17 Burst results for "Richard Freeman"

"richard freeman" Discussed on iHeart Podcast Channel

iHeart Podcast Channel

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"richard freeman" Discussed on iHeart Podcast Channel

"Neatly in a frog coat. He looks rich, well respected. Just the kind of man Rockefeller would like to be someday. Hewitt greets him than gestures to a desk and asks John to demonstrate his penmanship. Rockefeller approaches the desk and write out a series of sums in a careful hand. When he steps back you it looked over his work and frowns Fella's stomach turns. He was sure he hadn't made a single air. But then he would nod his approval and offers the job. Rockefeller could begin as a bookkeeper right away. Rockefeller feels like he's floating off the ground. He has a job, and soon he'll have money. He could support his family. Rockefeller almost feels like he's about to crime. But instead he summons all his calm so that he and thank Mr Hewitt in a steady voice. Then he's shown to where the books were Captain. Room where he'll make his first really salary. Keep listening. You can hear the rest of this podcast and all of its episodes and discovered thousands of others. All available to you for free right now by downloading the I heart radio app number one for podcasts. Here's a preview of a podcast that is sure to leave you wondering, this is hidden brain. I'm Shankar Vedantam. In 2011. Richard Freeman was working on a project he was studying the way groups of people work together specifically how scientists worked together. Richard, who's a Harvard economics professor, noticed something intriguing. Scientists in the United States seem to stick to their own kind. You'd see Chinese folk concentrated in one lab, Indian folk concentrated another lab. Europeans of different groups associating Mohr with their compatriots..

Rockefeller Mr Hewitt Richard Freeman Shankar Vedantam United States Harvard Mohr professor John
"richard freeman" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

06:15 min | 1 year ago

"richard freeman" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Touch with me. Richard at Santa Fe, Dotcom play Little Ray Wylie Hubbard because we had him on last week, and he said his favourite restaurant with the tea house. And so we have the owner that he has on now. Rich Friedman, Tio. Tell us about the tea house and the other place down the street called El Parole. Richard, How are you? Doing great. How you Richard? I am pretty darn good Friday like Fridays. All right. Had you ever heard of Ray Wylie Hubbard? I have, actually, um I know that I'm not terribly familiar with his music, but I I'm aware of his name, and it is this kind of place in the In the music world. And ah Grateful that he's a customer here and enjoys it. Yeah, he loves your place. In fact, Ah, they bought a house here in Santa Fe. And they're gonna move here permanently soon, their last last week, when you talked to him, they're going to be in Texas for a couple of weeks and then Heading back up here. The smoke was getting to his wife. But the fire's almost out 90% contained in the smoke is going away, all right, for those who might be visiting or just ignorant. What is the tea house tells about the teahouse then tells basically the history behind Alfa role. Well, you know, the tea house is has been around for about 20 years. Ah, I've owned it for about eight and ah Ah, I've turned into a full service restaurant, actually. So it's ah It's kind of a strange collection. Aah! A combination of Middle Eastern Mediterranean food, and we also have 150 teas. From around the world and, Ah S O. There's ah, big variety both in terms of menu and ah Ah, menu and drinks. Um Serve wine and beer, and it's been, You know, I'm very grateful has been a It's been a very successful business and people. I have a lot of outdoor space, which has been a blessing, right? S so we're able to with social distancing still have a a Bible. Ah, business. And Right across the street is Elf a role, which was first a restaurant in 18 35. Which Mike Group has owned for about three years and We renovated the place and We just recently created a beautiful back patio area. It includes Ah Out of it. To level waterfall. Beautiful water water feature. And ah It's you know, trying to create some of the I really want both places to have some of people's favorites, outdoor spaces. Dine and You know, we're like everybody else in the business. We're in survival mode and, ah Grateful for the local support that both of my places have. No, The teahouse has lots of trees. And shade. People get it in the shade. Ah, l For all the new patty area. Is it shaded? It's we have huge umbrellas back there. Which provides shade and we're open from 3 to 9 every day. So the the umbrellas provide. Ah, uh, some some break from the sun when we first opened, and then it gets goes into the evening. Gives a little protection if it rains. So it's a different kind of ah environment, but Equally is beautiful. We planted 30 trees. Aah! Dirty pots with flowers and plants in them. And also put in about Probably about Five tons of rocks to create this really beautiful water feature. The end of the centerpiece of the back. Our guest is Richard Freeman Rich Friedman, who's the owner of a tea house and then L for role what she said has been arrested since his 18 30 before that. It was kind of the place as the shepherds, you know, took their flock of sheep up the hill. They could stop in for a glass of water. You know, it's just been around forever. It's an old Classic cowboy Western kind of bar and Bye bye, Asta. Ray Wylie if he'd ever played there, and he said no, he should When we when you can get back Tio doing live music can you do like music right now at all? No, no, Basically, it's very restricted. You know, I think it's a combination of the The really don't want singers because because they're projecting out, it creates exposure issue. But we're hoping to. Ah Shortly, maybe be able to bring back some flamenco music like a guitar player. Good. Ah, to play some nice music. And we'll wait to see when the regulations changed. Go backto happy Music. Like music are people allowed to have a dull beverages? Yes, indeed they are. The bar area itself is is not open drives is not allowed to be. But the rest of the restaurant we have a full bar Adele Pharrell. Serving everything we did before the Before this all started, Really Okay to get a reservation. People want to come by for order V's or on afternoon. Drink some chips and salsa this afternoon or dinner tonight. You have to go online to make a reservation was the deal. You need to go online or call l for all and And it's um either way. Um We've had some weekend nights when we've been full in the back. Ah, word's getting out about our patio. And so I would recommend a reservation on a on a weekend night. Weekdays. Usually you can walk in and get a table 3297 days a week. Five days a week. We're closed Mondays and Tuesdays. Okay, good. Give people A little recoup time. What about the tea house? Make a reservation. What are the hours their way? We don't take reservations at the tea house were open 9 A.m. to 7 P.m. seven days a week. So But no reservations..

