17 Burst results for "Richard Goodwin"

"richard goodwin" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

07:32 min | 2 years ago

"richard goodwin" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Have the show jam packed with significant figures from the history of the national pastime in our first guest is certainly one of the most significant figures in the annals of the modern game or of any year actually the long time commissioner of baseball member of the hall of fame we are speaking with Alan Budd Seelig commissioner thank you for joining us Jeremy pleasure to be with you glad to do it and are you and I have done a lot of things together over the years so this impression well the the occasion isn't only our all star special bodies of course is well the publication of your new book for the good of the game the inside story of the surprising and dramatic transformation in Major League Baseball written with the great baseball writer Phil Rogers from Chicago but why do you want to put this story down in print well you know I thought about it for a long time and I'll tell you a little story which I hope Jeremy well illustrated years our goal I had gotten friendly with Doris Kearns Goodwin the famed historian who you know was written a foreword for the bark and I I can venture and her husband Richard Goodwin and a broad Samantha powers who later went on the United Nations and we are and we are on my friend every arm was there and you know Jeremy we started telling stories sat there for a long time and at one point she said to me because I am here three boxes you well know you've got to write a book you can't you to watch you these stories are fascinating I'm not day forward and everybody in baseball kept telling me the same thing and so Jeremy being a Hershey bar from being a history professor now I use there were a lot of subjects that I Robert Lee from my perspective M. even really told properly and so I wanted to where I was anxious to write a book it took me a long time Richard justice and Phil Rogers both in an excellent job we spent endless hours and so it was just a matter of I hope at least from my historical perspective telling the story the way I believe it happened speaking with the former commissioner of baseball bud Seelig who was the man in charge of the game for more than twenty years he's been out of the office of the commissioner for just the last four years succeeded by rob Manfred who ran labor relations for him for a long time and of course but one of the things you dress in the book is your legacy in terms of baseball's here of performance enhancing drugs and we've talked about this many times over the years and and you've talked about how frustrated you were with what you saw as the intransigence of the players union on the subject of testing how do you address that issue here in the book well I do when I try to terror with church the way it happened you know I've read and heard and you know Jeremy how sensitive the some of that where we were slow to react we didn't really care was good for our cameras all of which are myths of America have enormous consequences and so I I detail almost year by year and in some cases Burnett what happened Steve will see them and Chris were founder and join mark McGwire's locker and all we Jeremy that sold frustrating to me is that people don't seem to understand this is a subject for collective bargaining this is not something that commissioner can do people there are you know Brandis were still commissioner and I'd always joke well he's not look in two thousand Jeremy in two thousand I branded steroids in the minor leagues completely for the two thousand one season going to be now eighteen nineteen years and that but the others was the subject of collective bargaining and I don't say there's too warm no sense going back our lives but darned here in gene or as of the union we're very outspoken I mean there I'm not telling you anything that comes as a shock to anybody who followed it they didn't really look but I I had I had Marvin Miller on the show probably twenty years ago and I asked him about performance enhancing drugs and I asked him why he thought players should not be tested Marvin Miller the legendary union organizer the D. godfather I would not for your benefit but before audiences the man who really created the modern Major League Baseball Players Association he compared them to pilots you know who you know two or he said you know if we're not good at what he said was you know why should I let my guys be tested if I don't have to and and of course it was because about competitive balance right and Jeremy let me I was just gonna say I'm good for you because of trade he went it was great saying that if he were still there that nobody would be talked about bringing a bottle would be very blunt about it and and so locked that was Marvin zero that was Jean ours is really that was down to room and so this war is a herculean struggle this was something we battled day after day year after year an old two we've got what I know that was our last item I'll never forget it Germany and seven in the morning we got it done and it was like during the week program it turned out pretty good five percent and so on and so forth to five percent in two thousand three triggering mandatory testing once that threshold was reached exactly right and but even at all five middle six and fat when I went and I got senator Mitchell who don't want to work me George Mitchell to to do a whole still writing and six because it was still a lot of stuff going on we have a better program but not where we should be and as you know he came up with the with the with the program and may twenty recommendations by the way in which we live follow them and and so today after a lot of agony we have the toughest testing program in American sports better than that one of the world after I go reserves the one tire wear was good a program is is in America I'm proud of that but we went to are there any and and again from historic I tell my students sister me on track it seems that the fact that it was a subject of collective bargaining has been something of our people either didn't understand or just them now.

five percent twenty years eighteen nineteen years four years
"richard goodwin" Discussed on Vrain Waves: Teaching Conversations with Minds Shaping Education

Vrain Waves: Teaching Conversations with Minds Shaping Education

13:03 min | 2 years ago

"richard goodwin" Discussed on Vrain Waves: Teaching Conversations with Minds Shaping Education

"I'm Ben call been across the table is the only co host whom presidents, take the day off to honor her birthday. She's becky. Peter's, becky. What's good? It's all good Ben killing super lucky to bring the giants and education to the ear buds, busy, teachers, all to make us more informed inspired and connected educators. We try to keep this podcast evergreen. Meaning we try not to talk about news or trending topics so that you can pick up an episode anytime and get something awesome from it. And this can be enjoyed anytime to you. But it's pretty fitting that we're releasing it on Memorial Day a day, where we remember the ultimate sacrifice that people have made in service to our country and we're forever grateful that those people give their lives that we can enjoy the freedom we have today. And when I think about our country's rich history and about service to our country. One of the family names that comes up. I is the. Goodwin's in this episode we speak with doors, Kerns Goodwin and Michael Goodwin. Both of whom have committed their lives to making this country, better place, absolutely one hundred percent. Also husband, Richard Goodwin, who will talk about in this interview. But we can't talk to an amazing social studies teacher and Pulitzer prize winner without my intersocial cities geek coming out, and so I don't know how I've waited this long to my favorite story from American history. But it's coming out now. Yeah. So is a story I started telling out every US history class, I ever taught when I was teaching out in Illinois, but it's a story.

