder which prospects and accounts are hot inbound leads to reach out to next. Guided, selling even shifts reps priority in response to real time buying signals finally even knew reps can sell season once. Let Ring DNA. Be Your Guide to success. Learn more at Ring Ringa dot com slash guided selling. That's ringed, a dot com slash guided selling. As usual in startup for. A greedy get greedier. Don't become less free. And so goals get jacked and everybody thinks it should be two hundred percent growth year over year and assess. Start up world. And so people are not hitting goals because the goals outrageous. The goals are being dealt from the board down not from the pipeline. It's like a Oh. That's what your pipeline is. Great what we need to get this done. And then there's this assumption that everybody. And then there's this assumption that I think people misses it. One hundred percent of your sales team should knock it. Like, if you're building your business and your goals around everybody hitting a hundred percent, that's just not realistic at the numbers are using right now. The company should be statistically significantly profitable when seventy percent of your team just getting bull. Friends welcome do the sales enablement podcast on host Andy Ball. Now that was Richard Harris Richards the founder of the Harris. Consulting, group and director of.

Federal Officials Turn to a New Testing Strategy as Infections Surge

1A

00:53 sec | Last month

Federal Officials Turn to a New Testing Strategy as Infections Surge

"Federal health officials hope to begin an intensive testing campaign in southern states to help identify young people who are driving the new surgeon Corona virus. Case's details from NPR's Richard Harris Federal Corona virus Testing's Our Brett Giroir says he's talking with officials in Florida, Louisiana and Texas about mounting a huge increase in testing running a month's worth of tests in just a few days. Populace of testing over a few days. Could help to identify a lot of the under 35 year old asymptomatic. That may be spreading the virus. Your losses. It's really hard to use the standard technique of contact, tracing to identify people who are spreading the disease, but showing no symptoms. The hope is that at least some of these people could be identified through wide scale testing and then isolated to help slow the spread of the Corona virus. Cases of covert 19 continue to accelerate, especially in Southern states.

Brett Giroir Asymptomatic Richard Harris NPR Florida Louisiana Texas
Fauci and top health officials testify before House

Morning Becomes Eclectic

00:45 sec | Last month

Fauci and top health officials testify before House

"Federal health officials told lawmakers on Capitol Hill today that they have not been asked to slow down corona virus testing despite president trump's comments to the contrary and here's Richard Harris reports trump made his comment at a political rally in Tulsa the White House said he was just kidding but trump told reporters today that he doesn't kid even so top public health officials testifying at a house hearing say they are pushing hard to increase testing not decrease it here's Dr Anthony Fauci a top scientist on the White House coronavirus task force to my knowledge none of us ever been told to slow down on testing that just is a fact testing in contact tracing operations have been improving but officials acknowledge they are still trying to expand these measures to rein in the

Donald Trump Richard Harris Tulsa White House Dr Anthony Fauci Scientist President Trump
"richard harris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:57 min | 2 months ago

"richard harris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Richard Harris NPR news it's been more than two months since large parts of the country began staying at home to avoid the corona virus Americans are getting antsy now two thirds of states are re opening businesses but a new NPR PBS newshour Marist poll finds that most are concerned about a second outbreak and they don't expect life to return to normal for at least six months one to dive into the findings in peer senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro is here to medical Hey there thanks for having me all right so this question that is that I wake up with every morning with when can we get back to normal it sounds like this is on a lot of other people's minds what do they say they think will happen yeah it sure is and two thirds of Americans though say that they don't expect their daily lives to get back to a normal routine for at least six months there's a pretty big partisan divide on this though Democrats and independents are far more likely to say that they think it'll take that long or longer Republicans have a little Rosier view and are less likely to think it'll be that long maybe it's not surprising given president trump urging states to reopen some even outside his own federal guidelines and we think conservative protests in state capitals wanting business is back open town at Lee circle you back to this fear of a second outbreak that is something we have heard a lot of state leaders highlight in terms of why they're being cautious about re opening how worried are the people you talk to about it well Americans across party lines are very concerned about the real possibility of a second outbreak especially considering there's no vaccine yet no proven treatment again we're seeing pretty big partisan divides ninety three percent ninety three percent of Democrats say that they're concerned or very concerned about this happening a second outbreak but just fifty seven percent of Republicans are the most concerned word Democrats African Americans women and Latinos less likely to say that they were concerned were Republicans white men without a college degree those in the silent or greatest generation and those who live in rural areas and by the way those two groups sound a whole lot like the bases of both parties meanwhile we are now inside of six months from the election the presidential election what did our poll finds in terms of how people are thinking not necessarily about how the corona virus will affect who they vote for but the way in which they want to cast their vote well you know vote by mail is getting a lot of attention and you have more people now saying that they want to vote by mail instead of in person fifty percent said that they want to vote by mail if their state allows it only thirty eight percent said that they want to vote in person realize that a quarter of voters in twenty sixteen voted by mail so this is double right now again we have a partisan divide majorities of Democrats and independents say they'd prefer to vote by mail if they can but a majority of Republicans say that they want to vote in person we can expect that there will be more states that look into expanding vote by mail because of the pandemic and we've seen some of that today you know president trump going after Michigan and Nevada places that are looking to expand vote by mail he was attacking them because of absentee ballot applications that went out in Michigan today and you know going after Nevada whatever Republican secretary of state and they have primaries coming up that are going to be all male and this is raising a lot of concerns about what could be the legitimacy of the election in November indeed NPR senior editor and correspondent dominical.

Richard Harris
The FDA Tightens the Rules for COVID-19 Antibody Blood Tests

All Things Considered

00:54 sec | 3 months ago

The FDA Tightens the Rules for COVID-19 Antibody Blood Tests

"The food and drug administration is reining in the loosely regulated tasks they're supposed to identify people with prior exposure to the corona virus NPR's Richard Harris reports how the FDA now plans to tighten its standards these blood tests identify antibodies which indicate past exposure to the coronavirus the FDA initially set a very low bar for these antibody tests the main requirement was that developers weren't supposed to claim that they were authorized by the FDA for more than a hundred has flooded the market some of dubious value so now the FDA has set to minimum standards for these tests manufacturers will also have to seek emergency use authorization for the test within ten days of putting them out on the market the FDA says twelve tests have already been granted this authorization which is a lower standard than full approval scientists don't know whether someone with antibodies is actually protected from the

Richard Harris FDA
Antibody study suggests coronavirus is far more widespread than previously thought

Live from Here with Chris Thile

04:34 min | 3 months ago

Antibody study suggests coronavirus is far more widespread than previously thought

"Blood tests to detect past exposure to the virus are starting to hit the market but as NPR's Richard Harris tells Steve Inskeep of morning edition even test that claim to be more than ninety percent accurate will often miss the mark one of the tests supposed to do well the test cannot be used to diagnose the disease instead they identify antibodies that appear in your blood about a week after you've been infected he said about is a part of your immune system's reaction to the virus so I just do not know the weather people with antibodies are definitively protected from the disease and if so for how long but that hope that prospect is really driving a lot of this excitement so for example I talked to Deborah Vander gassed and tipped in Iowa she runs a daycare center for children with developmental and behavioral disabilities they're a lot like little kids everywhere we laugh about you know the the sanitizing everything because you know the three impacted justice two seconds later center gassed is eagerly awaiting the rollout of the blood test in her county she thinks about her staff who are being hyper vigilant not to spread the disease if some of the people I have already been established to have antibodies they wouldn't have to go home and I sleep for two weeks they can continue working she says the test isn't available in her area but it is starting to take off nationally Dr Jeremy Galbraith runs a mobile medical service in Austin Texas he says he got a supply of antibody tests made by a major Chinese manufacturer he's already run a few hundred tests in the last few days we you know also the test for people who may have suspected that they had corona virus back in February or March when testing with a nasal swab PCR was very limited Gabbar says he only test people when he has other evidence that they might have been exposed if they had an illness that sounds like it could have been coronavirus and they have a positive antibody test then it's very likely that this is a what we call a true positive that they indeed had come in nineteen the testes using boasts a specificity of ninety nine percent which means it only falsely says a blood sample has antibodies when it doesn't just one percent of the time but despite that impressive statistic a test like this is not ninety nine percent correct and in fact in some circumstances could be much much worse that's because of this counter intuitive fact the validity of a test depends not only on the test itself but oddly on how common the diseases in the population you're sampling it is kind of a strange thing Dr Gilbert Welch is a scientist at Brigham and women's hospital in Boston hi antibody test is much more likely to be wrong in in the population with very little code the Greeks Boettcher Richard I think we need to slow down here why with the accuracy of a test depend on how common the disease is in a population yeah that it's surprising but here's a simple way to look at it say you are running a test it gives five falsely positive results in a hundred people sounds like pretty good odds right but yeah but consider this Steve if five percent of our population is infected then you run the test on a hundred people you should get five true positives but you also have those filed false positives well says there's no way to know which is which the test will be wrong half the time half the people will be falsely reassured so it's basically a coin flip and it gets worse the food and drug administration does not regulate these tests but the White House coronavirus task force set in informal standard they're supposed to have no more than ten false positives per hundred if you were to use a test that meets that standard in a population where only one percent of the population had been infected with rotavirus a positive result would be wrong a shocking amount more than nine times out of ten and you can see that one way to limit this problem is to focus on populations with the disease is more common Dr Jordan laser a pathologist at Northwell health on Long Island New York says it would make sense to start with health care workers should be wonderful for health care workers to know their immune status and give them just a peace of mind even so laser says it would still be a mistake to rely on these results definitely don't use these tests to change your practices in terms of personal protective equipment definitely do not become more comfortable in doing your job and taking care of complications it really would be more of a psychological benefit but you know these tests can still be incredibly useful as long as individual false positive results don't matter and one situation with that is the case is serving a broad populations and in fact these tests will be used to figure out just where

NPR Richard
Coronavirus: Cuomo says New York 'flattening the curve'

All Things Considered

01:41 min | 4 months ago

Coronavirus: Cuomo says New York 'flattening the curve'

"New York governor Andrew Cuomo had mixed emotions as he delivered today's update on the coronavirus crisis in his state on the one hand to date more than twice as many people have died from covert nineteen in New York than died in the terrorist attacks on nine eleven it is a sobering fact and flags are to be flown at half staff across New York in remembrance on the other hand there is also this New York Cuomo says is flattening the curve the number of patients hospitalized is down anecdotally the Ripper individual hospitals the larger systems are reporting that some of them are actually releasing more people that are coming in new York's news is a heartening sign for anxious Americans working hard to adjust to life during the pandemic and wondering when or if things will ever get back to normal for more on what's happening in New York and what else for learning about the virus we're joined by NPR science correspondent Richard Harris national correspondent Hans along and White House correspondent Tamera Keith could have all three of you here good to be with you I am very sorry Hans you want to share with you because you're in New York City the national epicenter of this crisis does it feel like New York may be turning a corner well New York governor Andrew Cuomo says you know based on the latest numbers of hospitalizations it looks like social distancing staying at home those orders appear to be working but we need to keep at it the governor says that this does not mean it's safe to go outside if you don't have to go outside because you have to keep in mind the number of people who are dying every day from cove in nineteen that number continues to climb and it's still hard to say what New York City will look like you know two months from

Andrew Cuomo Tamera Keith Hans New York City NPR Richard Harris White House Correspondent
Trump says US may put a 'very powerful hold' on funding to World Health Organization

All Things Considered

02:17 min | 4 months ago

Trump says US may put a 'very powerful hold' on funding to World Health Organization

"Briefing president trump also lashed out at the World Health Organization even threatening to cut off funding Richard Harris turning to you what do you make of that threat well it's not the first time the president has complained that the W. H. O. should've acted months earlier but in fact the W. H. O. acted quickly there are officials in China learned about the outbreak at the end of December when it was still just a few dozen cases the W. H. O. share that news with the CDC and others in early January by the end of January the W. H. O. had declared it a public health emergency of international concern that's their highest level of alert it's true they didn't use the word pandemic for awhile but the W. H. O. was constantly updating countries around the world about the developing developing epidemic in really treating it very seriously if trump follows through with his threat to cut off funding to the W. H. O. how significant would that be in the middle of this pandemic well the United States is the largest single contributor to W. H. O. it contributes more than twenty percent of the agency's four billion plus annual budget the president mentioned a figure of fifty eight million dollars which is the amount of money the U. S. was supposed to pay as a regular assessment in January but the U. S. has long contributed far more than the minimum partly out of concern for the billions of people who have poor access to health care but really also out of self interest as we have seen diseases don't respect international borders so whether it was Ebola outbreak source eco or sars or now the new coronavirus we need information from around the world and we need action from around the world to bring diseases under control well Richard as you mentioned the president has floated the trial balloon of cutting off funding to the W. H. O. before and Scott turning to you put this in context will for us with with the president's statements in general I mean how does this fit in with his approach yeah this is an important point the president regularly floats things threatens things then changes her mind or just doesn't follow through that's been the case his entire presidency there are two recent examples during the coronavirus crisis though that day that he said and tweeted that he was considering stopping people from leaving New York New Jersey and Connecticut that would have had been a drastic step that would have affected millions of people but at the end of the day president trump said he wouldn't actually do it another example is that he's been talking for several days about stopping flights into specific US cities but there's been no official