Richard Freeman Rich Friedman Ray Wylie Hubbard Santa Fe Ray Wylie Dotcom Texas Mike Group Adele Pharrell
"richard freeman" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"richard freeman" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Sinai hospital co chair Richard Freeman telling CNBC labs are scrambling to see what antibodies actually work against the virus the big focus for us for awhile as I mentioned on our last interview the you know are we are we are terrific in diagnostics and we've gotten our rules for the you know the basics of qualitative test approved but the work is going on to improve the quality of that task and make it so that it's a quantitative testing able to give us more information about whether or not you're a musician and whether or not you have the right antibodies because there are a lot of anybody that's out there and I think the public we're used to in our society to be able to go for tests and relying on those tests and I think at this point we're all we all want higher quality information from these tests this is a rich as using your you want to get better information can we get certain definitive information or is that still months away no I don't think it's months away I think the you know we're moving ahead to get more precise information on whether or not the antibodies that actually provide the immunity against the virus the work the phrase you're gonna start hearing more about is do you have the antibodies that will neutralize the virus and that's why now we're working on I'm sure others may be working on it as well but that's what we're working on right now now researchers say right now data is inconclusive giving the changing nature given the changing nature of the virus the New York democratic presidential primary must take place June twenty third because canceling it would be unconstitutional that according to judge Analisa Torres she ruled after hearing arguments a day earlier as lawyers and for withdrawing candidates Bernie Sanders and Andrew Yang argued it was wrong to cancel the primary the judge said there was enough time before the primary occurs to figure out how to carried out safely the democratic members of the state board of elections voted to cancel the primary even though New York was planning to hold its congressional and state level primaries June twenty third they said corona virus as a reason to cancel the election since Joe Biden is now one opposed and the museum of fine arts in Boston has agreed to create a five hundred thousand dollar fund devoted to promoting diversity and that according to the Massachusetts attorney general's office the action coming after the world class museum was accused of racism last year after black middle school students said they were mistreated on a class trip by other museum patrons and a staff member who allegedly told the children no food no drink and quote the watermelon for behind the scenes look at America's first news you can head on over to A. F. and now dot com reach out to me on Twitter or Facebook any time I met Matt.

Richard Freeman Sinai hospital CNBC
"richard freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

13:41 min | 2 years ago

"richard freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A resource for investors when buying stocks find out more at fool dot com and from Americans for the arts it was December of nineteen thirty six and a few other workers had a plan they wanted to shut down the biggest car maker in the world General Motors the way they were gonna do it was they were gonna sees a few key factories in flint Michigan shut down the machines kick everybody else out and stay there until the company gave them what they wanted we'll Robinson one of the workers remembers how it went down there was one guy who gave the signal and then we went to just about five six minutes we've always tried to pull pull pulling switches turning off the machines and I have three balls running behind me brother our new fired you fired you fired and I was still grabbing switch Leo Robinson was interviewed by a BBC documentary crew back in the nineteen seven we started with the stairway and there we met a bunch of lawsuits and they were about to come into the dining room and up the steps and they got us fifteen or sixteen took a for the front gate showed us out slam the gates to unlock the how may in three or four other guys Climategate one man yeah on the first day the workers managed to turn off all the machines in two different autobody factories most of the workers and all the supervisors were outside in a few men stayed behind to keep the factories closed yeah it's called a fit down strike right because they're basically sitting down in the factory and they're actually pictures and you know think of cars made in the thirties right they don't have bucket seats they have those big spring he bench seat and the guys would actually sleep on those seats these pictures of guys sleeping in the factory on those big old seats they are members of the United auto workers which would go on to be one of the biggest unions in America probably one you've heard of but at this time he was this tiny new organization it represented a small percentage of GM workers at the time Kevin Boyle historian at northwestern says the U. A. W. had a problem signing up more people a lot of workers were interested in the benefits the union might bring to them but before they're willing to take the chance of joining that union which was a big risk get fired for doing that you don't wanna lose a job in December nineteen thirty six before you're willing to they were willing to take that chance the union have to prove that it could actually deliver what workers wanted what workers one it is basically what we think of as the union right at the group that could negotiate with the company on things like like benefits and job security but companies like GM just didn't negotiate that stuff with you yeah the U. A. W. was caught in this catch twenty two how could they deliver what workers wanted when a vast majority the workers are not in the union yeah that's why that's why they chose this kind of sit down strike right because it doesn't take that many people to shut down a factory if they have just like a regular marching out walk the picket line kind of strike it would've been a joke Jim wanted in life that's not enough people to scare us it was hardly workers to join in on the strikes because they didn't end well it was common for companies to get court orders they would demand the union and strike if your company once you have that court order get a call the cops called the National Guard to send them in to open up the plant and bring workers into the plant to run the plant that some of the greatest conflicts in American economic history took place at exactly that point this was bloody bloody conflict still workers miners people worked on real roads they all had strikes were people got killed yeah they were famous events that you know we still know the names today the the homestead strike the Ludlow massacre and the workers striking flint they would have known about these events and for a couple of weeks there was this sort of stalemate GM posted guards outside the occupied factories the workers stayed inside Victor Reuther was a union organizer for the U. A. W. and he'd come around and visit the occupied factories everyday he had hit one of those cars you know those old school cars with like the big old loudspeaker on top yeah the microphone inside so he come around any play music for the workers he called martial music we could exactly figure out what that means there's no recordings of it but you would come by talk to in place in music make sure food was getting into a factory and it was pretty calm for a while then one day about two weeks into the strike everything changed his Reuther speaking in a documentary called brothers on the line when I arrived there and I started playing some music and started talking they should cut the crap Bruiser don't you know what's going on one of the factories was two stories high the workers only held the second floor so people have been bringing food into them by climbing a ladder that went up to an open window but earlier that day GM guards had taken the letter away around the same time the company cut off he to the factory and was sixty degrees out then after Reuther showed up the guards disappeared something was coming and pretty soon Ruth saw what it was the police had gathered at the top of the hill and as they got close enough to the bridge they began firing tear gas shells Ritter picked up the microphone in that sound card he told the strikers to go up to the roof of the building they've been making weapons up their out of spare parts it's ground from the factory they had these pound and a half hinges which they made their and they stretch inner tubes between two heavy steel poles so they could use them as a great sling shot to throw these hinges hinges yeah well you know since the thirties are we being heavy metal cars and they have these big goal hinges for you know like for the door on the body these are big heavy pieces of metal there was a barrage of hinges that flew over there and when they hit the first cars they damage them enough that our people on the picket line they pulled the cars and turn them over as a short of barricade we block the traffic it was intense the strikers turned over the sheriff's car with the sheriff is still in it then the chef got into the car and got hit in the head by a flying hinge the battle went on for a while the cops started shooting real bullets thousands of people around flint just came out into the streets to see you know see what's going on the police got pushed back from the factory and they they formed a barrier you know a perimeter it's kind of a stand off you can picture it like there are three concentric circles you know the center there's the factory the strikers in and around the factory then a ways back there's a police line and then I will be on the police line are basically spectators just thousands of ordinary people standing in the streets this standoff went on for hours and it finally ended with a woman named Ginori Johnson who was on the picket line just outside the factory came up to Ruth she came over to me and said to me give me the Mike I want to help you let me talk to them and I gave her the Mike so I took the microphone and I was intensely furious this is Johnson speaking that BBC documentary from the seventies firstly talked on the Mike to the police then you start talking the people massed out beyond the police line and I said to the woman this is your fight you have everything to gain by coming down here don't be afraid of the cops break through those lines come down here and stand with us there was the big roar that went up on both sides of the lines and the women started to break through the lines of the police and once that happened the man screamed down and we had the police then outnumbered that was the end of the battle bulls front bulls run because people used to call police bulls nobody was killed about a dozen people went to the hospital and the workers kept occupying fact so you have this group of strikers were sees the factory which is pretty clearly illegal and now they've attacked the police with hinges this is the moment of the governor calls in the National Guard this is it you know this is the story of how strikes usually end National Guard marches on the factory either the strikers leave peacefully and probably lose their jobs or they stay and get shot the National Guard shows up in flint the next day along with the governor Frank Murphy the guard doesn't try to kick out the workers it doesn't start shooting instead Murphy orders the guard to keep the peace to get between the local police in the strikers are not going to settle the strike by force and violence we will work our way out of the strike he's probably I'm about injustice to anyone he's essentially saying Hey union and company you do need to work this out on your own and this is huge for the U. A. W. because remember what they really wanted was not some particular wage increase or anything specific they wanted GM to agree to negotiate with them another governor was saying to do it there they are the police the strikers the National Guard and the governor all in flint Michigan and the governor Frank Murphy is saying negotiate and this wasn't just like some random lucky break this probably was not a huge surprise to the union Murphy had just been elected and he was a straight up new deal Democrat in fact the U. A. W. would organize the whole tightening of the strike it largely because they hoped that the governor would come in and help them out so they negotiate and at two thirty in the morning on February eleventh GM and the United auto workers reach a deal it fits on a single page basically GM agrees to negotiate with the union and the union agreed to end the strike governor Frank Murphy goes in for the newsreel cameras with people from the company and people from the record thanks for the good men were about me here I tested will mean a new mutual atmosphere I'm good well in good faith employer and employee good will and good faith is may be pushing it that GM deal sets off this we've of strikes around the country industry after industry gets union in just a few years this big central swath of the economy is is transformed we took a labor economist at Harvard Richard Freeman he says this fast dramatic kind of shift is up to the way it usually happens the history of unions in the U. S. and almost every other country it's not some slow steady evolutionary process when the unions go up they go up in a really sharp home bank and that's what the flint strike help several workers are very upset and they see that they can make their lives better through unionization and everybody sees this this kind of sharp kick off of of unions doesn't just happen it takes a really particular set of circumstances in this case you had for one thing you have these massive industries that suddenly needed a large numbers of low skilled workers that give workers leverage also there was almost no foreign competition and the political climate was really friendly to unions not just in Michigan the year before the flint strike started the federal government have passed this law that made it easier for workers to join unions as we sort of had to the end of the show like people must be thinking well well what happened what about the last sixty years and this huge victory that the pick a membership what went wrong there's no single incident like the flint strike or something we say this company went out there and just busted unions and fired all the workers replace them or somebody else it's gradual the share of private sector workers and unions has been falling steadily since the fifties and there are a lot of reasons for this Freeman says you know heavy industry is more is more mechanized they don't need as many workers there's tons of foreign competition now there's no governor Frank Murphy swooping in to save the day for unions and yet you know plenty of workers are our discontent I mean if you just look at the numbers right the economy is growing productivity is going up and yet median wages have been stagnant for years yeah it's enough to make you mad enough to get up on the roof of a building with a bunch of hinges instructor fling them it at somebody but the problem now with unions is that they are so weak it's hard to imagine a big dramatic moment like flint happening again but you know Freeman says that moment would have been hard to imagine back in the thirties this was I think it was nineteen thirty two the head of the American economic association was a labor specialist and he said I see no possibility for the union's growing in the next five years because it was the middle of the Great Depression he workers seem weak obviously there are unemployed why would you suddenly see a burst of unions you do it so my view is that the if I sent I expect this to happen or something to happen I might be as foolish sound take care and see for it so I would never say that but I would expect something will happen that will change the situation country cannot continue with with so much of the wealth and income going to so few if something does happen to change the situation Freeman says it probably will not look anything like the U. A. W. and those other big unions of the twentieth century let us know what you thought of today show you can email us planet money at NPR dot O. R. G. we can twist at planet money a special thanks today for Sasha roof third for letting us use his interview with his grandfather Victor Reuther that's from that documentary he make called brothers on the line.