Michael Goodwin Richard Goodwin Ben US Pulitzer prize giants Peter Illinois one hundred percent
"richard goodwin" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"richard goodwin" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Vaccines are up to date. If you're going to do overseas travel. It's really important that that MMR vaccine measles. Mumps rubella is up-to-date Florida's just one case away from officially having an outbreak. It takes three cases for that. The first Florida case this year was reported in Broward County last month. A Hernando county deputy is facing criminal charges. The sheriff's office says Dulles Kovin was arrested this week for domestic battery against her husband. She's accused of pushing him during an argument in their home in Springhill Coleman has since resigned Pinellas county man accused of forcing an elderly woman to live in appalling conditions, Richard Goodwin. Dunedin was arrested after deputies say they found the sixty seven year old woman living with emaciated dogs in a home that had no working toilets and no food. The woman was taken to the hospital an animal services took possession of ten dogs found in the home on Pinehurst Dr. To the state house has voted to make it harder to get a constitutional amendment on the ballot lift the Republican Representative Mike BELTRAN says the constitution is bloated and out of state interests are to blame. A couple of million dollars can come in from out of state. Gather up these signatures put it on put it on the ballot. And then send out some mailers opponents say the petition process is the only way for some voices to be heard the Bill still has to go through a Senate committee. It's eight oh five at News Radio. WFL a orders for new business. Equipment jump on the most eight months last month, then MO for sharing payments and transferring money among friends now has more digital users than any Bank in the country except for chase forty million us then MO visas says it had increased payments to businesses to get them to accept fees. Slack messaging will start providing a new bridge to Email and improve calendar. Integration on slack. Starting later. This year. Comcast lost video customers because the streaming but gained internet connection customers waste management company says it is making new progress in recycling. More trash WWE says business is down and cinema. A competitor to troubled movie pass will drop that same business plan is movie pass and try running loyalty programs for theater chains. Instead is not that unusual that a startup. We'll have a good idea, but not have found exactly the right market for it yet. So they try something else in a related way for NewsRadio. WFL a I'm Joe Connolly with a Bloomberg business update..

Dulles Kovin WFL Florida MMR vaccine Broward County Hernando county Mumps Pinellas county Senate committee Comcast Springhill Coleman Mike BELTRAN WWE Dunedin Representative Richard Goodwin Joe Connolly Bloomberg sixty seven year
"richard goodwin" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"richard goodwin" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Just one case away from a fishery having an outbreak. It takes three cases for that. The Florida case the first one reported in two thousand nineteen was in Broward County last month, a Hernando county deputy facing criminal charges deputies announced that dollas Cullen was arrested this week for domestic battery against her husband. And she's accused of pushing him during an argument in their home in Springhill, coal, then has since resigned. Pinellas county man is accused of forcing an elderly woman to live in appalling conditions, Richard Goodwin of Dundrennan was arrested this week after deputies say they found the sixty seven year old woman living with emaciated dogs in a home that had no working toilets and no food. The woman was taken to the hospital animal services took possession of ten dogs found in the home on Pinehurst drive. The city of Sarasota is going after big pharma blaming opioid makers for the epidemic in the country. That's costing millions of dollars. Sarasota official. Tom bar tells news channel eight's the money will be used to treat addicts. We are hopeful that are brother and sister cities will agree that whatever the settlement amount is we invested right into dealing with substance abuse problem and challenge more in prevention and treatment more than sixteen hundred cities across the country are filing lawsuits against the prescription drug makers members. Of the Florida house. Thank people are passing too, many constitutional amendments it voted seventy one to forty one to make it harder to put them on the ballot Republican, Mike BELTRAN lithium doesn't like petition amendments because they don't go through state leadership. There's no bicameralism where it goes through the house. It goes through the Senate. It's presented to the governor. Sarasota, democrat Margaret good says people pass them in minutes because Tallahassee is failing them. Things like constitutional amendments on the ballot..

Sarasota dollas Cullen Pinellas county Broward County Hernando county Pinehurst drive Florida Mike BELTRAN Springhill Tom bar Richard Goodwin Senate Margaret good Dundrennan Tallahassee official sixty seven year
"richard goodwin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

