35 Burst results for "Richard Harris"

What Are the Newsom Recall Polls Saying?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:01 min | Last week

What Are the Newsom Recall Polls Saying?

"Hey everybody. Welcome to this episode of the charlie kirk show with us. Today's a friend of mine and he's rarely ever wrong. In fact we had him coming on our program leading up to the election and he got almost all of his predictions correctly. Richard harris from the people's pundit and also we had you on for the georgia thing and you're the one that early said. Hey we got a problem in georgia and you're right so we're going to talk about california polls and so all right richard. Let's cut through all of the nonsense. Yes the way. It works in california for all of our friends in maine and massachusetts and florida and south carolina. It's a two part question. Yes or no recall gavin newsom and if yes then who let's start with the yes or no. Do you think that the yeses are going outnumber the nose. Yes we pulled it a couple of weeks back and we had no ahead by a little bit charlie. But let me leave this with you. The caveat here is that. I thought my share of the you know is part of poland. I thought my share of the white vote was a little bit high california's usually forty five fifty percent tops and did see other pollsters. That had him in the sixties. If you look at who's voting right now. This is why democrats are nervous. The electorate is very white. And it's and it's much older so if if the electorate and we had them at fifth we whites at fifty five but we still had the age breakdown to be pretty young so that could a two point advantage could easily be swamped demographic difference like that the problem newsom has then i was just saying this before he needs white liberals and asian voters to come out and they are the least likely to want to vote. Weitz were over. Eighty percent certain to vote when we pull them And asia voters were in the fifty s. So it. I mean it really. It goes to show you got a close race can turn into a nailbiter either way

Charlie Kirk Georgia California Richard Harris Gavin Newsom South Carolina Maine Massachusetts Richard Florida Charlie Poland Newsom Weitz Asia
"richard harris" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

09:23 min | 4 months ago

"richard harris" Discussed on Accelerate!

"A marketplace a network of connecting people with bis district conditions or concerns with either. Free resources are paid resources. That could help them out. There's always been a stigma with mental health. You simply and certainly things are getting better But it wasn't too long ago where you simply wouldn't ask your neighbor or friend or coworker. A good therapist to recommend sculpture. They do right most parts of the country. You probably couldn't get away with that even today. So there's a couple of thoughts. I can cheryl. Nowadays you know my parents. Imogen might plant parents split around nineteen eighty and. I remember when they got divorced. We lived in macon georgia. It's about eighty five miles south of atlanta They ended up going to atlanta to find a a family counselor in the eighties. Now what i don't know was was there. Nobody in making town of one hundred thousand people we weren't we weren't really small or were they too embarrassed to have someone locally know that they were going to right. So that's one thing. I can tell you that when i had my. You know my moment of clarity When i woke up one day just frozen living in san francisco My mom asked. I wanted a therapist. I said yes. And then i asked my parents. You know we pay for therapy. And i did. I was afraid that if i used my health insurance for it would get back to my job and i could get fired this long before. Hip lives in around two thousand. So i think that fair still exists totally. I told i through my journey. My wife always reminds me. She's like you know. Richard your your way further in your journey. A lot of people what you find so comfortable is still massively uncomfortable. So i have to be mindful to that like but but i do think the generations are changing it. Though right like i see this you know with the millennials you know they're. They're causes anxiety and stress Might are still similar to ours. The technology's just surrounding it in a different way. But they're still feeling stressed their stressed about work or loneliness or all. Those things haven't been those things haven't changed since message tamie. I don't think i would just add that luck. I think while technology has certainly helped in many ways to to connect us. It's also as we all know it's it's really created a lot of disconnection it's referring to is that there's this technology piece. Where where millennials can you know everybody. It's not only ios but where they've just grown up to the phone being in the hand right and You know that's not their fault right like you know you get to blame the parents for you. Let me have a phone too soon. All those kinds of things but It's called it's caused some its own. Its own struggles. Which is very different than what i went through right. Sure but what i what i would also style assay. Is that technology as it is. Today gives us the the false sense that we're actually more connected with people than we are and while we we may look at their instagram photos or even get a sense of what they're like on facebook. That's really not a conversation. I've talked to my daughter for example and astor. Hey have you been talking to your friends. Her version of talking is talking extra them or or snap chatting or something like that. And i think what we're all experiencing pandemic and just technology wise is disconnection with others and disconnection with ourselves. Because they're so much pressure to be things that you may not be and there's so much pressure to look a certain way and to hit a number or to excel at work that we're feeling more and more isolated and support is so critical and having network of people where you can connect and openly discuss so your your statistics. Richard about people feeling more depressed in the workplace and not as safe talking to others about what they're going through half of my employees. I've never met in person. It makes it that much more difficult to connect with people over zoom. And i haven't had lunch. I haven't had a drink. I haven't been in the office and just been able to sit down with people so of course. We're all feeling more disconnected. Of course we don't feel safe in the workplace. We haven't built the type of relations. I think we're gonna kick andy off because we just keep taken over the show and you don't even have to ask questions. This is your easiest episode are well. Yeah i'll just. I'll just video. But while i was gonna ask this question. Howard though is so in this environment though. So how do you when you haven't met people when you haven't form these relationships when everybody is remote. How do you let someone know that yet. It's safe to talk about these things. This is a resource person. You can talk to. I mean how do we come to. This is not going away anytime quickly. I mean we're still going to be fractionally remote. Some large portion of the workforce. How do we create a culture that that encourages people to talk about this. And i think that. Hopefully we're doing just that dna but when i think about relationships it's really based on trust and connection and so for me how i feel safe with others is by first of all opening up if i can be vulnerable in open up with them. It provides an environment where they can feel safe to open up as well. And i think that that that is the most important thing is finding a place where you do feel safe that you can open up that you're not going to be shamed or embarrassed and the only way to create that is by being somewhat transparent yourself being vulnerable and creating an environment where look we're human beings which means we make errors. We make mistakes all the time. And if we don't beat ourselves up but we grow and we learn and we support each other through it then we're able to create environment where people are actually connecting. Where they're being vulnerable where they're able to have trust and take risks and i think that is so paramount to connecting with one another and in the same way it's connecting with your buyers right as sales people. Your job is to connect with them understand and and if you lead with talking about your own vulnerability or your desire to be whatever it is. It's connecting app that core human level building. Trust so that you can connect and be helpful. Together i agree because actually actually data point. I did want to bring up that we that we got. This is in the last six months. This was a question around the last six months fifty two percent of the respondents either agreed or strongly agreed that they felt supported by their leader or manager. Which for me was a little bit of good and bad. I was like okay. That's better than what i thought and really only fifty two percents after leader win it. So right what. What direction is that trending. Is that trending up or trending down. That's where we're gonna keep going through that through that for the next year. So but it is about that support and it's about leading with vulnerability and for me you know. It's up to the leader to lead with the vulnerability to build that into the culture. Right it's it's you know it's up to howard to sharon experience right. It's up to howard to encourage that. In andy for youtube. I mean you're your boats veteran's life in sales and and you know you guys have a lot to offer in control people that it's okay You know it's very interesting in we do that and don't do that so it's i'm glad we're having this conversation. Yeah well it's one of the things we're trying to do with this program is is highlight these these issues have these conversations so that you can try at least our own ways. Help de stigmatize people on the show. We've talked about addiction issues and substance abuse and so on it's all part and parcel is and you look at organizations like salesforce have create these internal organization sober force that are there to empower and enable people to have these conversations and get the support. They need which are so important without steph. I did her session yesterday. Clubhouse With the former svp a business development at american express been there twenty seven years and she built their whole sales team globally right and it was so that was all done remote and we asked. What did you guys do. How did you build those connections. And she said you know one of the best activities were anytime you do something on zoom with a pet. Everybody shows up..

san francisco Richard youtube yesterday macon georgia next year facebook twenty seven years american express Today Howard today atlanta one hundred thousand people instagram eighties fifty two percent around two thousand about eighty five miles fifty two percents
2 Dead, Multiple Wounded After Shootings at Virginia Beach

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:49 sec | 6 months ago

2 Dead, Multiple Wounded After Shootings at Virginia Beach

"Richard Harris. NPR news Police in Virginia Beach are investigating shootings overnight that left two people dead and eight wounded. NPR's Giles Snyder reports. Several arrests were made. Virginia Beach police chief Paul knew the gate says it was a chaotic night. We have a very chaotic incident very chaotic night in the beach, many different crime scenes, according to a police statement, the eight people who were wounded we're taking the hospitals with injuries ranging from serious to life threatening. And new to Gates is an officer was injured when he was struck by a vehicle during the initial police response, while police were investigating the initial shooting knew the gate says additional shots were fired nearby, leading to a man being fatally shot by an officer. Has been placed on administrative leave. Separately, A woman who was killed by gunfire is not believed to

Giles Snyder NPR Virginia Beach Police Paul Knew Richard Harris Virginia Beach Gates
CDC director warns of possible Covid surge as U.S. cases increase by 7%

NPR News Now

00:46 sec | 6 months ago

CDC director warns of possible Covid surge as U.S. cases increase by 7%

"Will inskeep says one thousand nine cases are starting to climb again and the nation could face another surge of people. Let down their guard. Npr's richard harris has more at a white house briefing. Well linski said that. The average daily case count of covid nineteen has recently increased about seven percent and hospital. Admissions are also starting to climb slightly about a thousand people a day continue to die. She said she's deeply concerned about this trajectory and we know from prior surges. That if we don't control things now. There is a real potential for the epidemic curve. Just sore again. She acknowledged that many americans are weary of the epidemic but she said that it is still important to take precautions. Such as wearing masks a bit longer until a large share of the public is vaccinated. Richard harris

Inskeep Linski Richard Harris NPR White House
AstraZeneca updates report, insists COVID vaccine highly effective

NPR News Now

00:50 sec | 6 months ago

AstraZeneca updates report, insists COVID vaccine highly effective

"Has updated information about its covid. Nineteen vaccine this comes after a federal advisory board complained. The company's original report was based on outdated information. npr's richard harris reports. The new data are not a lot different. Astrazeneca reported monday that its vaccine was seventy nine percent effective against covid nineteen in its latest study but a review committee complained that the figure was based on incomplete data that public scolding editor other company. Missteps that had left people unsure about astrazeneca's research. The company has now that figure to say that the vaccine was seventy six percent effective overall. Not a big difference that the figure could still change. As the company processes more data the company also says the vaccine was one hundred percent effective at keeping people out of the hospital in preventing death in its latest. Study richard

Astrazeneca Richard Harris NPR Richard
U.S. Covid-19 Case Decline Leveling Off In ‘Very Concerning Shift’ As Variants Spread, CDC Director Warns

NPR News Now

00:52 sec | 7 months ago

U.S. Covid-19 Case Decline Leveling Off In ‘Very Concerning Shift’ As Variants Spread, CDC Director Warns