General Motors five six minutes sixty degrees sixty years five years two weeks one day
"richard freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"richard freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Taught me through his Jewish tradition about embracing being up a feeling a tad labeling identifying feelings I tend to mute those things or don't like real conflicts so now you might be asking what's the big deal anytime a couple gets together they blend their lives embrace some things let go of others but here's the difference when people from different countries or cultures come together it seems to affect their creativity I am a study this topic we caught up for longer chat when Jen and the kids want around I wanted to know how he'd gotten interested in the link between diversity and creativity Adam says it started long ago when he was in high school before leaving for a semester abroad he attended a mandatory orientation and I still remember to this day they said look summer you're going to go to China in in China it is a sign of respect if you leave food on your plate because it says that you got enough to eat but in Indonesia where I was going it's a sign of disrespectfully food on your plate because it basically says the food wasn't very good and so that was a real eye opening and transformational experience for me to recognize the same object food on the plate could have very different meanings and have very different implications depending on the culture the same thing means different things depending on your background and perspective it made Adam wonder how different cultures can help us see the world differently and spark creativity and innovation years later he decided to explore these ideas in a research project the whole project is a great story because it's a good example of a scientific discovery and scientific collaboration adamant some colleagues tracked a group of students at a business school the researchers hypothesize that the students who showed the most creativity at the end of this school year ours would also be those who had the most interactions with people from different countries connected a vast amount of data crunch the results they were about to publish when another group of researchers had actually even a better design and we did and scooped our idea and publish the paper that should have been the end of it the goal has been to publish and they've gotten beat so even though they had a lot of data they put it all away and moved on a couple years later I had a first your doctors to Jackson Lou and I said Hey we have this all data we can't publishing a great journal because someone already scooped us on it but we could be publishers replication summer good why don't you go through the data what happened next might be an example of the phenomenon Richard Freeman noticed that it helps a research project to have scientists from different ethnicities Jackson Lou saw something exciting atoms data that Adam himself had overlooked and I said what's that and he said I found this.