14:11 min | 2 years ago

"richard goodwin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"He shall overcome the famous spiritual in protest song, not just from the sixties, but from long long before especially among American black people in negroes protesting their conditions in America. A lot of Americans know this song, Robert, Carrol wise, it so important to you and the stories that you've told him, and you continue to tell you know, when Lyndon Johnson picks up the banner of the civil rights movement and decides to pay us Civil Rights Act of nineteen sixty four and the Voting Rights Act of nineteen sixty five that was the song that they was singing in the streets in nineteen Sigmar nineteen sixty five they're singing it and sell morale with police violence against the marches the dog sick on the deputy sheriff's with their bull whips riding into the marches using their whips. And Johnson is going to give the speech to congress. And they the civil rights leaders have always wanted in their heart. How much he was with him in this speech? He says it's not just them who we who negroes who used the wording is not just negroes who must overcome. We must overcome. We must overcome our prejudice. We must pay us lure, and he said, and we shall overcome. He picked up the words that aunt of the anthem of the civil rights movement. Very interesting. Martin Luther King was listening to the speech into living room of one of his supporters down in Selma. I wouldn't Johnson says himself we shall overcome his aides turn around to look at Dr king, and he's crying. Then it's the only time they ever saw Martin Luther King Croix. So you said the two songs which symbolize the sixties to me. That's. Part of the glorious things Lyndon Johnson does but there's another song waist deep in the big muddy. It's about Vietnam. Waist deep in the big muddy and the big fool says the push on waist-deep, hip the. And the big full says the push on. So the other half of Lyndon Johnson story in the nineteenth enough that you can make it happen. Have is Vietnamese and how he got how he led this country into a war in the jungles of Asia. I mean, think of it he sent almost six hundred thousand men over there. We dropped more bombs on Vietnam than we dropped on Germany and World War Two. So the two sides bright a dog soy to Johnson's presidents and the fool says push on in that song. That is Lyndon Johnson the fool in the decisions that would ultimately undo his presidency and the subject of of what you're working on. Now, I'd like to go back to that scene. You just set though, we shall overcome where protesters are outside the White House. They're sending it as Johnson goes up to the hill in the limo set the scene, though inside the limo because you talk about turning every page, maybe not. On paper, but turn every page with the people who are talking to you to give witness to the power and the work of Lyndon Johnson. Because you went inside the limousine that night on the way to make that speech. We shall overcome. Well, I I went and saw Todd good question really read by books carefully. I have sir. So so Johnson is sitting in the backseat of the limousine with loose leaf notebook with the speech open on his lap going through it. In the opposite in. His three speechwriters Horace Busby. Richard goodwin. Jack valenti. So I talked to all three of them Goodwin. Busby at length, and I would say to them. What did you see? What did you hear that? Right at first, they say, nothing, you know. But finally Busby said, you know, we'll there was one thing as or core turns out of the gates of the White House onto Pennsylvania Avenue to drive up. The Capitol Hill the protest is a right there, Pennsylvania Avenue was not at all closed off. They could come right up to the fence next to the White House, and they are singing right into the car. We shall overcome. And they're saying that chanting. Hey, hey, LBJ, just you wait till sixty eight to show him that they think he's not supporting the civil rights movement enough. And I said to Busby was what was Johnson's reaction. And he said he never looked up from turning the pages of his loose leaf notebook. Never once. But Busby really knew Johnson. And I said. But that he hear them and Busby said he heard he gives this speech. The core comes back and Busby said, you know, when we turned back into the White House, the pickets were all gone. Johnson shut shut them all up. Yes. I mean, it was one of the you know to me ton. There are great moment in Linden Johnson's memorable moments memorable to me anyway. And I hope I make people see why I think they're memorable in Johnson's presidency. This was a shining moment of a man who all his life had had wanted to help poor people and particularly poor people of color when all the way back to win. He's very poor. Boy, he has to drop out of college between a soft more junior years to make enough money to go on and he teaches in what they called the Mexican school Mexican American school, but the to the Mexican school down in a little town called ca- Tula in Texas, and I wrote about that time no teacher had of a cared of these. Children learned this teacher cared. So when he's writing this, we shall overcome speech thirty years letter later dick Goodwin says to him. Did you really mean? Do you really good ones, helping right? He says you really mean it or basic basically asking or is this just a polit- for a political reason Johnson, listen when I was teaching down there. I swore that if I ever had the power to help these kids I would use it. Now, I have the power, and I mean to us. People had debated in. We'll continue to to debate the dichotomy of Lyndon Johnson. The man from the south the friend of southern racist who used racist language himself and also his drive his insistence on helping poor people unfortunate people people of color who were downtrodden because of no falter their own. But to take get at his motivation for that latter part and maybe for both of those sides of Lyndon Johnson. You did more than than turn the page to get it. Why he was like this people need to understand that you picked up and took your wife on the two of you, and you moved to Linden Johnson's backyard. You moved to the to the dirt poor Texas hill country. Yes. Because I I realized we weren't understanding that country weren't understanding the people and therefore I didn't understand Lyndon Johnson. So I said, you know, we're going to have to move there and live there to this very isolated. You know, part of America. I said why can't you do a biography of Napoleon? He moved to France in that case, but you might not get very far. Robert Carro, you said from your early years as a beat reporter on Long Island and through your work is offer that it was important to you in the young case to work at a paper. Not just the covered the news. But a paper that was fighting for something that had took sides and had something to say about a cause why was that important to you as a as a young person? I guess for a lot of young people it is. But it's not an impulse that sticks with everyone as they pursue their careers. Has it has it stuck with you? Oh, I don't. I don't know. And I've also taught I don't. I suppose I do feel that way. I try to make my books. I mean, I discovered you know, I don't know what you learn as you go along. But I realized as I went along doing the power broker that if I wanted to write books about political power in America the way I wanted the books to be I would have to write not only about the powerful the people who wielded the power, but about the powerless to people on whom the power was wheeled to show. What government would go political power can do to people both for good and frill? We've been hearing from one listeners who want the chance to ask you a question or two Robert Caro Susan emailed to ask. How shocking was Johnson's loss to Kennedy Susan's talking about the democratic convention in nineteen sixty when Johnson was originally vying for the democratic nomination, he wouldn't have his moment. Then was it. A lesson learned for him. I don't know if it was a lesson learned, but it was certainly a shock. You know in the nineteen fifties Lyndon Johnson was the most powerful democrat in the country. Dried Eisenhower was president. Of course. He was Senate majority leader he was a figure of immense power. I mean, it's not Eisenhower's civil rights Bill that's passed than it's Lyndon Johnson. Civil rights Bill. They were set. It was writing the him its own legislation. So he thinks and Jack Kennedy is just a freshman. Senator who's really not doing much in the Senate at all Johnson has absolute contempt for him. He used to say about Kennedy. You know, he's such lousy Senator. He doesn't even know how to address the chair used to talk about how sickly he was yellow all the time from in fact, the Addison's disease he thinks he's got it wrapped up Kennedy is going around the country with his amazing charm and his idealism. And taking the states away from Johnson without Johnson realizing what's happening until it's too late, and you can go behind the scenes in master of the Senate since you brought it up the the shuttle diplomacy in the hotels, Robert Kennedy, himself up and down. The back stairs, Jack Kennedy negotiating with LBJ. When Robert doesn't know because Robert doesn't want Johnson on the ticket. They were lifelong enemies in. This was only the mid point of their intimacy, I suppose, well, one of the, you know. The hatred and hatred is a word, you know, as a biographer yet. You don't like to use because it's such a loaded term. And it sounds so AG's rated, but I decided after learning about it hearing about it for a long time that hatred was the right word to describe the relationship between Lyndon Johnson and Robert Kennedy, and it came from both directions. You make clear in your books that how capable of hatred real hatred Lyndon Johnson was he had I would say an equal partner in. This regard. Bobby Kennedy was was a hater too. And he hated Lyndon Johnson. He just well, he despises Johnson. And story that you tell which was in my last book the passage of power. Where Jack Kennedy has put Johnson. He's about to nominate him that evening at the convention for vice president while he's taking a nap during the afternoon, Bobby Kennedy comes down the back stairs of this hotel to Johnson sweet three times to try to get him to withdraw from the ticket Johnson thought that was the most you miliatimen moment of his life. He never never forgot that afternoon, and he never forgave. And you said he never did forgive. Once you crossed him. Figure that was the moment between them in many subsequent moments where the Kennedys marginalized and embarrassed Lyndon Johnson once he was vice president not not like a Dick Cheney not like vice president today despite his skills in N being one of the most formidable politicians in modern American history. You put your finger on a that's a great way of some of that, you know, he was the greatest legislative the greatest majority leader in American history. The Kennedys won't even ask him for or in many cases, allow him to give advice on how to get these bills. When Kennedy puts his civil rights Bill before congress Johnson has to plead. Can I have fifteen minutes alone with him? And as I recall, it just I don't think he ever gets those fifteen minutes, certainly Kennedy. Never listen to anything you had to say on this Bill. Fascinating fascinating bunch of events, and and you detail in the book as well before we take a quick break here. Robert Caro, how Linden Johnson's fortunes changed drastically tragically with the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy one of my favorite scenes in your book the passage of power. Is when a dejected depressed self pitying, really Lyndon Johnson is really at the low point of his vice presidency tragedy strikes the United States when Jack Kennedy is murdered in Dallas and the transformation as a switch flips in the mind and the actions of Lyndon Johnson, you those who were in the room with him at parkland hospital saw him transformed from dejected self pitying loser into a powerful directing take charge president of the United States. It's a fascinating scene that only somebody who interviewed people in the room over and over could..