"We've been seeing in new covid. Nineteen cases is starting to level off. That's the warning today from federal health officials who are worried the pandemic could once again take a turn for the worse. Here's npr's richard harris cases hospitalizations and deaths have been declining significantly for several weeks. But at a white house briefing director rochelle walinsky warned that the decline seems to be stalling. We are watching these concerning data very closely to see where they will go over the next few days. But it's important to remember where we are in the pandemic scenes are tenuous. Now is not a time to relax restrictions yet some states and localities are starting to do just that even as about seventy thousand. New cases are reported daily. health officials. Say they need more time for vaccination campaigns to take effect in order to bring that number down towards zero richard

Rochelle Walinsky Richard Harris NPR White House Richard
Doses Of Antibody Drugs Remain Unused As They Present Various Challenges

All Things Considered

03:51 min | 9 months ago

Doses Of Antibody Drugs Remain Unused As They Present Various Challenges

"The federal government says it has delivered more than 300,000 doses of monoclonal antibody drugs to help facilities nationwide. They're designed to treat patients with mild to moderate covert 19. The ideas keep those patients out of the hospital, but Many of those doses are sitting unused, due in no small part to the challenge of administering those drugs. NPR's science correspondent Richard Harris looks at to healthcare systems that have overcome those hurdles and are seeing hopeful results. Monoclonal antibodies present all sorts of challenges. They're given to people who have active infections, but who aren't hospitalized, so it's important to treat them without exposing other patients to risk. The drugs by Regeneron and Eli Lilly are also given by infusion, and that process takes a couple of hours. So when you add all this up, you know it's really a logistical challenge to deliver this therapy to a lot of people. But Dr Howard Long at Houston Methodist Hospital, says they figured out how to do that. They've opened clinics around Houston and doctors affiliated with the hospital are referring eligible patients. That is people who are over 65 or who have health conditions that put them at high risk. So at this point we're doing about 50 to 70 infusions a day, and patients are usually scheduled within a Relatively short period of time. So from the time they call into being infused, it's usually less than two days. The timing is important because these drugs appear to beam or effective early in the course of the disease. Mostly help people who aren't mounting their own strong immune reactions and, well medication sits unused in many locations around the country. That is not the case at his hospital, Hong says. Right now we're constrained more by the drug supply. They use it as fast as they get it. Any doctors nationwide aren't so enthusiastic about these drugs, though treatment guidelines issued by the National Institutes of Health say there's actually not good evidence to know whether they work. That's because the Food and Drug Administration relied on studies of just a few 100 patients to grant these drugs, emergency authorization. So these are very small numbers that under normal conditions nobody would never publish in the journal like New England Journal of Medicine. Yet this is, you know, kind of headline news. Welcome Toko bit time right. But doctors are gaining experience. Houston Methodist is now treated more than 1100 patients, Hong says. We're seeing results that are comparable to what was reported in the clinical trials by Eli Lilly and Regeneron about six or 7% of patients who are treated end up in the hospital or emergency room. He figures that without treatment about 15% of the most high risk patients could end up in the hospital or ER. Doctors affiliated with the Mayo Clinic or also encouraged by their experience. They've dust more than 2000 patients in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Arizona and Florida. Dr. Raymond reasonably has done a preliminary analysis of the 1st 1000 or so patients and finds low hospitalization rates. More importantly, there is some signal that is also reducing death. But again this our preliminary analysis we have to kind of make sure that this are all vetted by pure review. But this is what we're seeing. That's why we're happy. Unlike a clinical trial, this real world experience doesn't have a careful comparison group so doctors can't say for sure that these patients are faring better. Even so, these encouraging findings may be swaying doctors who weren't sure they wanted to refer their patients for treatment. There's nobody says patients are also becoming less skeptical. Initially, there were more declines than accept. But no, we're actually seeing more except than declines, and even though it takes a lot of person power to provide this treatment reasonably and Hong believe they're actually reducing the overall workload. Keeping patients out of the hospital. Richard Harris NPR

Regeneron Dr Howard Long Houston Methodist Hospital Eli Lilly Richard Harris NPR Houston Methodist Federal Government Hong Houston Dr. Raymond National Institutes Of Health Toko New England Journal Of Medicin Food And Drug Administration Mayo Clinic Wisconsin Minnesota
New COVID antibody treatment underway at Houston Methodist may reduce hospitalizations

All Things Considered

00:50 sec | 9 months ago

New COVID antibody treatment underway at Houston Methodist may reduce hospitalizations

"The outcome will determine which party controls the Senate. And it Bonnie Drugs to treat people with mild to moderate Covad 19 have been slow to roll out. But two institutions that have succeeded say the drugs are apparently helping people get out of stay out of the hospital. NPR's Richard Harris says that story. The federal government says it is distributed more than 300,000 doses of monoclonal antibodies for emergency use. These drugs are designed to keep people with mild to moderate illness out of the hospital. But many hospitals offended difficult to ramp up to infuse these medications. It takes staff and time and patients are infectious, which adds to the challenge. Plus the benefit is uncertain. But the male clinic says it is infused more than 2000 patients to date, and Houston Methodist Hospital says it's treated more than 1100 patients. Doctors at both hospitals say the drugs appear to be keeping people out of the hospital,

Covad Richard Harris Bonnie Senate NPR Federal Government Houston Methodist Hospital
Oxygen-Detecting Devices Give Misleading Readings In People With Dark Skin

All Things Considered

02:46 min | 9 months ago

Oxygen-Detecting Devices Give Misleading Readings In People With Dark Skin

"College the common advisor fingertip Nikita Leo devices is with college that measure bound, oxygen which works in with the blood low income or and increasingly first generation students. finding their way Normally, into what people's we do homes is we sit Because down the of students, the covert 19 we pandemic. walk through the common These pulse app. We ox walk devices through can different sometimes like give schools, misleading websites readings, and though, and people even with dark like, skin help them That's according physically to a new study. do it fast stuff NPR's we're science doing correspondent all of that. Richard Harris Over the reports phone and video when Detroit's screen, hospital and started so to overflow with that's covert really patients. hard. Earlier But this while year, colleges some are patients being flexible ended up at for the seniors University around of Michigan tests and in activities, Ann Arbor the Leo and advises his doctor Michael applicants showed to Ng steer started clear treating of this writing influx about the of pandemic. largely black Every patients. teenager He wants to started write about noticing Cove in something odd about the results from the fingertip and device like just called encouraging a pulse them to, like, Oximeter. try to think about other It's things that have happened It's out in of their life this and number called And right an oxygen about those things. saturation Education value, strategist which Michael Horn gives us says an understanding the big dip in of enrollment how much at campuses Oxygen this fall is in could the blood. work to some But that students oxygen advantage. reading was sometimes They're off much when compared more in to the a position more sophisticated of being test able that to samples choose blood the college from a person's because artery. a lot of these colleges So are shooting desperate and for his colleagues them to show started up gathering and pay data for comparing most applicants. these readings The application in light skinned deadline people versus is January dark 1st. skinned people. For NPR They measured. News. How often I'm Ryan Delaney. a pulse ox reading, apparently It only took in the normal range 100 actually years. came from Major someone League with low Baseball oxygen. announced today We found it will recognize that this the happened Negro much Leagues more often as major in patients. league correcting They were black, with the organization basically calls about a long three time times this oversight often in about the game's 12% history. of the time. Apparently Move comes normal on the readings centennial were actually of the misleading, founding Shooting of the says. Negro Leagues You know, it's Back not in happening 1920. a lot. From then to But 1948. if you think about Black players how were not often allowed to play these with white players measurements in the American are taken or national leagues. If it's wrong, Author you know 12% and historian of the time. Larry Lester I think is that three called founder I'm worried of the that Negro could be Leagues really Baseball impactful. Museum. So He how has Where been do advocating you think doctors for this in moment. critical care and For years. elsewhere in Larry hospitals Lester, Welcome are to all how things Where considered. are they have this issue? Thank you for having me. I Mary don't think they're Louise aware Kelly. at all. We're When glad I to have you with create us. And these as analysis, I know, this I was has just been really a surprised. long time Shorting coming. says There are Would a you tell few previous me how you studies about this how phenomenon. you heard So the news? What specialist went through in your some head? fields may be familiar with it. He's Oh, spreading the word Have more broadly a Negro with leagues, report Google in alert the New England and Journal of Medicine, Came across he my desk suspects this morning. the reason And behind this is that the color is that of tears light of used joy that in pulse ox emitters after can 50 be absorbed plus years by skin of pigment. Dr Mentality Tool. statistics Mullen, associate they're now dean being for health recognized. equity at the University of Texas Dell Medical School So in Austin, it was agrees. a watershed This is about moment skin for me. color, not I can't race, imagine. but she's I can't concerned imagine that the impact feeling the of finding seeing that could alert. have Come on across people your who phone may and rely think on today consumer I didn't read grade that right? pulse Is ox this real? devices Finally? at home, sometimes Yes, in exactly. lieu of medical care. Pulse. Ox devices are still We mentioned a all valuable the years tool, that you she have says. been But working it's on important this. This has to look been at your the results in context. your mission has been If somebody going through has the archives coronavirus, trying to dig and through they're feeling really short of breath, and compile but they're getting all the statistics our normal because number. the statistics for the Say Negro League an have oxygen were saturation incomplete of 92 over Lost. to 96% Is that right? or more, Oh, yes. they should Before pay more attention there was an to Internet their shortness of I breath would make daily trips than what that to the oxygen library is being and measured. and read microfilmed. Shooting says these will remain Newspapers, important for hospitals particularly the black as well. newspapers But across now he thinks the country more carefully about and how to interpret make the

Nikita Leo Seniors University Michael Horn NPR Ryan Delaney Major Someone League Richard Harris Larry Lester Larry Hospitals Lester Ann Arbor NG Baseball Detroit Michigan Dr Mentality Michael University Of Texas Dell Medic Louise Journal Of Medicine
Hospitals Puzzled With How To Administer Monoclonal Antibodies To COVID-19 Patients

All Things Considered

03:47 min | 10 months ago

Hospitals Puzzled With How To Administer Monoclonal Antibodies To COVID-19 Patients