"richard freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"richard freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Yesterday afternoon then split into two burning an estimated forty two hundred acres officials say the likely spread even more because of high temperatures low humidity and strong winds at least forty towns have been evacuated wildfires are common in southern Europe during the hot dry summer months I'm Nora Raum NPR news in Washington support for NPR comes from the ECM see foundation celebrating five years of philanthropy and supporting efforts to improve post secondary education for underserved students learn more at ease C. M. C. foundation dot org and the listeners who support this NPR station this is hidden brain I'm shocker of it on to in two thousand eleven Richard Freeman was studying scientists specifically how scientists work together Richard was a Harvard economics professor noticed something surprising scientists in the United States stick to their own kind you'd see Chinese folk concentrated in one lamp Indian folk concentrated another land Europeans of different groups associating more with their compatriots this was not surprising you see this kind of clustering in lots of work places what is your thought not to be different in general people who are more alike likely to think more like one of the things that gives a kick to science and scientific productivity is that you get people with somewhat different few different perspectives coming together.

Europe NPR C. M. C. foundation dot org Richard Freeman professor United States Nora Raum Washington Harvard forty two hundred acres five years
"richard freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"richard freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Me through his Jewish tradition about embracing any other feeling a tad labeling identifying feelings I tend to mute those things or don't like real conflicts so now you might be asking what's the big deal anytime a couple gets together they blend their lives embrace some things let go of others but here's the difference when people from different countries or cultures come together it seems to affect their creativity I did a study this topic we caught up for longer chat when Jen and the kids weren't around I wanted to know how he'd gotten interested in the link between diversity and creativity Adam says it started long ago when he was in high school before leaving for a semester abroad he attended a mandatory orientation am I still remember to this day they said look summer you're going to go to China in in China it is a sign of respect if you leave food on your plate because it says that you got enough to eat but in Indonesia where I was going it's a sign of disrespectfully food on your plate because it basically says the food wasn't very good and so that was sort of I opening transformational experience for me to recognize the same object food on the plate could have very different meanings and have very different implications depending on the culture the same thing means different things depending on your background and perspective it made Adam wonder how different cultures can help us see the world differently and spark creativity and innovation years later he decided to explore these ideas in a research project the whole project is a great story because it's a good example of a scientific discovery and scientific collaboration item and some colleagues tracked a group of students at a business school the researchers hypothesize that the students who showed the most creativity at the end of this school year ours would also be those who have the most interactions with people from different countries the collected a vast amount of data crunch the results they were about to publish when another group of researchers have actually even a better design than we did and scooped our idea and publish the paper that should have been the end of it the goal has been to publish and they've gotten beat so even though they had a lot of data they put it all away and moved on a couple years later I had a first your doctors to Jackson Lou and I said Hey we have this all data we can't publishing a great journal because someone already scooped us on it but we could be publishers replication summer good why don't you go through the data what happened next might be an example of the phenomenon Richard Freeman noticed that it helps a research project to have scientists from different ethnicities Jackson Lou saw something exciting atoms data that Adam himself had overlooked and I said what's that and he said I found this.

"richard freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"richard freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I seen Bob was second CD for NPR news army Smith with the queen that IT government meteorologists say the state of Alaska has just experienced its warmest month on record the national oceanic and atmospheric administration says that Alaska's average temperature in July was fifty eight point one degrees five point four degrees above average point eight degrees higher than the previous warmest months of July two thousand four climate experts say such unusual weather events likely will become more commonplace as climate warming continues the impact has been apparent across Alaska with wildfire season starting early and lingering drought conditions on the southeast panhandle and sea ice the main habitat for polar bears disappearing I'm Louise Schiavone NPR news Washington support for NPR comes from NPR stations other contributors include the Joyce foundation committed to advancing racial equity and economic mobility for the next generation and the Great Lakes region learn more at choice FDN dot org and the any eat Casey foundation this is hidden brain I'm shocker of it on to in two thousand eleven Richard Freeman was studying scientists specifically how scientists work together Richard was a Harvard economics professor noticed something surprising scientists in the United States stick to their own kind you'd see Chinese folk concentrated in one lamp Indian folk concentrated another land Europeans of different groups associating more with their compatriots this is not surprising you see this kind of clustering and lots of work places Richard thought not to be different the general people who are more alike likely to think more like and one of the things that gives a kick to science and scientific productivity is that you get people with somewhat different few different perspectives coming together.

Bob Alaska NPR Joyce foundation Great Lakes Richard Freeman professor United States Smith Louise Schiavone Washington FDN dot Casey Harvard eight degrees four degrees one degrees
"richard freeman" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