Lyndon Johnson Linden Johnson Horace Busby Bobby Kennedy Johnson White House vice president America Martin Luther King Jack Kennedy Robert Senate Martin Luther King Croix Jack valenti Selma dick Goodwin
"richard goodwin" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

13:16 min | 2 years ago

"richard goodwin" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"We shall overcome the famous spiritual and protest song not just from the sixties. But but from long long before especially among American black people in Negros protesting their conditions in America. A lot of Americans know this song Robert CARA, why is it so important to you and the stories that you've told him, and you continue to tell you know, when Lyndon Johnson picks up the banner of the civil rights movement and decides to pay us Civil Rights Act of nineteen sixty four and the Voting Rights Act of nineteen sixty five that was the song that they was singing in the streets in nineteen March nineteen sixty five they're singing it and sell morale Bama with police violence against the March is the dog sick on the deputy sheriff's with their bull whips ROY getting into the marches using. Their whips and Lyndon Johnson is going to give this speech to congress, and they go the civil rights leaders have always wanted in their hearts how much he was with him in this speech. He says it's not just them who we who negroes who used the word is not just negroes who must overcome. We must overcome. We must overcome prejudice. We must pay us this lure, and he said, and we shall overcome. He picked up the words that aunt of the anthem of the civil rights movement. Very interesting. Martin Luther King was listening to this speech in the living room of one of his supporters down in Selma. And wouldn't Johnson says himself we shall overcome? His aides turn around to look at Dr king, and he's crying. Then it's the only time they ever saw Martin Luther King cry. So you said the two songs which symbolize the sixties to me that's part of the glorious things Lyndon Johnson does. But there's another song waist deep in the big muddy about Vietnam. Waist deep in the big muddy and the big fool says the push on waist-deep, hip the. And the big full says the push on. So the other half of Lyndon Johnson story in the nineteenth enough that you can make it half. An have is Vietnamese and how he got how he led this country into a war in the jungles of Asia. I mean, think of it he sent almost six hundred thousand men over there. We dropped more mom's on Vietnam than we dropped on Germany in World War Two. So the two sides Brighton a dog saw to Johnson's presidency and the fool says push on in that song. That is Lyndon Johnson the fool in the decisions that would ultimately undo his presidency and the subject of of what you're working on. Now, I'd like to go back to that scene. You just set though, we shall overcome where protesters are outside the White House. They're seeing it as Johnson goes up to the hill in the limo set the scene. No inside the limo. Because you talk about turning every page, maybe not. On paper, but turn every page with the people who are talking to UT give witness to the power and the work of Lyndon Johnson. Because you went inside the limousine that night on the way to make that speech. We shall overcome. Well, I I went and saw Todd good question freely. Read by books carefully. I have sir. So so Johnson is sitting in the back seat of the limousine with loose leaf notebook with the speech open on his lap going through in the opposite him. His three speechwriters Horace Busby. Richard goodwin. Jack valenti. So I talked to all three of them Goodwin. And Busby at length, and I would say to them. What did you see? What did you hear that? Right. At first say, nothing, you know. But finally Busby said, you know, we'll there was one thing as or core turns out of the gates of the White House onto Pennsylvania Avenue to drive up. The Capitol Hill the protest is a right there, Pennsylvania Avenue was not at all closed off. They come right up to the fence next to the White House, and they are singing right into the car. We shall overcome. And they're saying that chanting. Hey, hey, LBJ, just you wait till sixty eight to show him that they think he's not supporting the civil rights movement enough. I said to Busby was what was Johnson's reaction. And he said he never looked up from turning the pages of his loose leaf notebook. Never once. But Busby really knew Johnson. And I said, but did he hear them? And Busby said he heard he gives this speech. The core comes back and Busby said, you know, when we turned back into the White House, the pickets were all gone. Johnson shut shut them all up. Yes. I mean, it was one of the to me Todd. There are great moments in Linden Johnson's memorable moments memorable to me anyway. And I hope I make people see why I think they're memorable in Johnson's presidency. This was a shining moment of the man who all his life had seen had wanted to help poor people and particularly poor people of color when all the way back to when he's very poor boy has to drop out of college between a sophomore junior years to make enough money to go on and he teaches in what they called the Mexican school Mexican American school, but equal to the Mexican school down in a little town called ca- Tula in Texas, and I wrote about that time no teacher head of a cared of these. Children learned to not this teacher cared. So when he's writing this, we shall overcome speech thirty years letter later dick Goodwin says to him. Did you really mean? Do you really good ones, helping right? He says you really mean it or basic basically asking or is this just a for a political reason Johnson's listen when I was teaching down there. I swore that if I ever had the power to help these kids I would use it. Now, I have the power, and I mean to us. People have debated in. We'll continue to to to bait the dichotomy of Lyndon Johnson. The man from the south the friend of southern racists who used racist language himself and also his drive his insistence on helping poor people unfortunate people people of color who were downtrodden because of no fault of their own. But to take get at his motivation for that latter part of maybe for both of those sides of Lyndon Johnson. You did more than than turn the page to get it. Why he was like this people need to understand that that you picked up and took your wife, Ana the two of you, and you moved to Linden Johnson's backyard. You moved to the to the dirt poor Texas hill country. Yes. Because I I realized we weren't understanding that country. We were understanding the people and therefore I didn't understand Lyndon Johnson. So I said to you know, we're going to have to move there and live there to this very isolated. You know, part of America. I said why can't you do a biography of Napoleon? Well, he moved to France in that case. But you might not get very far. I'm Todd like this one a. Robert Caro, you said from your early years as a beat reporter on Long Island and through your work is by for that. It was important to you in the young case to work at a paper. Not just the covered the news. But a paper that was fighting for something that had that took sides and had something to say about a cause why was that important to you as a as a young person? I guess for a lot of young people it is. But it's not an impulse that sticks with everyone as they pursued their careers has it has it stuck with you. Oh, I don't. I don't know. And I've also taught I don't. I suppose I do feel that way. I try to make my books. I mean, I discovered you know, I don't know what you learn as you go along. But I realized as I went along doing the powerbroker that if I wanted to write books about political power in America the way I wanted the books to be I would have to write not only about the powerful the people who wielded the power, but about the powerless to people on whom the power was wheeled to show. What government would political power can do to people both for good and for ill? We've been hearing from one listeners who want the chance to ask you a quick question or two Robert Caro Susan Email to ask. How shocking was Johnson's loss to Kennedy Susan's talking about the democratic convention it in nineteen sixty when Johnson was originally vying for the democratic nomination. He wouldn't have his moment. Then was it. A lesson learned for him. I don't know if it was a lesson learned, but it was certainly a shock. You know in the nineteen fifties Lyndon Johnson was the most powerful democrat in the country died. Eisenhower was president. Of course. He was Senate majority leader he was a figure of immense power. I mean, it's not Eisenhower civil rights spill that's passed. Then it's Lyndon Johnson's civil rights Bill. They were the Senate was writing on the him its own legislation. So he thinks and Jack Kennedy is just a freshman. Senator who's really not doing much in the Senate at all Johnson has absolute contempt for him. He used to say about Kennedy. You know, he's such a lousy Senator. He doesn't even know how to address the chair, you know, used to talk about how sickly he was yellow all the time from in fact, the Addison's disease he thinks he's got it wrapped up Kennedy is going around the country with his amazing charm and his idealism. And taking the states away from Johnson without Johnson realizing what's happening until it's too late, and you can go behind the scenes in master of the Senate since you brought it up to the shuttle diplomacy in hotels, Robert Kennedy himself up in down. The back stairs, Jack Kennedy negotiating with LBJ. When Robert doesn't know because Robert doesn't want Johnson on the ticket. They were lifelong enemies, and this was only the mid point of their animosity, I suppose, well, one of the, you know, the hatred and hatred is word, you know, as biographer yet, you don't like to use because it's such a loaded term. And it sounds so rated, but I decided after learning about it hearing about it for a long time that hatred was the right word to describe the relationship between Lyndon Johnson and Robert Kennedy, and it came from both directions. You make clear in your books that how capable of hatred real. Hatred. Lyndon Johnson was he had I would say an equal partner in. This regard. Bobby Kennedy was was a hater too. And he hated Lyndon Johnson. He just well, he despised Johnson. He I and distorted that you tell which was in my last book the passage of power where Jack Kennedy has put Johnson he's about to nominate him that evening at the convention for his vice president while he's taking a nap during the afternoon, Bobby Kennedy comes down the back stairs of this hotel to Johnson sweet three times to try to get him to withdraw from the ticket Johnson thought that was the most you miliatimen moment of his life. He never he never forgot that afternoon, and he never forgave it. And you said he never did forgive. Once you crossed him of that was the moment between them. In many subsequent moments where the Kennedys marginalized and embarrassed Lyndon Johnson, once he was vice president not not like a Dick Cheney not like vice president of today, despite his skills, and and being one of the most formidable politicians in modern American history, you put your finger on taught that's a great way of summit up. You know, he was the greatest legislatively. Greg's majority leader in American history. The Kennedys won't even ask him for or in many cases, allow him to give advice on how to get these bills through when Kennedy puts his civil rights Bill before congress Johnson has to plead. Can I have fifteen minutes alone with him? And as I recall it, I don't think he ever gets those fifteen minutes, certainly Kennedy. Never listen to anything you had to say.