"Are starting to use new drugs that are designed to keep covert 19 patients out of the hospital. But it's not clear how well these monoclonal antibodies work, and some hospital administrators are wondering how long their staffs will be able to give this time consuming treatment. As emergency rooms and beds fill up. NPR's science correspondent Richard Harris spoke to doctors in New Mexico and Wisconsin as they launched their treatment programs. The Food and Drug Administration has granted emergency authorization to two monoclonal antibody formulations. These drugs are supposed to prevent the Corona virus from invading cells there specifically for people with mild to moderate disease who are not in the hospital. And it's not just a shot or a pill. They have to be given by Ivy infusion, a process that takes two hours or more like everything in today's world during the pandemic, our biggest challenges are around staffing. Dr. Peter Newcomer is chief clinical officer at University of Wisconsin Health in Madison. He says his hospital is giving the drug after hours in an infusion center so infectious covert patients don't cross paths with cancer patients and other vulnerable people. Special plea went out for nurses to take on yet another shift. Even as the hospital struggles with rising Covad cases, the hospital can initially handle eight patients a night. Newcomer says They started with three patients on Tuesday night. Our advertising campaign to the community when I'll come Monday and Tuesday, so we're going to see more tonight and then Philip all over slots. Real soon. If everyone who qualifies for this treatment asks for it, the hospital will quickly run out of drugs. So you w health set up a system to identify people who would most likely benefit primarily people over 65 with underlying health conditions. Will randomly pick from that pool. If there isn't enough drug to go around. It's basically a lottery type system with an allocation that is done as equitably as we can informed consent for this includes telling patients that it's not clear just how well these drugs actually work. The National Institutes of Health put out treatment guidelines, saying there's simply not enough information to know if they are effective. Company studies suggest doctors have to treat 10 to 20 patients to avoid a single hospitalization. Dr. Newcomer wishes he could tell how well the huge investment in staff time will pay off as long as we can continue to provide this treatment. We plan on it. It's gonna have to be an ongoing evaluation of what we can afford to do. From the staffing standpoint, the drugs could help hospitals if they can keep their patient loads down in Santa Fe, New Mexico, Dr. David Gonzalez is keeping a close eye on the capacity of Krista's ST Vincent's Hospital where he's the chief medical officer. We're currently entering crisis levels stage with bed capacity that's throughout the state of New Mexico. His hospital is directing people most likely to benefit from the new treatment to the hospital's emergency room for the infusions. We have a portion of our emergency room that's dedicated to cope in positive patients. Krista Saint Vincent's Hospital infused its first patient Tuesday, using one of the eight initial doses of the drug allocated by the state of New Mexico. After the hour long infusion. Nurses monitor patients for 1 to 6 hours to make sure that there are no serious side effects, and Gonzales says that monitoring continues once patients leave the hospital were able to follow the patients at home. And, uh, and a pain their vital signs and they can go through a questionnaire in which we ask them if they're experiencing specific symptoms more than 2400 medical facilities nationwide have been allocated some of these drugs. And many are like these in New Mexico in Wisconsin, now starting to figure out how to make it all work. Richard

Dr. Peter Newcomer University Of Wisconsin Health New Mexico Richard Harris NPR Food And Drug Administration Dr. Newcomer Wisconsin Dr. David Gonzalez Madison St Vincent's Hospital National Institutes Of Health Cancer Krista Saint Vincent's Hospita Krista Santa Fe Gonzales Richard
Trump returns to Oval Office, says it's a "blessing from God" that he got COVID-19

All Things Considered

03:21 min | 1 year ago

Trump returns to Oval Office, says it's a "blessing from God" that he got COVID-19

"President. Trump has been back at the White House for a couple days now, after being hospitalized for the Corona virus, And today he released a new video aimed at showing everyone he is doing. Okay. I think this was a blessing from God that I caught it. This was a blessing in disguise. Of course, His doctors have said that he is not out of the woods yet, and they are monitoring his condition. Very closely Here to talk about the latest are NPR. White House correspondent Tamara Keith and science correspondent Richard Harris hated both of you. Hello. They also a OK Tam. Let's start with you tell us a little more about this video. So it came after Trump spent 48 hours out of public view. Once he returned to the White House. This was recorded in the Rose Garden. He emphasized that it was outside of the Oval Office and in terms of spreading it to someone else outdoors would be a safer place to film it, certainly for the staff. The message was essentially, I'm back. I feel great. He recorded it a few hours before it hit Twitter on DH just in time for the evening news. Fox News aired the whole message and White House chief of staff Marks met Mark Meadows, who was also on Fox emphasized that the president was hard at work. And I understand that President Trump talked a lot about therapeutic drugs in this video. Richard. What did you make of what he said about those drugs? Right? Well, the president's video is clearly a rush job. He talked about an experimental drug he called Regeneron. But you know, that's actually the name of the company that makes the product. Trump said he got it in the hospital, but his doctor earlier had said that he got the infusion on Friday before he went to the hospital. The president has decided without evidence that it made a big difference for him, even though he received other medications. Here's just a little bit of the video. It really did a fantastic job. I want to get for you what I got. And I'm going to make it free. You're not gonna pay for it, huh? Okay, So what exactly are these drugs like? How do they work? Well, these are antibodies that are designed to block the virus. There monoclonal antibodies they're called. It's a very promising idea. Kind of like a shortcut to temporary immunity. At least that's the concept. But the data aren't yet strong enough to get full FDA approval and indecision, too. Regeneron. Eli Lilly has a couple of products in the works, and they see most promising. For people who are just getting sick. It's not a miracle drug, but it seemed to keep people out of the hospital. Eli Lilly applied for Emergency Youth Oscar with authorization today for one of those two products that it has in the works, but FDA approval process takes time. The lowly executives were not expecting a snap decision, as the president suggested was coming in is right and we also just heard the president say he's gonna make these drugs free. I mean, what are the chances of that? Will regular Americans be able to get them? Well, that's a good question. Presumably, the federal government will subsidize this there. They've already subsidized Regeneron project to the tune of like half a billion dollars. Lily is doing it on its own dime, but but they also expect that the government will subsidize it, Lily, by the way, his eyes expecting to produce a million doses of this first product by the end of the year, so so there could be at least reasonable supply. Although it would have to stretch globally, so right, Yes. So that's sort of the butt. But, yeah, it seems as though if it could get emergency youth authorization, it could be available and potentially if the government feels like it at little or

President Trump White House Regeneron White House Correspondent Eli Lilly FDA Federal Government Richard Harris NPR Twitter Fox News Oscar Tamara Keith Lily Rose Garden President. Oval Office Chief Of Staff FOX
Trump’s medical team says he could be discharged from Walter Reed as soon as Monday

Weekend Edition Sunday

05:18 min | 1 year ago

Trump’s medical team says he could be discharged from Walter Reed as soon as Monday

"Could be headed back to the White House as soon as Monday that from the president's medical team who held a briefing today, here's a clip from that Dr Sean Connolly, speaking in front of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Over the course of his illness. The president has experienced two episodes, Transit drops his oxygen saturation, and and there there was was much much more more information information from from today's today's briefing, briefing, particularly particularly compared compared to to yesterday's. yesterday's. Let's Let's welcome welcome NPR NPR science science correspondent correspondent Richard Richard Harris. Harris. Good Good Morning, Morning, Richard Richard and Dr Carlos del Rio, an epidemiologist at Emory University. Hello, do you Are you? Well, Richard, I'm going to start with you. But let's hear first. Ah clip from Dr Brian Garbled E. On the treatments the president has received. We continue to plan to use a five day course of Rome disappear. In response to transient low oxygen levels as Dr Conley has discussed. We did initiate Dexter methadone therapy, and he received his first dose of that yesterday. And our plan is to continue that for the time being All right, Richard, What does that tell you? Well, that tells me that the president was at fifth had very least serious course of disease, and he's getting sort of the top line treatment to address it. The decks the method zone is a steroid. Drug that helps tap down inflammation, which can be a really bad sign in somebody who's immune system may be starting to overreact to the virus. So doctors have come to realize that this is actually capable of saving lives in people. This is the only drug that has actually been demonstrated to do that with Corona virus, and so they've given it to him that will really help stabilize his immune system. That's the hope and of course, the room disappear is a drug that is designed to stop the virus from mass producing itself inside the body. The FDA is authorised its use, but specifically people who are really sick enough that they need help breathing. It has now become evident that the The president's had a couple of episodes where his oxygen levels were dropping. And and at least one instance where they gave him supplemental Oxygen. So s so it looks as though he's you know, getting pretty aggressive treatment for his for his condition, which seems appropriate And surprising to me is how quickly they expect that he may actually be able to go home. Maybe as soon as tomorrow. Well, Dr Del Rio. Let's talk about that. We heard in the clip in the introduction. The doctors they're talking about the president's oxygen levels. As we know with covert 19. It does affect the lungs and oxygen. Saturation is a real big indicator about how well you're doing. So, what did you hear there? Well, you know, I heard several things that hurt that. He he was there when you need to put things together. He's initially diagnosed. He's got mild of these, like, you know, 84% of people of covert have smiled. But they made the decision to give them the one of the two call antibodies Regeneron one and that's currently being studied in people with mild disease. We don't need to be in the article. Then his options saturation crops, and the decision is to transfer into the hospital because once your oxygen saturation cross below 94%, even if it's transitory. You're immediately in the category of no longer mild or moderate, but in the category of being released and its investigations that boat from disappear and Memphis on has proven to be effective. And that's exactly what the president has received was given disappeared. He conceded that the medicine and that's where he currently is right now, Dr Florio. This's important so I'm going to put this to you all along. They had been describing The president's symptoms as mild. You seem to be suggesting that the moment his oxygen levels dropped and he was given supplemental oxygen and then put on these experimental treatments. You could no longer categorize him what he was experiencing as mild symptoms. That is correct. Correct at that point in time, the president no longer having me having mild disease. That's how he's having severe disease, and he's put in a different category. And you know, that explains why Mark Meadows was concerned as express complains why he was actually he told us you know the president. We were very concerned. You know exactly that. I think he's telling you, he was telling the truth. But then I guess the question is your your doctor. Why wouldn't the presidents of the president's doctors have explained it in the same way? I mean, we heard today. Dr Conley say that he wanted to give an upbeat assessment. But that seems at odds with perhaps what the truth may have been. That is correct. I mean, I don't want to to say you know, but I was quite frankly, very disappointed by the press briefing yesterday. I think the press briefing yesterday. What spent he was speaking like a spin doctor. He wasn't speaking like a medical doctor. And you know the job of a loss in medicine when you're doing something like this, especially when somebody who is as important as president is to is to speak the truth and to be transparent, and I think, you know, Unfortunately, we are an administration were transparency and truth has not been at the forefront of this of this response. And we're seeing even in this case when the president of the patient

President Trump Richard Richard Richard Richard Harris Dr Conley NPR Dr Sean Connolly Dr Carlos Del Rio Dr Del Rio Dr Brian Garbled Walter Reed National Military Dr Florio Emory University Methadone White House Memphis FDA Mark Meadows
"richard harris" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"richard harris" Discussed on KQED Radio

"They continue to have headaches continued to have Malaya that continue to have this brain fog just Dunfield normally, so I suspect that you're not going to be normal and it's gonna be really hard. You have a full schedule to be campaigning to be here to be there. If he is, if he goes in that direction, and Mara Liasson that will definitely have an impact on many things. On many things. I mean, look, there are two debates coming up to presidential debates. Is he going to be well enough to attend them? They're the last two chances that he'll have to change the dynamic of this race. What about campaigning? What about just the basic message of the campaign? The president said that Cove in 19 was in the rear view mirror and you know it was it was something the country was moving past. Clearly he's not able to make that case anymore. I'm going to leave the last word to you, Richard Harris, because there's still quite a bit we don't know. And that is about when the president was infected who infected him and who he may have infected. Indeed, I mean, we saw this cluster of cases around the time of the White House event last Saturday, introducing the the nominee for the Supreme Court, and it seemed too so a lot of the disease had spread at that time, but we don't in fact, know whether the president got it. That or another time. We don't know whether he was infectious when he was sharing the stage with Vice President Biden. On the on Tuesday when they were debating together. He had events Wednesday. He had another event Thursday. And and so you know, clearly, people spread this disease before they're showing symptoms. So there's there are concerns about how widely his you know his activities have actually spread Corona virus that will still remains to be seen, and I hope we will learn more about that in the coming days. That is NPR science correspondent Richard Harris and NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson and Dr Carlos Del Rio and epidemiologist from Emory University. Thanks to you. And there's plenty more tomorrow morning on the president's healthy effects on his administration, and what it may mean for the November.

president Richard Harris Mara Liasson Biden Vice President Malaya national political corresponde NPR Dr Carlos Del Rio Emory University White House Supreme Court Cove
Trump receiving remdesivir antiviral drug as part of experimental treatment

Weekend Edition Sunday

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Trump receiving remdesivir antiviral drug as part of experimental treatment

"Trump remains at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center after testing positive for the Corona virus and showing symptoms of covert 19. He's expected to remain there for a few days for treatment that includes the antiviral drug grim death Severe NPR's Richard Harris. This drug is designed to stop the virus from mats producing inside the body. And the FDA has authorised its use, but specifically for people who are sick enough that they need help breathing. You know when it was tried in people with mild to moderate symptoms that actually didn't seem to help, But I should say that observation was based on a small sample, so we don't really know exactly where this drug is useful and a video president Trump tweeted last night, he said. He is feeling better, but at the next few days of his treatment will be the real test. The video came after contradictory messages that cause some confusion about his condition.