11:55 min | 2 years ago

"richard freeman" Discussed on KTRH

"Coast, David Weatherly with us. A couple of his books the black guy children strange intruders as well. How did you get started into all of this David for yourself? George. I started when I was really young. I became intrigued by ghost stories and just strange things like that. And you know, by the time, I hit my teenage years, it was sort of. Oh, almost all consuming. I discovered fate magazine. You know, thanks to a a neighbor. And you know, that that really was kind of eye opening because all of a sudden, I realized, wow, there are people all over the place that are doing this pursuing these things and never stopped from there. I just I actively started investigating when I was a teenager and continue to do it for all those years. You've done a great job. And what are you working on? Now these days. Actually, there's a new book coming out it should be out in the next. Couple of weeks is called would not, and it is technically is a journal of sasquatch research, and it includes contributions from a real A-List of crypto zoologist. Of course, I have a long piece in there on sasquatch at the on the Navajo reservation in the southwest. But we've got contributions from Lyle Blackburn, Ken Gerhard, Richard Freeman over in England, mica hang Linda Godfrey is. You've got them all the heavy hitters idea. I'm really happy with this thing and beautiful cover by artists. Sam Sharon, the guy who did the strange intruders cover. So again that should be out around the beginning of June. And all the information will be on my website. And of course, that'll be on Amazon. Are you believer that demons are real the real deal? I believe that there is there is something that we identify as a demonic presence. Yes. You can feel that. Yeah. Have you ever? I've seen some very dark and disturbing things. And of course, you know, people always ask, you know, don't don't you get afraid going into any of these places because I go into a lot of notoriously haunted locations, and you know, my I have a couple of partners I research with now a lot today Spinks and might rich sector, and we go into some of the nastiest haunted locations, you can imagine. But you know, what what I find frightening Georgia, the things that human beings do to other human beings, you know, when when they're little and those are the things that I tend to be a lot more cautious about well. Let's go to the phones are lining up for you. We'll go to Tim in Long Beach, California to get things started. Hey temp. Go ahead. Hello, georgia. Yes. I'm calling you because back in two thousand seven I lived in Los Angeles and had a paranormal group we did a investigation Hollywood forever. Memorial cemetery there, Los Angeles error. No, well, we have seen we hit that one of the members of our group was talking to us about an experience he had with a black guy person Franklin really not heard of that before. And he described this person give it t-. And when we left the Moslem Valentino was is in we saw this very same guy. And I gotta tell you it was so spooky thing. He just stared at us, and he started approaching the car, and as he did I could see the black guys. And I had a I was driving. I had a sense of doom. I gotta get the heck out of there. And it was a very frightening experience. I had an explanation, but he was even wearing the same clothes established. I in our group described. And it was it was something I've never wanted to experience. Again. I that's that's when you were talking earlier about a sense of doom. That was definitely the feeling we felt, but I wanted to share that with you and love to hear your your thoughts on it. Do you think of that David thanks for calling in San? That's that's a really interesting story. Of course, a lot of activity reported in that particular cemetery. I've been there myself, and I wasn't aware that there was a black person attached to encounters there. But. You know, that sense of doom that is that is very very common in these accounts. I I hear again, and again people say things like they were terrified they people will say that they felt like they were being held by a predator. And of course, the most unnerving aspect is when these creatures beings, whatever they are begin to, you know, stare with those black orbs, and they do seem to create a high level of fear in the people who experienced all right next up. We go to John and Ontario in Canada. Hey, john. Thanks for calling. Go ahead. Good. Yup. Okay. Solomon. Right. One thing. I mentioned a Tommy a lot of times when I phoned in the phone ringing. I hear other stuff going on in the background clicking of women's heels. And then and then all of a sudden when you come back on the air where did you hear this? From took comes over the phone, not our home, then you'll hear a guy say hat got up and then last night, and all of a sudden, my portable phone, you know, you can walk around with it gets wedding ring anymore. It kept saying you got the wrong number preaching. I'm trying again. So I tried on. Stable phone, call your phone company. But go ahead, John. What's your question with David? This is I don't know why. I'll just weird stuff happens to me. But anyway, it's according to twelve at night in the life, and I were sitting on the couch watching TV, I got to carry lights all around the house and other buildings and that none of them went on at somebody knocked at the door. What the hell's going on that Geico nights? I've noticed went over. I flicked it and whatever. It ended up become background lights. But this guy's Dan their winter, and it's really cold out any stress like. Guys in this without us. He's got the, you know, the lederhosen and stockings pulled up and and and. Arden shirt, but his. What are you doing? Wow. And he had a book in his hand. It's. Well, I tell stories to children, and he's at your place. Yeah. My son. Let him in. No, no, no. But I got what do you mean? Tell you tell stories to kids like that and itself. That's okay. But it's a quarter to twelve at night. Anybody who has kids you're going to be sleeping? So he says, you know of any other people that have kids on your I I'm on a country road, and you know, any house it has. Kids. And he says, look, but I noticed that you know, you. Your footstep, and then you step down and you're outside. The same, you know fund and the side door. Well, he's slowly putting to get his foot up on upset. And I noticed his hand he's up we can hire for the door. He was he wanted in any fire. Didn't he wanted in? Yeah. And I says, look, I don't know what you're doing what you're up to or you know, what kind of thing that Yar. But you get your hands off my door. If your foot away from my footsteps. Yeah. And then. Did he leave? What was funny? Finally. I look either leave item butcher knife. And my back on my. Pants. A butcher knife. Yeah. 'cause I always keep by the college because I'm talking about the door rattling. And that one time. So did you pull out the butcher knife? Yeah. I if he don't back right now, I'm going to cut up a lot of little pieces. My. Here insane. I wouldn't have done anything to them. But it care. Put a you know does he leave? Yeah. But what what's funny all the security bites went on sooner. They close the door while they're supposed to are. So I quick run outside. I twenty two or go back. I couldn't find him anywhere. You went out with a twenty two. You had a butcher knife. You're to the towns that guy, but what color were his is. All black thing is he had to high as the brand that sticks out in front inside his was wider. I didn't get real good on you know, he wouldn't look me in the eye. But it kept trying to get at it. But all I could see was that they were very very dark. Well, what do you think David could this have been one of the dark eyed adults? I think John sounds like somebody not to mess around with. Yeah. You don't wanna go to John's house? That's for sure. It could be you know, what's interesting about that case. Georgia's at bring something else up, and that's the fact that, you know, these black-eyed kidding counters. They never used doorbells. It's always a Knox knock is. And it's usually a long monotonous knock, you know, if you just imagine someone rapping on your door, nonstop, you know, wouldn't with no break until you. Jess. In fact, there have been, you know, some circumstances where people have gotten very aggravated and flown the door open, and sort of pointed into, you know, why didn't you use the blank my doorbell and these kids look at the, you know, the little white button. Like, what is that? Like, they have no concept of what a doorbell is has anybody ever touched their skin. Yeah. They have there have been a couple of cases where someone has reached out. There was a woman who reached out and touched one of these children, and she reported that she said, it was like touching a dead body that the child will cold very very cold, and you know, a little bit of stiffness typical rigor mortis very ill afterwards after touching us child. Let's go next Jesus. That's unbelievable. Tom in the Bronx. Hey, Tom Europe with us. Go ahead. Hi, George tight and your guest. I I like to say the kids in Peru, and the school could it be very experiencing holograms and the whole way maybe there's some sadistic government agency conducting an insidious experiments 'cause it's it's been done here. In different places. Now, there was other types of things, but they'll lease adds up to paranoia. Could be. Could be. Ability. And I appreciate your call. The one thing that would cause me to immediately hesitate about something like that is that these children are also reporting physical contact with this entity. So it does appear that there is something that is taking a physical form within the school that is harassing at least some of these children qisas an Illinois first time caller, good morning. Keith go ahead, sir. Well, I've been listening to this. And sounds to me I've been listening to a prophet.