Lyndon Johnson Horace Busby Robert Kennedy White House America Martin Luther King Senate Todd vice president Robert CARA Selma Jack valenti dick Goodwin Negros Asia Robert Caro Richard goodwin
"richard goodwin" Discussed on Techstination

Techstination

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"richard goodwin" Discussed on Techstination

"Your destination for gadgets gear. I'm Fred friskin, creating flavor combinations using artificial intelligence IBM research has partnered with McCormack to create a line of one dish recipe mixes that will soon be on the market. Dr Richard Goodwin is the manager of the computational creativity research group at IBM, the computer takes all this data. The information by the formulas in the rum Tirias and a sensory results and learn the patterns of things that that work. Well, combinations of ingredients that pair well, together, functional substitutes and other things. And then it uses these to generate new suggestions Goodwin says the results have been pretty impressive. And later this year, you'll be able to put the products to the taste test yourself. You can find us at texted nation dot com. I'm Fred Fishburn. Now, this how many companies out there have continued to innovate when it comes to building. A better radio. I'm Fred Fishburn, host of textile nation, and I'm here to tell you about the new C sky wave SP radio from the wonderful people at sea crane baba is crew really love radio, and it shows in this new compact model that is packed with features beyond great AM FM reception. Unsound you can tune into shortwave signals from around the world. Listen to ham radio operators aviation and more. It's the radio you'll turn to every day. And in emergencies it will run for nearly three days on just two AA batteries hair. The sleep timer with the new soft speaker three and you've got the perfect radio for your nightstand. Of course, it can wake you up to click on secret at texted nation dot com and put in the code text nation for free flashlight with your order. They love radio. And you'll love secretly.

Dr Richard Goodwin Fred Fishburn IBM Fred friskin McCormack three days
"richard goodwin" Discussed on Techstination

Techstination

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"richard goodwin" Discussed on Techstination

