20 Burst results for "Richard Feynman"

Responding Creatively to Fear

The Mindful Minute

09:24 min | 9 months ago

Responding Creatively to Fear

"Welcome y'all as many of you know at Sacred Chill West. We create a community tension every month for all of our classes to focus on as we teach meditation. Yoga Yoga and this month's community intention for the month of May is awake to the transitions awake to the transitions. Now this phrase really stems from teachings that we my business partner Octavia and I received from one of our teachers Tracy Stanley and she continually uses this phrase as the reminder not to go back to sleep when we wake up when we learned something about ourselves. Don't let yourself get pulled back into old habits or old ways of coping just because things get hard or scary even in the midst of a pandemic. So I've been reflecting on this. How do we stay awake to the transitions? How do we stay awake as the moment to moment shifts under our feet and right in line with this thinking? I listened to episode of Radio. Labs podcast you'll know. I Love Radio last. And in this episode they were reflecting on a question posed by famous physicist Richard Feynman. And he asked this question all the way back in nineteen sixty one he asked. If in some cataclysm all of scientific knowledge were to be destroyed and only one sentence was passed on to the next generation of creatures what statement would contain the most information in the fewest words and then of course he went on to answer this question in his own brilliant physicist way but radio lab took this a step further and they went out and asked a myriad of artists musicians scientists creative thinkers this very question and what was so interesting to me about the response was the vast majority responded in some way with the word fear. Fear is the thing that most people want to tell other people or other creatures or other beans. This is the thing that limits us that holds us back that paralyzes us that keeps us from our potential and that we must have a willingness to respond creatively to fear. And so this whole talk. Today is based on the question. What do I do when I feel? I can't handle what's going on. What do I do when I feel? I can't handle what's going on and I'm willing to bet all of you have an immediate answer because how many of us have been sitting at home for weeks on end feeling like we can't handle what's going on and so we do the thing right. We all have these coping mechanisms. Maybe it's shopping maybe it's TV watching. Maybe it's eating or drinking or drugs or talking on the phone too much. Who knows we all have these mechanisms and we use them to avoid feeling uncomfortable? We use them to go back to sleep rather than stay awake to the unknown and of course the problem with this is this is fake control coping mechanisms. Are Pseudo control. That becomes actually like a prison. Boxing us into our neurosis. We couldn't possibly wet go of our beliefs. We couldn't possibly let go of the actions or escape mechanisms that we've created because what is left would be way too scary. We become increasingly terrified of the possibility of freedom. Now happily meditation does tell us. There's another way. Meditation reminds us. That freedom doesn't come from resisting or blocking our fears but it comes from getting to know these fears well so today. We're going to get to know our fears and in many traditions. The teachings within a meditation practice are that there are three main ways. We protect ourselves from this fear of the unknown from the fear of uncertainty. The first one is the one. I already referenced. This is the method of escape that each of us has so someone shops someone uses alcohol's food drugs sex. Tv books walking in nature being social. You know some of these are completely benign. Some of these maybe a little bit more dangerous but all of them can be methods for stain asleep. No matter how we escape. Our normal response is not one of curiosity. Meaning were not normally going. Oh look at me escaping the moment by calling a friend. No we're just calling the friend and were numb to what we're escaping. We don't explore it and our practice now is to get curious. This is step one right. Gay Curious what am I relief from when I engage this escape mechanism? What am I feeling relief from as I engage this escape mechanism the second way that we avoid fear our beliefs the beliefs that we used to give us a sense of certainty these might be political beliefs or social justice beliefs or religious beliefs? A scientific beliefs right any belief that gives us the person a sense of rightness or correctness. Now the problem of course is not the beliefs themselves but rather the problem is. How do we use these beliefs to make us feel steady to feel grounded or in control? How do we use these beliefs to avoid feeling the discomfort of not knowing? What will happen next? This one has been particularly potent for me in this moment. You Know Georgia beam the first state to reopen anything and my personal belief surrounded are that that's way too soon and sponsor and I could go on for hours and so the act of curiosity is to really pay attention does what does that righteous anger prevent me from feeling the right when. I get all up on my soapbox and outraged an angry and yelling. My opinions is it trying to make me feel more in control of a moment. That's totally out of control. And I'm not hear me say this. I am not saying you should not get outraged about certain things and speak up and not discounting the need for justice and standing up for what's right by any means that is a talk for another day but what I am talking about. Today is the curiosity of how we use those beliefs to make ourselves feel better the last way that we avoid fear is perhaps the most tricky this form of protection comes to us by seeking altered. Mind states some might do this through drugs. Some might do this through exercise highs or extreme meditation through falling in and out of love anything that takes us out of the mundane the ordinary and feels special right. These special mine states can be so powerful because we feel above or removed from the discomfort of the every day. So like if you have a really powerful meditation experience and you get some kind of clarity or visit or you hear voice or something magical happens in that meditation and in the next time you meditate you expect the exact same thing to happen but what really happens you write the grocery lists for twenty minutes. Now were feeling disappointed in our practice or upset with our practice. We can clean to those special experiences as a way to avoid life. And what we're not trying to do is avoid life. What we're trying to do is be in our

