20 Burst results for "Richard Florida"

"richard florida" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

GeekWire - Geared Up

03:34 min | Last month

"richard florida" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

"Parents scared the daylights out of me about one of my uncles. Got his teenage girlfriend. Pregnant and got married young and didn't finish high school like an on. The parent of two girls are four and five. But i'm not going to scare them like that. I'm going to tell them to actually having kids as the greatest thing you can do and it's really important. I just think more general awareness instead of saying kids make you not happy which is a whole literature on this that say your happiness clients when you have kids the other thing is probably support by you know i kids later in life and we have a nanny because you know i made more money like i think it's really hard if you don't have support in our child care system is so awful so so better support like social supports for to have kids in. Yeah i just think there's a way to turn this around. I mean we. We've depended on immigration right. In america we dependent on immigrants coming here having more kids than we do like my grandparents having set. You know seven aside from italy. Southern italy but yeah. I think there's stuff we can do. And i think we're better off for it. You know. i think we've been accomplished society. I hate to say this. Monica and maybe somebody will drop my head off. I think we've become a society. That's kind of biased against kids. We send out a message that that it's hard that it's hard work. It's no fun but also that it's expensive that ties you down that it's an encumbrance on your personal freedom and i you know i'll tell you the truce if my wife wasn't persevering in didn't have the seventeen. Id abson was chicken. As i am in a given up. I would miss the greatest joy in my life. That's tell i'm a guy who said i don't want kids fine with my profession self actualising. I would have missed the greatest joy my life. So maybe that's what you should tell people like these things are really miraculous in. They're fantastic and to build a society which which reflects that rather than decided it says if you have these kids you're going to give up. Something is going to be hard. I think it's more social and the public policies support right. An ecosystem of childcare is or but more. It's a societal norm. In a sense that having kids as a joyful experience well as someone who is expecting their first. I'm happy to hear you say that. Oh holy god. Congratulations and you're younger than me. So you did it right writer. Letterman always said this. And i don't like folks. I mean david letterman always had this thing to do over hewitt kid more kids in more kids early and i would say it i agree. Let's take a quick break when we return. Monica on richard will explore how the pandemic may fundamentally change cities like seattle. We'll be right back and though is here to help you. Achieve a certain operative state. I'm joined here today. With max zaitsev and all of its ski and they are the co founders of cool service called endel. The neuro science of music is music. Big part of that in like. Why does that help. People get to that more calming place. What is it about music or sound. Sound is very powerful. It's known that it's proven that by using certain frequencies scales intones were can make you run scared by more. Relax sleep focus. There's a lot of research. Are there some of that research..

america Monica five italy two girls seattle four seventeen Letterman today david seven first one letterman Southern italy richard max zaitsev hewitt
The Rise Of Remote Work

City of the Future

05:47 min | 8 months ago

The Rise Of Remote Work

"So Eric we've been working from home for about eight months now I hadn't noticed. Yeah. So how has it been going house remote work than for you in a lot of respects? It's very challenging. My Wife, Janine? She also works from home. She's worked at home this entire time and you know our marriage is great. You guys are still married just for the record year despite eight months of cohabitation and Co. working right. Yeah, no know there are definitely challenges. But when it comes to the PODCAST, this has actually been a brief and this is the one thing that got better I i. agree actually I mean, we used to every single time we had to record a podcast used to make sure we had this one booth and we would get in there. I would even sometimes like Jerry rig it. So the air conditioning wouldn't come on. So we would get the perfect sound quality for our podcast for you. Listeners just offer you guys and then as soon as we were regarded from home or like oh we. Just set up mic in our bedrooms at it's fine. Yeah. A picture in the dictionary of a super spreading event, it would be that little podcast with four people crammed in and Stuffy Air floating around for an hour on those little tiny seats. Yeah. So, from podcast hosting perspective remote work has been way better, and in fact I think we'd continue to do it this way even if the office opened back up when you think yeah I think so and and it is interesting because there are a lot of companies that we've been reading about. That are starting to offer this option to their workers. Right? You don't have to go back. You could be remote indefinitely. Maybe forever, what would you do if you had that option? I mean that's tough flood. There is something attractive about going somewhere with nature. Some were cheaper right re working from there but. I don't know even I don't miss the booth per se I do miss the office I. I think I would go back to be honest. I'm not going back. I'm not going back to that old way it was taking too much Outta me I'm not going to deal with it. That's Richard Florida professor of Urban Economics and an advisor to sidewalk labs. We wanted to hear what he thinks. Remote work will mean for the future of cities I mean for me, I've liked being home. I find that I like my neighborhood better. I find that I like my life better I'm certainly I mean, my kids are three and four. It's giving me a lot more time to spend with my two girls. So I've gotten to know my neighbors a lot more gotten to be like cycling buddies with my neighbors that I wasn't before some. Glad on long rides. With, people over on the front porch a lot we set up a front porch. I mean, we didn't. We have like an earn out there. Now we set up a front porch. For Richard It wasn't just neighborhood life that improved teaching classes got better to. taught my course online. So I was able to bring in people from all over the world. A mayors are backing up developers people from technology companies. We had to learn how to do it and we got better at it but another big thing for me was showing me the ability to do remote teaching in having go very successfully. So I actually think that's going to be a big deal. It is interesting that your experience highlights the two different advantages of remote work. Right on the one hand in your teaching you've brought in all of these global perspectives than ever before and on the other hand at the same exact time you're so much more keyed into the local, right what's happening outside your front door. Yeah. It made me appreciate the local in ways I mean is it forty? Your urbanism I never would have thought that the other thing is my neighborhood was a commuter neighborhood for knowledge workers for corporate people, which means as a remote were professor. In writer I was the only man adult men in the neighborhood during the day. I really felt like freaking oddball. Now. There are a lot of guys my age in the neighborhood all the time like out with their kids or out hanging around or going to the park. So it sounds like the daytime population of your neighborhood has gone up dramatically. But. Do you have a sense of what the daytime populations now like in the commercial districts of Toronto in those corporate knowledge sector places that the the folks who live around aren't going to anymore it's terrible. There's not many people down there and you know I, had saw more of those buildings were residential and they're not they are still office work. So I think personally central business district is a historical relic. During the industrial revolution beginning with manufacturing, we separated work from life. You know people used to work where they live, they were artisans or producers with above their shop. And then as we added transportation innovations, lay subways, trains, and transit people started the commute more and more not just the factories but the offices in develop these giant commercial towers and stack and pack knowledge workers. I think a lot of that's going away and I think this shift to virtual earth remote work is a big part of it. Richard. told us that this forced experiment in remote work has hastened the. Process that was already in motion, not just for individuals but for cities to the future of economic development is talent there is now no other economic development strategy and I'm talking economic developers all the time in the light bulbs are going off in their head. If you want to talk about the new economic development of the new city competition, it's been the shift away from the power of firms to the power of town. And I think especially in an era of remote work, the location of talent will be ever more important cities will and communities and suburbs and grow aries. The terms of the competition will be about competing for talent competing for workforce competing for people