"Welcome to text the nation's joining us is Dr Richard Goodwin. Principal researcher and manager of computational creativity. Research group at IBM research, quite a title. Thank you for joining us, Dr Goodwin. Thank you for having me, and you are doing some really interesting work having doing some really interesting work into using artificial intelligence comes to flavor and food product development, and you've had a well known name as a partner. Give us the overview sure, it'd be happy to so our group has always been looking into whether or not computers can help be people. Be more creative and creativity is kind of like, beauty and intelligence people think they know it when they see it, but it's very hard to define. And so we decided to look into the area of food because people are familiar with being creative in their own kitchens and trying new dishes, whereas they're not very familiar with being creative as in like a Jackson Pollock or a Picasso. And so we using this as a vehicle to explore creativity and food, and we've had the the great pleasure and opportunity to work with McCormick and their product developers and flavors and using all the data. They have to try to get a computer that can help there. They're product designers and flavors. Be more creative. Well, tell us how how this came about the they approached you to see what could be done with computers and trying to come up with some new flavors. Yeah. It was kind of a mutual thing. So we were we were doing work in this area. And one of my former colleagues, I was actually interviewed for a radio program and someone McCormick hurt it. And then followed up called us, and that's kind of how the partnership began. And they have a lot of expertise in in food, and, you know, creating new food products and stuff and our expertise is obviously more on the computer science side and the machine learning side. So we thought it was a, you know, sort of marriage made in heaven where we could apply, you know, their expertise our expertise in a way, you know, to help, you know, create more innovative products that people will like, and that are, you know, better for them. And so the results of this partnership are coming to market pretty soon. Right. Yeah. They should be in the next couple of months. There's. There's three products in particular for the new one line of products that McCormack caz. They're ones shan't, sheep pan and one Skillet pan. Beal's one's a bourbon, pork, when's Tuscan chicken and another New Orleans style sausage in vegetables. And these are just the first of what we believe will be a a a whole set of products that come out they they use a to assist the product developers in creating new flavors. So eventually, we would see this being used by all of this the five hundred people at McCormick that work in their, you know, development areas to help them create better products. And you know, it's like any other tool. The better the tool you have to work with you know, hopefully, the better the results that come out. Tell us how this works from the on the view from that from that perspective. I don't think computers can taste can they know they can't. And that's actually one reason why we think this is partnership between the computer and the person so to train a practice bell per flavors. They I will say getting undergraduate degree and food science or nutrition or chemistry, and then they'll apprentice to one of the masters,.

Dr Richard Goodwin McCormick IBM Principal researcher Jackson Pollock New Orleans product development Beal partner
"richard goodwin" Discussed on We The People

We The People

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"richard goodwin" Discussed on We The People

"But maybe you can't. And obviously there was no way that FDR good bargain with Hitler or with Mussalini. And I think he would have told him that that you have to understand that. And maybe this is not a war that needs to be fought. What what are you doing in trying to change people's feelings about nationalism in Vietnam? And but most importantly as I suggested, I think what he would say to him. If you're going to go into this war, you have to go into it and educate the American people because the citizens are going to be sending their sons and daughters into battle. And there's nothing more important than understanding why they're there Johnson. So wanted to keep the great society going that he didn't want to talk about the war and he hid the appropriations. He didn't have the national guard come out, and he just thought maybe I can run these two things together. And then what he was afraid of was not so much even winning the war. He's afraid of losing the war. So he kept putting more troops in to prevent the loss of the war. Instead of having a philosophy of whether is this war worth winning or not? But it lost it lost him his presidency. It lost him his place in history. And he was as I say he suffered from that as well. So that even though I was so angry with him. When I first knew about him when I was in the war being with him just made me feel more empathetic toward somebody who I believe this isn't what he wanted when I see yell. How many kids did you kill today? LBJ? Hey, hey, that's not what it was about. And I came to feel sad about him and sad about the heartbreak of the country that this guy could have been and was in many ways, an FDR except for this failure of leadership epic in the war one last question on LBJ. You talk about the qualities that the great leaders you describe how. And empathy is a crucial one and the ability to listen if Johnson had more of that would have been a better leader. Well, you certainly had empathy in the domestic affairs. I mean, one of the most important experiences. He had when he was young. He had to leave college for a year in order to get money because they couldn't afford to stay in. And he worked as a principal a Mexican American school in Kula, and he saw the pain of prejudice. He said on the faces of these kids, and he did everything he was the principal. He was the teacher. He organized a soccer games the organized basketball games. Those kids said they've never been in the presence of such an energy, and the oral histories of those kids say he changed their lives and then much much later in nineteen sixty five when he's giving the we shall overcome speech for the voting rights after the Selma demonstrations, which I'm proud to say, my husband, Richard Goodwin worked on that speech. And and he was working you only had that day to write the speech because Johnson decided on the Sunday night that on the Monday night..

Johnson principal FDR LBJ Hitler Vietnam Mussalini Richard Goodwin soccer Selma basketball Mexican American school Kula
"richard goodwin" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

04:41 min | 3 years ago

"richard goodwin" Discussed on Words Matter

"Even if we pay this Bill. Battle will not be. What happened in Selma is part of a far larger movement which recused into every section and state of America. It is the effort of American negro. To secure for themselves. The full blessing of American life. They're called must be are called to coach not just grows. But really it's all of. Much overcome the crippling legacy of bigotry and injust. And we shall overcome. So what do take from that speech in nineteen sixty five in where we are today in light of what we saw with voting and possible voting suppression specially in Florida and Georgia and the difficulty that so many Americans still have exercising. Their constitutional right to play a role in democracy. I mean, I'll admit the book came out in two thousand fourteen and when I was working on it Linden Johnson's Voting Rights Act and his speech to the joint session of congress about voting rights seemed much more like history than it does today. This idea of you know, state sanctioned voter suppression is much more with us today. And maybe it was in a way that I didn't even focus on when I when I was working on the book, and I think. You you know, that moment in the Johnson presidents for me is sort of Lyndon Johnson at his his greatest. He Johnson was not generally a great speaker his speeches tended to be like really flowery again, he was sort of self conscious about John Kennedy's. So he would make his speeches like really wordy, and he delivered them on comfortably and that speech really sticks out because it's such a great speech. And that's because he had moral clarity and moral clarity sort of. You know, writes it self in a sense, Richard Goodwin. Who's who recently died was a person who wrote that speech, you know, described the sort of real clarifying experience that having to address the nation after he was speaking after after the terrible scene in Selma, Alabama, and how that how that sort of made the writing easy, and you feel that in Johnson, I think that's really a key element. We were talking before about what Johnson and Trump hadn't. And the biggest difference is that Johnson had this incredible capacity, for empathy, and that that was something that he used toward to to great success over and over again, he used it legislatively in terms of being able to understand what different members of congress needed what they wanted what they feared. And he was able to sort of lie that as you know, like an master chess game strategy. He was able to do that with his staff. He understood what it was like to be a staffer and a White House or to be a member of cabinet could put himself in their shoes into that sort of made him made him treat some of them better than than he might have at times. But most important he was able to sort of put himself in the shoes of people who had a lot less than he had and he was able to speak to people's real life experience on the issue of race. And you see that in the voting rights speech. And that's something that to me seems so lacking obviously in the president. In the United States today. But really in a lot of our politicians and Trump is more often compared to Ronald Reagan because of the background in Hollywood and both are performers of sorts. You could say. What though do you make of comparing Donald Trump to Ronald Reagan? Yeah. I think superficially, it's a it's a pretty easy comparison because you know, Reagan came into politics late in life. He was in his in his fifties. When he ran for the first time he had had this career as someone who was was outside of politics as a performer in his entertainer. And I think that Trump would like to see himself as sort of a Reagan like figure because Reagan was known for having these great sort of images, and this sort of central casting to use a Trumpian term image of the presidency..