Donald Trump World Health Organization Richard Harris President Trump W. H. O. China CDC United States Scott New Jersey Connecticut Ebola New York Official
"richard harris" Discussed on Iron Advocate

Iron Advocate

03:08 min | 4 months ago

"richard harris" Discussed on Iron Advocate

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irs Harris Jeff Dan.
"richard harris" Discussed on Iron Advocate

Iron Advocate

02:41 min | 4 months ago

"richard harris" Discussed on Iron Advocate

"Was attracted to, and so in you know he was certainly. I particularly appreciate about watching him and learning from him was. That he was so authentic, he was. He was himself and he was uncompromising himself. And so uncompromisingly so and as a result I thought that that was something that I wanted to do just to be as relevant and as authentic as I possibly could. And at the same time recognize you know some really good skills without without imitating somebody in any way rich, because because while you have some you know physical and kind of you know verbal cues in things that resemble Tariq on your enormously different, and you're exercising the same rules, which is be yourself, be authentic, which is part of why you're. You're demanding all these. Necessary tools for you in your cases now whether it's a linguistic jury consultant or whatever that's who you are right. That's right I. Think you're right so I think you know I mean if you think about. Kobe Bryant and Lebron, they both. They were both of them were modeling their their careers after Michael Jordan, but they're all different so you. Although they could see the. The import of having someone as a sideline. Also important for them to develop their own skill set around that so I would i. Wouldn't certainly put myself in their class, but I would say that process was the same so social. Take this and ask you about. Super, so one last thing on on Tariq. which is that you know I, he will go into. You know a very rural courtroom whether it's in the middle of Pennsylvania or whether it's whether it's down the south. And he will resonate with an all white jury. From a rural area because of his authenticity, which which the pro which is, what does it right so? I honestly so let me use that. Is this pivot? Go into particularly big law, but but but all. Do you mind if we ask you? What are some of the challenges that? Black Lawyers Warriors of color in the profession are facing at at big law, and and how do you confront those challenges and try to teach you know those around? You. You know expansive methods for dealing with it. That's a loaded question. I would say..

Tariq Kobe Bryant Michael Jordan consultant Pennsylvania Lebron
"richard harris" Discussed on Iron Advocate

Iron Advocate

04:46 min | 4 months ago

"richard harris" Discussed on Iron Advocate

"Stress, etcetera. What you know what tools are Jeff and I? Did an episode. Recently will hoffer who's a very very well-known therapist to a bunch of books. And we talked a lot about their. What are you? What do you do to? Listen I've had a therapist on and off for the past. Ten years that if I don't have a conversation or at least a session once every two weeks then I'm losing my mind so I. so that's part of my routine as well so now therapists but I have a coach executive coach. That I've had to for the past. Three actually on and off. All three of them consecutively past. I guess he's eighteen years now. So that's part of my DNA as well. Let me! Ask You about the rich. For the lawyers out there who? And because the culture, especially among trial lawyers is, there's so much deniel around fear and other pieces of it and the vulnerability which come back to. What could you tell someone listening with about what therapy is done for you? How has it benefited you? The whole vulnerability do vulnerability piece that we just said. I recognize. Is that the most meaningful relationships? ARE WITH! Those people that I can be most vulnerable with. And so. Once? I, Unlock that in the fear of that vulnerability, because obviously the more vulnerable you can be than the more likely. You can be injured. In so one-sided unlocked that in I recognize that. If I got injured that I could recover. Then, I'm less concerned about being vulnerable because I knew that I can recover and so ultimately the relationships that I. Embark on, invest in or those that I can be the most. Relationships are the same so like I said I may have said this to you. Right! I no longer have. Clients, I'm only having. A. Transactional relationship with now. I'm at a point in my career, but my clients are going to be able that. I want to have a deeper relationship with that. We're that our success. Our success is tied to get..

Jeff executive
"richard harris" Discussed on Iron Advocate

Iron Advocate

02:23 min | 4 months ago

"richard harris" Discussed on Iron Advocate

"Folks know that as a a corporate matter. This is not okay with you that whatever happened on the on the low level with your boys? You'll deal with, but the corporate level. You understand the gravity of this, and that's right. That's right inside. It's one hundred percent, Bob, and so like I, said the incident of it was less important than my impression, and so the impression is not only that I thought then with as it relates to Denny's that employees and our patrons were being mistreated, but overall that there was a lack of corporate respect for African American. And so as a result what I was acutely aware of when I saw the video. That's GonNa be the impression. Of African, Americans across the country and I can't speak for everyone, but ultimately my I had a sense that when everyone saw the video. That they believe that two individuals were just doing with any other customer would do and in starbucks, which is designed for meeting place. It's a meeting place. And we brandon market the organization around meeting. It's the third place, so we say that you. Know. It's the third we call the third place. In so as a result of that. We want to encourage people to come together and me, and as a result of them doing exactly what we brand the organization do. They're now being arrested for. Breads Brits Abridge. I mean I know they appreciate you and and littler in the work. That was done, but I mean just a brilliant read. So. On on, don't about how what I'll say. This speed and I also said that the one thing that I encourage them to do was to act quickly as because you don't have time. So if you think about a legal response. Most. Most lawyers give your typical. Risk? Response which is take your time that over time you'll be able to investigate, and you'll be able to figure the best course of action. But when you're talking about a brand problem, you don't have time so running against the clock so true I mean God help you. Become. starbucks doesn't welcome people of Color. Right. And, that's why said it's so you have to meet with address every single person you could possibly think of..

starbucks brandon market Denny Bob
Coronavirus Latest: Testing Challenges And Protecting At-Risk Elderly

Short Wave

09:11 min | 5 months ago

Coronavirus Latest: Testing Challenges And Protecting At-Risk Elderly

"Hey everybody emily here so obviously. The biggest story in science is the corona virus and rising cases of its disease cove in nineteen. In the coming weeks. We're going to cover it a little more with regular updates on the latest news and science and today to help us do that. We are lucky to have not one but two colleagues from the NPR science desk correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce. Hainault Hi Emily and correspondent John Hamilton page on high so krona virus. It's already impacting American society. And you're each going to focus on one part of the Krona virus story this week. Now why do you got for us? So one of the things I've been thinking about a lot is who is most at risk of severe illness from this virus and while there's a lot we don't know about exactly how deadly it is overall. We do know there are some things that we need to do for the most at risk people to keep them safe yes and John. You're recently in Washington state in Seattle. Which is the site of one of the biggest outbreaks in the nation? Votes rate is where the first use case of corona virus appeared back in January. Now it has hundreds of cases dozens of deaths and no efforts to slow down. The Corona virus have have really largely. Shut down the entire Seattle area. It's not quite a ghost town but it's pretty quiet there all right so in this episode. We'll talk about all of that efforts to get tested for the virus up and running in Washington state amid the slow roll out of testing kits by the Federal Government. And how we can help people who might be the most vulnerable to the virus. Okay now before. We dive into some of the details from the week. What's the latest on the virus and it spread and I should say we're taping on Thursday morning and things are moving. Pretty fast they are they are. I mean just in the past twenty four hours. There have been some pretty dramatic developments and you can kind of feel a shift. In tone as the nation grapples with this president. Trump has this travel ban for visitors from Europe that he unveiled in an Oval Office address the NBA has suspended its season here in the US in Germany. You've got soccer leagues just playing to empty stadiums. Even Tom Hanks and his wife announced that they had corona virus. And so you can see as testing increases cases across the. Us are going up. There's this real sense that things are accelerating here and people are paying attention in a new way. Yeah and we should say that neither of US actually here in the studio with us right now. Yeah so I'm feeling sick with the kind of sickness that like normally you might sort of like you know take some cold drugs and go to work but like these days they say to stay home so I'm staying home will. I'm feeling fine but because I was around people who might have been exposed to the virus during the time I was reporting in Seattle I have been encouraged to stay home for a couple of weeks just to make sure I'm not contagious. So now I want to ask you. Oh I hear a dog. Yeah that would be. This is Bella. Bella Bella has been wanting to be on shortwave for most of my life. This was an opportunity and she sees did so John Yourself Quarantine Nell. You're keeping yourself home to make sure you don't get anyone sick. You're both so responsible. Thank you So John. We mentioned earlier that Seattle. It's the center of something called a community outbreak. There's a few of those right now in the US. Tell us what that means. All it really means is that the virus is spreading in the general population. Right so in Seattle you know the first case was brought in from China and then there were a bunch of cases related to a single nursing home but those are both sort of isolated. Now it's all over the place so while I was in Seattle. I saw the public health system stop focusing on tracing individual cases. Start looking at clusters of cases and they are also emphasizing community wide efforts to slow down the spread so that Seattle's response and hosts a little more of what it all looked like when you were there. He used to live in the Seattle area. And I never saw the traffic so light as I did the past ten days at rush hour on I five you know. It was a breeze and a couple of days ago I was. I was walking through Seattle's Chinatown the Pike Place Market. These are both big tourist areas and it was strangely quiet. A lot of the restaurants were closed. There were signs explaining that Kobe. Nineteen is the reason and I should also say people's behavior Seattle has changed You know they keep their distance. They wash their hands. I passed a couple of bars that were still open. And you could see people sitting there but it was every other barstool. Yeah our people trying to get tested for corona virus in Seattle. Yeah definitely I mean everybody wants to be tested in a whether the symptoms or not and the problem is it is really taken a while to set up the system to provide all that testing. And why is that? Well you know my my colleague. Richard Harris has been reporting on that and one reason he's found is that testing for the kroner virus. It's not that simple. You have to extract viruses from samples taken from patients. Then you have to use this device that creates lots of copies of the virus. Then you need another instrument that looks to see if the virus is a genetic match with the corona virus so this is something that is sophisticated lab can do but a doctor's office really can't and John. Why is testing so important with a couple of reasons is really important? It's how you pinpoint an outbreak. You need it for contact tracing because you have to know somebody has it to go and look for other people who might have got it from them and later on as as things spread it tells you which communities are getting infected that sort of the point where Seattle for instance is right now within Seattle. What areas is the virus showing up and finally it tells you what percentage of people who have symptoms actually have corona virus if percentage were to go up over time. It would tell you that you're not winning but the testing is what gives you clues that allows you to follow the spread phillies have a trail. You now what do you think about that? I think it's interesting. It's a different way of thinking about diagnostic testing than most people. Normally think about it. Like normally you feel sick you go to the doctor. And the reason you're getting a test is so the doctor can determine your treatment like maybe you have strep throat in that. Means you need antibiotics. But in this case we have no proven antiviral treatment against this new virus. We don't have vaccine. All the treatment is basically the same kind of supportive treatment you would give someone with another respiratory virus. So it's kind of weird situation. Where the testing that sort of everyone's clamoring for is really of most use for protecting the community and giving public health workers information about what they need to do on a community-wide basis rather than individual patient basis. Yeah and initially the CDC. It wasn't even permitting private labs and universities to do testing that dramatically reduced available capacity for testing. But that's changed recently right. It has and now certain labs so called high complexity labs are they are allowed to run their own tests. But that's not really actually the biggest problem. The biggest problem is setting up the system to collect samples for testing because they have to be sent in for a lab. You don't want people to sort of descend on some doctor's office or a clinic where they might spread the disease yet. You have to test a lot of people really quickly so one solution I saw. Seattle is What they call drive through testing. It's something that they used in Asia and the idea is that you can get tested for corona virus without leaving your car and I actually spent a morning watching this happen. I it was in one of these multilevel level. Parking lots you know next to a hospital in northwest Seattle. So the morning I was there a nurse named Jeff. Cates would walk up to each car. He was in full protective gear. You know with the disposable gown the Globes a clear plastic face mask and he would greet each person as they arrived by name. Jeff and then play health. Now we're going to be doing your swabs today. So he takes these these two swabs one from each nostril. Lean your head back with a little so you know he. He collects these samples and seals them up in plastic tubes and they will be processed by a lab. That's only a few miles away so we're going to be testing for flu. Ab IN SV when we're also testing for covert wriggles. Back to you as soon as we can. Thank you feel better soon now. Only healthcare workers are being tested his way right now but it's important because they're the people that are on the frontlines of fighting the virus and so you gotTa make sure they're not sick still they don't take the infection to other staff or patients in healthcare system. Also there has been talk of expanding this kind of drive through testing to for instance first responders who might have been in contact with somebody who had the virus and eventually even to