Front Porch Richard It Janine Eric Richard Florida Professor Of U Toronto Jerry CO. Professor Richard. Writer Advisor
How Tight and Loose Cultures Wire Our World

The Psychology Podcast

06:53 min | 1 year ago

How Tight and Loose Cultures Wire Our World

"What are social norms? So this is a great question and as a cross cultural psychologists. I tried to understand this really puzzling. Phenomena of culture culture is one of these puzzles because it's omnipresent. It's all around us but it's invisible like we tend to ignore it all the time and it's like the story of two fish. Were there swimming along? And they pass another fish. Who says how's the water boys and they swim on and wants US the other? What the Hell is water and for fish? This invisible thing is waterboy for humans. It's culture and a big part of culture is social norms or these unwritten standards for behavior that sometimes become more formalized in laws and rules but nevertheless we follow social norms all the time endlessly without even realizing it and we have to really understand their impact on social behavior. And that's why I wrote the book. That's so cool. Well thank you for writing it and for shyness late on this. But certainly there's individual differences in them like dark triad people. You know people who score high on the dark triad Scales and Machiavelli's and narcissism psychopathy. They they don't like social norms. They are versed. Do it. Well you know I've right in the book about sort of individual differences in people who like or dislike social norms rulemakers rube acres. You can think about the analogy of the chaos quarter. Muppets exactly like think about sesame. Street like the chaos. Muppets are like you know. Cookie Monster and you know and animal who loved to just create chaos. And don't follow rules by Ernie and Bert actually and Kermit the frog who love rules and I actually have tight-loose mindset quiz on my website where you can find out. Where do you veer in terms of mindsets people who like tightness really notice rules? They have a lot of impulse control. And they like structure. People who beer lose tend to ignore rules more often. They're more impulsive. But they're more creative and more open minded book. I talk about the advantages and disadvantages of this construct across levels from nations to neurons from states to organization. So it's something that I think about as a fractional pattern which is repeated pattern of phenomenon across different levels and I tried illuminate why titans differences evolve in the first place at Cross levels and what what consequence love the link that to creativity. Some people have. I wonder how that relates to some people. Argue that Asian cultures are less creative? You know then. Do you think that some of that can be explained by sort of the laser looseness titan of the culture itself? Yes so in our first analysis tight. Lucy was across thirty something nations where we were able to classify nations as veering Erg loose. Even knowing that all nations have tightened elements and some countries like Japan and Singapore China. Beer tighter than places like Brazil and New Zealand and the Netherlands Brazil anything goes indicators of Titus was the accuracy of clocks and how coordinated crops are city streets tight cultures the quad city streets. Pretty much say the same thing but in loose cultures like Brazil or Greece entirely. Sure what time it is because the clocks around you say a lot of different things and that speaks to something. That really is about the tight lose. Tradeoff tight cultures have a lot of order and loose cultures a lot of openness and that means that both have strengths and liabilities. Depending on your vantage point so your question about creativity. We have found that across nations across states. 'cause organizations that are tight. They tend to have less novelty idea generation than loose cultures by. What's interesting and we're finding this recently. Is that each. Has its own strengths. In terms of innovation. So who's cultures can create a lot of ideas but tight cultures can implement that much better so in fact both again have strengths that can be brought to bear on a common issue like innovation. Oh great have you read Richard Florida's work at all and the credit? Yeah the creativity class and yeah and at the city level. Also I think he's really staying. That's right because this also differs state by state within America rate. Do you think like is there a south difference versus? I don't know I don't WanNa grossly stereotype things without you. Actually telling me what the data says so in one of the chapter in the book. I talk about how we can move beyond red vs blue right right. In fact we have a paper in the Journal. Precedes National Academy that rank orders the fifty states into the tight and loose and often? You're saying that the South tends to actually of your tight. They have more strict rules. They have more order to some extent they have less creativity. They're also more polite so the route estates are the loosest states which tend to be on the coasts but those states had to have more creativity like like you surmised and so what got me does that we can kind of look at different different states now through a new Lens. One of the more important things that I talk about in the book is why these differences evolve in the first place and what we find across nation states etc is that groups. That have a lot of threat. Whether it's from Mother Nature like chronic disasters are famine or other human types of threats pathogens or population density or invasions tend to veer tighter. And the logic's pretty simple when groups have a lot of threat. They need rules to coordinate to survive and norm provide that they help people to actually control themselves in difficult situations and the titus states in the US tend to have more threat. They have more pathogens have more disasters and so forth and so there's some kind of logic to why groups evolved to be tighter loose. I mean with that sad and we could talk about it later. Threats now are whether perceived or real tend to produce the same psychology and. That's something nowadays that we're dealing with more. And more in terms of how tight who's manifesting itself in politics and in other contexts where threat is less objective and more

United States Brazil Machiavelli Richard Florida Lucy Singapore China Ernie America National Academy The Journal Japan Netherlands Brazil Bert New Zealand Greece
"richard florida" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"richard florida" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Over for seventy five years you might be Smokey bear only you can prevent wildfires that's why I'm filling in for smoking to switch things up because there's a lot more to say and I should know because my grandfather was a fire fight and one of the things he taught me is that the people that love the outdoors the most are often the ones accidentally starting wildfires which means always B. Y. O. B. no bring your own bucket to the campfire twenty five percent tariff on American cars the reserve vice chairman Richard Florida says that he was too busy at the central bankers conference in Wyoming to read.

B. Y. O. B. vice chairman Richard Florida Wyoming twenty five percent seventy five years
"richard florida" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