Linden Johnson Ronald Reagan Donald Trump Selma John Kennedy congress America United States Richard Goodwin Alabama president Florida White House Georgia Hollywood
"richard goodwin" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:34 min | 3 years ago

"richard goodwin" Discussed on Here & Now

"We live in a turbulent time. And one of America's foremost presidential historians has written a new book about how past American presidents have led through difficult times here. Now's Robin young. Has this story from concord, Massachusetts. We came to concord once home to throw and Louisa may Alcott to visit our old friend, historian doors, curtains goodwill. Oh, thank you so much doing this. Are you kidding? Are you kidding? Thank you. Know to see you. You. Probably just all right. Richard Goodwin, her husband of forty, two years father of their children and adviser and speechwriter to both JFK and LBJ died in may at eighty six. Their sprawling home on a rural road is filled with his big life. So let me just show these pictures. This is dick escorting Jackie to a state dinner. Young. I know it is this a great picture, and then this is this is the best one. He's getting the pen for having the, we shall overcome speech, which is what he worked on, and this is the pendants on Voting Rights Act. Some have called that one of the greatest speeches ever written and somewhat overlooked in the pantheon just because it was Lyndon Johnson who wasn't known as a speech, given the most important thing about a speech. Does it mobilize people to action? And the great thing it did was by using the phrase we shall overcome. It meant that he was connecting to the civil rights movement. When you have the person in power and this room movement coming from the outside in, then that's when you really get something Martin Luther King cry cried when he heard it. Yeah, it's it's an amazing speech. I mean, it starts out every now and then history and fate meet at a certain place at a certain time. So it was at Lexington and concord. So it wasn't up Matic's. So it wasn't so my Alabama. There long longsuffering men and women peacefully protested the denial of their rights as America. Many were brutally assaulted. One, good man. They man of God. Was killed. I mean, it's incredible is not, and he had only that day to write the speech. I couldn't do it if my life depended on it. So no, there's no way honest to God. So yeah, no, it's it's great stuff here. You've written the book about four men, but there's a fifth question. The other four men endorses life, the four presidents. She's written about for years and gathers now in her new book leadership in turbulent times, which looks at how Lincoln teddy Roosevelt Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Lyndon Baines Johnson handled those times. Like all of her writing. This is well researched. We make our way through walls lined with books. We'll have pictures at here. Now, dot org. We go through the nonfiction library to the fiction library books in it. I couldn't move from this house because of the books. What would I ever do with all these books? You know, it's a big part. It's our decoration, you know, instead of art or objects books are everything we go through more halls, lying whose looks three. Presidents have their own rooms at teddy Roosevelt's upstairs. Franklin's actually here, and finally, we sit down to talk about presidents and leadership. So the book is leadership in turbulent times by that. You mean of course, there's a civil war for Lincoln Vietnam war for Johnson..

Lyndon Baines Johnson teddy Roosevelt Franklin Delan concord America teddy Roosevelt Robin young Martin Luther King Massachusetts Richard Goodwin Alabama Louisa Jackie Matic Alcott Lexington two years
"richard goodwin" Discussed on Cover-Up

Cover-Up

02:38 min | 3 years ago

"richard goodwin" Discussed on Cover-Up

"The address however was written by a different tit jfk speechwriter and adviser ted sorensen the man who had written some of jfk's most memorable words not what your country can do for you and what you can do for your country the man who wrote the script of how jfk's one thousand days in office would always be remembered was now in charge of presenting ted's version of chappaquiddick to the american public ted had spent the week following the accident secluded in the family compound surrounded by lawyers and advisers who were there to figure out a response to the growing scandal in addition to ted sorensen were robert mcnamara former defense secretary to jfk another speech writer richard goodwin and burke marshall the former assistant attorney general under rfk among others they had all gathered in rose kennedy's formal dining room to deal with the growing crisis and dictate the narrative which ted would convey in the televised address it was all managed by stephen smith the husband of ted sister jean kennedy smith who had called in the family as most trusted advisers it was a gathering that some likened to the handling of the cuban missile crisis this time the crisis was how to save ted's political career over one mile away the call that i was driving on an unlit road when often narrow bridge which had no god raoult's was built on the left angle to the road the car overturned a deep pond and immediately filled with water i remember thinking is the cold water rushed in around my head that i was a certain drowning the motor ended my lungs and i actually felt the sensation of drowning but somehow i struggled to the surface alive i made a media and repeated efforts to save mary jo by diving into the strong and murky current but succeeded only in increasing my state of utter exhaustion and alarm mike conduct and conversations during the next several hours to the extent that i can remember them make no sense to me at all i regard as indefensible the fact that i did not report the accident to the police immediately the speech was vague on.

jfk ted sorensen writer assistant attorney general rfk jean kennedy smith robert mcnamara richard goodwin burke marshall rose kennedy stephen smith mike one thousand days
"richard goodwin" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"richard goodwin" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

"Historian and author doris kearns goodwin who is here with us in new york and that is notable notable because i'm going to hold your hand as i say this you lost your husband the great richard goodwin just a few days ago and we joined everyone else in extending our condolences to you and remembering him brian indeed i'm so glad to be on with you because the tribute to gave to him was so incredible that it meant so much to me in my kids i've spent a lifetime telling stories about people who are no longer alive and having stories told now about everything my husband did for jfk for bobby kennedy more importantly for the country for lbj and having that out there it's it's everything i care about it's how a person lives on after they're gone so it meant everything so glad to share it with you tonight we're grieving with you and as i tried to point out that night he helped so many americans who never knew his name or never got to meet him and that's i think the measure it was the best life well lived let's talk about pardons let's talk about this president who your your husband did not serve and had his own opinions about where where is the business of pardoning versus where you know it from the standpoint of historian the standpoint of the brilliant framers who gave this all to us in parchment oh it makes me so sad about these pardons right now is when you look at the pardons that mattered in history they often meant forgiveness or healing for the country i pardon george washington was for the members of the whisky rebellion because they had been considered traders they were going to be hung and he decided he wanted to heal the country didn't want it to go on any longer this problem and then you think about abraham lincoln what did he do he pardoned soldiers who may have been afraid and ran away from battle or maybe deserted to go home to their family and he wanted them to be able to be soldiers again so that they could retrieve their lives he said in the middle of the civil war the only thing that made him happy when all these people are dying was to be able to pardon a soldier and johnson pardons.