David Weatherly John George georgia journal of sasquatch research Los Angeles Tom Europe Memorial cemetery fate magazine England Geico Solomon Lyle Blackburn Sam Sharon Spinks Linda Godfrey Georgia Amazon
"richard freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"richard freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Than I ever had. When I was a single atom grew up in a secular Jewish family in North Carolina, gen grew up in Connecticut with parents would emigrated from the Philippines, they'd held onto their Filipino culture. Part of that culture includes a deep respect for the home respect they passed on to Jen, Jen. Anton passed on that cultural belief to add I think that. Yeah. That the bedroom now is like it does feel a little bit more like a sanctuary like them like it's almost like you're stepping across this into this different Portola. If you will Jen is also adopted. Some of Adam's values has taught me through his Jewish tradition about embracing. Opening up a feeling Ceuta labeling identifying feelings I tend to mute those things don't like real conflict. So I'll steer. Now, you might be asking what's the big deal anytime a couple gets together. They blend their lives embrace some things let go of others. But here's the difference. When people from different countries or cultures come together, it seems to affect their creativity. Adema studied this topic record up for a longer chat when John and the kids weren't around. I wanted to know how he'd gotten interested in the link between diversity and creativity. Adam says it started long ago, and he was in high school before leaving for a semester abroad, he'd attended a mandatory orientation, and I still remember to this day. They said look summer, you're going to go to China, and in China, it is a sign of respect if you leave food on your plate because it says that you got enough to eat. But in Indonesia where I was going. It's a sign of disrespectfully food on your plate. Because it basically says the food wasn't very good. And so that was her eye opening transformational experience for me to recognize the same object food on a plate could have very different meanings and have very different implications. Depending on the culture, the same thing means different things, depending on your background in perspective. It made Adam wonder how different cultures can help us see the world differently and. Spark creativity and innovation years later. He decided to explore these ideas in a research project. The whole project is a great story because it's a good example of both scientific discovery and scientific collaboration. Adam colleagues tracked a group of students at a business school. The researchers hypothesized that the students who showed the most creativity at the end of their school years would also be those who had the most interactions with people from different countries, they collected a vast amount of data crunched the results there were about to publish when another group of researchers had actually even a better design than we did and scooped our idea and publish the paper that should have been the end of it. They had been to publish and they'd gotten beat. So even though they had a lot of data. They put it all away and moved on a couple of years later. I had a first year doctoral student Jackson, Lou. And I said, hey, we have this whole data. We can't publish a journal because someone already scooped us on it. But we. He could publish it. As a replication simmer. Good. Why don't you go through the data? What happened next might be an example of the phenomenon. Richard Freeman noticed that it helps a research project to have scientists from different ethnicities Jackson loose or something exciting Adams data that Adam himself had overlooked. And I said what's that? And he said I found this finding that people who had dated someone from another culture became more creative during their business career. But those who just had friends from another culture didn't send you become more creative. So there's something unique and wonderful about intercultural Mandic relationships..

Adam Jen John North Carolina Philippines Anton Portola Indonesia Connecticut Adema Richard Freeman China Jackson Lou
"richard freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"richard freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I tend to mute those things don't like real conflict. So I'll steer. Now, you might be asking what's the big deal any time? A couple gets together. They blend their lives embrace some things let go of others. But here's the difference. When people from different countries or cultures come together, it seems to affect their creativity. Adema studied this topic recon up for a longer chat when John and the kids weren't around. I wanted to know how he'd gotten interested in the link between diversity and creativity. Adam says it started long ago, and he was in high school before leaving for a semester abroad. He had attended a mandatory orientation, and I still remember to this day. They said look summer, you're going to go to China, and China, it is a sign of respect if you leave food on your plate because it says that you've got enough to eat. But in Indonesia where I was going. It's a sign of disrespectfully food on your plate. Because it basically says the food wasn't very good. And so that was her eye opening transformational experience for me to recognize the same object food on a plate could have very different meanings and have very different implications. Depending on the culture, the same thing means different things, depending on your background and perspective. It made Adam wonder how different cultures can help us e the world differently and. Spark creativity and innovation years later. He decided to explore these ideas in a research project. The whole project is a great story because it's a good example of scientific discovery. And scientific collaboration adamant some colleagues tracked a group of students at a business school. The researchers hypothesize that the students who showed the most creativity at the end of their school years would also be those who had the most interactions with people from different countries, the collected a vast amount of data crunch the results there were about to publish when another group of researchers had actually even better design than we did and scooped our idea and publish the paper that should have been the end of it. The goal had been to publish and they've gotten beat. So even though they had a lot of data. They put it all away and moved on a couple of years later. I had a first year doctoral student Jackson, Lou. And I said, hey, we have this whole data. We can't publish in a great journal because someone already scooped us on it. But we. Could publish it. As replication simmer. Good. Why don't you go through the data? What happened next might be an example of the phenomenon. Richard Freeman noticed that it helps a research project to have scientists from different ethnicities Jackson loose or something exciting and Adams data that Adam himself had overlooked. And I said what's that? And he said I found this finding that people who had dated someone from another culture became more creative during their business career. But those who just had friends from another culture, didn't you become more creative. So there's something unique and wonderful about intercultural Mandic relationships..

Adam China Indonesia Adema John Richard Freeman Jackson Adams Lou
"richard freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"richard freeman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Century. And the Annie E Casey foundation. This is hidden brain. I'm Shankar Vitanza in two thousand eleven Richard Freeman was studying scientists specifically how scientists worked together, Richard. Who's a Harvard economics? Professor noticed. Something surprising scientists in the United States stick to their own kind. You'd see Chinese folk concentrated on lamp Indian folk concentrated nother lab Europeans of different groups associated more with their compatriots. This was not surprising. You see this kind of clustering in lots of workplaces. But Russia thought science ought to be different in general, people who are more alike are likely to think more like and one of the things that gives a kick to science and scientific productivity. Is that you get people with somewhat different views different perspectives coming together. Some people agree with Richard contention that a mix of perspectives will produce better ideas. But others say no, a group that has lots of different views will end up in gridlock. So. Which is it. Richard decided to figure out whether scientists who collaborate with others from the same group produce better or worse research, then scientists who have a wide network of collaborators. He looked.

Richard Freeman Annie E Casey foundation Shankar Vitanza Harvard United States Professor Russia
"richard freeman" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