Seattle John Hamilton United States NPR Nell Greenfieldboyce Bella Bella Washington Soccer Tom Hanks President Trump Federal Government Phillies CDC Jeff Globes Europe Kobe
The Haunting of the Juneau Hotel

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:23 min | 5 months ago

The Haunting of the Juneau Hotel

"My investigation into the world or the paranormal metaphysical. I took us out to sea and looked at a haunted ship. Now I bring us back to the shores of Alaska and a haunted hotel. That has a history that dates back to the Alaskan gold rush the US bought Alaska from the Russian eighteen. Sixty seven just thirteen years after this in eighteen eighty Joe Juneau and Richard Harris discovered gold and Silver Creek Basin. Soon after the Alaskan gold rush began with a vengeance years later in nineteen thirteen mccloskey brothers who had struck it. Rich during the rush built a three story. Hotel near the steamship docks. The gold rush attracted an estimated. One hundred thousand people many came expecting to strike it rich and be able to return home were they would live out wealthy man's life. They brought what little money they have. Many selling everything they owned women from all walks of life joined the Klondike Gold Rush of eighteen ninety seven ninety eight. Some were poor. Some were professional. Some wives joined their husbands. Other women left their husbands at home. A few women came from desperation to support themselves and families other sought out adventure and excitement for their boring routine life. These women face no ordinary circumstances most damn Peter's male or female. We're not physically conditioned for the strenuous life that was required. Some died along the way. Now there's turned back as dreams gave way too harsh reality. Some women found themselves in situation. Say Never Imagined. One of the few options they had was employment in the sex industry. Although there were man that took advantage of the sex trade many from the midwest eastward repulsed the types of work women were able to do in the Klondike full into three categories prostitution dancehall entertaining and respectable work. The majority of women worked in one or both the first two fields creating the wild west myth of the Klondike however many women worked in less scandalous positions. One thing all women share no matter what type of work they did was their style of dress whether they worked in the private or public sphere. They all wore. Clothes considered respectable for the Victorian Society. Red Light district work the last recourse woman could turn to. When she had exhausted all others was the most undocumented type of work despite its fame as the oldest profession that would be prostitution the first woman to follow men to the gold rush where prostitutes they knew the scarcity of women in the region would bring men to their doors in search of brief female companionship and pleasure and they would pay dearly for of the forty thousand. That actually reached Juno Dawson city. Only about fifteen thousand became prospectors and of those only around. Four thousand actually struck gold. The Legend states that a woman named Alice came to Juneau with her husband. Who put her up on Alaskan Hotel? He left telling her he'd return in three weeks but when after several months he hadn't come back she ran out of money and food. She became desperate alone. Not knowing a soul she became a lady of the evening but in a twist of fate her husband did return and was so enraged. Twenty found out what she had been doing dragged or ten to a room the back of the hotel and he shot her. The Alaskan hotel was purchased to nine thousand nine hundred eighty seven and renovated by new owners but they claim that ghostly activity has increased. One Ghost said to reside in the Alaskan hotel is named Alice. Staff have stated that they always felt an unearthly presence when in the back of the hotel and a recount. How towels and other items misplaced guests? Who Occupy Room to eighteen and to nineteen at the back of the hotel and have no prior knowledge of the murder of Alice often asked to be moved to another room. One that is less noisy. One visitor told staff that during his stay he felt waves on unhappiness.

Alaskan Hotel Alice Alaska Prostitution Joe Juneau United States Silver Creek Basin Victorian Society Midwest Juno Dawson City Richard Harris Peter Juneau Murder
Coronavirus outbreak panic spreads globally

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:22 min | 5 months ago

Coronavirus outbreak panic spreads globally

"Several more unexplained cases of the new coronavirus have appeared on the west coast it's raised concerns that covered nineteen is spreading in ways that are hard to control their new cases in Washington state Oregon and California and the disease continues around the globe the World Health Organization now reports cases in at least fifty six countries join now with the latest by NPR science correspondent Richard Harris Richard thanks for being with us sure good morning Scott first please bring us up to date on these new cases in the U. S. yeah well it's been quite a week it earlier this week there was a case reported in Solano county California that's sort of midway between Sacramento and San Francisco and that's raising concerns because that woman had never really come in contact with anybody who they knew had been exposed to the corona virus she hadn't travelled to China she's now in the hospital and people are really concerned about that the CDC sent like ten additional investigators out there to figure that out but I just as that story was starting to unfold late yesterday California authorities talked about another presumptive case in San Jose which is at the south end of San Francisco Bay or in San Jose area I should say then health departments in Washington and Oregon chimed in the wee hours a Oregon said there was an adult in Washington County Oregon who fell sick about ten days ago and was tentatively diagnosed just yesterday with the corona virus in there two cases and Washington one woman who traveled in South Korea so that's not too surprising but the other person was a high school student in Snohomish county which you may recall who seems like a long time ago now was the side of the very first case identified in the United States we should all of that seems like a serious new turn of events what's going on it could indeed be quite serious community spread is troublesome to date all the other travelers have been doing pretty well known they've either been travelers to China or Japan on that cruise ship or their spouses health officials contract folks in those circumstances because they can figure out who the got been in touch with them keep following up and make sure those people are keeping track of their own health and so on but when cases start popping up at seemingly random moments that control method gets increasingly problematic so question is is this really the first sign of things going out of control or it is also a possibility that just there is been a long delay in testing and now that states are starting to do testing were almost sensing a burst in new cases and what's behind the holed up in testing here in the US yeah well testers to officially run in Atlanta which is why these are still presumptive tests but the CDC produce some test kit some weeks ago and they sent them out to the states but that didn't work into the state said we're not going to run them until you sort it out she says take a long time to figure out what exactly is been wrong with the kids they originally sent out and are they finally said okay we have the green light you can go ahead and use those cats they sent out a new patches and so on and so that's why we're seeing test now so unfortunately that delayed also means that there's been very little testing over the past several weeks beyond highly suspected cases and so that's why maybe by we're starting to see this out first right now U. S. now has more than sixty cases of the corona virus could you put that into perspective for us well clearly it's nowhere as bad as in China and we've been seeing the last couple of weeks these other areas of outbreak like South Korea Iran and Italy where cases are really rapidly multiplying since most cases here are still pretty well understood a most searched and fact off the diamond princess cruise ship that was in Japan for awhile it's too early to panic clearly but you know it is it is a concern and I think we'll learn a lot more as testing wraps up in the next week or two really what the dimensions of this are here so we keep hearing wash your hands don't touch your face any other steps that people can take yeah well certainly if you're six stay at home and if you are in contact with a sick person or concerned about that keep your distance six suites a good distance think of this is the fluid essentially spreads the same way and and treated appropriately when the CDC says be prepared what does that entail well at this point at its institutions really who need to be kicking into high gear we've been hearing all week from companies about their plans they're canceling work trips there figuring out who can work from home they're putting out their policies one of the biggest challenges I think we're gonna face collectively is individual school districts may decide to close maybe for weeks and weeks and that's a huge issue for parents and also for the employees to figure out so I think we have to start thinking about you know what life would look like if if schools close that's a

New coronavirus case may be 1st sign of "community spread" in U.S.

All of It

00:51 sec | 5 months ago

New coronavirus case may be 1st sign of "community spread" in U.S.

"Health officials are investigating a new coronavirus case in California that has no obvious links to traveling from China NPR's Richard Harris reports the patient has been in isolation at the UC Davis hospital in Sacramento officials there said the patient was transferred from another hospital but the CDC would not immediately test samples from the patient because they didn't meet the CDC's criteria eventually CDC ran a test and the results were positive for corona virus the individual lives in Solano county which is also the home of Travis Air Force base the sight of some evacuations from Asia health officials are now investigating but so far they say they see no link to other known cases cases that arise in the community are a concern because they could be a sign that the disease is starting to spread there are now sixty reported cases of the corona virus in the U. S. and this one is the first real

California China Npr Richard Harris Uc Davis Hospital CDC Solano County Sacramento Travis Air Force Asia
Global stock markets plunge on coronavirus fears

Marketplace

03:42 min | 5 months ago

Global stock markets plunge on coronavirus fears

"To another story now stock markets here in the US and in Europe tumbled today out of concerns about the corona virus disease known as covert nineteen it has now spread to thirty countries public health officials in Iran and Italy and South Korea in particular are struggling to contain the disease that began in China the World Health Organization says it is deeply concerned about that the outbreak is not a pandemic yet and there are encouraging trends as NPR science correspondent Richard Harris reports the most hopeful news is that the epidemic in China appears to have plateaued in late January and is continuing on a good trajectory Dr Bruce Aylward just completed a World Health Organization trip to China with the scientific delegation and he says there's no doubt in his mind that the trend is real speaking at a news conference in Beijing he said just yesterday he'd spoken to a researcher in Wuhan who is testing potential drugs to treat cobit nineteen and when I asked him what challenge they're finding in trying to implement the trial he said the single biggest one is recruiting new patients into the trial because of the drop in cases that's a good kind of problem the message from China is that it's not hopeless he says it is possible to control this disease now we're starting to see countries like Italy take extremely aggressive actions what China has demonstrated is you have to do this and if you do it you can save lives and prevent thousands of cases of what is a very difficult disease what succeeded is getting the public's full cooperation to do the simplest tasks believe it or not the most valuable thing the whole population could do was wash its hands who continually also avoid crowds as you'd find in schools and other large gatherings restricting travel is not on a awards list of useful actions you don't have to lock down cities is the big message from China in fact the WHO's scientific delegations task was to learn what worked in China and spread that word to the rest of the world but even during their brief trip the disease was making serious inroads in South Korea Iran and Italy there is a lot of speculation about whether this increase this means that this epidemic has now become a pandemic W. H. O. director general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus says the label isn't simply whether a disease is on multiple continents but whether it's out of control and doing significant damage does this virus have bundamedik potential absolutely he does are we there yet from our assessment not yet there's still time for countries to get in front of it the WHO's top priorities are to protect healthcare workers to protect vulnerable people such as those who are sick and elderly and to protect vulnerable countries Dr Michael Ryan at the W. H. O. says even the advanced nations of Europe have work to do since their hospitals are pretty full these days with flu patients those beds might be needed for coronavirus patients even now slowing down the virus spreading in Europe in order for the flu season to end well free of significant capacity of the health system so even slowing down the virus by a month or six weeks has a massive positive benefits of the system health officials in the United States know that they can't count on identifying every single new case immediately and isolating those patients so they're also thinking about containment measures like school closings that helped beat back the disease in China Richard Harris NPR