Physicist Sacred Chill West Partner Richard Feynman Tracy Stanley Octavia Georgia
Sam Altman: Entrepreneurial Prodigy, Y Combinator President and OpenAI CEO

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

13:47 min | 1 year ago

Sam Altman: Entrepreneurial Prodigy, Y Combinator President and OpenAI CEO

"Hello and welcome to behind the tech. I'm christina warren senior club advocate at microsoft and i'm kevin scott today. Our guest is sam altman. Sam is a entrepreneur and investor. Sam was <hes> for while the president of y combinator. Which is the most successful startup incubator i think without argument in the entire world and recently same became the chief executive officer of organization called open a is that is seeking to build general artificial intelligence inside of a nonprofit structure sure so that the value that creates a cruise to the public good yeah that's right and this is one of the rare times where we have a guest on that. I actually know that i actually we have have known before. He was sam altman. You're not so fast. Tell us a little bit about that. I didn't know that so when when sam was doing loops his first start up. I was as a reporter at nashville and i used to cover startups. All the time and loops was actually one of my favorites not so much because i thought that what they were doing was the most revolutionary solution everything in the world but because sam was so incredibly smart he was always three or four steps ahead of the whole industry was doing and although that ended up not necessarily working on loops favor i actually remember. I sent him an email. When when loops made its exit that said you know you. You might not love what's happening now but i have no doubt that whatever you go onto the future. You're going to be amazing and that's going to be honest. That's probably the only time i've ever send email like that. <hes> and it's is really true. Sam as sam is a super super impressive guy like not not just in the sense that he's like really bright but that he's very determined to like make big things happened. <hes> and how much weight loop was an interesting the company in in that it was like sort of ahead of its time it was it was doing the location based thing before the four squares and the goal is is and facebook were thing a lot of the stuff that he was imagining like now become just sort of a standard feature set that any modern mobile application is is more or less built on top of so he predicted like this whole big thing that was happening. Timing was <hes> like less than great without us. The whole thing you know every time i would. I would get on the phone with him or meet. In person i would talk. I would just walk away and think this is the most impressive founder i've ever met and so although hello he's been successful beyond what i ever could have expected i also have the same not at the slightest surprise yeah no some of the stuff that he has been doing with entrepreneurship and trying to help <hes> like really smart motivated entrepreneurs like find on their way to having impacts like has been amazing and the stuff that he's doing right now with <hes> with open again like getting a bunch of like very very bright individuals visuals sort of rallied around this very interesting 'cause like also super impressive well. I can't wait to hear what he's up to and hear your conversation nations. I'm excited to chat with sam so let's do <music> next up with sam. Altman Altman sam is an entrepreneurial prodigy. I believe he started his first company when he was nineteen years old and that was where <hes> where you and i first met since then you have gone on to become an enormously successful investor president of y combinator through one of its most interesting runs in its history and most recently <hes> you become c._e._o. Of open i which you know obviously we just did a partnership with <hes> you all <hes> but like that partnership notwithstanding like open is <hes> unquestionably doing some of the most interesting things and contemporary very artificial intelligence so welcome show. Thanks very much so i think we we met the first time when you were when you were at luke. <hes> like i was actually doing <hes> like i was adventure nearing at <hes> at another mobile startup at the same time <hes> and <hes> and that was sort of an interesting like crazy. I'm <music>. I'm like one of those things where you sort of. I guess both of us and like in our own way were <hes> like experiencing the explosion asian of a brand new platform ecosystem <hes> and so you did that for eight years and then you took this year all and then and i took over i see yeah <hes> so you you went to stanford yeah and what did you choose to major in their a computer science. I actually took mostly non computer science classes which at the time sorta felt indulgent and looking backwards that was all the super valuable stuff <hes> <hes> so the time that i spent like taking writing classes or studying history or particular study in science like hard science <hes> <hes> have a big impact for the next ten years <hes> but after that <hes> those are all the most aiba classes. I was going to learn to program no matter what i was going to be good at no matter what and you were. How good a programmer were you by the time you got to stanford like with the programming assignments were easy horrid. They were the first freshman year was easy and then it heart okay. You know i think as you're thinking about how we educate our kids like that's a great luxury to like. Have by the time you get to college. You've already got a reasonably good skill. Oh and then you can sort of do this exploration. That's a that's an incredibly beneficial thing yeah like i. I'm sure you do too like i think the education system in general there's just not nearly ambitious enough but <hes> i think like i was incredibly lucky to go to an amazing high school and i learned a lot of the sort of basic skills knowledge. Certainly i had learned how to learn and so by the time i got to college i could just pursue stuff. I didn't have to. I think really hard about just making everything done for my major. Yep done a lot of that yep. So how did you get started in tech. There was this period of time that i was born. Smack in the middle of of like kids who hit the computer revolution exactly right yeah <hes> <hes> where like the computers started easy enough to work with where we could figure it out on our own and then they like kinda got the right time for us. Yep i was born very lucky time from that yeah <hes> in a lot of a lot of people who have gone on to sort of start reporting companies would be technology. Investors were born in relatively short window. It seems like i i say this a lot like i feel the same thing so i. I got lucky to be an eleven year old like right win. The personal computing boom was say yeah like like right when the personal computers started showing up hooked up to a little thirteen inch t._v.'s in department stores like that was that was when i was developing as a human being a very interesting question is what are these sort of seven to twelve year olds now like what is that technological revolution going to be that they're going to grow up with an it's super like i've got a <hes> like a nine year old an eleven year old right now and so do you have a guest guest then what it'll be. I don't know it's really hard hard to say and i don't know whether i don't know whether i would have had guests <hes> back then. When i was right in the middle of it i certainly would not have. I think it's sorta hard to tell <hes>. I know that their expectations are fundamentally different. <hes> the mind were so like they just they expect a world where you can talk to computers and where you touch them and they don't understand people programming content for you that you <hes> that you sort of have to consume based on their abstract understanding of your preferences like they they you just sort of watch what they want and read what they want whenever they want i mean it's very very different than we were when we were little kids but like i don't know what the technology thing is. Is that <hes>. This is going to captivate their interest. One of the things that was magic but computers is you could go very far in terms of what you can do with them but you could start start easily as a kid like maybe synthetic bio is going to be the thing but like we're not gonna have like seven year olds playing in the lab making new orleans. I don't think maybe we will and like just easy to start with which is synthetic bio like you would hope that that would be a thing because like the benefit to humanity entity if you could have a whole generation who were as enthused by that is we were with computers. It's like i think that would be beneficial. <hes> <hes> you know maybe maybe if you can get a bunch of that stuff in a simulation environment where the cost of doing an experiment wasn't so high but like something like. I think it has to be something i mean like your point about. It's it's always something always