11:25 min | 2 years ago

"richard florida" Discussed on Amanpour

"Jobs in food service preparation retail work office work better the backbone of our economy but if people are thinking further and further into poverty. Do you think in some ways capitalism capitalism is broken when it comes to a market economy and said he's like that well in my field my field we have a long tradition of Marxist postmarks analysis and a lot of critics come from that hard night they want to invasion. I and I learned from these people particularly guiding David Harvey Who's absolutely brilliant but there's a hope for a kind of socialist utopia that doesn't come so pragmatically. Yes capitalism is broken. What do I believe? I think we have to go about fixing thing it. How do I think we can fix it if we could just empower our CDs to begin to address these problems and why I think it works is because C._D.'s are engaged suburbs? No matter how gentrified New York or San Francisco become they're still poor people there are ethnic and racial minorities. They're still progressive political actors who act on politics so I do think our cities are going to be the place. They're going to be the laboratories of democracy that figure out a way to create a new social compact that can make this kind of capitalism work. I I shudder. I think what the alternative might be but if we empower cities would that leave. Some people like the people who live in suburbs are exurbs or the countryside leave them out. I think it might leave people in the reddest parts of the country out but but here's the way I figure it and I've I've talked to the leading theorist of this about this both on the left and the right look. We don't agree on many things in this country. We don't agree on gun rights. We don't agree on women's rights. We don't agree on gay rights. I could go down the litany and already state state. Preemption is taking a lot of those rights away. Explain what that is well states you know across this country are are saying because they're run by rural and suburban my jar Majo- majorities. We're going to prohibit you from acting to control guns bill peduto. The mayor of Pittsburgh who's a good friend of mine has several pending civil suits and maybe a criminal case and give them the Pennsylvania state government that says he's acting too quickly on gun control gay rights or another one minimum wage minimum wage is another one although we've seen more red states interestingly enough at least be able to raise their minimum wage somewhat so I think this is happening. What what the best theorist of the so called federalism you know the United States is a federal system where we can adjust the relationship between the federal? The state and local governments say yes Walter. That's a risk in the short run yes Richard. That's what brisk in the short overtime though these states and cities have to compete so what's happening in Georgia now under the threat of these new women's rights bands and gay rights man the Hollywood companies are saying we're GONNA have to pull the films that are being made in Atlanta. We're GONNA have to bring them back to a city that doesn't impose that so the theorists say this competition for economic growth what the same thing I see when I go to Texas the business people are saying to the governor stop it. We can't attract Amazon H._Q.. Too if you keep up this kind of red state looniness in terms of social policy so the theorists believe that this competition between jurisdictions may lead to some places running to the bottom in the short term but over the competition will lead to better outcomes when you look at the big sort that you and bill bishop talked about one of them is the cities that have become enclaves of creative people and then the area's just around him you look at Austin Texas going ninety percent Democrat and same with Houston but right around ninety percent for trump a we dividing our country based on the new urban elite versus the rest of America. Yes it needs divides or fractional big word big word FRAC. Don't they occur at every scale they occur between the coastal elite places like New York Boston Washington Card in the southern and Northern California Los Angeles San Francisco and Seattle but then even within those places those divides replicate. I mentioned Toronto earlier Toronto's a very progressive place. It's a very blue place but even within that there's red and blue liberal-conservative away I like to think about it is the knowledge economy. Creative economy is very spiky. Tom Friedman had a wonderful book. That said the world is flat for for many things manufacturing simple services. The world has flattened completely but within that flat world that Tom explained so brilliantly there are these spikes in what happens is these spikes take on a different character a different economic character a different political. Oh character in a different cultural character and the backlash is not so much about the economic inequity. It's about the cultural norms and values. If you live in an urban center you tend to not want to have guns around you. You want safety. You want to be open minded to all those people who are contributing to your economy. You want to be pro immigration and for women's rights because women make up by believe it or not more than half the creative classes made up of women just like more than half our economy. Oh we'll population made up of one but to create a class as much greater numbers of women than say the working the working class but if you live in one of those places in the outlying areas and you're white middle aged man you feel threatened you feel threatened by diversity you feel threatened by women you feel threatened by the fact that women and immigrants have gotten in your view a leg up you feel threatened by the sexual and gender revolution and creates that backlash backlash is not just between parts of the country. Yes it's between parts of the country but it's with in parts of the country as well so in other words between counties and parishes or something where you have people are very comfortable diversity very comfortable comfortable and creative a knowledge economy and people who may feel that they're being down upon by the elites and so we have a divide in this country but it's not the old people get mistaken. It's not the old north-south more south divide. It's not a frost belt sunbelt. It's not an East West. It's a new kind of divide. It's very spiky. Big Word Very Fratto very concentrated but I think we're about evenly split. There's about half of us that are populating one and that takes the creative class and some of the new immigrant groups and about half the country populating another and sometimes we live quite close my here's an interesting fact though there's a brand new study out that I found so amazing in it heartened me for a moment in time others. There's viewers may think are dark. This was a group of political scientists to know a ton about the big sort that we've been talking about and who studied the sorting of Americans not just Americans they looked at the most sorted of US highly active Liberals Rosen highly active conservatives on national issues which we've talked about gun control social issues women's rights abortion. We are worlds apart when they pulled those same people on local issues. Do you want your economy to grow. Oh do you want good schools and they went down to a I'm giving big almost complete consensus and that gave me hope that when we're closer together and focused on our local communities and get out of this chamber this Echo Chamber of national issues. We're focused on hometown. You know Mike Bloomberg used to say you couldn't tell if the mayor's you what was it there's no liberal or conservative Republican or Democratic Way to pave the street or did you pardon yeah thank you Walter Sudden no party and I think that really is the case you know I right when I meet mayors and I work with laudanum. It's very hard for me to tell and it's very hard for me to tell who's a republican or a Democrat so I think that when we look at the local issues and get out of the Echo Chamber of national issues these these these high potency nationally shy take where a lot better solve our problems and so what policies would you do to try to knit the fabric closer together so I don't think we can I think we're really divided and I think divides gotten worse over my way you know and I'm sixty ish years old. I we're going to have have to realize that we are best served by living together is to America's and the way to reduce this. I think trump proves how problematic the imperial presidency. We knew it people like you and I knew it but until you had someone who really wasn't up for the job you couldn't see see it now. You can see how problematic that institution so what we do is take our federalist gift this distribution of powers that we've dialed up right over the past fifty years since the dialed up the power the federal government and we begin to dial it down. No we don't give all power back to the communities and I don't mean just the cities we power back to the suburbs in rural areas we give them their tax power back. We give them their economic power back. We enable them to build their own and we enable them to create the kind of cultural context you know look here's a statistic mystic about twenty percent of us live in urban areas. I forget what it is. Sixty seventy percent of US live in suburban areas and the rest live in rural areas the overwhelming preponderance like where we live we vote with our feet in America vote. That's the big sort is we vote with our feet to be the kind of places that reflect the cultural and social political context. We Wanna live in so let's not avoid that let's not spend every four eight years screaming and yelling at one another. Let's admit that we are two or more countries and let's live together peacefully. Let's create united. Maybe not an united CDs OF AMERICA UNITED COMMUNITIES OF AMERICA UNITED PLACES OF AMERICA. It will be perfect but it'll be a lot more riposted resilient because we're much more successful when we district powered any kind of system than when we concentrated and I think if we reduced a stake around these national issues we'd have a somewhat better chance of being able to get along Florida. Thank you thank you great to spend time with you and and hope does spring eternal. Thanks for watching and goodbye from London uh-huh Yeah uh-huh..