United States Europe
Huge jump in coronavirus cases and deaths in China

Morning Edition

04:17 min | 6 months ago

Huge jump in coronavirus cases and deaths in China

"Health officials are reporting a huge jump in the number of coronavirus cases in China's Hubei province that comes as scientists there of change the definition of who has the disease now known as cove ID nineteen with this new definition the number of cases worldwide now stands at about sixty thousand more than ninety nine percent of those cases are in China if your science correspondent Richard Harris is with us in studio Richard thanks for coming in sure good morning so does this new figure represents an expansion of the disease of we can call it that order or simply a change in how it's being defined it's mostly a change in the definition but changing the definition of a disease does make it harder to track trends and to really understand what's going on beneath the surface right so we know the jump from last week to this week is not actually the result of a huge change in in how this disease progressing so what's the rationale why did the Chinese government decide to change the definition the first place that question came up yesterday at a press briefing at the World Health Organization in Geneva and W. H. O. scientists of you bring your own help explain what's going on first of all what is important to understand it's no more during the course of an outbreak to adapt the keys the Phoenician because we need to be very close to the reality to monitor as a disease how is unfolding and in the earliest as he died in the earliest days of this disease the virus hadn't been identified so all the cases were essentially defined by clinical symptoms like pneumonia into one your doctor Briel again the situation is evolving so when you are few cases you have a very specific even specific case definition because you really want to die the couple each and every case when the situation is evolving you change your definition just to make sure that you can monitor as a disease are correct and sees what they have done recently changing the case definition to incorporate my Casey's so is she saying there it's now going to incorporate mild cases I mean what factors are gonna have other than obviously having more cases to report right well in the short run it causes some confusion because you can't simply compare last week's numbers to this week's numbers and get some sense of a trend of the disease but in the long run it will actually be helpful because health officials really do need to control those mild cases to in order to keep the disease from spreading so going forward we could well have a better sense of how the disease is progressing it's also the case that once you've included all those mild cases it will push down what's called the case fatality rate which is the number of deaths per diseases and so yeah yeah so you you don't change the number of number of people who die when you change the definition of who's sick but but if you include all of these additional people the rate will go to the rate goes down you know this about three percent right now something like that in trying to but that may be an inflated number what you put in all of these other cases yeah so I let me ask you this there's been a lot of frustration that China hasn't been leading an international scientists including scientists from the U. S. so they can see for themselves the data behind all of these numbers what what can you tell us about that effort well China has finally granted WHS some access that W. H. I. sent three experts to scope out the situation earlier this week and to try to figure out exactly what their full team would do the CDC hopes to be part of that delegation but that still hasn't happened so you know there has been a lot of suspicion that China isn't telling the whole story but the W. H. O. has been pretty adamant the trend has been very helpful so especially when it comes to controlling the spread of the disease outside its borders witness the fact that less than one percent of all of those cases are elsewhere service at that news conference yesterday WHO's scientist Mike Ryan pointed out that the new case definitions actually step toward that transparency this is not an attempt to ignore cases it's an attempt to widen the net and Lou by look cases and I'm all lab confirmed cases regardless of the symptoms so what are they just counting the number of people who have tested positive for the new crossfire yeah that would be ideal if the test were completely reliable and if they had enough of the test kits to go around but we seen reports of the test and trying to have been in short supply and of questionable quality it's generally run from the nose or throat swab and in some cases the when you swap like that you really don't get the virus necessarily could be cheaper in the long so so even a perfect test may not pick everything up but to you know that that's what they're trying to expanded rather include cases that that are that are big mild exactly

China Hubei
Some coronavirus test kits shipped around US are flawed, CDC claims

Morning Edition

00:50 sec | 6 months ago

Some coronavirus test kits shipped around US are flawed, CDC claims

"Lab tests to detect the novel coronavirus have been shipped to many state and local labs but they're not quite ready for use as NPR's Richard Harris reports the centers for disease control and prevention developed a test to detect the novel coronavirus and early January shortly after Chinese scientists identified the virus itself no swabs are now shipped to the CDC in Atlanta for testing to speed the testing process the agency scramble to produce hundreds of test kits and ship them to state and local labs across the country but a CDC official says quality control checks at some of those labs have identified a problem with the test one of the ingredients is apparently unreliable so federal health officials are working to provide fresh ingredients to the labs that have problematic test kits that could delay local testing in some places by a week or possibly

NPR Richard Harris CDC Atlanta Official
Coronavirus death toll seems to be slowing

All Things Considered

03:43 min | 6 months ago

Coronavirus death toll seems to be slowing

"The number of new coronavirus cases reported in China seems to be slowing public health officials say it's too soon to know what's going on the most hopeful explanation is that the disease now called cove ID nineteen is starting to ebb that's the most hopeful but there are other possible explanations as NPR science correspondent Richard Harris is here to tell us hi Richard hello Mary Louise so when we say it seems to be slowing one of the numbers look like well the in absolute numbers that they're still kind of grim the number of cases now tops forty five thousand ninety nine percent of them are in China and there was an eleven hundred deaths also reported in China so but the toll the good news is the toll doesn't seem to be mounting quite as quickly as it had had been and today the World Health Organization give a briefing about the situation and one top official Dr Mike Ryan give his interpretation of what's going on the stabilization in cases in the last number of days it is very reassuring the behavior of the virus also one who pay doesn't appear at this point to be as aggressive or as acceleration Nick is is the opportunity for containment intention interruption of transmission of the virus okay but so Richard what else other than a real slowing of the epidemic what else would explain this trend well we don't have a really clear idea about the time lag between when cases are our rights and how soon the reported so this could be you know sensually variation in how quickly paperwork moves through the Chinese healthcare system and then on to the W. H. O. in Switzerland it's also the case that China has been tweaking the definition of this disease and that can certainly affect trends but Ryan says it appears the Chinese are now using a broader definition of the disease the shift is actually likely to generate more confirmed cases not less this is not an attempt to ignore cases it's an attempt to widen the net and include my other cases of all lab confirmed cases regardless of the symptoms that said the W. H. O. hosted a two day meeting our technical experts identify urgent priorities and on that list was the need for better disease tracking as well as a better understanding of exactly how this virus is transmitted we still don't really know yeah okay so there's that there's better disease tracking as you mention what else is the W. H. O. as saying could help the situation well officials said the Chinese scientists who called into the meeting said what they really need is a faster test for the disease when that they could run quickly in doctors offices and clinics and so on I like your rapid strep test at your doctor's office right end up finding new drugs of course it's a priority but to do that site to see what they would really like to have a standing standard testing pro calls so results from the studies that are already springing up in trying to can be compared with one another what about trying to prevent it all together a vaccine absolutely that's a or they're already number those in the works but at least a year away so that's sort of a middle range hope if you will at Texans are not going to stop a new epidemic certainly not to the early going question that's been on my mind which is there but a lot of questions about how China handled this particularly in the early stages the WHL has repeatedly come to China's defense why and is it warranted well we clearly don't have the whole story about how China as reacted within its own borders but we do know that unlike the sars epidemic nearly two decades ago China has been very helpful in controlling the global spread of the new coronavirus W. H. O. director general doctor to address a non Cabrera assist said he's not feeling any pressure to praise China he says it's deserved if you see the number of cases in China it's more than forty thousand but in the rest of the what did we have around four hundred and only one death so let the Druze speak for itself he said after the crisis is over everyone can go back identify the inevitable missteps and then learn

China
Sepsis Is A Global Killer. Can Vitamin C Be The Cure?

Short Wave

04:57 min | 6 months ago

Sepsis Is A Global Killer. Can Vitamin C Be The Cure?

"Mattie Safai in the House with Richard Harris yet another one of my favorite science correspondence must be all your favorite special. That's what my mother always said. You're all my favorite Richard. You have some serious business to discuss today. Indeed indeed I do yes. I'm GonNa Talk to you about sepsis right so for anybody who might not know. Sepsis is actually caused by the body's reaction to an infection basically the immune system overreacts causing this huge inflammatory response. Blood vessels get a leaky which messes up. How blood flows throughout the body body? In severe cases. Septic shock can set in. And that's when your blood pressure drops to dangerously low levels sometimes leading to multiple organ failure and in death doctors treat that initial infection and they can try to manage the dangerous symptoms of Sepsis. But there's no cure for it that's right and as a result assault is the single most expensive condition in. US hospitals best estimate is that it strikes one point seven million people a year in the United States and kills more than a quarter million. Wow so it's a huge toll right and one of the reasons. It's so common is because a lot of different types of infections can result in sepsis many roads into sepsis but even though it's a huge deal we don't really talk about it that much in. That's kind of weird isn't it is such a common condition but it isn't even bigger problem. Globally thirty thousand people die of it every single day. That's why it's a huge number. It's truly under appreciated disease. And why I'm telling you the story today is because the results have been published important new study on the treatment of Sepsis with the transfusion of simple mixture really vitamin C.. And Fireman thion which is vitamin B. One that's right and also some corticosteroids. These are all cheap and readily available drugs so today in the show the journey to find a cure for sepsis. Yes we hear the latest on this wild claim about a potential cure of vitamin C drug cocktail. Okay Okay Richard. When you were first telling me about this you said you actually got to talk to somebody a few years ago? Who received this newfangled treatment right? I was interested in really following how this evolved volve this this audacious idea and seeing where it would go and actually a number of doctors immediately started picking up and started using it at least on their most desperately ill patients and talked to one of them. This guy with an incredible story in Christopher Kelly who had this horrid logging accident this is out in Seattle I was cutting for a logging outfit up on these rock cliffs and fell about one hundred and fifty foot for tree into these maple trees. They add a bunch of dead tops we call them widow makers mhm tree came down the butt of it bounce toward him crushing him. I heard the bones crunch when it got me. It was pretty precarity Yell for a minute. And then I'd pass out and I guess my ribs were ripping. My lungs is the reason I I was only you know in and out of consciousness. And Amazingly he was there for a couple of hours before a couple of other men working in the area found him and got him on a Medevac helicopter to harborview medical center in Seattle in the Wendy says he wound up with a shattered pelvis all of his ribs. Broken twenty two bones and Dane. The day I met him. He developed a very high fever along with shock. That's one of Kelly's doctors at David car-bomb who realized that Sepsis was beginning to set in so sepsis is one of the big risks and injuries like this because infections sometimes time start on the wounds on the skin or from inside the lungs or internal injuries or whatever and the infection of course can turn into septic shock which is the nastiest form of this condition. When Oregon's start to fail that often leads to death and as we mentioned earlier? There's no known cure for SEPSIS. That's right car-bomb could treat the underlying infection with antibiotics Roddick's but he was also one of a set of doctors who had actually started experimenting with his new treatment of vitamin C and firemen and steroids and discuss it with his son and his son and was very amenable. We talked about The fact that it's a new therapy that there really wasn't very strong evidence but I felt that it was not a ton of risk and that this could be beneficial. How did it work Richard? Well hold on how quickly to respond. Usually patients very sick for a few days before responding antibiotics and him it took about a day his fever head cleared and he was off the medicines to support his blood pressure and looked remarkably better. But this is not actually a totally new new idea at all. I mean vitamin CS. Curative Properties have been batted around for decades and decades. A lot of. It's kind of Kooky so that actually works against this argument people initially and understandably skeptical about it but that said it is true that people who have sepsis have surprisingly low levels of vitamin C in their blood. So there's some biological logical plausibility to doing this right.

Sepsis Richard Harris Seattle Fever United States Christopher Kelly Mattie Safai Harborview Medical Center Multiple Organ Failure Dane Curative Properties Assault Oregon Roddick Wendy
Coronavirus: Death toll from China virus outbreak passes 100

Morning Edition

03:52 min | 6 months ago

Coronavirus: Death toll from China virus outbreak passes 100

"Morning how severe is the spread of the coronavirus health officials around the world are plainly concerned an outbreak centers on China where officials have blocked traffic in and out of multiple cities Hong Kong cut back connections with the mainland the United States is urging Americans to avoid all nonessential travel to China and your science correspondent Richard Harris is here to assess what officials are up against Richard good morning morning skate what are some numbers that give us a sense of the scale of this well the numbers keep growing rapidly but the latest figures show about four thousand cases narrow the vast majority in China and more than a hundred deaths have now been reported those are probably even underestimates at least a case or two has been reported in at least sixteen other countries around the world just five cases here in the United States or been diagnosed and those are all among people who had recently seen in the city of Wuhan where the outbreak began but yesterday said just five cases in the United States is there a risk of more there are likely to be more cases health officials say especially from other people who had been in China and I've come home recently so less clear is whether any of the people who have it now have passed it along to others it's a respiratory virus so it could spread from a cough or sneeze or perhaps on the surface like a bed rail in hospital room or something and people at greatest risk would be the actual health care workers who are in those rooms and caring for those patients how deadly is this virus if you get it that isn't an unresolved question but according to reports in the latest journal the lancet it seems like only three percent thus far in China who came down with the disease actually died but that three percent number is subject to change as more deaths get reported that will obviously change that though the mortality rate of the previous virus that was similar to this is the sars virus and that ended up killing about ten percent of people Richard this is one of these viruses where you are contagious before you were notably sick you might not have any idea whether you're spreading it or not that is an open question obviously you it would be an important factor in the spread of the disease that does happen as you mentioned in like in in the in the flu measles that happens for so it's not an unusual thing if it were to happen but sars this previous coronavirus seems only to spread when it was symptomatic yesterday in a telephone news conference at CDC official death doctor Nancy missing a got a question on this point in here's what she said we at CDC don't have any clear evidence of patients being anxious before symptom onset however we are being with our state and local health department partners very aggressive and very cautious in tracking of close contacts to determine if we are able to identify and Texas are ill so far we have not seen any human to human transmission in the United States and respiratory diseases as I mentioned office printer cough and that is in fact a symptom right so along with fever or shortness of breath for this one how concerned are the experts here I spoke to an epidemiologist at the university of Toronto yesterday who said it will be hardest by far to get this epidemic under control in China because are already so many cases in each one has the potential to spread it further Dr David Fishman is trying to contain says trying to contain the epidemic in trying is like being an outfielder and being told to catch you know hundred fly balls at once he says the task is much easier here we're kind of getting knocked fly balls one at a time and the job is not to drop them all but that's much easier than playing catch up when you fill out an academic to to grow to a point where you have thousands of cases and now you're trying to sort of track your coolant and prevent transmission so at this point the CDC's messages that this is a serious condition obviously but we in the United States are currently at very low risk is always subject to change but as long as are just a handful of cases as is the case right now health officials can stay on top of it the trick is to identify the sick people isolate them quickly to keep an eye on their contacts and to make sure that the health care providers are also taking precautions they need to they don't get sick themselves Richard thanks for the insights my pleasure NPR science correspondent