starts looking kind of toy and it just keeps going yeah so i don't know what it is right now. Which is i think a curious <hes> a curious thing. I never said we didn't know what it was when it was computers first place yeah well what what i'm what i'm yeah i certainly didn't. I'm and i'm confident what is going to happen is that they're going to be the ones who figure it out <hes> for sure yeah <hes> <hes> so and so you took all of this <hes> like amazing. It's almost like a liberal education and in a <hes> in a way i think the two strategies to succeed in life. Are you either go super deep in one field of knowledge or you go extremely broad and i've always been go extremely brought and find the connections and sort of be good at the intersection. So what was the what was the most interesting non computer science thing you took when you were at stanford <hes> uh the most intellectually satisfying thing ever physics <hes> the thing this surprisingly most relevant one was creative writing yep and so there's nothing that's more fun than a great business class right like just the most intellectually stimulating by what was your favorite physics class. Ooh <hes> well. I'll answer my favorite physics book <hes> but it's related to my class. <hes> quantum electrodynamics. I think is the best science book ever written <hes> answering murray gilman's by richard feynman okay and it's like a series of four or lectures but everyone always like wants to focus on the parts of physics we don't perfectly understand and then there's a few areas where they're incredibly beautiful and and we clearly like we don't understand what's happening like in an easily model level but the math we understand perfectly <hes> and that was this example and there was a class i took that was basically teaching this of like wow like there's this big piece of reality that we actually just perfectly understand. Are we understand well enough to work within model and you know it's amazing so quantum electrodynamics just for the <hes> for the audience <hes> who is <hes> also pretty broad <hes> so this is the this is the study of the leave very very small scale interactions everything but gravity yeah but all of the other forces between particles yeah. It is fascinating stuff. I highly i recommend the book. It's a short read. There's no math in it. <hes> it's really fun so why not become a physicist well physics has been a bad field to go into as a career for a long time now and i remember there. Was this thing where all of the kids that were studying. Physics at stanford ended up going to like work in finance <hes> at which i almost briefly got tempted to <hes> actually accepted an offer to be an intern and then i realized i really didn't want to do that but there was clearly something wrong with physics as a career path the time i i was there. Maybe it's better now just just in the sense that it was going to be hard to get a job. All the really smart physics kids weren't going to physics after they graduated gotcha and that that was like computer science kids were going to do some sort of programming and so it was like i think maybe physics just got too hard or the problems got too trivial or something but it's like. It was very hard to see what i was gonna do. I still studied out of interest but it was like i could sort of sense at the time it was not the right career trajectory and so let's talk about this creative writing thing like in what ways is that useful to you now. <hes> actually agree with your assertion that fabulously ability useful why was it why see certainly the highest leverage on time thing i could ever do was right startup advice yep like the not secret secret too. I see is that <hes> we started because p._g. Is incredible at writing assez and was able to sort of create a friend and a community in a nexus just from his essays <hes> no one else will be as good at writing as p._g. But i was over the bar i was able to continue that like i was well. Well aware it was worse but it was good enough to keep the funnel going. <hes> and you know like you can write something in a couple of hours and get hundred thousands of people to read it and many of them complied why <hes> or later do or come. We're gonna waste company and so that was like <hes> like one of the important important jobs. I think of the person writing why cease to be able to write reasonably well about startups and was was it important as c._e._o. Of looped <hes> no no not at all yeah so again. There were all these like things that i studied college