America United States New York David Harvey Tom Friedman Amazon C._D. Toronto San Francisco Texas Echo Chamber of national Pittsburgh London Mike Bloomberg Atlanta Richard Florida Georgia trump
"richard florida" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

10:11 min | 2 years ago

"richard florida" Discussed on Amanpour

"And now let's turn to what our next guest calls the New Urban Crisis Richard Florida is a leading urban Est.. He's a professor and also an author and he says America's biggest divide is not red versus blue but rather city versus suburbia arguing that where we call home is one of the most crucial factors affecting affecting where we sit in the social ecosystem he joined Walter Isaacson to math out the state of urban hubs today from income inequality too big tech your great urban studies studies scholar and you helped invent the notion of the creative class and how that was going to revitalize American cities explain what that original notion was so here's here's where it comes from. I I was born in Newark in late nineteen fifties. I watched Newark decline and decay so the city jobs in industry move to the suburbs. I actually witnessed the national guards tanks in the street. When I was a young scholar? No one believed that cities could come back so flash forward now. It's the late nineteen in eight thousand nine Hundred Ninety S. I'm living in Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh. Was it hard by deindustrialization what could begin to revive cities. What I began to see was in places like New York in San Francisco at a time in Boston? There was this group of people scientists technologists knowledged startup people artists musicians professor types who are coming back to CDs. I couldn't explain it. That's where the idea of the creative class comes from when we put the numbers to it about the year two thousand what we found is this group of people which was less than ten percent of the workforce when I was a boy grew to a third of the workforce and in big cities these scientists techies business managers knowledge workers and artists were now thirty three forty forty five percent of the workforce so that is the creative class and it is the force like it or not for good in bed that has revitalized many of our cities and because they moved into the urban core more than they would go to the suburbs. I think what happened really is that I wrote this book in two thousand and two so it's quite a ways time ago after about two thousand this. It's urban revival just goes on steroids and these folks begin to clustering cities not just because they like cities not because they just have parks in amenities and universities and coffeeshops what the economists have found is the city's they're clustering and cities uh-huh drives economic growth increase innovation and productivity but they don't clustering all cities now they had gone into many cities but they tend to cluster in these superstar cities like New York or Los Angeles or London in the U._K.. Or these big tech hubs like San Francisco or Seattle Adler Boston or maybe Washington D._C.. Got To push back from people like Joel Kotkin who said okay. It's a great theory but the numbers don't show the data thought that people actually are moving to suburbs not cities. What was your answer that it's funny because Joel has become come believe it or not a great personal friend and we have had some of the most vicious fights but I told him I literally said Joe? I've learned about as much from you as I've learned from anyone else. Look the creative class can thrive in suburbs and we did the data later we started with Metros right these suburban urban agglomerations when you look at the data there are some suburbs you know even in the outskirts of Detroit suburbs Royal Haute and Birmingham that have very high clusters of the creative class. I don't think it's an either or it's both but here's the point it's not ah everywhere in certain suburbs in certain cities. It's a certain big cities. It's uncertain small cities and it's where those places have the attributes that can engage this clustering. You began to see after the rise of the creative class came <music> out some of the downside of the sorting in America. So what did you do so me and a guy named bill. Bishop actually worked together he wrote this fantastic book called the big sorts. We were intended and explain what that is about. The big. You're watching is the idea that in America this is way before trump that we were becoming more divided not only red and blue we were sorting into specific kinds of communities that engaged US economically but reflected our political and cultural bias and that those divisions have now we were talking about this in two thousand and two. We're expanding over time and I think neither one of us. Certainly I could never have anticipated how big this would go. So what happened was when you mentioned I took some great criticism as you do. When you write a popular book people read it and it criticizing I learned from that but the world changed the world that I was envisioning of optimistic rosy eyed revitalization coming back to the city in in an open minded environment became very one-sided rich people highly educated people move back to cities and parts of cities? Not all cities became gentrified colonies in our cities began to split apart these happened on steroids beginning in two thousand accelerating accelerating after two thousand and ten the reason I came to this as I was living in Toronto where I still spend a good part of my time and it's Crazy Crack Mayor Rob Ford got elected and I was thinking in Toronto Toronto the Good Toronto the place that has a healthcare for all that has invested in transit at least up to that point that had safe streets no gun very little gun crime. Why would they elect this populace before trump because the creative class my creative class was colonizing the inner city <hes> taking advantage of the great locations close to the university close to downtown making money off their housing as it went up and the working people and the people worked in those low and service industries were being pushed out and our community just like our country just like America was becoming more and more divided that that's what I see as the contradiction of the creative class lead to a greater inequality of wealth that became part of the resentment we actually documented this in two thousand and two in two thousand three for for essays? I wrote for at that time the Washington monthly you could see these creative cores in San Francisco in Austin and Seattle in Boston and New York inequality was the greatest in the nation but when I came to write about this in the sequel book the New Urban Crisis What I found was this contradiction the more diverse the more dense the more innovative the more open minded the more liberal and progressive more votes for Obama more roads or Clinton whatever the more inequality segregation and that contradiction was what I wanted to fly because of the big sort because of the sorting of spy economic status by class position by level of education where becoming a very sorted country in which the advantage folks cluster they can be urban and there's still many many advantage folks in the suburbs of New York in the suburbs of California in the suburbs around Boston we can sort into urban centers in suburbs but the places we sort into become so darn expensive you know look at housing prices in New York or San San Francisco or Los Angeles that less advantaged people lower skilled people working people are pushed out so tell me about the book then that you tried to explain that problem well walking back of your earlier book. I don't I don't think get so much of a walking back is recognizing things have changed recognizing some mistakes that I made and really trying to interpret the world as it evolved and you here's what it was. It's kind of track the ARC in my life the kid born into the older crisis in Newark in New York City for declaring the city drop dead. You're in bankruptcy go away and a crisis of failure. A crisis of complete and total urban failure accompanies moving out people moving out a whole they called it in urban studies hole in the doughnut mhm then to see this revitalization com slowly at first and then the floodgates open after two thousand but the new urban crisis isn't a crisis of failure ironically enough its Chrysler of urban success. It's a crisis of urban success. The more these cities attracted attracted talent the more they had attracted the creative class the more they gentrified the more unequal they became with other parts of the country and within themselves so and what I argued in the book is the Norman Crisis Isn't just a crisis of cities when you see it play out on the electoral map in the divisions of this country which you know so much about it's kind of a crisis of our moment of democratic capitalism it really is how do we put these two parts of our economy the creative centers and the rest of the country back together Kennewick so what should we do about gentrification well. I think look there's a couple of things that people are policymakers and academics and thinkers are talking about. I there is no doubt that we need to build more housing where we need it. Not Out the far-flung excerpts we need to build more housing in the core and in those old suburbs which have the single family homes that can be identified to do that. We've got to liberalize our land use restrictions number one. Some people so called market urban is as to why Meyer a lot think that's sufficient. I think it's necessary but insufficient. I think we've got to commit to building affordable housing in New York. Now we have a program in this city where if you're going to build a new tower I forget the exact fraction but it's between twenty and thirty percent of those units you can't buy out in that new tower that new luxury tower have to be devoted to affordable housing. We have to build more transit to connect people out in those suburban areas and especially those close in suburbs and densify around the clubs and I think the last thing we need to do which which few people are talking about Walter about a third of us now in America have the great good fortune to be members of the creative class. We make a pretty good amount of money. Even the artists and cultural workers never mind the scientists and techies more than half of Americans work in low-wage edge crappy precarious service jobs condemned to a life almost disadvantage almost poverty when we decided to build the middle class in this country. We made manufacturing work good work. My Dad used to tell me he worked in a factory. He started that job in the depression Russian when it came back from World War Two F._D._R.. The new deal his job became a good family supporting job. You could buy a house in the suburbs. Put My brother and I through college. Service workers can't do that today. They are working with Karl. Marx was back to life. You would say they're working in misery did substance conditions. We need a national effort to upgrade the fifty percent of low wage service jobs.