Everything you need to know about the new coronavirus

All Things Considered

03:09 min | 7 months ago

Everything you need to know about the new coronavirus

"A man from Washington state recently returned from China infected with a new virus that is responsible for about three hundred cases and at least six deaths it's the first case of the disease reported in the US public health officials say the risk to the general public remains low and NPR science correspondent Richard Harris joins us now with more Hey Richard Hey so we are talking about the coronavirus here tell us a little more about this disease well it's a long infection caused by this virus the corona virus and it can a corona viruses include mild viruses that cause the common cold but also nasty viruses like the marshes possible for two previous global outbreak you may remember sars and maybe Murray and this one cropped up in Wuhan China late last year at first Chinese health officials said it was just confined to that city nothing to worry about but there are no reports of it among people who travels from China to Thailand Taiwan Japan and South Korea and now the U. S. so tell us about what happened with this first U. S. case well the story was laid out today in a telephone press briefing with officials from the centers for disease control and prevention as well as health officials from Washington state as they recounted a man in his thirties had returned home to Snohomish county in the middle of last week we started to feel off so he called his doctor and he told his doctor who travel to Han that immediately triggered public health officials to suspect that he might have contracted this new coronavirus who's taken to Providence regional Medical Center in Everett Washington which is instantly were bowing mixes airplanes news placed in isolation yeah and then the CDC actually was able to identify the school overnight how is he doing now health officials in Washington state you say is doing just fine in fact the main reason he's in the hospital is to isolate him and make sure that other people are being put at risk okay so what exactly is that risk of spreading the disease well researchers don't know a whole bunch about this virus yet it did show up first in a market that live seafood in animals they do know it can spread from person to person and that could happen to sneezes or coughs or potentially someone shedding the fires and touches a surface that than somebody else touches okay so what are health officials doing now to try to contain this so first of all they're starting to contact the people that the minute had contact with they say thankfully that's a very small number of people because he was so vigilante call this doctor right away as soon as he got concerned about this and he was quickly isolated but the CDC has sent investigators to Washington state to track everyone he contacted that includes people like in seats near his on his airplane honest various flights back from China while so last Friday the CDC announced that he was going to be setting up screening at three major airports to check the health of people returning from Wuhan that was San Francisco Los Angeles JFK in New York did this man actually come through that screening process he actually arrive before they had set up that screening process but as a result of this case the CDC is no X. adding a couple of airports to its screening plan they're adding Chicago in Atlanta so for to total five now in its requiring anyone who's returning from Wuhan to be routed through one of those airports that get screen anyone returning from Wuhan but cases are now being reported in Japan and South Korea Thailand and Taiwan it doesn't seem like we're in position to catch all the cases yeah you can never get a hundred percent right but the CDC is playing the odds in picking the most likely travelers that said no this public health strategy is evolving quickly and if the disease starts to spread in a meaningful way I'm sure that CDC

China Washington
Iridium's Pivotal Role In Our Past And ... Maybe Our Future?

Short Wave

10:01 min | 8 months ago

Iridium's Pivotal Role In Our Past And ... Maybe Our Future?

"We're talking about iridium as show. What does this element tell us about dinosaurs? and how they went extinct. We're going to go back. Tens of millions of years ago to start. Yeah well we start and say like nineteen eighty. That's what I said Richard. I said one thousand nine hundred nineteen eighty okay. Well that's actually. When an academic paper gets published by a group led by a father and son team from the a University of California at Berkeley Louis Alvarez the father of physicist and by the way Nobel Prize winner and his son Walter Alvarez? WHO's a geologist and they? We're interested in a specific period of time. In Earth's history it was a transition between two geologic periods the Cretaceous period and the Paleocene good ones too good period. Yeah so dinosaurs still roamed the earth during the Cretaceous period. But after that you don't find any of these dino bones except in our current dinosaurs birds. You're you know what I mean. I I do know what you mean. Yeah thinking of dinosaurs. Birds Birds Dinosaurs. Same thing it's sad. It's true so at any rate but the Alvarez's weren't actually trying to answer that big. Why did the dinosaurs go extinct? Mystery that point Walter and Louis Alvarez. We're trying to answer. Just one part of that riddle which is how quickly that transition between the two periods took place so walter trump off to Italy where there are rock outcrops that were laid down his sediment back at the time of that transition. Okay seems like a good idea. Why look at those rocks knocks well to get the back story? I talked to another Berkeley scientists. My name is Paul Renae. And I'm the director of the Berkeley Ju- Chronology Center any said the secret to figuring Out How fast. That transition happened involved measuring dust from outer space. That's constantly raining down on earth. Tiny amounts Louis Alvarez Walter's father her biggest physicist thought. Well you know we can determine that we can. We can make some reasonable assumptions about how much dust is coming in from from extraterrestrial sources. Okay extraterrestrial we're talking stuff from outside Earth or the atmosphere in Richard. Can I just say the fact that somebody thought thought about measuring cosmic dust to figure out the passage of time sixty million years ago is objectively awesome. It is and when you think about the dust coming from asteroids colliding with each other. It's even cooler and they were looking for particular stuff and In particular if we look at an element. That's rare on on earth but common in meteors in an element. That's rare on earth but common in asteroids Guess what we're talking about Matty I'm going to take out style and I'm GonNa say radium. Guess Excellent guests. Thank you are we. But what's the role of the dust here right well. Louis was operating unreasonable unreasonable assumption. which is that? This dust from meteors rains down on the earth. More or less constant rate. It's dust of course enriched with iridium. So I figured if they could measure is your how much iridium had built up in. This transitional layer. They would be able to tell. How long taken to accumulate? So I'm thinking sort of figuring out how much snow fell over a period of the time. If you know the rate at falls and how much is on the ground except this is tens of millions of years ago Roger Dodger tens of millions of years ago and the iridium doesn't Milton the sunlight so it sticks sticks around you can still see at sixty five or sixty six years later so so it didn't rate when they ran those calculations with the Alvarez's found was stunning. The results were so so extreme. That just just a the passage of a long time would not really explain this. It was many times greater than the amount amount of radium in this layer than expected just from this gradual accumulation so the conclusion they drew was that there had been some huge pulse of extraterrestrial Oriole's Joe Matter and the obvious conclusion that they quickly came to was that it was a large impact a large impact. We're talking to you asteroid did we are an asteroid They think the asteroid smashes into the earth destroying so much of life on earth and throwing up an enormous muscle mass of dust into the atmosphere. The dust itself caused mass extinctions but it also had iridium in it and it spread around the Earth so they realized this collision is a big one and and the conditions that resulted you know reasonably enough they thought they theorized killed off. These won't bring dinosaurs. You know what you're nobody ever thinks about that other life. I feel like it's always dinosaurs. Dinosaurs dinosaurs. I know you don't get little plastic models of marine for him. And if we're talking to you as I mentioned in this paper was published back in one thousand nine hundred eighty and back then. A catastrophic end seemed to mini scientists pretty far fetched because evolution takes place over millions of years so so a lot of scientists were expecting to see gradual changes. and and Paul Rennie says when the Alvarez has proposed this meteor theory created quite a stir in the community it did. Yeah I mean. It was originally not widely accepted but acceptance sort of came in waves and the biggest confirmation team win in the early nineties. There was the discovery of the crater on the northern coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. A study published in. Today's issue of Science magazine appears to add weight to a theory that a giant media or struck the earth. Sixty five million years ago and what is now Mexico many scientists. This is the Intro to my story that aired in NPR back in Nineteen ninety-two. Some scientists. See this as evidence that helps prove their theory that the dinosaurs were wiped out by a giant asteroid or comet but as NPR NPR science correspondent Richard Harris reports the theories baby Richard Harris Science reporter even covering this story for a bit. I have indeed actually packs into the early nineteen eighties but that no dinosaur drug please and a really big asteroid could scatter iridium dust. Globally the question was. Where's the crater that a huge asteroid like that would make take a look and listen to all that? Join Your Voice you know I know well what what can be more fun than dead dinosaurs. Really Okay So. This study found the point of impact for the giant asteroid. Yes it was a crater one hundred ten miles across called Jiffy Lube and it was created by this asteroid that had a tremendous amount of explosive power. As you can. Well imagine sure so. When these geologist tested the age of the materials from the crater it turned out to date very closely to the mass extinction by the way? Dating methods. have been recalibrated calibrated since that paper. So scientists now say that catastrophe happened. Sixty six million years ago. Not Sixty five million. What's a million years among friends? Yeah yeah yeah absolutely so Joe. Yeah but the point is of course the impact and the dinosaurs demise lineup perfectly and for that nineteen ninety-two story. I talked to Carl Swisher at the Institute of Human Origins which at the time was in Berkeley Berkeley Berkeley Berkeley no even much larger when we went across the street to the UC. Berkeley and told Walter Alvarez the ages we're getting I think he was quite excited because he spent What the last Ten fifteen years trying to find a crater of each throughout the World Team Alvarez for the win absolutely yes for the most part. There's a lot of evidence but there will always be some skeptics in the scientific community. And you know it's also important maybe to mention that at the same time about the same time there was a whole lot of volcanic activity we also on the earth. So there's always people thinking one two punch. Maybe you're saying definitely came. But was it the absolute Khuda Gra for all these dinosaurs. That's still that's still debated. Yeah astroid touch volcanoes low bit of mix maybe so okay Richard Radium helped us figure out our dinosaur extinction mystery. You mentioned earlier that it could also help us potentially prevent the next global catastrophe. We're not talking another asteroid here. No we have Bruce Willis For Asteroids if you remember the action movie Armageddon No no no actually. We're talking about climate change climate change. How does a radium help? Well what we really need to do to. Combat climate change is to have clean fuel. That's cheaper than fossil fuels. If we could get such a thing in other words would quickly switch to the cheaper fuel and we'd stop dumping all that carbon dioxide said in the atmosphere. I don't know about quickly but sure. That's the dream. Richard Yeah Fair enough. So what's the link between clean fuels radium. Well we really liked to capture energy. She from sunlight and turn that into liquid fuels now. Plants figured this out long before the dinosaurs were even around. Tho- sent this says that's right and the first step in this process is to split a water molecule. And the problem is this is not so easy to do in the lab what chemist need is a catalyst so the chemicals that that speed up chemical reactions out there getting stuff done. You got it and I'm guessing you can see where I'm going with this. A radium is a good catalyst. It is a great catalyst for this purpose and imagine turning sunlight into hydrogen fuel or liquid fuel. You could put into an airplane. Of course there's one eighty problem with the scenario. Iridium you will recall. Aw is one of the rarest elements on Earth's crust because of his scarcity's one of the most expensive metals as well. So he does complicate our Laura Research so is the Mother Nature through that us. That's Guanghui Wing. He's a chemistry professor at Boston College. And he's trying to develop an iridium catalyst to make fuel out of sunlight and he's trying to get around this issue of how little of it. We have our ideas that we wanted to utilize this catheters to his maximum. That is we wanted Khimik every atom conce and since iridium is so rare he wants to make sure every single atom in a catalyst is actually at work speeding up reactions even so oh it's probably a stretch to think about building industry around iridium right so he and his colleagues are also hoping that once they understand how iridium does this magic they can find something else that will work as a catalyst as well or nearly as well and ideally something. That's abundant on the earth. So iridium or something like it could potentially help save the day. That's