Sam Altman Stanford President Trump Altman Altman Microsoft Chief Executive Officer Christina Warren Nashville Kevin Scott Facebook Reporter Founder Luke. Programmer Physicist
"richard feynman" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

04:47 min | 1 year ago

"richard feynman" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"From new knowledge and that's uniquely as you as we have said before that is just uniquely human that's right that's a that's a characteristic that is uniquely human let's talk about some people let's talk about some curious people and to the U. feature well let's talk about one first Leonardo da Vinci yes so Leonardo has been called by Kenneth Clark to the art critic of the most the relentlessly curious mind in history and indeed you know here is the person you know of course we know him from his works of art them on at least I know that but he was really curious about everything I mean he has you know he has left us with some seven thousand pages of notes and probably there were made maybe double that it when he leaves and in in the those he studies everything from the flow of water to the flight of birds too how do you paint to how long is the the Congal the woodpecker I mean he was literally history interested in everything around except perhaps politics which was a very good thing because he lived at the time of the board jobs and they basically killed anybody what involved in politics indeed and and you know we had just spend some time with David McCullough not long ago and the curiosity of the Wright brothers was remarkable I mean these two guys just kept going to add it and they were curious and they tested and they were curious in their own way they were hobbyists but they were doing things that well Leonardo was thinking about and puzzled over himself that curiosity drove them to right you are absolutely right of course you know I mean not all were he's ideas I mean it would be fewer than the things we think where you know there were things that were in the air at the time but the fact that he was interested in all of those is what makes him so absolutely unique indeed indeed and and very few people have that kind of mind in that level and breadth and depth of curiosity let's talk about that other person you talk about the book Richard Feynman and by the way who is he for folks who may not have ever heard his name yeah so Richard Feynman was a one of the most celebrated physicist of the twentieth century he works in almost every area of physics and also Nobel laureate in physics but in addition to everything you did in physics he was interested in so many other things he was a bongo drummer he studied how to DO role he was an expert in cracking safes he was an expert in Mayan hieroglyphs day and things like the so he was again a sort of a Leonhard both type person although more you know in the sciences then in the arts but but really a person that found everything interesting you basically say everything is interesting if you look into its deeply enough and you coined the phrase curiosity is the best remedy for fear talk about that yes you see very often things were fearful about or afraid of I think that we just don't know much about or we don't understand and by actually learning more about them and under strain to understand them better we actually can get to read of that fear and that's why I I truly strongly believe in the statement that curiosity is the best remedy for fear and indeed you you sort of intimate that yes it is better than bravery for overcoming fear the ETS cute curiosity are very often will drive people to do more risky things then you know you just associate with bring that's a great people in intimates risk and risk taking and curiosity will you just got to follow it down when we come back we're going to continue our conversation the book why what makes this curious and we're curious about this book continue our conversation with professor Merrill radio after these commercial messages hi hello hi where the producers the producers our American stories find our American network and we.

"richard feynman" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"richard feynman" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"I mean, you're not one thing to sort of pontificate on Twitter. It's quite another thing when you actually have to show up in clinic, and see hundreds of patients as you do. Thanks. I mean, I think that's one of the things that I think distinguishes me from some of the other people that are out there that, that stuff's gotta work otherwise it just ain't worth it right. Like you can talk all you want about this that, but if it doesn't change management than it doesn't interest me, particularly because that's where I come from. And I think this is where a lot of people get sort of the academics, and they say, okay while they know everything about this. It's like well, they might know everything. But if it doesn't work on the front lines, it's not worth anything. I think this is an attitude. I see, like in physics, which is I know you, you really look up to Richard Feynman as do. I actually love the whole story of, you know, I kn- Stein, and the floor and all that because physics to me is sort of, like I love that because the way they do science is so much better than we do in medicine. That is to say for in this specific instance, for example, if you have all these theories, they're great, but if they don't agree with experimental evidence. It ain't worth anything, right? And they've, they say this in physics, but they don't say this in medicine, where it's. Like, okay, you think that know, eating lots of carbs is really good for you. Right. You have this hypothesis that eating less fat and tons, and tons of refined carbs as good for you. And that's a great theory at all makes sense and the same thing with calories. Get sounds like if you just cut calories, it makes sense. But if you're theory doesn't work, then it's not a good theory. And this is what they say, in physics, which they don't say in medicine, and in medicine always, like boggles my mind, how these bad theories go round and round and round because they make sense, but nobody's actually put them to the test or nobody's point out these things, and it's the same with insulin resistance. I think actually, to me, the most important topic is sort of insulin resistance, because again, that's what I deal with as the frolic gist. I see a lot of type two diabetes that to me is completely sort of misunderstood and the way we think about insulin resistance, is sort of totally wrong. And that's why we have the sort of mass that we have. I think, well, we're going to get to that for certain definitely like to build on what you've said. Yeah, there's a beautiful demonstration of what you describe. It's a video from either Caltech Cornell, I can't recall. So was either right before he had left Cornell or after he had arrived at Caltech, we're fine minutes at a blackboard, and he is explaining the scientific method in about, as elegant away, as you can, which is to basically say, what you did, which is this is the scientific method. You make a guess you design experiment to test the consequences of that guests, you do the experiment. And if the output of that experiment aligns with your guests. The hypothesis turns out to be likely. Correct or more more likely to be correct. And if it doesn't go back to the drawing board and the simplicity with which one of the most brilliant, physicists of the twentieth century explains that is not lost. Anyone who watches it, and I would agree with you completely I've gotten into trouble by saying this before, but I guess, I guess on your podcast, you can sort of say what you want, but I'm generally suspect of people who have very, very strong points of view on. Things in biology, or medicine who no longer interact with patients doesn't mean that the wrong that I'm generally suspect because of that because the other thing is biology's harder than physics. The route of it's just a lot Messier. And sometimes people ask me do you think you'll always see patients? And the answer is yes. I think so. And I hope so because they are kind of a humbling tool every time I think I've really got it figured out. I'll always meet a patient who proves me wrong. And they're obviously, right? And I'm wrong..