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"richard florida" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

10:26 min | 2 years ago

"richard florida" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"This is a rooted. Book, but you've got a highly mobile life. So let me take you to the spine than what you'd explain to me. How this all can hangs together. You grow up in Nebraska, you were an undergrad at Harvard and Houston, you studied at Oxford and at Saint John's college, Annapolis Santa Fe, Annapolis Annapolis. Your PHD in history from Gail, you're a consultant for BC G, and then MacKenzie and assistant professor at Texas in Austin, three years, the department of health and human services, including a stint as assistant secretary. Then you're the president of middle university in Fremont, Nebraska. We've talked to that already. And now, you're US Senator and you're not eighty so this is this is. There's been a lot of the outlier of the US. Eighty youth movement in the US Senate point is obviously that you've done a lot. This is a celebration of rudeness. And yet your life sort of typifies mobility put that together for me. So these three categories the mobile the rid it in the stock that you grabbed I'm borrowing from Richard Florida. And I think one of the most basic things that's happening in our time. Is we have more mobile, and we have more stock. We have a lot less rooted, and I think so much the title them is referencing this idea. We'll talk about later. I'm sure of anti-tribal, and how our identities are more and more formed in opposition to things instead of and constructive embrace of things, but I don't think political tribalism is the story of our moment. I think political tribalism is filling the vacuum of declining local tribes and the kinds of tribes that make people happy, family deep friendship. Long-term shared vocations or meaningful work, local worshiping communities. All those things are being. Undermined by the moment where at in technological history a lot of positive things we can. And I'm sure I'm sure well say about what's happening in technology in our moment. But I think we have to be aware that technology is enabling us to be rootless technology is flattening the world so that we can just traipse across the surface. And so what's happening is lots of people. Who would traditionally have been routed are making understandable choices to become mobile? But as they do the eco systems that are left behind are really really different. And so a big share of the people who stay in one place are people who have a decreasing number of choices. There's a lot of broken stuff in the world always. But I'm not sociologist. But I think in the sociology of our moment what's happening is a lot of places are defined by the people who are stuck. They're not the people who are choosing to invest there and a lot of mobile people kind of keep hopping, and as they hop, and I've I've done this. I don't want to say precisely have been guilty of it. Getting some of my hops. I wanna regard as things that I'm guilty of because I get to easy to see the grass is greener and just trips off to another place. Well, turn out the more that you jump the more that you hop. The more often the more times that your mobile the harder. It is actually to put down roots in the future. But also the hardest for other people to find places that are as interesting to put down roots because everybody's kind of playing musical chairs traipsing around. So the rooted are people who could be mobile but choose to embrace the virtues and benefits of place there. Nothing wrong with being mobile for a time. But being mobile should be a means to an end of getting back to rooted because of the stuff that drives happiness again that connection to family and friends and meaningful long-term work in along vocations, not just your you're paid employment and your local worshiping communities. Those things are all tightly intimately connected to place and right now, lots of our places feel like they're more and more exurban. They're more and more sort of like strip malls forever. For more. There's less and less community of places that folks can reimburse and I think we're gonna have to figure out how to rebuild habits of rudeness for the digital age. There was. Is a phrase us over and over this book, and it was something that obviously really spoke to your heart. I think you read it in Sports Illustrated, you called it the the hometown Jim on a Friday night feeling what is that? So my dad was a football and wrestling coach, and I grew up in a community. I live just outside the same small town now to twenty five thousand person manufacturing town for from when I was born until recently, the biggest employer in town is a pig plant, and we have a new chicken plant that's arriving in town. So we do ask manufacturing the standard Brassica is the bread basket of the world and lots of agricultural industries require small to medium sized towns. And this town that I grew up in in the nineteen seventies and eighties. There was a sense that people from that town. We're all in it together. There's a lot broken. They've always been centers across America. We have big racial divides past present and future. This town was pr-. Homogeneous back in the day. But most people were not just white, but German, but the town would have divides that anyplace would have there'd be political differences. But everybody was a Fremont tiger. Or the Catholic high school in our town was the is the Bergen nights and those two schools worthy to high schools where people would be gathering on a Friday night. And everybody was in it together in the sense that you were in Fremont together. Sort of overshadowed the things that might divide you my dad again, we didn't have any money. And so in addition to being a football wrestling coach he refereed for lots of different sports, volleyball and track and softball and whatnot. And so I grew up as a gym rat where I was sort of on the road in the backseat of my dad's car going to wherever he was working any given week night calling a sporting event or a revenue sporting event somewhere but on Friday nights after the Fremont. Tigers played all the coaches, my dad's buddies would end up in our kitchen, and they'd be standing around talking late into the evening, and they knew two and three and four degrees of familial connection. To the kitty sprained his ankle that day, you knew who what aunt was likely to pick him up from the from the hospital after that the images came back and he didn't break his ankle. And where are you going to drop the casserole off that thickness was sort of personified or illustrated on Saturday night in the middle of winter? Even though we were wrestling family when you go to a basketball game on a Friday or Saturday night. And then all the winner. There was a census you stepped in there that this was the picture of town, and we were assembled for home room when I was with Melissa and I got married right after college, and we were living in Chicago. I worked for the Boston consulting strategy firm. We lived across the street from Northwestern University. And in one thousand nine hundred forty nine hundred ninety five north western went from being one of the worst football teams in America to being pretty on their way to be in pretty decent. And we would go to all the north western games. And we realized well this isn't our stadium. These are people. This doesn't have exactly the same feeling. I grew up with and over the course of the first decade and a half of marriage. No, listen, I paid taxes in about a dozen states as we'd follow different projects and opportunities across the country. And every place. We went felt like this is a place to love your neighbor and B invested and yet it doesn't really feel like there's a gym like the gym. You don't have to be from a small town. It can be in a city in an urban neighborhood gym. This doesn't feel like what I'm used to feeling community is like, and I thought it was just us at first I thought it was just that we were moving a lot. So we couldn't find these community places. Well, it turns out Robert Putnam wrote in the late nineteen university wrote in the late nineteen ninety s and two thousand about what he called the bowling alone phenomenon and Charles Marie scholar at the American Enterprise Institute has written some really similar stuff Putnam found that more Americans were bowling in the late nineteen ninety s than at any point in US history and yet bowling league membership rolls the lowest level in history. And this might just be some weird phenomenon of bowling. And so he dug in and he found in sector after sector industry after industry community after community in life Americans were much less association all much less. Neighborly than they had been in the past something was happening Putnam. He calls that social capital. These the ties of trust between people are starting to fray that and as a result people are more isolated in this gets to the epidemic of loneliness that you talk about here. But let me let me ask you this. So you're big it. Obviously, it touched you this. This this phrase the hometown Janet hometown Jim on a Friday night. And I read that and I felt nothing because there's I don't really have a hometown. When I grow up in Seattle, Washington. But I go back there. I feel nothing. There's no, Jim. There was Friday night. That was I guess Friday night comes to everybody because we all lived through the weeks. But I don't have any sense of that. What does that mean in my bereft? I mean is there is is it a is it a problem? Can I get it back? We can get it. So there are lots of forms of the manifestations of social capital can happen. Lots of ways, but you're putting the right heading on. What I think this project is about I'm serving for a time in the US Senate where people act like, wow, politics are really a mess, and we need to fix it by beating other people more in politics. The solution to the problem of political tribalism should be more political winning. I actually don't think politics can fix this problem because I don't solve this problem. I think we're living through a time. And I think there's a lot of economic backstory, we should unpack. But I think we have massively Evaporating social capital the loneliness epidemic that you reference, and I think that comes. From the disruption of our technologies and our moment in economic history making up for it with politics. I think politics is trying to. Good and bad tribes. Ben Sasse Republican Nebraska Arthur Brooks, president of the book them. Okay. So let's let's stop here for a second. Let's talk about this. Because basically, you know, people always talk about tribalism is if it's a in a unilaterally negative phenomenon. You say, no, no, no, no. There's lots of good tribes. And when you don't handle good tries when you don't have these communities when you when you are bereft of the hometown, Jim on a Friday night feeling you're going to put something in that that hollow inside yourself, and increasingly where people are unrooted where people are mobile people are moving around, and where people are not paying attention to the local communities. They're only paying attention to the cable TV show on on one of the cable networks, and and don't know their neighbors..