Walter Alvarez Louis Alvarez Louis Alvarez Walter Berkeley Berkeley Berkeley Berkeley Ber Geologist Physicist Richard Yeah Joe Matter Cretaceous Richard Walter Trump Richard Radium NPR Radium Berkeley Ju- Chronology Center Nobel Prize University Of California
"richard harris" Discussed on The Cashflow Show

The Cashflow Show

03:18 min | 8 months ago

"richard harris" Discussed on The Cashflow Show

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The <Speech_Male> facilities manages <Speech_Male> the construction <Speech_Male> the council's <Speech_Male> who do have <Speech_Male> lots of contractors. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And who need to manage Sean <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> By <Speech_Male> the opportunity <SpeakerChange> for <Speech_Male> us <Silence> <Speech_Male> As well <Speech_Male> I mean is even with. <Speech_Male> The trays is plenty <Speech_Male> of companies out. 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It's <Speech_Male> social <SpeakerChange> media. <Speech_Male> How do people get of <Speech_Male> you as we <Speech_Male> have The <Speech_Male> copy website so <Speech_Male> a copy dot com <Speech_Male> has <Speech_Male> them confined to through <Speech_Male> Google Search <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> job. <Speech_Male> She's electronic <Speech_Male> job. She saw workforce <Speech_Male> management <Speech_Male> around <Speech_Male> the APP stores <Speech_Male> the Iran <Speech_Male> issued so <Speech_Male> again. We look for appeal. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <hes> wet foot <Speech_Male> punishment up sheets <Speech_Male> as I <Speech_Male> enjoy <Speech_Male> On there <Speech_Male> so he's that you spend <Speech_Male> it. Yeah Ok. <Speech_Male> P Y <Speech_Male> auto <Speech_Male> fair <Speech_Male> is social <Speech_Male> media as well so <Speech_Male> yet. We're on a <Speech_Male> twitter. I <Speech_Male> O K on <Speech_Male> the school. Ip <Speech_Male> Cohen look <Speech_Male> for as their limited <Speech_Male> facebook doc <Speech_Male> but yeah <Speech_Male> yeah aspect of websites <Speech_Male> that the key <Speech_Male> a <SpeakerChange> copy dot <Speech_Male> com excellent. <Speech_Male> Thank you very much <Speech_Male> for that. So <Speech_Male> Richard Harris <Speech_Male> CEO and Co <Speech_Male> founder of Oak Happy Happy. <Speech_Male> Thank you <Speech_Male> very much for joining <Speech_Male> us. Here on the cash flow. <Speech_Male> Sean thank you <Speech_Male> yeah. It's been a pleasure <Speech_Male> having you and hearing <Speech_Male> all about Your Business <Speech_Male> and your growth <Speech_Male> and your proposed <Speech_Male> expansion <Speech_Male> and we wish <Speech_Male> you all the best in the future. <Speech_Male> Thank you <Speech_Male> thank you very much <Speech_Music_Male> anyway. Thank <Speech_Music_Male> you for listening to <Speech_Music_Male> another episode of the cash <Speech_Music_Male> flow show. It's <Speech_Music_Male> really appreciate your <Speech_Music_Male> joining us. <Speech_Male> If you've enjoyed what <Speech_Male> you've heard today <Speech_Male> would like to hear more <Speech_Music_Male> than please subscribed <Speech_Music_Male> by your chosen <Speech_Music_Male> podcast provider <Speech_Male> and do <Speech_Music_Male> be notified when new <Speech_Music_Male> episodes are released. <Speech_Music_Male> If if <Speech_Male> you wish to like comment <Speech_Male> subscribe <Speech_Male> leave a message <Speech_Music_Male> or follow us <Speech_Music_Male> on social media. <Speech_Music_Male> Please do so <Speech_Music_Male> as we would love <Speech_Music_Male> to hear from you <Speech_Male> so until the next time. <Speech_Male> Take care from everyone we <Speech_Male> wanNA cashflows. <SpeakerChange> Show <Speech_Music_Male> Goodbye <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Sir. <Music>

London Sean twitter Google Iran facebook Cohen Richard Harris Co CEO founder Oak
"richard harris" Discussed on The Cashflow Show

The Cashflow Show

12:48 min | 8 months ago

"richard harris" Discussed on The Cashflow Show

"Hello and welcome back to this episode of cash flow show and we have Richard Harris. CEO The And co-founder of Okapi and before we left for the break we were discussing venture capital series as seed funding. And and all these other things. And it's not a gardening. Show people as you know. It's about entrepreneurs their businesses and what that entails. So if you're your follow up the show or even if you're not you'll know that we have a couple of questions that we always ask guests and we try and see if we can get a response from the momentum of what they do in what they like in terms of this time because we don't expect them to be working all the time but at some point they need a break. So Richard. The question into you is. What is your favourite film? And why had my favourite film I would say is I've skie- said the one we have. Tom Kris okay. Tell tell me about this. I've never seen that one. Yes basically. It's about Tom. Cruise is at a guy's got a pretty charmed existence. His father was. I'm Publishing Mogul I'm not created a a strange character. I'd have much hospice love from his father. He had untold wealth So he basically had than he while he was involved in a car crash in. It's about how he's life changed and there's a twist in it because it's said different levels is not just kind of like the here and now is wow until about the twins go through violence knows yea is a bit more than the justice story but yeah I just find it interesting because this is about someone who has a different different life and a life I spent a lot of people. People aspire to intimate of the wealth and the Ferrari and they Manhattan apartments on. I guess it was kind of seeing how that changed their fragility Alvin Seen how he coped with it and also how the people in his life cope with it as well. How involved okay? Yeah I just I I just found. It was very different to kind of opposite a lot of other films. I must say I did have a bit of a twist. Okay But yeah it was just interesting interesting thought. Provoking else is one of the things I'm always Keenan for myself is not to be. I suppose average but to try trying to create something special and I think that's a lot of the thing behind copies is wanting to to make a difference and be different and create something special. I show an aspect of inspiration. Awesome inspiration from that Phil excellent excellent and so. What is your favorite book and why I'm sorry this one's probably a bit hardest book sovereign which can have like. I mean I read one recently. Cold the knicks. Okay by I think it was Nathan Hill so I think it's quite a recent book is being published And it was again. It's about a story about people in sixties about the riots in Chicago around the Vietnam War and again is talking about the one of the key characters are cheap went to Chicago University head background. She was originally from. I think Norway so they'd emigrated to America living in a small rural town and she was trying to break out thoughts tailgate Goatee University Which I guess was inspirational saying thought side of it But then it was about she she got involved with other people that are involved volt the riots. How that kind of impacted her life of friends life and on the other side of the coin is while the a policeman How their lives changed and evolved over time and the story was basically looking out that lies from the sixties through to to the present day? Okay and it was really interesting saying how back on lives changed. Fulsome aspirations change and in particular how the the main go it also impacted future generations impacted. Her relationship with her son An again I suppose the there's a bit of a twist at the end in terms of some of the characters and how that kind of lies progressed. But yeah got I guess again. It was just interesting characters. It was thought provoking a It was interesting learning about at the time and American culture as well but you have an is bit of humor in Arizona can affect trust interesting interesting choice And so what is your favorite album stroke single and Y This always frozen. Yes I guess rest now a days. I tend to listen to the radio a lot. More light one station in particular like my wife hates to a station called frisky Radia via a house music on C.. And the Justice Osmosis. It's not songs. This is mobile. Isn't it for after hours. Yeah yes it's the beast rhythm and find it relaxing league and enjoy that now often the ASP as albums all all songs. Okay Fair enough. That's great that's interested. I mean there was one lady and she you on on the recent percussion she basically she liked all the Alcott who those of trance compilations from the nine tests. Shiites of those that this clearly and I can't remember Dijon will come back to me but she likes a lot of those and that was quite unexpected that well okay. I shall look up for ski radio. She should look riskier. Riskier ideas frisky radio. It's the one for you. That's interesting because nobody's a radio station. meet people usually because genre a of some sort if they don't be cannot ist. I'm seeing up. Could not people think you know I'm dying booths the The lady. That was on podcast before you last week. She was in a position where what she pates. Ninety s our be. That was hers you on that. She didn't pick any anything specific case so somebody's picked two radio stations and that's a a good and quiet. ECLECTIC tastes I when I do listen to music. I listen to quite Sometimes plus ical sometimes pop music sometimes the Music Bay I guess I suppose again. Technology's changing moving away from even I choose these closing down Now but yeah moving away from songs while says I choose moved from people reform albums to songs and then I guess we spotify and Abbas does Internet Radio Light Frisky can. That's the next stage on not much. I listen to songs on albums or even genres anymore though. I'm sure that we've cassettes with. I'm sure that we've cassettes coming back. That will be a thing. It will all be albums at some stage which is going to be all albums so I can see that happening okay. So you know you've been in business now for a little while you've had quite a bit of experience in the corporate side and then besieged in now as a CO founder of your own business. What is your advice to anyone thinking of star in business? Today I am Osmar. Advice is is just go for it often kiss very easy to analyze and keep thinking about it and keep thinking what should we do. What name should we use? What should the product deal? What functionality analogy? I think the key is just need to get out there and then you involve in its rights and improve and don't get sidetracked and keep the focus But yet don't let people put you off. Don't let in decision put you off. It get started and build from there. Excellent thank you. That's always good helpful. I think a lot of people do get paralyzed avid tendency. Now I've in the past to over think things and sometimes you really do just have to get your mind together and decided. I'm going to go for it. You know audited a an MBA cranfield school of management. A lot of that was around analysis and analyze the market and understands the Industry Strean swot analysis. All this stuff but yeah. I think it's against to easy to They often cite with him. Based you is always analysis assist process You can analyze too much. You end up not doing anything. I think a my experiences. You've just gotTa go for it and and see and yeah you make mistakes along the way the and what you start off with might not necessarily be where you are in if years time But yeah if you can open to change and you're looking for China. ronna provide the best product or service. in my experience you'll get there. You'll have a competitive and learn from mistakes approving building eventually so in terms of that I wanted to ask what are the best resources that have helped suit in your business or helped you along the way wherever it be APP so whether it be volks or seminars any kind of thing. That's helped you. Do you think I think that would help other people. Yeah I mean I just mentioned Cranfield School of Management in the father that GonNa analysis paralysis but not. That was one of the big drivers for me as well Not necessarily in terms of what I learned around finance marketing go all sales but it gave me the confidence gave me the network. Check my soul other people's starting business. I think that's probably the biggest Help with yet going through going through the MBA program Gramm L.. It was also a a good catalyst. I was in investment banking business before and sometimes I think it's hard to give up a cushy lifestyle a steady income but the at Cranfield gave me all the NBA gave me the opportunity in the time and the confidence. I think mostly to Ed to set up a business and to to build it and and to realize it. Yeah we've all got power. They they ability to create things so again just just going on doing it excellent. So what's been your scariest. Moment is an entrepreneur lower. We've had lots a scary moment. Have scary moments that you could talk about scary moments in the early days when the wasn't steady income coming gain a and worried about the mortgage and the Iraqi Gov Pioneer. You're worried about well. How do you live from one month to the next have as things have developed ties the company's grown than off Things change don't necessarily get easier at a stall you what you're trying to build the platform Worried about well. How do it and if these books in Issues Zab is a nightmare in trying to resolve? That's as you get bigger than you put processes in place. You have tomatoes testing The technical problems go away but then other problems trying to grow the business that you're looking for sales engaging customers MS and how'd you get customers and keeping customers happy and any bill trucks here in York satellites and then it becomes what she now needs to get funding in Investors and keep investors. Happy and I suppose my point is that kind of yeah this this lots of moments through time. And they're probably always will be of course you get to hospice mind bishen Asian is to get to to IPO and build a bake a public company. But I think even then and I spoke to CEO's public companies and they say well yeah. The problem was still. Oh that just different was it those rappers say more money more problems in all the problems aside in order for you to get to your IPO. What type of businesses does Okapi want to work with in the future other name? Away targeting the trades in the tier two contracted to the facilities manages to the construction companies. The insurance companies as the big opportunity for copiers a lot of volka pennies. They're creating networks with big players so we already have a big facilities management companies on the platform. We have councils big construction auction. Companies insurance companies at the moment that largely receiving information received job sheets from all customers receive invoices messages rich's the opportunity for aspects way we'd.