new york richard goodwin jfk bobby kennedy lbj president george washington abraham lincoln doris kearns goodwin brian johnson
"richard goodwin" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

At The Movies with Arch and Ann

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"richard goodwin" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

"But i kind of one that wasn't enjoying it i just sort of but i do wanna go match win something golden globes yeah i think is nominee i think she did and it's it's been renewed okay ps didn't i think the expanse did it the people spoke and it has been picked up for next that and there's an episode tonight this is one of the best science fiction series of all time so good and just a quick wash good material nick terra bay who you guys don't know but he's such a brilliant actor and he had one of the great death scenes you know it just love him i will watch him in anything so neck i know you listen to podcasts don't really but you should a love you did we'd love michelle obama this kid content up the wok zoo i gotta talk to them because i'm doing later this year maybe i should talk to over there hey mentioned this i have i have a nomination for the best series titled it's something i read about on the diy cable channel do it yourself okay and it's about lawn care called lawn and order i was just to have that title news leary's lawn and order never seen it and the idea that is a good so that a we now to recommendations yeah you lead off i'm really pushing i reformed and please don't forget about tully and in honor of richard goodwin watch quiz quiz show absent lewis show rob most yeah that's a great call and what a fascinating story i mean behind the scenes it's just that is a terrific one robberies at robbery for director that right redforddirected that kids got a future i it's it's is from nineteen ninety four so it's about twenty five okay i'm gonna cheat a little bit.

nick terra bay michelle obama lewis robbery director leary tully richard goodwin
"richard goodwin" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

At The Movies with Arch and Ann

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"richard goodwin" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

"But they were yeah might have been the last musical act i think you're right i think you're right median and it's that that movie and particular kelly it's on every memorial day and everybody seemed to have you have you ever seen it action it never seen barry kelly's heroes it's about a gold is they find out that there's a bank with thirty million gold behind enemy lines three kings right yes exactly i knew that and as i said rickles vallace clint eastwood it's a fun it's a fun cast for that and it's it's it's a warm of carol connors in it i mean it's just it's warm but it's sort of like a tongueincheek war movie that was before carroll o'connor was as well known archie bunker right yeah all in the family and donald sutherland at gavin macleod yeah trent dot turning lopez it's harry dean stanton you'd very young harry dean stanton yeah yeah so it's it's fun if you haven't seen it is going to be on this weekend i every time it's on watching i smile that's a phrase you thought you'd never hear a young harry dean board don't you think he's one of those people born looking like i think he was just harry stanton in that harry's win the credits rolled yeah so we gotta bring up to important members of our society in this segment who have passed away this week and the departure lounge and i i want to refer to richard goodwin who is an important figure in history it was a speech writer for lbj the kennedys and eugene mccarthy he wrote a book a memoir about his life called remembering america particularly about the sixties and fifties and one of the chapters of that book became the basis of the movie quiz show which was directed redford grant star.

writer redford america harry dean gavin macleod donald sutherland clint eastwood eugene mccarthy lbj barry kelly richard goodwin harry harry stanton archie bunker carroll o'connor carol connors rickles
"richard goodwin" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

The Tony Kornheiser Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"richard goodwin" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

"Move on your way more not letting go now nor should you don't all the avenues open to fight back if you have been in fact maligned you should say though when i know it's no exactly apples to apples but who was it whole cogan and gaca and gutters pretty much out of business out yeah yeah so there you go by the way i think i've said this before on the air there is this hbo special that our friend bill simmons had a lot to do it andre the giant the star of that specialists whole coke ho kokin is great no lie dea i thought he was simply a howler and you know it was an idiot that's what i thought he he's his insight everything he says from historic perspective it's fabulous he's star the whole thing that match that they sort of do the breakdown of just fantastic can i wanna mention something richard goodwin died in yeah well into his eighties i'm going to commend to you to go to the washington post and radio bit i'm not going to sit here and tell you all the things that he accomplished but the things he accomplished were many he was for over forty years the husband of doris kerns stars kerns goodwin they are incredibly important in the history of politics in this country yes it's a very very smart room she's from rockville centre and i followed her particular career he was portrayed in a great movie called quiz show he's inquisitor he's the guy who does the investigation he's portrayed by rob morrow in quiz show and that was that's not even that's nowhere near the headline of his life just read this right tour you him kennedy's lbj credible influence you influence in politics in this country in the nineteen sixties seventies and eighties just just read it go ahead what else you got to the big names the big news yeah the big news is selling the radio station locally yes dance not a has sold the the last vestige of red.

cogan bill simmons richard goodwin rockville centre rob morrow washington doris kerns kennedy forty years
"richard goodwin" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"richard goodwin" Discussed on NPR News Now

"And last year the department of veterans affairs held a strategic review of its caregiver program which supports the loved ones who have become fulltime attendance to a disabled veteran npr found that va's across the country had been dumping caregivers off the program arbitrarily like ashley satorius whose husband served in iraq and afghanistan they just said he wasn't clinically eligible anymore and he didn't need to caregiver and honestly he's gotten worse it's i wish he was better via implemented several fixes to the program since last year but many of the caregivers kicked off when it was broken say they haven't been let back in even after several appeals quil lawrence npr news the trump administration's calling venezuela's presidential election that keeps nncholas my little empower a sham as a result president trump has signed an executive order restricting them doodo government from liquidating assets before the close the dow is up more than one percent this is npr richard goodwin adviser and speechwriter to presidents kennedy and johnson has died at the age of eighty six goodwin helped craft historic speeches and became a voice of the sixties it was goodwin who coined the great society the domestic agenda lyndon b johnson outlined in a nineteen sixty four dress at the university of michigan goodwin also wrote johnson's nineteen sixty five civil rights speech to a joint session of congress goodwin had less than a day to craft historic words of the president would deliver in the wake of the bloody marches in selma alabama goodwin's wife pulitzer prize winning historian doors kerns goodwin says her husband died from cancer.

pulitzer prize kerns goodwin alabama selma university of michigan kennedy richard goodwin executive lawrence npr afghanistan va president congress lyndon b johnson goodwin trump venezuela iraq