Donald Trump Walter Reed National Military Richard Harris FDA President Trump
Atlanta - Man arrested in Nashville for 25-year cold case murder of Georgia man

The Weekly Check Up

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Atlanta - Man arrested in Nashville for 25-year cold case murder of Georgia man

"Nearly 26 years after the murder of the North Georgia man. There's been an arrest in the cold case. WSB is Jennifer Perry with detail. It was the longest unsolved murder case in Walker County 54 year old Jaye. Is. Richard Harris was found dead beside his pickup truck on December 22nd 1994. He'd been robbed and killed before leaving for work that morning. Now, investigators say they've arrested his former co worker, Robert Allen Mallory, in Tennessee, the G B. I says Mallory was linked to the case in 2009, but they didn't have enough evidence to arrest him until now.

Robert Allen Mallory Murder Richard Harris WSB Jennifer Perry North Georgia Jaye Walker County Tennessee
Targeted lung cancer treatments help reduce death rates: study

All Of It

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Targeted lung cancer treatments help reduce death rates: study

"Officials say improved treatments have helped lower lung cancer death rates as NPR's Richard Harris reports, The trends are also driven by a decline in cigarette smoking. Death rates from lung cancer have been falling for decades. But it's been tricky to tease out how much of that is because fewer people are smoking and how much is due to improve treatment. A study in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that new drugs introduced in 2013 are playing a role. Scientists at the National Cancer Institute found that only about 20% of people who take these drugs have a long term response and the majority of people who are diagnosed with lung cancer still die within two years. But the drugs help enough people that it shows up in the death trends. Another class of drugs called checkpoint inhibitors, introduced in 2015 also appears to be beneficial.

National Cancer Institute New England Journal Of Medicin Richard Harris NPR
"richard harris" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"richard harris" Discussed on Accelerate!

"So in reps start their day. They'll never again wonder which prospects and accounts are hot inbound leads to reach out to next. Guided, selling even shifts reps priority in response to real time buying signals finally even knew reps can sell season once. Let Ring DNA. Be Your Guide to success. Learn more at Ring Ringa dot com slash guided selling. That's ringed, a dot com slash guided selling. As usual in startup for. A greedy get greedier. Don't become less free. And so goals get jacked and everybody thinks it should be two hundred percent growth year over year and assess. Start up world. And so people are not hitting goals because the goals outrageous. The goals are being dealt from the board down not from the pipeline. It's like a Oh. That's what your pipeline is. Great what we need to get this done. And then there's this assumption that everybody. And then there's this assumption that I think people misses it. One hundred percent of your sales team should knock it. Like, if you're building your business and your goals around everybody hitting a hundred percent, that's just not realistic at the numbers are using right now. The company should be statistically significantly profitable when seventy percent of your team just getting bull. Friends welcome do the sales enablement podcast on host Andy Ball. Now that was Richard Harris Richards the founder of the Harris. Consulting, group and director of.

Federal Officials Turn to a New Testing Strategy as Infections Surge

1A

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Federal Officials Turn to a New Testing Strategy as Infections Surge

"Federal health officials hope to begin an intensive testing campaign in southern states to help identify young people who are driving the new surgeon Corona virus. Case's details from NPR's Richard Harris Federal Corona virus Testing's Our Brett Giroir says he's talking with officials in Florida, Louisiana and Texas about mounting a huge increase in testing running a month's worth of tests in just a few days. Populace of testing over a few days. Could help to identify a lot of the under 35 year old asymptomatic. That may be spreading the virus. Your losses. It's really hard to use the standard technique of contact, tracing to identify people who are spreading the disease, but showing no symptoms. The hope is that at least some of these people could be identified through wide scale testing and then isolated to help slow the spread of the Corona virus. Cases of covert 19 continue to accelerate, especially in Southern states.

Brett Giroir Asymptomatic Richard Harris NPR Florida Louisiana Texas
Fauci and top health officials testify before House

Morning Becomes Eclectic

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Fauci and top health officials testify before House

"Federal health officials told lawmakers on Capitol Hill today that they have not been asked to slow down corona virus testing despite president trump's comments to the contrary and here's Richard Harris reports trump made his comment at a political rally in Tulsa the White House said he was just kidding but trump told reporters today that he doesn't kid even so top public health officials testifying at a house hearing say they are pushing hard to increase testing not decrease it here's Dr Anthony Fauci a top scientist on the White House coronavirus task force to my knowledge none of us ever been told to slow down on testing that just is a fact testing in contact tracing operations have been improving but officials acknowledge they are still trying to expand these measures to rein in the

Donald Trump Richard Harris Tulsa White House Dr Anthony Fauci Scientist President Trump
"richard harris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"richard harris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Richard Harris NPR news it's been more than two months since large parts of the country began staying at home to avoid the corona virus Americans are getting antsy now two thirds of states are re opening businesses but a new NPR PBS newshour Marist poll finds that most are concerned about a second outbreak and they don't expect life to return to normal for at least six months one to dive into the findings in peer senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro is here to medical Hey there thanks for having me all right so this question that is that I wake up with every morning with when can we get back to normal it sounds like this is on a lot of other people's minds what do they say they think will happen yeah it sure is and two thirds of Americans though say that they don't expect their daily lives to get back to a normal routine for at least six months there's a pretty big partisan divide on this though Democrats and independents are far more likely to say that they think it'll take that long or longer Republicans have a little Rosier view and are less likely to think it'll be that long maybe it's not surprising given president trump urging states to reopen some even outside his own federal guidelines and we think conservative protests in state capitals wanting business is back open town at Lee circle you back to this fear of a second outbreak that is something we have heard a lot of state leaders highlight in terms of why they're being cautious about re opening how worried are the people you talk to about it well Americans across party lines are very concerned about the real possibility of a second outbreak especially considering there's no vaccine yet no proven treatment again we're seeing pretty big partisan divides ninety three percent ninety three percent of Democrats say that they're concerned or very concerned about this happening a second outbreak but just fifty seven percent of Republicans are the most concerned word Democrats African Americans women and Latinos less likely to say that they were concerned were Republicans white men without a college degree those in the silent or greatest generation and those who live in rural areas and by the way those two groups sound a whole lot like the bases of both parties meanwhile we are now inside of six months from the election the presidential election what did our poll finds in terms of how people are thinking not necessarily about how the corona virus will affect who they vote for but the way in which they want to cast their vote well you know vote by mail is getting a lot of attention and you have more people now saying that they want to vote by mail instead of in person fifty percent said that they want to vote by mail if their state allows it only thirty eight percent said that they want to vote in person realize that a quarter of voters in twenty sixteen voted by mail so this is double right now again we have a partisan divide majorities of Democrats and independents say they'd prefer to vote by mail if they can but a majority of Republicans say that they want to vote in person we can expect that there will be more states that look into expanding vote by mail because of the pandemic and we've seen some of that today you know president trump going after Michigan and Nevada places that are looking to expand vote by mail he was attacking them because of absentee ballot applications that went out in Michigan today and you know going after Nevada whatever Republican secretary of state and they have primaries coming up that are going to be all male and this is raising a lot of concerns about what could be the legitimacy of the election in November indeed NPR senior editor and correspondent dominical.

Richard Harris
The FDA Tightens the Rules for COVID-19 Antibody Blood Tests

All Things Considered

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

The FDA Tightens the Rules for COVID-19 Antibody Blood Tests

"The food and drug administration is reining in the loosely regulated tasks they're supposed to identify people with prior exposure to the corona virus NPR's Richard Harris reports how the FDA now plans to tighten its standards these blood tests identify antibodies which indicate past exposure to the coronavirus the FDA initially set a very low bar for these antibody tests the main requirement was that developers weren't supposed to claim that they were authorized by the FDA for more than a hundred has flooded the market some of dubious value so now the FDA has set to minimum standards for these tests manufacturers will also have to seek emergency use authorization for the test within ten days of putting them out on the market the FDA says twelve tests have already been granted this authorization which is a lower standard than full approval scientists don't know whether someone with antibodies is actually protected from the

Richard Harris FDA
Antibody study suggests coronavirus is far more widespread than previously thought

Live from Here with Chris Thile

04:34 min | 1 year ago

Antibody study suggests coronavirus is far more widespread than previously thought