Tom Kris Okapi CEO Richard Harris Arizona knicks Cranfield School of Management Keenan spotify Manhattan Nathan Hill school of management Chicago University Phil Dijon Norway America
"richard harris" Discussed on The Cashflow Show

The Cashflow Show

02:00 min | 8 months ago

"richard harris" Discussed on The Cashflow Show

"Technological advancements but businesses often find themselves in a position where using an APP is something that they're unfamiliar Nia with today's guests in Twenty fifteen decided to take that big leap of faith to create their own commercial app the businesses if you want to know more about life life in and around silicon roundabout then join us on the other side. Look forward to seeing you. Hello and welcome. I'm Clayton and coke and I'm also the host for the cash. Cashflow show the radio show disguised in the shape of a podcast. But with so much most would be interviewing someone inspiring from the business world and finding out how they started in business with their trials and tribulations were and how they intend to grow their business in the future we will also be finding out about what they do in this space. Spare time as well as asking them to a film and the favourite single or album and to share their reasons for doing so so why not join us at the cash flow show show. It's not just a radio show. It's a whole new way of doing business. Hello and welcome to the cash flow. Show my name's Clayton M. Coke and today's guest guest is Richard Harris C. and co-founder of oh capi. And if you have not heard of Okapi before then I think the best thing thing for us to do is allow Richard to tell us all about himself and the company. He's CO founded so welcome. Richard to the cash flow. Sean Tie Clayton thanks. I'm I'm here. You're most welcome for me. This is quite an interesting subject. I'm always interested in APP. Some always looking them out and I'm always trying to find that things that make businesses and business processes work a lot better. I don't have any skills any technological skills or told whatsoever but I like the way that they run. Can you just tell us a little bit about you and business that you co founded. Yeah certainly a copy is is actually a lot more than than just piss a whole platform.

Richard Harris C. Clayton M. Coke Sean Tie Clayton silicon roundabout Okapi co-founder
"richard harris" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

11:09 min | 8 months ago

"richard harris" Discussed on Conversations

"This is an ABC podcast. I've always found the idea of cave diving to be fascinating and thrilling and so terrifying. I could never possibly attempt it. The whole idea of going down. Deep into the earth diving through narrow passages as of icy cool water into underground caverns Richard Harris. Who prefers to be called? Harry has been doing this with good friend. Craig Challen for many two years in June twenty eighteen. He received a call from fellow cave diver who was in Thailand. A group of teenage boys who are members and local soccer team were marooned somewhere in the back of a flooded cave network in Chiang Rai province the boys had decided to explore the cave life with a young assistant coach. There was a sign at the front. That said danger from July to November is flooding season. But did you lie was still eight days away and then it started to rain hod and the boys were tracked now as it happens Harry when he's not cave. Diving is an unauthorised at an Adelaide hospital. So he's friend in Thailand asked him if it would be possible to rescue the boys by putting them in scuba gear then sedating them and carrying the mount and the journey through the caves would take outs and Harry said absolutely not but when he and Craig flew to talk and they realized that that was the least worst solution and they along with the team of other divers and specialists went about bringing the boys out all the world held its breath. Harry written the story of those extraordinary dies with Craig Challen. Alan and the book is called against all odds. Hello Harry Hi Richard. Please tell me about the joy of cave diving. I'm so fascinated to scary. I'm just to clarify. I five between think about attempting. What's what's the most joyful pot of cave diving view? It's funny that for most people. Caving is their worst nightmare. It's probably like a hot standing on the top of the building looking over the edge Fills me with Tara. Mommy till you see I've got I've got all of that. That's normal. That's a normal and healthy response and the the only way to overcome that and it was the same familiar with guy daubing. It's a slowly amiss. Excuse the PUN. Ms Yourself into that world and you start very slowly very gradually and for me. It started looking for mice people in a very big wide open. Sinkhole Crystal Clear Water Nas beams of sunlight shining down and the water in some of these places. So crystal clear it's I. It's actually hard to explain to people how clear the water is so a lot of people have made to the Beijing summer and you can see the fish fishing the sand or many people who have snorkeled on the Great Barrier Reef or in the Tropics Insane beautiful clear water when you go into one of these freshwater sinkholes that salt water looks like. It's it's cloudy compared to this. It's just an order of magnitude clearer and you swim on the surface and look down and you can say twenty or Oh thirty. made us to the bottom. Some people actually get to guide. I feel like they're gonNA fold because it feels like you're in the in the air so what's not to love about that and that's how you get drawn into it and and of course you do training gradually explore more more different thoughts and then you start to think. Well what's around the next corner what's just onto that ledge and slowly kind of have get more and more into it when you come into some of these Gorgeous Underwater Cathedral like Kevin Spacey's is something about being suspended in the water as like. It's almost like you fly. Floating like a dreamlike experience being floating in the water and looking around at all this magnificence will around Yaw. It's it's there's a sort the three dimensionality you can't achieve anywhere else and even just putting your head underwater and breathing air for the first time. I can remember doing that in a swimming pool as a kid read that. That's just a great trick to put your face in the water and then keep breathing just blows blows me away still. I mean every time I jumped in the water and I'll do that. This is cool cool. You can be underwater and still brave and so it's just I've been obsessed with it since I was a young teenager. Your friend Craig. Challenge your book with you. Close friend friend. How did you meet him in? How did you get the we met through diving? We were introduced by a couple of cave diving friends who You know we both knew. And we're at Conference calls take in Sydney which is an international of technology conferences held every two years and we were both explorers. I guess by that stage and A might said Oh you black should say good idea by the. You're both pretty silly. I guess the talking to you by the medical expenses event new being a doctor and they said you've got a similar ties. Fakes you go should get. And then the next year we were both invited on an expedition up to a very might right sinkhole in the northern Kimberley's completely off the charts unmapped on now and someone had spotted from an airplane as they flew over it and so he mounted this expedition with a few other blogs and went dargin got on well. So we've been continuing to together since then so that was about two thousand five. I've been told you been cave diving with Craig in around the sink holes in the nullarbor I've been told like the nullarbor is just one of the great parts of the world for is that right. Aw It's it's fabulous. It's the single biggest slab of Lobstein in the world and Apparently there I have a ten thousand mocked features thoughts there For diving with the KYW. VESTA deepen up through the limestone to reach the water table. said it's about ninety meters depth before you get to the water so the caves have to be deep enough to even get into the water but once they do they just take off. There's one cave cocoa bitty Kyw that Craig and some friends were out exploring about four weeks ago and that six point two kilometers from the entrance to the firing of the God all really got the idea of being stuck in the end of a six point two kilometer underwater tunnel. It's just it's just even talking about it's making my hair to stand on. And that's wild. Tunnels Railway Tunnel. You could literally two or three trains next tweet. Djelic could go up and down in Sawed Crystal Clear Water Brilliant Watt Lobstein silt and mud. That just stunningly beautiful when you under their what's the impetus is a two. Are you looking go. Further all the time or to see beautiful things All of the above but the the exploration is truly the goal. And that's the bug that makes us. Let's keep going back in and look for different kinds and new adventures because it's a bit of a cliche but the only place left on this planet way a you can actually put your foot into a new piece of the cave or new tunnel and say on the first person to ever see this and in fact you can't even predict that. Is there until you walk around the corner or swim around the corner and see it for yourself. You know you can look at the rest of the of the planet from a satellite on Louis even and you can go. Well tomorrow will climb that mountain or I can look from the base of the mountain to the top with my binoculars but with caves. There's no way to neither neither there until you walk into them and explore them with your hands and feet. So I don't over state this is a bit like being. An astronaut is a privilege to being there that spice side some mm-hmm well. We don't like to use the astronaut analogy because if I say this on the radio one of my friends who out there on a Wednesday astronaut but it it is not the guy the guy but there are some similarities. I mean obviously. It's a low tech exploration compared to NASA. But you know the some of the equipment we use as a similar with ray braves where we recycle gas and That allows us to be very efficient and go much further on the water You truly so nate to be I self sufficient immodest welby on the side of the moon if you six kilometers underground and you have an accident. There is no one who is coming to help you. Yeah what can go wrong. Well the obvious obvious things you can run out of. Aero you can panic or you can Suit up the cave and lose your navigation We always run a continuous God. Not long piece of string through the five so that we can find out why out again but you can lose that or it can break. The kind of itself is very benign place you know. It doesn't tend to full down on your or trickle tricky. It's always human era ninety nine percent of the Thompson that gets people in trouble. You was sent out on a rescue mission to recover the body of a diver. Woman New Agnes Malacca who had died on a cave diving expedition. kind of them as agnes agnes was a wonderful person. Listen she was young explorer She was rapidly game gaining a name for herself in cave diving and caving exploration she was Unin late twenties but she already traveled around the world exploring caves and I was hoping to make a career out of being a cave explorer and a cave and maybe a media personality in that space and there was no question that she was exceptionally talented. There's a group of caves and Kaif's who we just stand alone from the rest of us and you can just you can sort of sense that they've got some extra skill was like you know the the one hundred meter athlete whose compared to the the kids at school or the local running club was something that we're doing the same thing but these people are special and are nine three or four of them around the world and she was she was well she was one of them. Yeah she was extraordinary but the sign is old pilots and bold pilots. But there's no old. Bold pilots unfortunately gone of applaud to Agnes. Because Bang Cy Young. I think she didn't really have a sense of our own mortality and she was pushing really hard to find chives and You know wriggling going through very taught. Bits of five to find passages beyond and she'd been very successful at doing that actually in Australia and the US but on this occasion agency. She got herself winkled into taught spot that she couldn't extract yourself from so she drowned in the. I'm just thinking you when you do something. Living Life diving you have to be an intrepid Saul and you have to have that that level of daring but the flesh and blood out we and well there's limitations to see we definitely don't think of Esso's as Adrenalin junkies it's very measured and controlled and always think of that amazing racing documentary about Alex Huddled the Free Free Silos where that Guy Climbs El Capitan. You know he does it without ripe. So three and a half thousand foot or something she vertical face and he challenges himself to climb it without without any ropes. Will you know equipment and you watch that film and you realize that guy is not in his right. Probably never gives gets about sixty and if it does that that means something's going wrong he's measured. It's like choreography. The way it goes up that hill. And that's the way we try and perform complex caved odds. It should be very very slow methodical..

Craig Challen Harry Thailand agnes agnes soccer Richard Harris ABC Chiang Rai Beijing Great Barrier Reef Gorgeous Underwater Cathedral Kevin Spacey Adelaide hospital Alan Tunnels Railway Tunnel Saul KYW NASA Lobstein Sydney
"richard harris" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:37 min | 9 months ago

"richard harris" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Process Richard Harris NPR news you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news four people are dead and six others wounded after a mass shooting in Fresno California the shooters are still at large and the community is now coping with the aftermath Fresno police chief and the whole provided this detail about the crime earlier today but I can't tell you there's this was not a random act it appears that this incident was a targeted act of violence against this residence joining us now is member station K. Q. E. T.'s Alex hall is not related to the police chief Alex covers California's Central Valley Alex I want to start by getting more detail on what authorities are saying about the shooting what have you learned so far the attack happened at a residence in southeast Fresno just before eight PM on Sunday it was at a party where family members were watching a football game and some of the family members were in the backyard that's where the shooting started right now authorities have confirmed that for individuals have died three at the scene last night and then later on at the hospital another died in surgery six individuals were taken to the hospital and two are still there they're in stable condition and those victims what have we learned about them the coroner's office has released the names of those killed the victims are seat lead twenty three years old a Fresno who is a famous singer in the manga community PR Vang thirty one years old a Fresno hsiung thirty eight years old a Fresno who lived at the house where the shooting took place and colors and how forty years old of Fresno all of the victims were adult men of mom or of other southeast Asian descent as we mentioned earlier the shooters are reportedly still at large who the police looking for well we know from the police that the gunmen entered the backyard through an unlocked side gate where a group of men in the family were watching the football game as of now we don't know a lot about the shooters although police said that they believe that they were males part of the reason is that it was really dark in the backyard so dark in fact that witnesses said when the shooting started they only saw flashes of light but chief hall I did say that Ortiz believe there were in fact two shooters at least two judging from the shell casings that were found at the scene and at those individuals either fled on foot or perhaps in a vehicle given with the police chief said about this being targeted what is the community reaction been well I think a lot of people are feeling really scared this is a large community of Mong families in this neighborhood in southeast Fresno where the shooting took place when I was at the crime scene last night neighbor seemed really shake and they describe this as a quiet calm community that recently has seen several instances of gun violence but that was something new so they were really surprised that this was happening people are really worried about safety especially with among new year celebration coming up right after Christmas there's going to be huge event here in Fresno next month with people coming even from outside of the area so that's something that people are looking ahead to and concerned about and Fresno police even said that there could be fears of retaliation in the community but do they have a motive I mean what's the spring that well so a thirties have hinted at the possibility that this could have been gang related a chief anti hall said that there have been several recent incidents in this community in this region that he said indicated an up tick of gang activity in the area but he was clear that please don't have reason to believe the shooting is connected to that tech he said Fresno P. is establishing an Asian gang task force to respond to this and just simply that gang violence is something that police are not ruling out that Alex hole from KQED reporting from Fresno thank you thank you you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news I'm on the device on the next news our.