The Cycling Podcast

04:23 min | 3 years ago

"richard freeman" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

"Was choked by teammate told he was zero nobody worthless quite a powerful and troubling blog really if anyone wanted to check that out on Yanni Brockovich, she's website. Bit more doping news in a white confirmation that the ban on the painkiller Trento will come into effect on March first we had long -ticipant to this. But the UCI have confirmed that Marcia I that's the last. Well, that's the first day that Trump will be on the banned list. And finally, the former teams guy and British cycling. Dr Richard Freeman faces a medical misconduct trial in Manchester early next month, some of the pre hearing reports of being posted on the general medical council website regarding the hearing, Dr Freeman is alleged to have ordered thirty show. Thirty sachets of testosterone put a coup Tesco jail from a company called fit for sport. Ltd the product delivered to Manchester velodrome in may twenty eleven in October of that year. Dr Freeman is alleged to have written to fit for sport requesting that they send him an Email confirming the order had been sent in the allegation is Freeman knew this to be forced the other key allegation is the product would intended for an athlete now the tribunal will oversee test of this evidence in a hearing that could lost as much as a month. The decision should be published twenty eight days after that. So we should be a little bit clearer on this story by what light March, I guess. But really troubling these allegations also stock, and of course, now there are no grey areas when it comes to a substance like testosterone or that. There are no no this is a dark shadow 'em looming on the. Very troubling. Indeed. I mean, there is you can't doping investigation into all gone on partic- team sky involving Dr Freeman on it didn't get to the bottom of some of the stuff and already in the published by while the allegations of the published and will which will be investigated doing the hearing they go farther than you county doping. We're able to go, and so I, you know, very very troubling. Indeed. And as you say, Lionel, no gray area Thole testosterone is cheating on if they're able to prove that it was intended for athlete, well while who was intended for and you know, what what are the implications of this for British cycling team sky. I agree rich. This is probably the most troubling whiles sort of shadow of of allegation of the allegations. And second. Secombe social evidence been sort of collected about teams going loss three or four years. Some of the stories and rumors and. Actions of amounted to nothing, really. But this is a very worrying one, particularly when one considers the timing two thousand eleven spring of two thousand eleven so before well before Bradley Wiggins second tilts toward France in the same spring few weeks before the contentious jiffy bag was delivered to the dolphin and allegedly deliver to the definite also a year when get Landes, the Belgian doctor who of courses at the center of the noise about team sky that was when he was probably he's if he was influential at all times, it was it was then and not season he had just on the detail as being released pre prior to that hearing. I mean, the things that leap out to me all accompany fit for sport supplying a testosterone product anyway and. The idea of sending anything of that nature clearly band to Manchester, velodrome home, British cycling, and if that was an error that was a significant error. It's a case the medical professionals will certainly want to get to the bottom of I actually had a look at the fit for sport website. And I mean, you can't search amongst the products. They do have testimonies from various sports teams football clubs cricket clubs, and so on providing plenty of, you know,.

Dr Richard Freeman testosterone Manchester velodrome Manchester Yanni Brockovich UCI Trento Marcia Trump Tesco Bradley Wiggins Landes Lionel France twenty eight days four years
"richard freeman" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

08:00 min | 3 years ago

"richard freeman" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Weiner or Wigner, minor minor. He's a graduate of Brown University. So he's a well educated in the Ivy league tradition and he's a PHD doctoral student up at university of Colorado in boulder, right, right? And so they they're probably talking about the roads and the mapping and using three D And lighter and drones in there in maybe satellite as well. Will it be the will this be kind of a are they going to have slides or? I think it'll be a highly visual presentation. Yeah. I mean, they have really interesting results mapping kind of information from the work that they've been doing with this aerial, photography and lighter work. So yeah, it should be pretty visual. And I think they're talking also about some of the materials that have been unearthed at Choco over decades worth of work, and they're just, you know, getting into the importance of the sun and the moon in the culture and the history of the region. I think it should be a pretty interesting talk. So I'm looking forward to it Meredith when you look at when you look at what you just mentioned the importance of the sun and the moon and the stars in cosmographers to the to the Choco wins. This was over a thousand years pre Pueblo ya. Masasi debt? They were mapping. Maybe maybe when they're going to trade because there have been things Choco Canaan from central America, South America, feathers and stones they're going long distances or people were coming into Mexico from long distances. And and so how did they travel? How do they navigate right by the stars and the moon and the sun, right? Didn't have a Sexton. But they they had to figure it out somehow, right? They didn't have an iphone with Google maps. So true. So they had to navigate somehow. They're just walking along is walking free horse. So they're walking. Yeah. They're walking along going. Well, let's see according to my calculations, you know, we should be fairly well on our way to, you know, New Mexico, doesn't it boggle your mind. I just it boggles my mind to think about traveling people could could navigate between islands know to win and the stars and the moon and the sun again and wave action, right? Right. Right. Exactly. Smell or I smell basically navigating the way like hummingbirds do or or monarch butterflies just by nature. Yeah. Yeah. We were like monarch butterflies. I like that. Analogy. Sure, which have to go a long way as well. Yeah. So roads were developed there were roads. And there were outposts and there have been, you know, actual stone structures found along the roads. We're probably part of this trade culture. Right. Exactly. I mean it expands way beyond the kind of four corners region that we're used to thinking about in terms of visiting Chaco canyon. You know, this is a whole network of of people and places and communities and on and her colleagues will definitely get into that that network and really the history that we know so far of the region. So this'll be on the twenty fourth which is a Thursday night. Six thirty correct. That's right at the James a little theater if you like to participate if you like to go watch it should be fantastic. Tickets have been selling because chocolate is a very very popular topic in place, especially amongst new Mexicans. All right. What else? What else? Do we need to know about this? Yeah. Well, I think a couple of things one thing that we are really dedicated to at the school for advanced research is our history of conversations around social sciences, humanities and archaeology in particular. You know, s era was founded by Edgar Lee Hewett and was originally was supposed to bring the field of southwestern archaeology to light in a in a bigger way. And so we're continuing that tradition and part of that origin story if you will is a commitment to dialogue and conversation and really getting into topics in informal, capacity. And so we do something in conjunction with the speaker series called speaker salons, and I like to think of them as coffee with the speakers there, four members of essay are only. So if you want to participate in this group, it's a smaller group. It's definitely a good reason to become. One of our members, maybe a higher level member. And we sit with about twenty twenty five people and the speakers the day after the lecture so Friday morning in this case, and we get into the topics that we talked about. So maybe something piqued your interest at the lecture, and you want to know more about public Benito in particular and something that that on Sunday, or, you know, whatever came up that may be intrigued, you you'll have a chance to really engage with the speakers, and the lectures and get into the topics a little bit more. So we do those on Friday mornings there from ten to noon. And we give you coffee, we give you some pastries. We do them. They are in our boardroom on our historic campus. They're really lovely and they're completely free. If you're a member we do give priority to certain levels of membership because it's a kind of intimate thing. So that's something else to consider. But I really encourage people to think about participating in that he'd be one for Anisa fair. Yes. So and I think we're about halfway full for that. So there is still time to reach out to us. If that's something that interests you in particular, and for that the easiest thing to do is go to our online calendar, essay our web dot org. Just go to the calendar. Find the salon on the twenty fifth. There's contact information on that calendar listing. All right. So that is a great way to get your questions answered or, you know, share thoughts or ideas with people who are doing these lectures, right? Yeah. Exactly. Our director like stir our president likes to refer to them as the coolest college seminar you've ever gone. Onto without the test. And and homework, and they really are interesting. I mean, the last ones that we've had we've been able to explore maker spaces in technology and education in New Mexico. We've talked with our first speaker about the uses of biotechnology in artistic practices, and they've all led to really interesting kind of mind opening conversations. And I think this will be no exception. Yeah. She was a very interesting young lady. Who Meredith I think we're in agreement here will someday. Very very wealthy young lady. Because of the biotech research. He's doing any private sector, right, Christina aga-, Pakis was our first speaker. She's the creative director at gingko bio works, which is the Boston company, and she was out here. She runs their artists residency program. And so they have artists using live bacteria to die fabric to you know, completely transform the. Really, really interesting. And that's you know, that's something that this is a new avenue for the school for advanced research is bringing in outside thinkers who are doing interesting work mostly in the social sciences, but sometimes outside of those fields. You know, biologists is little Al Qaeda that field, but who are making us think about issues of broad social concern in a big way. We'll be back with Meredith Schweitzer from the school for advanced research before we take a break a Thursday night. Thursday, the twenty fourth will there be a and A following the presentation? Yes, we usually do about forty minutes of talk and then twenty minutes of a the salon. Heavy question. Ready? You might be able to present it to Anna show fair so fair and Richard Freeman. And Robert whiner, we back Meriden Schweitzer essay are my name is Richard your house today on coffee and culture on talk twelve sixty one two three seven KTAR. See we stream we podcast is Santa Fe. Dot com, and we'll be right..