"Blood tests to detect past exposure to the virus are starting to hit the market but as NPR's Richard Harris tells Steve Inskeep of morning edition even test that claim to be more than ninety percent accurate will often miss the mark one of the tests supposed to do well the test cannot be used to diagnose the disease instead they identify antibodies that appear in your blood about a week after you've been infected he said about is a part of your immune system's reaction to the virus so I just do not know the weather people with antibodies are definitively protected from the disease and if so for how long but that hope that prospect is really driving a lot of this excitement so for example I talked to Deborah Vander gassed and tipped in Iowa she runs a daycare center for children with developmental and behavioral disabilities they're a lot like little kids everywhere we laugh about you know the the sanitizing everything because you know the three impacted justice two seconds later center gassed is eagerly awaiting the rollout of the blood test in her county she thinks about her staff who are being hyper vigilant not to spread the disease if some of the people I have already been established to have antibodies they wouldn't have to go home and I sleep for two weeks they can continue working she says the test isn't available in her area but it is starting to take off nationally Dr Jeremy Galbraith runs a mobile medical service in Austin Texas he says he got a supply of antibody tests made by a major Chinese manufacturer he's already run a few hundred tests in the last few days we you know also the test for people who may have suspected that they had corona virus back in February or March when testing with a nasal swab PCR was very limited Gabbar says he only test people when he has other evidence that they might have been exposed if they had an illness that sounds like it could have been coronavirus and they have a positive antibody test then it's very likely that this is a what we call a true positive that they indeed had come in nineteen the testes using boasts a specificity of ninety nine percent which means it only falsely says a blood sample has antibodies when it doesn't just one percent of the time but despite that impressive statistic a test like this is not ninety nine percent correct and in fact in some circumstances could be much much worse that's because of this counter intuitive fact the validity of a test depends not only on the test itself but oddly on how common the diseases in the population you're sampling it is kind of a strange thing Dr Gilbert Welch is a scientist at Brigham and women's hospital in Boston hi antibody test is much more likely to be wrong in in the population with very little code the Greeks Boettcher Richard I think we need to slow down here why with the accuracy of a test depend on how common the disease is in a population yeah that it's surprising but here's a simple way to look at it say you are running a test it gives five falsely positive results in a hundred people sounds like pretty good odds right but yeah but consider this Steve if five percent of our population is infected then you run the test on a hundred people you should get five true positives but you also have those filed false positives well says there's no way to know which is which the test will be wrong half the time half the people will be falsely reassured so it's basically a coin flip and it gets worse the food and drug administration does not regulate these tests but the White House coronavirus task force set in informal standard they're supposed to have no more than ten false positives per hundred if you were to use a test that meets that standard in a population where only one percent of the population had been infected with rotavirus a positive result would be wrong a shocking amount more than nine times out of ten and you can see that one way to limit this problem is to focus on populations with the disease is more common Dr Jordan laser a pathologist at Northwell health on Long Island New York says it would make sense to start with health care workers should be wonderful for health care workers to know their immune status and give them just a peace of mind even so laser says it would still be a mistake to rely on these results definitely don't use these tests to change your practices in terms of personal protective equipment definitely do not become more comfortable in doing your job and taking care of complications it really would be more of a psychological benefit but you know these tests can still be incredibly useful as long as individual false positive results don't matter and one situation with that is the case is serving a broad populations and in fact these tests will be used to figure out just where

NPR Richard
"richard harris" Discussed on Iron Advocate

Iron Advocate

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"richard harris" Discussed on Iron Advocate

"Stress, etcetera. What you know what tools are Jeff and I? Did an episode. Recently will hoffer who's a very very well-known therapist to a bunch of books. And we talked a lot about their. What are you? What do you do to? Listen I've had a therapist on and off for the past. Ten years that if I don't have a conversation or at least a session once every two weeks then I'm losing my mind so I. so that's part of my routine as well so now therapists but I have a coach executive coach. That I've had to for the past. Three actually on and off. All three of them consecutively past. I guess he's eighteen years now. So that's part of my DNA as well. Let me! Ask You about the rich. For the lawyers out there who? And because the culture, especially among trial lawyers is, there's so much deniel around fear and other pieces of it and the vulnerability which come back to. What could you tell someone listening with about what therapy is done for you? How has it benefited you? The whole vulnerability do vulnerability piece that we just said. I recognize. Is that the most meaningful relationships? ARE WITH! Those people that I can be most vulnerable with. And so. Once? I, Unlock that in the fear of that vulnerability, because obviously the more vulnerable you can be than the more likely. You can be injured. In so one-sided unlocked that in I recognize that. If I got injured that I could recover. Then, I'm less concerned about being vulnerable because I knew that I can recover and so ultimately the relationships that I. Embark on, invest in or those that I can be the most. Relationships are the same so like I said I may have said this to you. Right! I no longer have. Clients, I'm only having. A. Transactional relationship with now. I'm at a point in my career, but my clients are going to be able that. I want to have a deeper relationship with that. We're that our success. Our success is tied to get..

Jeff executive
"richard harris" Discussed on Iron Advocate

Iron Advocate

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"richard harris" Discussed on Iron Advocate

"This the most important thing that I think it has to be. Grounded in what's import? So meaning. There are a lot of highs and lows in our profession. But if you're grounded. In this sort of goes back football as well and being an athlete is that if you're grounded in, you know the people that love you. GonNa love you record. And, so if I focus on having deep meaningful relationships. That I'm less concerned about. The highs and lows with the practice and more concerned about whether or not I'm doing those things that I believe are consistent with the person that I wanted to be. And so. I think that's been an expiration, but I can tell you that. Early on I was particularly concerned about winning, losing that everything booth down to winning and losing if I was if I wanNA case, and I felt great about myself I lost the case I did. And I realized that that sort of episodic. Relationship! With myself was unhealthy. And so as part of as part of my maturation. Spiritually and. Emotionally. I have sort of. Pare that down to. My. Clients are those people that want to have deep meaningful relationship with. My family and friends whom I care about. They care about me when loser draw. And, so I'm less. I wouldn't say but I'm less moved by the outcomes on any given incident or any given case a rich. Was it difficult to get littler Mendelson to buy in on this right because at the end of the day it's their clients. You know I understand there. You're getting them to buy enough. and has it happened? It hasn't happened all end, but yeah. I'm still getting them to buy. Okay tell us about that process. How does So I advise I mean so part of my role expect. co-chair of the jury practice group complication. Group is that I often will triage case lawyers. We sort of have a mandate while you're within one hundred and twenty days before trial, you need to talk there either me or my co chair.

co-chair Pare Mendelson football
"richard harris" Discussed on Iron Advocate

Iron Advocate

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"richard harris" Discussed on Iron Advocate

"And so. The author of degrading has another one called great by choice. Great was probably the first one that I would say gave me a blueprint. In terms of how the best leaders lead. And so. They're. Particularly disciplined particularly routine oriented but they. Develop a way of going about their business in self your diary. Where they're doing a post mortem after each in every event, and so I tried to apply back into the practice of law so every single case good. Or otherwise I'm doing a postmortem to see if I could do something. And so I'm constantly evaluating my performance relative to what my client and I discussed. But also am I growing in my craft. And so I'm constantly doing that. Self evaluation so I, continued that process even when I was in the Public Defenders Office and then I tried to see if I could go to a larger platform to improve my craft into kind of represent the kind of clients that I wanted to represent in so each and every way. It's always a look in the mirror to see. How are you doing relative to where you would like to go? And argue improving in a way that's meaningful that you're getting the best out of yourself. Some constantly competing against myself, so let me ask you about the postmortems you reference, be referenced. You Played Football University of Marilyn, and that competitiveness I'm hearing comes into everything you do, and and you know all of us here were were public defenders in trial trial lawyers, so we all feel that. How do you? Do The post mortem. And analyze your performance at the same time. Don't get sucked into. The inner critic that can take down because I see a lot of lawyers unable to do a post mortem, and to be very clear about their own performance, and about taking the good and the bad. They focused so much on them what they didn't do right that they in the end..

Public Defenders Office Football University of Marilyn
"richard harris" Discussed on Iron Advocate

Iron Advocate

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"richard harris" Discussed on Iron Advocate

"Folks know that as a a corporate matter. This is not okay with you that whatever happened on the on the low level with your boys? You'll deal with, but the corporate level. You understand the gravity of this, and that's right. That's right inside. It's one hundred percent, Bob, and so like I, said the incident of it was less important than my impression, and so the impression is not only that I thought then with as it relates to Denny's that employees and our patrons were being mistreated, but overall that there was a lack of corporate respect for African American. And so as a result what I was acutely aware of when I saw the video. That's GonNa be the impression. Of African, Americans across the country and I can't speak for everyone, but ultimately my I had a sense that when everyone saw the video. That they believe that two individuals were just doing with any other customer would do and in starbucks, which is designed for meeting place. It's a meeting place. And we brandon market the organization around meeting. It's the third place, so we say that you. Know. It's the third we call the third place. In so as a result of that. We want to encourage people to come together and me, and as a result of them doing exactly what we brand the organization do. They're now being arrested for. Breads Brits Abridge. I mean I know they appreciate you and and littler in the work. That was done, but I mean just a brilliant read. So. On on, don't about how what I'll say. This speed and I also said that the one thing that I encourage them to do was to act quickly as because you don't have time. So if you think about a legal response. Most. Most lawyers give your typical. Risk? Response which is take your time that over time you'll be able to investigate, and you'll be able to figure the best course of action. But when you're talking about a brand problem, you don't have time so running against the clock so true I mean God help you. Become. starbucks doesn't welcome people of Color. Right. And, that's why said it's so you have to meet with address every single person you could possibly think of..

starbucks brandon market Denny Bob
"richard harris" Discussed on The Cashflow Show

The Cashflow Show

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"richard harris" Discussed on The Cashflow Show