Richard Harris NPR thirty eight years twenty three years thirty one years forty years
"richard harris" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:31 min | 9 months ago

"richard harris" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Survive this process Richard Harris NPR news you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news four people are dead and six others wounded after a mass shooting in Fresno California the shooters are still at large and the community is now coping with the aftermath Fresno police chief any hole provided this detail about the crime earlier today what I can tell you this this was not a random act it appears that this incident was a targeted act of violence against this residence joining us now is member station KQED is Alex hall to not related to the police chief Alex covers California's Central Valley Alex I want to start by getting more detail on what authorities are saying about the shooting what have you learned so far the attack happened at a residence in southeast Fresno just before eight PM on Sunday it was at a party where family members were watching a football game and some of the family members were in the backyard that's where the shooting started right now authorities have confirmed that for individuals have died three at the scene last night and then later on at the hospital another died in surgery six individuals were taken to the hospital and two are still there they're in stable condition and those victims what have we learned about them the coroner's office has released the names of those killed the victims are seat levy at twenty three years old a Fresno who is a famous singer in the manga community P. Ave ing thirty one years old a Fresno koosh young thirty eight years old a Fresno who lived at the house where the shooting took place and collapsing tower forty years old a Fresno all of the victims were adult men of mom or of other southeast Asian descent as we mentioned earlier the shooters are reportedly still at large who the police looking for well we know from the police that the gunmen entered the backyard through an unlocked side gate where a group of men in the family were watching the football game as of now we don't know a lot about the shooters although police said that they believe that they were males part of the reason is that it was really dark in the backyard so dark in fact that witnesses said when the shooting started they only saw flashes of light but chief hall did say that authorities believe there were in fact two shooters at least two judging from the shell casings that were found at the scene and at those individuals either fled on foot or perhaps in a vehicle given with the police chief said about this being targeted what is the community reaction been well I think a lot of people are feeling really scared this is a large community of Mong families in this neighborhood in southeast Fresno where the shooting took place when I was at the crime scene last night neighbors seemed really shaken they describe this as a quiet calm community that recently has seen several instances of gun violence but that was something new so they were really surprised that this was happening people are really worried about safety especially with the Mong new year celebration coming up right after Christmas there's gonna be huge event here in Fresno next month with people coming even from outside of the area so that's something that people are looking ahead to and concerned about and Fresno police even said that there could be fears of retaliation in the community but do they have a motive I mean what's the spring that well so the thirties have hinted at the possibility that this could have been gang related a chief anti hall said that there have been several recent incidents in this community in this region that he said indicated an uptick of gang activity in the area but he was clear that please don't have reason to believe the shooting is connected to that up tick he said Fresno P. is establishing an Asian gang task force to respond to this and just simply that gang violence is something that police are not ruling out that Alex hole from KQED reporting from Fresno thank you thank you you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news and this is ninety point three K. AZ.

Richard Harris thirty eight years twenty three years thirty one years forty years three K
"richard harris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"richard harris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Born blind whose at risk for HD. I'm just not going to stop because I don't want him to. Have to deal with this Richard Harris, NPR news. You're listening to WNYC coming up next. It's market place in a wave of San Francisco based companies going public Uber has its IPO tomorrow, but what will happen to the city's already expensive housing market. Whenever I meet somebody in an open house instead of saying, do you have an agent, representing you my first question is are you about to come into a large sum of money because of an IPO when housing an IPO 's collide that's next on marketplace right here on WNYC. Stay tuned. Support for WNYC comes from proof of love in this new play produced by audible theater, an accident uncovers a secret and a woman reveals her true self starring Brenda Pressley now on stage at the Minetta lane theatre tickets at TicketMaster dot com. This is WNYC ninety three point nine FM and AM eight twenty NPR news and the New York conversation. Marketplace is supported by smart sheet, whose work execution software empowers more than seventy seven thousand companies to plan manage automate and report on work at scale, more at smart, sheet dot com, smart, sheet, work, different, trade, and tariffs. Of course, gonna have to do those initial public offerings as well. And we'll do a Little Rock climbing to from American public media. This is marketplace. Marketplace is supported.

WNYC NPR Brenda Pressley Richard Harris Minetta lane theatre San Francisco New York
"richard harris" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"richard harris" Discussed on KCRW

"In some patients, Richard Harris, NPR news. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. This is rob long with MARTINI shot on KCRW, a friend of mine once met a movie star who like a lot of movie stars who spent much money was thinking about doing a television series. That was back when this was a rare thing like now when basically everything is a television series. I think my audience the actress said to my friend is ready to see me in a television comedy now pretty much everything was wrong with that statement at turned out. But the wrong est thing was the idea that audiences are ready for something or not ready for something in the actress case the audience was perfectly willing to give him a shot at a comedy. They tuned in at least for the first episode. But that didn't mean that they keep tuning in. If it wasn't any good, which it wasn't or if he wasn't funny, which he wasn't. And then once I offered the role of a young grandmother, that's the whole point of the character that she was sort of too young to be a grandmother to an actress who was at the time well into her seventies. And she replied that she liked the script very much, but wasn't sure that her audience really saw her. Her as old enough to be a grandmother now, what audiences are ready for or not ready for is the kind of thing people in the entertainment industry talk about because no one really wants to face the alternative in this case the truth that the audience is pretty much ready for anything the audience the television audience anyway has a wide and varied appetite. They like game shows and contests magazine new shows comedies cop shows, and every now, and then something scary mean have I missed anything? I remember a few years ago a network executive telling me that the traditional multi camera comedy was dead. And maybe this is the reason I remember the conversation so well because that kind of show is pretty much the way I make my money, and then a short time ago that same executive telling me that the traditional multi camera comedy was back and that this was because the audience is now ready to watch that kind of show again. Which is of course nuts. They were always ready to watch that kind of show as long as it was good and truly funny. It was broadcast television. That was unwilling. Willing to schedule such a show maybe out of misplaced snobbery, maybe out of risk management. Maybe because they had convinced themselves that everything was different now. Whatever the reason they did a classic Freudian move a projecting their fears and concerns and attitudes onto something vast and unknowable like the entire television audience, and this is a form of denial. The truth is the audience is pretty much open. We in the entertainment industry tried to create rules and algorithms and audience attitude measurements because the reality is so daunting and scary. This is a risky business. It takes a lot of intuition. A lot of nerve sure things will fail longshots will pay off no wage no in advance. And no way around that years ago to torment me. My brother would simply order me to do things. I was already doing or about to do. That's right. He'd say I order you to stand up just as I was standing up. I order you to eat that spaghetti he'd say just as I was, you know, eating spaghetti. I order you to. Read that hardy boys book he'd say is. I was reading the secret of the old mill or something. Thank you for obeying me. I wasn't obeying. You. I'd say I was doing it. Anyway. No. You weren't you were following my direct orders. Shut up. I'd say thank you for obeying me shut up. I'd say now I order you to get angry. And you see where this goes I was doing all that stuff. Anyway, I was just minding my own business, and he turned it into an irritating. Power game. He saw what I was doing. And he took credit for it. Which isn't totally unlike what my network executive friend was doing by noticing what the audience was watching and then pretending that he had somehow figured it all out. Now, I didn't throw anything at the executive. But I can't say the same for my brother. And that's it for this week next week. We will see it for KCRW. This is rob long. Happy.

executive KCRW NPR Richard Harris contests magazine hardy mill
"richard harris" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"richard harris" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

"Richard Harris. Welcome to enquiring minds. Thank you. Thanks for having me so nature. Did a big survey back in twenty sixteen about whether scientists think we have a major reproducibility crisis and something like over fifty percent said yes and a number quibble below that, but it's hard to get scientists, fifty percent of scientists to agree on much of anything these days. So that number struck me as a really big number. Can you tell me a little bit about reproducibility both in terms of its origins and how scientist's view this, whether it's a crisis or not? Yeah. Well, I think these have been issues since science was invented, and I actually do not like the word crisis. I think that's a misunderstanding of what's going on. I think this is an awareness of how big an issue this is, and I think scientists have been, you know, plotting along doing their usual thing. Using the techniques that everyone else uses and so on and assuming that always good. And it's only been in recent years where people started to reflect on that and ask, you know, are the things that we assume are good ways to practice science, really. All good in the answer comes back pretty resounding no. There are reforms that are needed, and particularly where I focus in is what's called pre clinical medical research. It's it's science. It's conducted in laboratories on animals and cells, and so on. And and in in that circumstance, people put out a lot of material and a lot of it cannot be reproduced when other people try to to pick it up. And of course, that's a cornerstone of science. That's something you ought to be able to do that in and of itself isn't surprising. I mean, signs at his best works in this in this series of of trial test repeat, but what has what is shifted over the last few years because the conversation of it becoming being a bigger issue has really emerged on the scene. Yeah. Well, I think one thing that has changed a lot is is yes, scientists is not perfect, and if every experiment worked in was published and and everybody else could repeat it, it would be a pretty boring experiment because I it's is supposed to explore the frontiers. Right? And so if you're if you're on the ragged edge, you should get things wrong. Sometimes I think what is changed is recognizing that there are a lot of. Results that don't pan out, and it's not because it was just because it was bad luck or whatever, but the experiments weren't designed very well. People did not take some very basic steps. For example, Richard Feynman went said that really the goal of science is to make sure that you're not fooling yourself and you are the easiest person to fool. And so you're supposed to do things like blind and experiments. So you don't know which is the control group, which is the group of, you know, th the animals, whatever, that's getting the active ingredient. And if you if you know those things than you can unconsciously biased yourself, it's not deliberate, but but these sorts of basic steps have have not been practiced very much. And the other really big issue has to do with the statistics of science. People have assumed that there was a sort of a magic threshold where something becomes significant. It's called a p value. And I think bio statisticians have have become increasingly concerned about how poor a measure that is about whether something really. Is going to pan out or not, and there's a big push to say, you need to run experiments with with more subjects, and you need to run the more carefully and you need to look for for higher degrees of of this value to make sure that you're really are getting significant results. So I think as as people started realizing that these issues were cropping up and and that a lot of things that were not reproducible because people were because the original experiments were not conducted very carefully. I think that's really where the focus is now, how can we think more carefully about how to design and conduct experiments, so that so that you know we can minimize the the number of or at least reduce the number of experiments that that turn out to be false false steps, false alarms. I wanna come back to some of those ingredients that are making four these experiments too good to go awry or at least the conclusions from the experiments go. Right, but but I want to back up a second say, do we understand the scale of..

Richard Harris Richard Feynman scientist fifty percent
"richard harris" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"richard harris" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

"Used the sauna what a beautiful shot went to number one i've written a for richard harris 'and he said elvis does your sovereignty site and that's how it came about i wrote to elvis a roach everybody and then elvis recorded it met with it the new when you're writing are you doing the words and the music yes you come from a musical back on what you play and how do you competitive yarrow my father was gripped out a prayer and my grandmother was a blaine piano teacher and my grandfather came from dial a sky which queen victoria's gaelic poyet's so there's obviously something in there and i grew up just listened to the pro every morning do you make a big distinction them between the lyrics and the music lim usually has to get you right away let's forget ship at the lyrics of the thing that they forever if you got a good sean i guarantee that very few people would know more than congratulations and celebrations they don't know the rest but they're not that lan wave me the children is what hits you but lyrically if you get something like a sinatra song when somebody loves you it's no good unless they love you all the way those words matter a alone were some body law it's no on less some of the other people you've worked for them there is some wonderful quotes billy connelly elton john of course and such tim rice of an enormous composer in in elton cheung by office book of woodland play the piano the christmas party and he keeps adultery every day of his life do you i ate bill martin i eat billboard then.

richard harris elvis tim rice elton cheung billy connelly christmas