Meredith Schweitzer New Mexico director Choco Brown University Ivy league Richard Freeman boulder Weiner Edgar Lee Hewett university of Colorado Santa Fe Chaco canyon Sexton Mexico Wigner cosmographers Robert whiner
"richard freeman" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"richard freeman" Discussed on KGO 810

"Twin brother says a US citizen and corporate security director was in Russia for a wedding when he was detained on accusations of spying, David Whalen, says he didn't worry about his brother Paul safety when travelling Paul's a former marine, he's a former law enforcement, he does corporate security any travels extensively. So I think as far as people who are aware of the risks off travel and being prepared to, you know, avoid whatever risks are possible. I think Paul is probably as best situated as anybody could be even in a country like Russia, Paul Whalen detained in Russia on charges of espionage the one hundred thirtieth tournament of roses parade now underway in Pasadena. Jim Roope is there for people from southern California. It's cold fifty three degrees at the start of the rose parade. But for Richard Freeman from Chicago. Obviously, it's better weather than where we came from. For Southern Cal. I'd take my flipflops off, man. That's rough or so, I no, no kidding. What do you mean later up forty floats twenty two marching bands eighteen equestrian units all along with a few surprises and musical performances today? This year's theme is the melody of life from Pasadena and the one hundred thirtieth rose parade. I'm Jim Roope. The mega millions jackpot is now four hundred twenty five million dollars. It is the eighth largest in history. The New Year's day drawing will take place at eight this evening. It is only the fifth time. The drawing has fallen under your stay back to Armstrong and Getty in just a moment on Keiichiro. Area. Need.

Paul Whalen Russia Jim Roope David Whalen Pasadena US Richard Freeman director Keiichiro Getty California Chicago Armstrong four hundred twenty five milli fifty three degrees
"richard freeman" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"richard freeman" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Whether the Republican led Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell would consider the bills is unclear Senate Republicans saying they will not take action without the president's backing police in Germany say at least four people have been injured after a man intentionally drove into a crowd of people in western Germany, and what appears to have been an attack directed at foreigners. Monster police say the fifty year old driver of a Mercedes drove into a crowd in the center of an area shortly after midnight Tuesday to other attempts by the driver to drive into other people had failed driver was arrested. Those injured of foreign descent the one one hundred thirty tournament of roses parade now kicking off in Pasadena, California. Jim Roop says the weather's been taking it to the brave parade. Go. Towers from southern California. It's cold fifty three degrees at the start of the rose parade. But for Richard Freeman from Chicago. Obviously, it's better weather than where we came from. And. For Southern Cal. I take my flipflops off, man. That's rough or so, I no, no kidding. What what do you mean layer up forty floats twenty two marching bands eighteen question units all along with a few surprises and musical performances today is this year's theme is the melody of life from Pasadena and the one hundred thirtieth rose parade. I'm Jim Rome parade kicked off about thirty minutes ago hospitals across the Chicago area welcomed the very first baby. So the new year one of the first to be born in the Chicago area in two thousand nineteen born at advocate Christ medical center in oak lawn ally, Jordan, born at twelve twenty seven AM weighing in at eight pounds, six ounces twenty and a half inches long. Mom and child doing well WLS news time ten thirty.

Chicago Senate Pasadena California Germany Mitch McConnell Jim Roop Jim Rome president Richard Freeman Christ medical center Jordan fifty three degrees thirty minutes eight pounds fifty year six ounces
"richard freeman" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"richard freeman" Discussed on KGO 810

"Eight o'clock bread is off today. Good morning to you. I'm Kim McAllister on this New Year's day House Democrats are unveiling two bills get hundreds of thousands of federal employees act to work at the government funding measures don't include money for President Trump's border wall democratic congresswoman Debbie Dingle of Michigan says the proposals would open the door to bipartisan negotiation, it would extend it to February eight so we can reopen the government so those customer in border patrol agents other only insecurity people who are working natural. When their next paycheck is going to come and give us time to sit down and negotiate or I'm not somebody who thinks compromises dirty word a robbery aboard. A Bart train leads to the arrest of three thirteen year olds police say the young Oakland teens robbed a girl aboard a train at gunpoint pushing the victim and taking your phone all three were arrested as they left the warm spring station, the family of legendary raiders safe. George Atkinson is morning and unexpected loss one of Atkinson's twenty five year old twin sons Josh died. Josh Atkinson was a standout athlete at Livermore Granada high school and at Notre Dame where he played football and ran track. No word yet on the cause of death. The one hundred thirtieth tournament of roses. Parade is kicking off right now in Pasadena. Jim Roope has been talking to parade goers for people from southern California. It's cold fifty three degrees at the start of the rose parade. But for Richard Freeman from Chicago. Obviously, it's better weather than where we came from. And. For southern. I'd take my flipflops off, man. That's rough or so no kidding. What do you mean layer up forty floats twenty two marching bands eighteen question units all along with a few surprises and musical performances today? This year's theme is the melody of life from Pasadena and the one hundred thirtieth rose parade. I'm Jim Roope..

Josh Atkinson George Atkinson Jim Roope Pasadena Livermore Granada high school Kim McAllister robbery Debbie Dingle President Trump Oakland Richard Freeman Chicago California Michigan football fifty three degrees three thirteen year twenty five year