Fremont US Jim US Senate wrestling president Nebraska America football Annapolis Annapolis Robert Putnam Richard Florida Harvard Sports Illustrated Texas department of health Gail Senator assistant secretary assistant professor
Has Amazon selected its next headquarters?

GeekWire - Geared Up

03:38 min | 2 years ago

Has Amazon selected its next headquarters?

"Of role in this decision. Right. It's possible. But another thing to keep in mind is that it seems likely that these two cities are the ones that Amazon's ended Vance talks with, but we don't know that exclusively and given how tight of ship Amazon runs. It's hard for me to imagine that the leakers at least all of them come from Amazon. I think it's more likely that they come from the city's. So it's very possible that Amazon is in advanced talks with more cities than these three that we talked about earlier, but those are keeping a better tighter lid on it. You know, you also mentioned Dallas that was part of one of the reports and Jeff Bezos has a large rocket operation in Texas through his blue origin space venture. So there is actually a common thread among the three of these locations. That's true. And then Texas like Washington state doesn't have an income tax. Any other two cities do and Amazon can be a little. Tax sensitive, Texas. I don't know what the appropriate term is. But I I don't think Dallas totally out of that game. Okay. So that's Texas is still a possibility. And obviously Austin in another part of the state is home to whole foods. So they could still be in the running and they were part of the final twenty as well if I'm not mistaken. No, you mentioned the cynics view earlier, and it's easy to look at this and say, this is a very Machiavelli and move all around by Amazon, one of the people you talk to this past week was Richard Florida. Who's been an outspoken critic of the way that Amazon is going about this search and specifically Amazon's focus on getting government incentives. Really if you look at it. Amazon has so much intelligence on the willingness and the ability for so many municipalities around the country to provide tax incentives tax breaks and other things that would make it worthwhile for them to go into a city. It seems like they basically got in a blueprint for their US and North American expansion over the next ten years here is that what's going on. I don't think it's not going on.

Amazon Texas Dallas Jeff Bezos United States Vance Richard Florida Austin Washington Ten Years
"richard florida" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

GeekWire - Geared Up

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"richard florida" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

"No felt like she'd didn't know what to do she invited the ironworkers to speak several times she really didn't want to be in a position where she was fighting against them but when she did eventually have the opportunity to address reporter as she said this is this is the game this is always happened in a capitalist society big corporations pit workers against workers backdrop of amazon's it was interesting h q to she search did which something makes that i it thought all was really smart the more fascinating they invited because here the leader you have amazon of the going protests out to come to up cities and speak around the they continent did and at first and st saying didn't want hey to but eventually we wanna he bring did take them up the on same that types of high but paying jobs yet that we have in seattle another thing to that's you important to and note is one that of the things that they're are asking not all for workers is tax are breaks of one mind and on here this you have the city shawna's council in wont seattle had going the other way several i thought it workers was really interesting in the what technology richard florida industry said there's on to twitter speak this and week one can you explain member who richard of florida the same is union who spelled is there lately to as speak close out as you can get in from favor being of an the head tax urban est and celebrity he he'd know he's he's blesses a scholar hard he did it but but it he's was very really wellknown it looked like and it he's was an a challenge editor at for large him for because city lab his and he writes co workers about cities in were urbanism shoes shouting in over new him has in jeering been very in outspoken yelling his name about the rights of all of cities this is against in the back this whole amazon search in saying to cities hey don't give away the farm to get these fifty thousand jobs not the best analogy for this hightech scenario but he wrote on twitter after amazon announced that it was gonna be freezing some of this development disgusting and disgraceful hey progressive mayors watch.

reporter amazon seattle shawna richard florida industry florida editor twitter
"richard florida" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"richard florida" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Progressives uh they have put together a pact as elected officials from the finalist cities of amazon second world headquarters we strongly oppose the tax breaking bidding war that amazon has begun at the expense of the public now we don't know of any tax breaks have been offered a amazon now we don't you lost in city council does not know that's right because they've given at all to the chamber of commerce to negotiate right and they have not been transparent up to this more these three progressive they're signing on to this this mutual quote nonaggression pact initiated by richard richard florida and signed by a diverse group of thousands of economist academics business leaders and everyday people across the country to reject massive subsidies for amazon amazon is using the economic and political power to push it these into a race to the bottom major corporate subsidies for amazon would undermine our ability as leaders to fund critical needs like education transportation housing and infrastructure which makes arsenis attractive for investment in the first place and i think a lot of people listening do not want to offer amazon any kind of tax incentives are tax breaks no other award auto orchard because we don't need them here we don't if if it was something that we really needed for our economy to be destroy our economies already strong so i don't see why we should be saqer kinda shortsighted to say we don't need 50000 high paying job well i understand what you're saying but we don't we it would be well i guess it would be nice again i'm very concerned about our traffic and all that what it might do but we don't we just don't what check this out the money goes on to say when amazon locates their new headquarters they will place a major strain our existing infrastructure housing stock and they will worsen income inequality instead of pressuring our cities to offer the biggest tax break package amazon should make real commitments.

amazon richard richard florida arsenis chamber of commerce
"richard florida" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"richard florida" Discussed on WCTC