"Like to push his <Speech_Male> converting <Speech_Male> those bigger companies <Speech_Male> into not just <Speech_Male> receiving information <Speech_Male> but actively using <Speech_Male> the system to <Speech_Male> at <Speech_Male> Sedna through to this <Speech_Male> of contracts <Speech_Male> and build <Speech_Male> a network themselves <Speech_Male> My <Speech_Male> Lot of these companies <Speech_Male> we spoke to <Speech_Male> public sector <Speech_Male> company <Speech_Male> relatively recently <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> in London on <Speech_Male> they have our property <Speech_Male> portfolio. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> They have <Speech_Male> they have about <Speech_Male> thirty guys. Guys <Speech_Male> internally <Speech_Male> managed all <Speech_Male> their properties and <Speech_Male> then they have seventeen <Speech_Male> thousand subcontractors <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> internally. <Speech_Male> They haven't baked complex complex <Speech_Male> sweat <Speech_Male> false management system <Speech_Male> which <Speech_Male> works well for thirty <Speech_Male> guys but for <Speech_Male> the seventeen thousand <Speech_Male> subcontractors. <Speech_Male> It's back to emails. <Speech_Male> It's back to <Speech_Male> sending text messages passages. <Speech_Male> It's back <Speech_Male> to chase them for job. <Speech_Male> She's had <Speech_Male> chasing frame <Speech_Male> voices <Speech_Male> on it Administrative <Speech_Male> Nightmare so <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> think that the kind of <Speech_Male> companies that we you <Speech_Male> want to <Speech_Male> to target is what <Speech_Male> is the big companies. The <Speech_Male> facilities manages <Speech_Male> the construction <Speech_Male> the council's <Speech_Male> who do have <Speech_Male> lots of contractors. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And who need to manage Sean <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> By <Speech_Male> the opportunity <SpeakerChange> for <Speech_Male> us <Silence> <Speech_Male> As well <Speech_Male> I mean is even with. <Speech_Male> The trays is plenty <Speech_Male> of companies out. There era <Speech_Male> bishop companies are <Speech_Male> are looking to grow <Speech_Male> instantly <Speech_Male> which anorectic law of interest <Speech_Male> and yes <Speech_Male> in a lot <SpeakerChange> of companies. <Speech_Male> Come aboard <Speech_Male> good excellent <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> obviously when people who <Speech_Male> who are tier <Speech_Male> two and who <Speech_Male> fit into <Speech_Male> the other categories <Speech_Male> that you mentioned previously. <Speech_Male> Where <Speech_Male> do they find you? <Speech_Male> Where do they find <Speech_Male> cafe? Where <Speech_Male> do you have have <Speech_Male> a website? It's <Speech_Male> social <SpeakerChange> media. <Speech_Male> How do people get of <Speech_Male> you as we <Speech_Male> have The <Speech_Male> copy website so <Speech_Male> a copy dot com <Speech_Male> has <Speech_Male> them confined to through <Speech_Male> Google Search <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> job. <Speech_Male> She's electronic <Speech_Male> job. She saw workforce <Speech_Male> management <Speech_Male> around <Speech_Male> the APP stores <Speech_Male> the Iran <Speech_Male> issued so <Speech_Male> again. We look for appeal. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <hes> wet foot <Speech_Male> punishment up sheets <Speech_Male> as I <Speech_Male> enjoy <Speech_Male> On there <Speech_Male> so he's that you spend <Speech_Male> it. Yeah Ok. <Speech_Male> P Y <Speech_Male> auto <Speech_Male> fair <Speech_Male> is social <Speech_Male> media as well so <Speech_Male> yet. We're on a <Speech_Male> twitter. I <Speech_Male> O K on <Speech_Male> the school. Ip <Speech_Male> Cohen look <Speech_Male> for as their limited <Speech_Male> facebook doc <Speech_Male> but yeah <Speech_Male> yeah aspect of websites <Speech_Male> that the key <Speech_Male> a <SpeakerChange> copy dot <Speech_Male> com excellent. <Speech_Male> Thank you very much <Speech_Male> for that. So <Speech_Male> Richard Harris <Speech_Male> CEO and Co <Speech_Male> founder of Oak Happy Happy. <Speech_Male> Thank you <Speech_Male> very much for joining <Speech_Male> us. Here on the cash flow. <Speech_Male> Sean thank you <Speech_Male> yeah. It's been a pleasure <Speech_Male> having you and hearing <Speech_Male> all about Your Business <Speech_Male> and your growth <Speech_Male> and your proposed <Speech_Male> expansion <Speech_Male> and we wish <Speech_Male> you all the best in the future. <Speech_Male> Thank you <Speech_Male> thank you very much <Speech_Music_Male> anyway. Thank <Speech_Music_Male> you for listening to <Speech_Music_Male> another episode of the cash <Speech_Music_Male> flow show. It's <Speech_Music_Male> really appreciate your <Speech_Music_Male> joining us. <Speech_Male> If you've enjoyed what <Speech_Male> you've heard today <Speech_Male> would like to hear more <Speech_Music_Male> than please subscribed <Speech_Music_Male> by your chosen <Speech_Music_Male> podcast provider <Speech_Male> and do <Speech_Music_Male> be notified when new <Speech_Music_Male> episodes are released. <Speech_Music_Male> If if <Speech_Male> you wish to like comment <Speech_Male> subscribe <Speech_Male> leave a message <Speech_Music_Male> or follow us <Speech_Music_Male> on social media. <Speech_Music_Male> Please do so <Speech_Music_Male> as we would love <Speech_Music_Male> to hear from you <Speech_Male> so until the next time. <Speech_Male> Take care from everyone we <Speech_Male> wanNA cashflows. <SpeakerChange> Show <Speech_Music_Male> Goodbye <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Sir. <Music>

London Sean twitter Google Iran facebook Cohen Richard Harris Co CEO founder Oak
"richard harris" Discussed on The Cashflow Show

The Cashflow Show

12:48 min | 1 year ago

"richard harris" Discussed on The Cashflow Show

"Hello and welcome back to this episode of cash flow show and we have Richard Harris. CEO The And co-founder of Okapi and before we left for the break we were discussing venture capital series as seed funding. And and all these other things. And it's not a gardening. Show people as you know. It's about entrepreneurs their businesses and what that entails. So if you're your follow up the show or even if you're not you'll know that we have a couple of questions that we always ask guests and we try and see if we can get a response from the momentum of what they do in what they like in terms of this time because we don't expect them to be working all the time but at some point they need a break. So Richard. The question into you is. What is your favourite film? And why had my favourite film I would say is I've skie- said the one we have. Tom Kris okay. Tell tell me about this. I've never seen that one. Yes basically. It's about Tom. Cruise is at a guy's got a pretty charmed existence. His father was. I'm Publishing Mogul I'm not created a a strange character. I'd have much hospice love from his father. He had untold wealth So he basically had than he while he was involved in a car crash in. It's about how he's life changed and there's a twist in it because it's said different levels is not just kind of like the here and now is wow until about the twins go through violence knows yea is a bit more than the justice story but yeah I just find it interesting because this is about someone who has a different different life and a life I spent a lot of people. People aspire to intimate of the wealth and the Ferrari and they Manhattan apartments on. I guess it was kind of seeing how that changed their fragility Alvin Seen how he coped with it and also how the people in his life cope with it as well. How involved okay? Yeah I just I I just found. It was very different to kind of opposite a lot of other films. I must say I did have a bit of a twist. Okay But yeah it was just interesting interesting thought. Provoking else is one of the things I'm always Keenan for myself is not to be. I suppose average but to try trying to create something special and I think that's a lot of the thing behind copies is wanting to to make a difference and be different and create something special. I show an aspect of inspiration. Awesome inspiration from that Phil excellent excellent and so. What is your favorite book and why I'm sorry this one's probably a bit hardest book sovereign which can have like. I mean I read one recently. Cold the knicks. Okay by I think it was Nathan Hill so I think it's quite a recent book is being published And it was again. It's about a story about people in sixties about the riots in Chicago around the Vietnam War and again is talking about the one of the key characters are cheap went to Chicago University head background. She was originally from. I think Norway so they'd emigrated to America living in a small rural town and she was trying to break out thoughts tailgate Goatee University Which I guess was inspirational saying thought side of it But then it was about she she got involved with other people that are involved volt the riots. How that kind of impacted her life of friends life and on the other side of the coin is while the a policeman How their lives changed and evolved over time and the story was basically looking out that lies from the sixties through to to the present day? Okay and it was really interesting saying how back on lives changed. Fulsome aspirations change and in particular how the the main go it also impacted future generations impacted. Her relationship with her son An again I suppose the there's a bit of a twist at the end in terms of some of the characters and how that kind of lies progressed. But yeah got I guess again. It was just interesting characters. It was thought provoking a It was interesting learning about at the time and American culture as well but you have an is bit of humor in Arizona can affect trust interesting interesting choice And so what is your favorite album stroke single and Y This always frozen. Yes I guess rest now a days. I tend to listen to the radio a lot. More light one station in particular like my wife hates to a station called frisky Radia via a house music on C.. And the Justice Osmosis. It's not songs. This is mobile. Isn't it for after hours. Yeah yes it's the beast rhythm and find it relaxing league and enjoy that now often the ASP as albums all all songs. Okay Fair enough. That's great that's interested. I mean there was one lady and she you on on the recent percussion she basically she liked all the Alcott who those of trance compilations from the nine tests. Shiites of those that this clearly and I can't remember Dijon will come back to me but she likes a lot of those and that was quite unexpected that well okay. I shall look up for ski radio. She should look riskier. Riskier ideas frisky radio. It's the one for you. That's interesting because nobody's a radio station. meet people usually because genre a of some sort if they don't be cannot ist. I'm seeing up. Could not people think you know I'm dying booths the The lady. That was on podcast before you last week. She was in a position where what she pates. Ninety s our be. That was hers you on that. She didn't pick any anything specific case so somebody's picked two radio stations and that's a a good and quiet. ECLECTIC tastes I when I do listen to music. I listen to quite Sometimes plus ical sometimes pop music sometimes the Music Bay I guess I suppose again. Technology's changing moving away from even I choose these closing down Now but yeah moving away from songs while says I choose moved from people reform albums to songs and then I guess we spotify and Abbas does Internet Radio Light Frisky can. That's the next stage on not much. I listen to songs on albums or even genres anymore though. I'm sure that we've cassettes with. I'm sure that we've cassettes coming back. That will be a thing. It will all be albums at some stage which is going to be all albums so I can see that happening okay. So you know you've been in business now for a little while you've had quite a bit of experience in the corporate side and then besieged in now as a CO founder of your own business. What is your advice to anyone thinking of star in business? Today I am Osmar. Advice is is just go for it often kiss very easy to analyze and keep thinking about it and keep thinking what should we do. What name should we use? What should the product deal? What functionality analogy? I think the key is just need to get out there and then you involve in its rights and improve and don't get sidetracked and keep the focus But yet don't let people put you off. Don't let in decision put you off. It get started and build from there. Excellent thank you. That's always good helpful. I think a lot of people do get paralyzed avid tendency. Now I've in the past to over think things and sometimes you really do just have to get your mind together and decided. I'm going to go for it. You know audited a an MBA cranfield school of management. A lot of that was around analysis and analyze the market and understands the Industry Strean swot analysis. All this stuff but yeah. I think it's against to easy to They often cite with him. Based you is always analysis assist process You can analyze too much. You end up not doing anything. I think a my experiences. You've just gotTa go for it and and see and yeah you make mistakes along the way the and what you start off with might not necessarily be where you are in if years time But yeah if you can open to change and you're looking for China. ronna provide the best product or service. in my experience you'll get there. You'll have a competitive and learn from mistakes approving building eventually so in terms of that I wanted to ask what are the best resources that have helped suit in your business or helped you along the way wherever it be APP so whether it be volks or seminars any kind of thing. That's helped you. Do you think I think that would help other people. Yeah I mean I just mentioned Cranfield School of Management in the father that GonNa analysis paralysis but not. That was one of the big drivers for me as well Not necessarily in terms of what I learned around finance marketing go all sales but it gave me the confidence gave me the network. Check my soul other people's starting business. I think that's probably the biggest Help with yet going through going through the MBA program Gramm L.. It was also a a good catalyst. I was in investment banking business before and sometimes I think it's hard to give up a cushy lifestyle a steady income but the at Cranfield gave me all the NBA gave me the opportunity in the time and the confidence. I think mostly to Ed to set up a business and to to build it and and to realize it. Yeah we've all got power. They they ability to create things so again just just going on doing it excellent. So what's been your scariest. Moment is an entrepreneur lower. We've had lots a scary moment. Have scary moments that you could talk about scary moments in the early days when the wasn't steady income coming gain a and worried about the mortgage and the Iraqi Gov Pioneer. You're worried about well. How do you live from one month to the next have as things have developed ties the company's grown than off Things change don't necessarily get easier at a stall you what you're trying to build the platform Worried about well. How do it and if these books in Issues Zab is a nightmare in trying to resolve? That's as you get bigger than you put processes in place. You have tomatoes testing The technical problems go away but then other problems trying to grow the business that you're looking for sales engaging customers MS and how'd you get customers and keeping customers happy and any bill trucks here in York satellites and then it becomes what she now needs to get funding in Investors and keep investors. Happy and I suppose my point is that kind of yeah this this lots of moments through time. And they're probably always will be of course you get to hospice mind bishen Asian is to get to to IPO and build a bake a public company. But I think even then and I spoke to CEO's public companies and they say well yeah. The problem was still. Oh that just different was it those rappers say more money more problems in all the problems aside in order for you to get to your IPO. What type of businesses does Okapi want to work with in the future other name? Away targeting the trades in the tier two contracted to the facilities manages to the construction companies. The insurance companies as the big opportunity for copiers a lot of volka pennies. They're creating networks with big players so we already have a big facilities management companies on the platform. We have councils big construction auction. Companies insurance companies at the moment that largely receiving information received job sheets from all customers receive invoices messages rich's the opportunity for aspects way we'd.