"The rotunda of the rayburn building that's where most americans i think arthur out living their dreams and making them a reality but i think these congress people do have to be and the white house have to be very careful that in their effort to help and in some way answer the cries of these daca people that they don't at the same time kill the dreams and hopes of their own base and the american citizens that it's an important balance to strike and i don't think that's a radical statement by richard florida you wanted to say what we also i just wanted to say about uh i think the president's getting ahead of the the game here by uh uh getting the at one point eight in the end of the chamber operation the problem is going to be the wall ponding the problem is going to be the chain migration because each one of these eight hundred thousand or million daca dreamers a you know they're gonna do it will bring in five or ten people and you're talking ten million people not one point eight million people so by clamping down on the uh chain migration by putting in the either fly i mean it's win win win yes was going to cost one point eight million or one point eight million it's a lot better and we know who they are and they are ten to twelve years and if they break the law and do doubt things out verses 10 to 20 million people who we don't must so in other who they are yeah that's a great point richard the question is is that going to be enough remember when ronald reagan signed his embassy in 1980 six he was told this is the final this is it the final amnesty he signed it he deeply regretted it erode the day he did it however it was not the end i can't remember how many amna ties i think it was a million people something like that but it was going to be the once and forever amnesty didn't turn out that way because he didn't the border security and everything came after the fact three million people three million people ronald reagan granted amnesty too so you you can't keep doing that forever eventually you have to address either.

arthur white house richard florida president ronald reagan rayburn congress twelve years
"richard florida" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

The Michael Knowles Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"richard florida" Discussed on The Michael Knowles Show

"Jewelry in the curls and everything i'm not sure that worked either so they've won tool at their disposal that sadly says a lot about our culture and in particular the culture of millennials they can virtue signal and slogan near on politics sociologist richard florida explained advertisers used to wonder how a spot would play in pre peoria now they wonder how it will play in brooklyn rob baiocco or creative executive at a major ad agency he admitted the same thing marketers are increasingly relying on woke issue adds to target millennials in a phrase he says creative's are trying to make their toilet paper saved the world even though sometimes of pringle is just a pringle but for millennials are pringle can never just be a pringle everything has become politicized and activist obviously mainstream journalism that was the first ago the universities now even the nfl even pepsi even burger king it's a sad state of affairs says a lot about our culture cs lewis put it well he said a six society must thing much about politics as a sick man must think about his digestion to ignore the subject may be fatal cowardice for one as for the other but if either comes to regarded as the natural food of the mind if either forgets that we think of such things only in order to be able to think of something else than what was undertaken for the sake of health has become itself a new and deadly disease our society is without question sick and so we have to think a lot about politics but we're only thinking about politics so that we can think about culture and art and philosophy and building things and eternal questions and our nature and our creator among other things but advertisers have rightly determined the millennials are obsessed with politics shallow politics of that not as a means but as an end and i think i think it's because they're using politics as a standin for something else they're they're trying to place all of their identity and all of their hopes in politics saint augustine wrote about this he said you have made us.

richard florida peoria rob baiocco pringle pepsi saint augustine brooklyn creative executive nfl
"richard florida" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"richard florida" Discussed on KGO 810

"Where do we begin to address this i mean when when you look at this richard florida and what's happening in the bay area de start by saying well we need to hurry up and start building more housing do we we're where do you even start when you look at this so first of all i agree with you and acquired turned down can i had the dog oats over the past fifteen this is how i've never gone for justice reason i thought it was a elite festival uh so you're absolutely right the and and increasingly they look like the emperor has no clothes so i suspect thing is you know we we have these two divides what you really import i call it the winner take all doctors winnertakeall capitalism winner take all urban as we have winning in places like san francisco in la boston new york washington carter and then the rest of the country be left completely behind and then even within the winner risk that we have all urbanism again where we have a small sierra winners in the actual winners any each syrup losers and yeah i think you know there's a couple of indication to this one is we have a president uh are you know it was a reflection of this trump is in part just people just getting angry at this book the other thing is not going to happen in the bay area you know we're liberal we're blue were progressive i live of the in toronto guest became before trump what i would argue toronto is in many ways you more progressive the more social good it avoids the fullest to or public health care cause you to each efforts who took the torontonians elected rob four the crack may the garden because of this anger because people were really pissed off at the urban elite so he can happens there it has happened here and i think it to giant wake up call you know we never seen this web within a quality probably since the gilded age back to the civil war and we've got to rebuild our middle class yeah of course we got to build more housing but just building more housing we'll be rich people condominiums go to build affordable housing we've got.

richard florida san francisco carter toronto civil war la boston washington president public health
"richard florida" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"richard florida" Discussed on KGO 810

"Are overtaxed we have housing costs are wildly out of control we have all these different issues that are facing us but i have a very special guest this going to join me i have been wanted to talk this guy for a long time i don't know if you know who richard florida's use american urban studies theoreste he is professor head of the martin prosperity institute at the rotten school management university of toronto said some very famous book why i want to get india what he thinks we should be doing here in the bay area about our housing immediate what he is he's an urban planning specialist and he likes talking about the creative class which we have an massar richard florida joins me van traffic from the chilton auto body traffic there's we've got delays on both sides if i we wanna one down in the pruned dale and san juan bautista area because of the roadwork lane closures southbound at highway one twenty nine the right lane is closed four uh some bridge repair work there it's backed up to vahdet bell in the north battle what i want to do in some tree work near echo valley for that's got things just a little bit slow as you head past the scene eastbound 37 a lake feel the right lane still blocked with a knee injury crash backed up about a half a mile westbound thirty seven still congested over the mere island bridge was also offender vendor at the base of the bridge on the right shoulder vein we're still backed up into the maize especially on the eighty approach protest congested and golden gate field all the way to the toll plaza and the metering lights are the westbound baybridge we're sponsored by indeed are you hiring with dg you can post jobs in minutes set of screener questions than.

martin prosperity institute richard florida echo valley professor rotten school management unive chilton san juan bautista
"richard florida" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"richard florida" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That pockets of likeminded citizens that have become so now you you can decide for itself whether you're included in this pockets of likeminded citizens that have become so ideologically end brent that we don't know can't understand and could barely conceive of those people who live just a few miles away from us and then a little later richard florida who you've worked with at city lab wrote that the big short you just recently is only getting bigger and that it is now he is saying that the big sort that built discovered and roundabout is what is driving our political polarization so i want to throw to us bill this is a lead up to it what i want to ask you it had not i think there's two thousand twelve so somewhere there two wellknown political scientist at stanford came out they write a piece they would there it hoover sam allen an molefi arena came out and they wrote a piece that said basically that the big short was a myth the way he they didn't quite so you've made it up at that the one you wrote was a myth and it was based on three assumptions that the unit basis on three assumptions one was that neighborhoods are important centres of american life secondly that people you were assuming the people who live in neighborhoods talk to each other and third that politics is an important topic that they talk about and so fearing an allen wrote that respect give scholars the basically the academic community as a whole and they mentioned bob putnam in particular who wrote bowling loan don't believe it's true that the neighborhoods.