Tom Kris Okapi CEO Richard Harris Arizona knicks Cranfield School of Management Keenan spotify Manhattan Nathan Hill school of management Chicago University Phil Dijon Norway America
"richard harris" Discussed on The Cashflow Show

The Cashflow Show

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"richard harris" Discussed on The Cashflow Show

"Technological advancements but businesses often find themselves in a position where using an APP is something that they're unfamiliar Nia with today's guests in Twenty fifteen decided to take that big leap of faith to create their own commercial app the businesses if you want to know more about life life in and around silicon roundabout then join us on the other side. Look forward to seeing you. Hello and welcome. I'm Clayton and coke and I'm also the host for the cash. Cashflow show the radio show disguised in the shape of a podcast. But with so much most would be interviewing someone inspiring from the business world and finding out how they started in business with their trials and tribulations were and how they intend to grow their business in the future we will also be finding out about what they do in this space. Spare time as well as asking them to a film and the favourite single or album and to share their reasons for doing so so why not join us at the cash flow show show. It's not just a radio show. It's a whole new way of doing business. Hello and welcome to the cash flow. Show my name's Clayton M. Coke and today's guest guest is Richard Harris C. and co-founder of oh capi. And if you have not heard of Okapi before then I think the best thing thing for us to do is allow Richard to tell us all about himself and the company. He's CO founded so welcome. Richard to the cash flow. Sean Tie Clayton thanks. I'm I'm here. You're most welcome for me. This is quite an interesting subject. I'm always interested in APP. Some always looking them out and I'm always trying to find that things that make businesses and business processes work a lot better. I don't have any skills any technological skills or told whatsoever but I like the way that they run. Can you just tell us a little bit about you and business that you co founded. Yeah certainly a copy is is actually a lot more than than just piss a whole platform.

Richard Harris C. Clayton M. Coke Sean Tie Clayton silicon roundabout Okapi co-founder
"richard harris" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

11:09 min | 1 year ago

"richard harris" Discussed on Conversations

"This is an ABC podcast. I've always found the idea of cave diving to be fascinating and thrilling and so terrifying. I could never possibly attempt it. The whole idea of going down. Deep into the earth diving through narrow passages as of icy cool water into underground caverns Richard Harris. Who prefers to be called? Harry has been doing this with good friend. Craig Challen for many two years in June twenty eighteen. He received a call from fellow cave diver who was in Thailand. A group of teenage boys who are members and local soccer team were marooned somewhere in the back of a flooded cave network in Chiang Rai province the boys had decided to explore the cave life with a young assistant coach. There was a sign at the front. That said danger from July to November is flooding season. But did you lie was still eight days away and then it started to rain hod and the boys were tracked now as it happens Harry when he's not cave. Diving is an unauthorised at an Adelaide hospital. So he's friend in Thailand asked him if it would be possible to rescue the boys by putting them in scuba gear then sedating them and carrying the mount and the journey through the caves would take outs and Harry said absolutely not but when he and Craig flew to talk and they realized that that was the least worst solution and they along with the team of other divers and specialists went about bringing the boys out all the world held its breath. Harry written the story of those extraordinary dies with Craig Challen. Alan and the book is called against all odds. Hello Harry Hi Richard. Please tell me about the joy of cave diving. I'm so fascinated to scary. I'm just to clarify. I five between think about attempting. What's what's the most joyful pot of cave diving view? It's funny that for most people. Caving is their worst nightmare. It's probably like a hot standing on the top of the building looking over the edge Fills me with Tara. Mommy till you see I've got I've got all of that. That's normal. That's a normal and healthy response and the the only way to overcome that and it was the same familiar with guy daubing. It's a slowly amiss. Excuse the PUN. Ms Yourself into that world and you start very slowly very gradually and for me. It started looking for mice people in a very big wide open. Sinkhole Crystal Clear Water Nas beams of sunlight shining down and the water in some of these places. So crystal clear it's I. It's actually hard to explain to people how clear the water is so a lot of people have made to the Beijing summer and you can see the fish fishing the sand or many people who have snorkeled on the Great Barrier Reef or in the Tropics Insane beautiful clear water when you go into one of these freshwater sinkholes that salt water looks like. It's it's cloudy compared to this. It's just an order of magnitude clearer and you swim on the surface and look down and you can say twenty or Oh thirty. made us to the bottom. Some people actually get to guide. I feel like they're gonNA fold because it feels like you're in the in the air so what's not to love about that and that's how you get drawn into it and and of course you do training gradually explore more more different thoughts and then you start to think. Well what's around the next corner what's just onto that ledge and slowly kind of have get more and more into it when you come into some of these Gorgeous Underwater Cathedral like Kevin Spacey's is something about being suspended in the water as like. It's almost like you fly. Floating like a dreamlike experience being floating in the water and looking around at all this magnificence will around Yaw. It's it's there's a sort the three dimensionality you can't achieve anywhere else and even just putting your head underwater and breathing air for the first time. I can remember doing that in a swimming pool as a kid read that. That's just a great trick to put your face in the water and then keep breathing just blows blows me away still. I mean every time I jumped in the water and I'll do that. This is cool cool. You can be underwater and still brave and so it's just I've been obsessed with it since I was a young teenager. Your friend Craig. Challenge your book with you. Close friend friend. How did you meet him in? How did you get the we met through diving? We were introduced by a couple of cave diving friends who You know we both knew. And we're at Conference calls take in Sydney which is an international of technology conferences held every two years and we were both explorers. I guess by that stage and A might said Oh you black should say good idea by the. You're both pretty silly. I guess the talking to you by the medical expenses event new being a doctor and they said you've got a similar ties. Fakes you go should get. And then the next year we were both invited on an expedition up to a very might right sinkhole in the northern Kimberley's completely off the charts unmapped on now and someone had spotted from an airplane as they flew over it and so he mounted this expedition with a few other blogs and went dargin got on well. So we've been continuing to together since then so that was about two thousand five. I've been told you been cave diving with Craig in around the sink holes in the nullarbor I've been told like the nullarbor is just one of the great parts of the world for is that right. Aw It's it's fabulous. It's the single biggest slab of Lobstein in the world and Apparently there I have a ten thousand mocked features thoughts there For diving with the KYW. VESTA deepen up through the limestone to reach the water table. said it's about ninety meters depth before you get to the water so the caves have to be deep enough to even get into the water but once they do they just take off. There's one cave cocoa bitty Kyw that Craig and some friends were out exploring about four weeks ago and that six point two kilometers from the entrance to the firing of the God all really got the idea of being stuck in the end of a six point two kilometer underwater tunnel. It's just it's just even talking about it's making my hair to stand on. And that's wild. Tunnels Railway Tunnel. You could literally two or three trains next tweet. Djelic could go up and down in Sawed Crystal Clear Water Brilliant Watt Lobstein silt and mud. That just stunningly beautiful when you under their what's the impetus is a two. Are you looking go. Further all the time or to see beautiful things All of the above but the the exploration is truly the goal. And that's the bug that makes us. Let's keep going back in and look for different kinds and new adventures because it's a bit of a cliche but the only place left on this planet way a you can actually put your foot into a new piece of the cave or new tunnel and say on the first person to ever see this and in fact you can't even predict that. Is there until you walk around the corner or swim around the corner and see it for yourself. You know you can look at the rest of the of the planet from a satellite on Louis even and you can go. Well tomorrow will climb that mountain or I can look from the base of the mountain to the top with my binoculars but with caves. There's no way to neither neither there until you walk into them and explore them with your hands and feet. So I don't over state this is a bit like being. An astronaut is a privilege to being there that spice side some mm-hmm well. We don't like to use the astronaut analogy because if I say this on the radio one of my friends who out there on a Wednesday astronaut but it it is not the guy the guy but there are some similarities. I mean obviously. It's a low tech exploration compared to NASA. But you know the some of the equipment we use as a similar with ray braves where we recycle gas and That allows us to be very efficient and go much further on the water You truly so nate to be I self sufficient immodest welby on the side of the moon if you six kilometers underground and you have an accident. There is no one who is coming to help you. Yeah what can go wrong. Well the obvious obvious things you can run out of. Aero you can panic or you can Suit up the cave and lose your navigation We always run a continuous God. Not long piece of string through the five so that we can find out why out again but you can lose that or it can break. The kind of itself is very benign place you know. It doesn't tend to full down on your or trickle tricky. It's always human era ninety nine percent of the Thompson that gets people in trouble. You was sent out on a rescue mission to recover the body of a diver. Woman New Agnes Malacca who had died on a cave diving expedition. kind of them as agnes agnes was a wonderful person. Listen she was young explorer She was rapidly game gaining a name for herself in cave diving and caving exploration she was Unin late twenties but she already traveled around the world exploring caves and I was hoping to make a career out of being a cave explorer and a cave and maybe a media personality in that space and there was no question that she was exceptionally talented. There's a group of caves and Kaif's who we just stand alone from the rest of us and you can just you can sort of sense that they've got some extra skill was like you know the the one hundred meter athlete whose compared to the the kids at school or the local running club was something that we're doing the same thing but these people are special and are nine three or four of them around the world and she was she was well she was one of them. Yeah she was extraordinary but the sign is old pilots and bold pilots. But there's no old. Bold pilots unfortunately gone of applaud to Agnes. Because Bang Cy Young. I think she didn't really have a sense of our own mortality and she was pushing really hard to find chives and You know wriggling going through very taught. Bits of five to find passages beyond and she'd been very successful at doing that actually in Australia and the US but on this occasion agency. She got herself winkled into taught spot that she couldn't extract yourself from so she drowned in the. I'm just thinking you when you do something. Living Life diving you have to be an intrepid Saul and you have to have that that level of daring but the flesh and blood out we and well there's limitations to see we definitely don't think of Esso's as Adrenalin junkies it's very measured and controlled and always think of that amazing racing documentary about Alex Huddled the Free Free Silos where that Guy Climbs El Capitan. You know he does it without ripe. So three and a half thousand foot or something she vertical face and he challenges himself to climb it without without any ropes. Will you know equipment and you watch that film and you realize that guy is not in his right. Probably never gives gets about sixty and if it does that that means something's going wrong he's measured. It's like choreography. The way it goes up that hill. And that's the way we try and perform complex caved odds. It should be very very slow methodical..