richard florida scientist stanford bob putnam sam allen
"richard florida" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"richard florida" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That pockets of likeminded citizens that have become so now you you can decide for itself whether you're included in this pockets of likeminded citizens that have become so ideologically in brand that we don't know can't understand and could barely conceive of those people who live just a few miles away from us and then a little later richard florida who you've worked with at city lab wrote that the big short you'd just recently is only getting bigger and that it is now he is saying that the big sort the built discovered and wrote about is what is driving our political polarization so i want to throw us bill this elite up to what i want to ask you it it not i think as two thousand twelve so somewhere in their two wellknown political scientist at stanford came out they wrote a piece uh they barrett hoover sam allen an molefi arena came out and they wrote a piece that said basically that the big sort was a myth the way they didn't quite so you made it up at that the one euro was a myth and it was based on three assumptions that the unit basis on three assumptions one was that neighborhoods are important centres of american life secondly that people you were assuming the people who live in neighborhoods talked to each other and third that politics is an important topic that they talk about an so fi arena and alan wrote that respect good scholars the basically the academic community as a whole and they mentioned by putting in particular who wrote bowling loan don't believe it's true that the neighborhoods.

richard florida scientist stanford hoover sam allen alan
"richard florida" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"richard florida" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The story of the culture and landscape of no way the country he calls time that's coming up on in this tdi after the news we busy news with meal new cars the united nations is to impose further sanctions on north korea for carrying out its most powerful nuclear test europe the sanctions was reached move careers oil imports and bandits exports of textiles the un security council resolution was approved by unanimous voter after the united states softened its original proposals to obtain support from china and russia the bangladeshi prime minister sheikh hasina is due to visit one of the main camps for revenge your muslims who fled vaudin's in neighboring myanmar bangladeshi aims to build international pressure on me on monitoring the refugees the drop icl storm richard florida as our agreeing continues to push in learned bringing torrential rain and storm surges to the states of georgia and south carolina the deaths of at least eight americans have been attributed to the effects of the storm the british government says it wants to keep cooperating closely with the european u in defence matters after it leaves the block it says britain would continue to contribute military hardware and forces to eu missions after leaving the eu as well as agreeing on common positions with brussels we wall british plans to replace the supremacy of european union mole in the uk have passed their first major test in parliament in a series of votes lawmakers agreed to consider the proposals in further detail a united nations report says that subsahara and children are the most vulnerable of all migrants attempting to reach europe from libya unstuck you the report says that lessons from subsaharan africa all the most likely prove to be of used traffic to and exploited in australia voting forms have been sent out at the start of an eightweek national postal survey on legalizing samesex marriage the postal ballot is nonbinding vote if a majority of respondents are in favor of change the government has pledged to amend the law this year bbc news.

eu bbc australia eu myanmar prime minister russia un security council oil imports libya europe uk brussels united nations military hardware britain british government south carolina georgia richard florida vaudin sheikh hasina china united states north korea eightweek
"richard florida" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"richard florida" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And hopefully community benefits agreement yeah and richard florida uh these are sort of uh the things that you suggest that you actually suggest that tech companies need to take a more proactive role not just to be a passive negotiator but actually really start entering communities and talking zoning and bringing in affordable housing can you talk about that a little bit everything that's been set exactly right and exactly where we have to go and becoming clear to me that this is real test case for the future of tech based element in america and what a great thing for san jose a city that has not seen this you know as kim's said these companies have come roaring back in the city's because that's where the talented creative people they need wanted e e and in the past been extracting did not only taking community money they've gotten good deals on land they put their headquarters did extracted benefits much happened gugel amazon facebook apple microsoft larr companies in the most highly valued companies in the world are now seen as villains nevermind uber rainier indeed renouncing his dillon's gigla san francisco said we want you guys out they had a ballot measure the laws we want you guys out now it's time for them to really show the world that these very highly profitable very valuable companies at say they're on the cutting edge can good urban stewards in good urban citizens so of course silicon valley rising in the city of san i have to keep pressure on them but it's time for these companies to bumped up and do what's right to engage in inclusionary prosperity affordable housing and that we are going to pick up on that thought in we are talking about glucose plans for san jose campus and we're talking to kim wallace director here the economic development for the city of san jose jeffrey buchanan with working partnerships and richard florida professor at the university of toronto i'm queenie kim and you are listening to form.

america san jose dillon san francisco economic development jeffrey buchanan richard florida professor queenie kim richard florida amazon microsoft san i kim wallace director university of toronto
"richard florida" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

02:19 min | 4 years ago

"richard florida" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"How would for example the georgia six special election look if or would have looked after let's say the supreme court rules on this overturns this and says you know at this is unfair you have to use this cobb ballistic magic number of seven the answer is seven would something like the george six race have looked any different we'll georgia is a place where there have been arguments over racial gerrymandering so the answer your first question is the reason we have this whole line of cases about racial gerrymandering is the voting rights act which has been interpreted to say that its protections for minority voters apply in redistricting cases there's a tension between that and the equal protection clause in the constitution which the supreme court is interpreted say like the government's not supposed to take account of race in making decisions unless it does things in this very narrowly tailored compelling interest way so republicans have argued for a while a lot of them including people on the court that that this redistricting application of the voting rights act is just like wrong that's what justice thomas thinks about this and the answer your second question so now we're talking about uh the kind of relationship between gerrymandering and what i always think of as the big sort is that richard florida's term from the atlanta he's a author who wrote a book by that name i believe in nazi idea that like democratic voters in big cities are wasting their votes by living where they live me and you know i live in an incredibly blue city in new haven um if i moved out to the red are suburbs of connecticut my vote would be worth a lot more in state legislative races that's my choice about where i live and that element of um how republicans have gained more power in legislative and congressional races that is not that it particularly affected by the argument over gerrymandering in other words like even if we had a very robust set of protections against partisan gerrymandering there would be a ton of wasted democratic votes in urban strongholds just based on where people live but how why not have for example super tiny districts say urban districts that.

voting rights act richard florida atlanta connecticut georgia george thomas
"richard florida" Discussed on Technotopia

Technotopia

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"richard florida" Discussed on Technotopia

"Welcome to dopey a podcast a better future i'm john biggs today on the show have richard florida he's an author in thinker we're going to be talking about waste cities are changing this is second tokyo tech the toby is brought to you by typewriter typewriters your ondemand editor in their amazing team of riders will make your book chapter blog poster email shine typewriter editors come from places like tech crunched gizmodo in the new york times and the offer lowballed rates for longer work check it out a typewriter dot plus that's typewriter dot plus welcome back detected toby a podcast about a better future i'm john biggs today on the show i have richard florida he's the author of the new urban crisis how are cities are increasing inequality deepening segregation failing the middle class and what we can do about it and he's also a university professor and the directors of cities at the martin prosperity institute at the university of toronto's rutland school of management and distinguish at nyu shack and suit of real estate you're also an editor editor at large atlantic city lab and you are probably one or the cooler people at i get to talk to you on this thing so thank you for joining me richard sperry kind thank you thank you for having me so you're you've always been a favor to mine for the past you've been writing for on this specific thing for a little over a decade right yet what i've been i've been actually rise of the creative class my i mean book on cities per se came out in two thousand two but.

john biggs editor new york times richard florida martin prosperity institute nyu shack real estate tokyo university of toronto rutland school of management richard sperry