Craig Challen Harry Thailand agnes agnes soccer Richard Harris ABC Chiang Rai Beijing Great Barrier Reef Gorgeous Underwater Cathedral Kevin Spacey Adelaide hospital Alan Tunnels Railway Tunnel Saul KYW NASA Lobstein Sydney
"richard harris" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"richard harris" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Process Richard Harris NPR news you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news four people are dead and six others wounded after a mass shooting in Fresno California the shooters are still at large and the community is now coping with the aftermath Fresno police chief and the whole provided this detail about the crime earlier today but I can't tell you there's this was not a random act it appears that this incident was a targeted act of violence against this residence joining us now is member station K. Q. E. T.'s Alex hall is not related to the police chief Alex covers California's Central Valley Alex I want to start by getting more detail on what authorities are saying about the shooting what have you learned so far the attack happened at a residence in southeast Fresno just before eight PM on Sunday it was at a party where family members were watching a football game and some of the family members were in the backyard that's where the shooting started right now authorities have confirmed that for individuals have died three at the scene last night and then later on at the hospital another died in surgery six individuals were taken to the hospital and two are still there they're in stable condition and those victims what have we learned about them the coroner's office has released the names of those killed the victims are seat lead twenty three years old a Fresno who is a famous singer in the manga community PR Vang thirty one years old a Fresno hsiung thirty eight years old a Fresno who lived at the house where the shooting took place and colors and how forty years old of Fresno all of the victims were adult men of mom or of other southeast Asian descent as we mentioned earlier the shooters are reportedly still at large who the police looking for well we know from the police that the gunmen entered the backyard through an unlocked side gate where a group of men in the family were watching the football game as of now we don't know a lot about the shooters although police said that they believe that they were males part of the reason is that it was really dark in the backyard so dark in fact that witnesses said when the shooting started they only saw flashes of light but chief hall I did say that Ortiz believe there were in fact two shooters at least two judging from the shell casings that were found at the scene and at those individuals either fled on foot or perhaps in a vehicle given with the police chief said about this being targeted what is the community reaction been well I think a lot of people are feeling really scared this is a large community of Mong families in this neighborhood in southeast Fresno where the shooting took place when I was at the crime scene last night neighbor seemed really shake and they describe this as a quiet calm community that recently has seen several instances of gun violence but that was something new so they were really surprised that this was happening people are really worried about safety especially with among new year celebration coming up right after Christmas there's going to be huge event here in Fresno next month with people coming even from outside of the area so that's something that people are looking ahead to and concerned about and Fresno police even said that there could be fears of retaliation in the community but do they have a motive I mean what's the spring that well so a thirties have hinted at the possibility that this could have been gang related a chief anti hall said that there have been several recent incidents in this community in this region that he said indicated an up tick of gang activity in the area but he was clear that please don't have reason to believe the shooting is connected to that tech he said Fresno P. is establishing an Asian gang task force to respond to this and just simply that gang violence is something that police are not ruling out that Alex hole from KQED reporting from Fresno thank you thank you you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news I'm on the device on the next news our.

Richard Harris NPR thirty eight years twenty three years thirty one years forty years
"richard harris" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"richard harris" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Survive this process Richard Harris NPR news you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news four people are dead and six others wounded after a mass shooting in Fresno California the shooters are still at large and the community is now coping with the aftermath Fresno police chief any hole provided this detail about the crime earlier today what I can tell you this this was not a random act it appears that this incident was a targeted act of violence against this residence joining us now is member station KQED is Alex hall to not related to the police chief Alex covers California's Central Valley Alex I want to start by getting more detail on what authorities are saying about the shooting what have you learned so far the attack happened at a residence in southeast Fresno just before eight PM on Sunday it was at a party where family members were watching a football game and some of the family members were in the backyard that's where the shooting started right now authorities have confirmed that for individuals have died three at the scene last night and then later on at the hospital another died in surgery six individuals were taken to the hospital and two are still there they're in stable condition and those victims what have we learned about them the coroner's office has released the names of those killed the victims are seat levy at twenty three years old a Fresno who is a famous singer in the manga community P. Ave ing thirty one years old a Fresno koosh young thirty eight years old a Fresno who lived at the house where the shooting took place and collapsing tower forty years old a Fresno all of the victims were adult men of mom or of other southeast Asian descent as we mentioned earlier the shooters are reportedly still at large who the police looking for well we know from the police that the gunmen entered the backyard through an unlocked side gate where a group of men in the family were watching the football game as of now we don't know a lot about the shooters although police said that they believe that they were males part of the reason is that it was really dark in the backyard so dark in fact that witnesses said when the shooting started they only saw flashes of light but chief hall did say that authorities believe there were in fact two shooters at least two judging from the shell casings that were found at the scene and at those individuals either fled on foot or perhaps in a vehicle given with the police chief said about this being targeted what is the community reaction been well I think a lot of people are feeling really scared this is a large community of Mong families in this neighborhood in southeast Fresno where the shooting took place when I was at the crime scene last night neighbors seemed really shaken they describe this as a quiet calm community that recently has seen several instances of gun violence but that was something new so they were really surprised that this was happening people are really worried about safety especially with the Mong new year celebration coming up right after Christmas there's gonna be huge event here in Fresno next month with people coming even from outside of the area so that's something that people are looking ahead to and concerned about and Fresno police even said that there could be fears of retaliation in the community but do they have a motive I mean what's the spring that well so the thirties have hinted at the possibility that this could have been gang related a chief anti hall said that there have been several recent incidents in this community in this region that he said indicated an uptick of gang activity in the area but he was clear that please don't have reason to believe the shooting is connected to that up tick he said Fresno P. is establishing an Asian gang task force to respond to this and just simply that gang violence is something that police are not ruling out that Alex hole from KQED reporting from Fresno thank you thank you you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news and this is ninety point three K. AZ.

Richard Harris thirty eight years twenty three years thirty one years forty years three K
"richard harris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"richard harris" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Born blind whose at risk for HD. I'm just not going to stop because I don't want him to. Have to deal with this Richard Harris, NPR news. You're listening to WNYC coming up next. It's market place in a wave of San Francisco based companies going public Uber has its IPO tomorrow, but what will happen to the city's already expensive housing market. Whenever I meet somebody in an open house instead of saying, do you have an agent, representing you my first question is are you about to come into a large sum of money because of an IPO when housing an IPO 's collide that's next on marketplace right here on WNYC. Stay tuned. Support for WNYC comes from proof of love in this new play produced by audible theater, an accident uncovers a secret and a woman reveals her true self starring Brenda Pressley now on stage at the Minetta lane theatre tickets at TicketMaster dot com. This is WNYC ninety three point nine FM and AM eight twenty NPR news and the New York conversation. Marketplace is supported by smart sheet, whose work execution software empowers more than seventy seven thousand companies to plan manage automate and report on work at scale, more at smart, sheet dot com, smart, sheet, work, different, trade, and tariffs. Of course, gonna have to do those initial public offerings as well. And we'll do a Little Rock climbing to from American public media. This is marketplace. Marketplace is supported.

WNYC NPR Brenda Pressley Richard Harris Minetta lane theatre San Francisco New York
"richard harris" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"richard harris" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

"Richard Harris. Welcome to enquiring minds. Thank you. Thanks for having me so nature. Did a big survey back in twenty sixteen about whether scientists think we have a major reproducibility crisis and something like over fifty percent said yes and a number quibble below that, but it's hard to get scientists, fifty percent of scientists to agree on much of anything these days. So that number struck me as a really big number. Can you tell me a little bit about reproducibility both in terms of its origins and how scientist's view this, whether it's a crisis or not? Yeah. Well, I think these have been issues since science was invented, and I actually do not like the word crisis. I think that's a misunderstanding of what's going on. I think this is an awareness of how big an issue this is, and I think scientists have been, you know, plotting along doing their usual thing. Using the techniques that everyone else uses and so on and assuming that always good. And it's only been in recent years where people started to reflect on that and ask, you know, are the things that we assume are good ways to practice science, really. All good in the answer comes back pretty resounding no. There are reforms that are needed, and particularly where I focus in is what's called pre clinical medical research. It's it's science. It's conducted in laboratories on animals and cells, and so on. And and in in that circumstance, people put out a lot of material and a lot of it cannot be reproduced when other people try to to pick it up. And of course, that's a cornerstone of science. That's something you ought to be able to do that in and of itself isn't surprising. I mean, signs at his best works in this in this series of of trial test repeat, but what has what is shifted over the last few years because the conversation of it becoming being a bigger issue has really emerged on the scene. Yeah. Well, I think one thing that has changed a lot is is yes, scientists is not perfect, and if every experiment worked in was published and and everybody else could repeat it, it would be a pretty boring experiment because I it's is supposed to explore the frontiers. Right? And so if you're if you're on the ragged edge, you should get things wrong. Sometimes I think what is changed is recognizing that there are a lot of. Results that don't pan out, and it's not because it was just because it was bad luck or whatever, but the experiments weren't designed very well. People did not take some very basic steps. For example, Richard Feynman went said that really the goal of science is to make sure that you're not fooling yourself and you are the easiest person to fool. And so you're supposed to do things like blind and experiments. So you don't know which is the control group, which is the group of, you know, th the animals, whatever, that's getting the active ingredient. And if you if you know those things than you can unconsciously biased yourself, it's not deliberate, but but these sorts of basic steps have have not been practiced very much. And the other really big issue has to do with the statistics of science. People have assumed that there was a sort of a magic threshold where something becomes significant. It's called a p value. And I think bio statisticians have have become increasingly concerned about how poor a measure that is about whether something really. Is going to pan out or not, and there's a big push to say, you need to run experiments with with more subjects, and you need to run the more carefully and you need to look for for higher degrees of of this value to make sure that you're really are getting significant results. So I think as as people started realizing that these issues were cropping up and and that a lot of things that were not reproducible because people were because the original experiments were not conducted very carefully. I think that's really where the focus is now, how can we think more carefully about how to design and conduct experiments, so that so that you know we can minimize the the number of or at least reduce the number of experiments that that turn out to be false false steps, false alarms. I wanna come back to some of those ingredients that are making four these experiments too good to go awry or at least the conclusions from the experiments go. Right, but but I want to back up a second say, do we understand the scale of..

Richard Harris Richard Feynman scientist fifty percent
"richard harris" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

02:09 min | 4 years ago

"richard harris" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

"Used the sauna what a beautiful shot went to number one i've written a for richard harris 'and he said elvis does your sovereignty site and that's how it came about i wrote to elvis a roach everybody and then elvis recorded it met with it the new when you're writing are you doing the words and the music yes you come from a musical back on what you play and how do you competitive yarrow my father was gripped out a prayer and my grandmother was a blaine piano teacher and my grandfather came from dial a sky which queen victoria's gaelic poyet's so there's obviously something in there and i grew up just listened to the pro every morning do you make a big distinction them between the lyrics and the music lim usually has to get you right away let's forget ship at the lyrics of the thing that they forever if you got a good sean i guarantee that very few people would know more than congratulations and celebrations they don't know the rest but they're not that lan wave me the children is what hits you but lyrically if you get something like a sinatra song when somebody loves you it's no good unless they love you all the way those words matter a alone were some body law it's no on less some of the other people you've worked for them there is some wonderful quotes billy connelly elton john of course and such tim rice of an enormous composer in in elton cheung by office book of woodland play the piano the christmas party and he keeps adultery every day of his life do you i ate bill martin i eat billboard then.

richard harris elvis tim rice elton cheung billy connelly christmas