Caltech Cornell Twitter Richard Feynman Stein Caltech Messier
"richard feynman" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

05:44 min | 1 year ago

"richard feynman" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Called a different kind of theory of everything, and what they were what she was basing it on with something that physicist, Richard Feynman came up with back. I think in the sixties and his argument was, you can have different stories, and of course, with seven hundred seventy near death experiences every day. There are many, many different stories with different kinds of details. But if they lead to the same conclusion, they are they can all be true, even though they might be contradictory and. What Feinman used as an example was? He said, imagine that, there are two objects that are exerting pull on each other. He's a physicist and this is the way he described it. He can say it's Newton's law of gravity. That's pulling them together. You can say it's a gravitational field extending through space, or you can say it's a, a plying the principle of least action, which holds each object moves by following the path of the released energy. You know. The most direct line. These are all different explanations physics, physical explanations. But they're saying what he was saying was, they could all be true. And so, and then as analogous to that of the four gospels, you know, these are told by different people in different with different influences. Some details are left out of one story, -cluded in another and so forth. And you could say, well, is that really true because it's not, you know, not Mark or not in, in John. Yes, it could be. I mean, in many respects it makes it more. Yeah. Right in many respects, it makes it more true. When you have four different accounts slightly different because there's a human element there. And so instead of emphasizing the differences, and we what we should be doing is emphasizing the. The big picture, which is that all of these things are telling us the story in different words and different experiential detail. But it's the same story and it's a, it's a powerful story. And if we could just grasp, but then we wouldn't be picking the details of near death. Experience. What do you say to the materialists who, who suggests that the near death experience can be explained near chemically? In other words, the release of brain chemicals adder near the end of life. Well, there have been a lot of theories along those lines and ions in particular has been very interested in stories with for what they call radical evidence stuff that you can't possibly have known or learned without. Without without the story being through for instance, the man who they removed. Man's false teeth is hard stop. They had to do CPR the nurse puts his false teeth in the drawer. And. And when he's when he's recovered, they can't find a false teeth. And so he says, well, I saw the nurse put put my teeth and drawer over there. And by golly. That's where they were. Now he was dead on the table when she took the took the teeth and put them in the drawer. So obviously, he was out of his body, and he was able to witness this thing. Another famous story is of a of a sneaker out on a window ledge that couldn't be seen from a window that this person out of her body. Traveling around through the hospital said, you know, by the way, there's a, there's a red sneaker something I've forgotten the color, but she described it exactly sitting out on that window, ledge ridiculous. How could you possibly know that she said, well, I saw when I was out of my body, and they went and looked. And yes, there was a seeker there. There are many, many details story told about the woman who could hear both sides of the conversation that kind of vertical evidence is not the dying of the optic nerve or any of the other kinds of explanations of people, the scientists who are trying to disprove any ease have offered. Right. I would agree. I mean, the natural occuring trace amounts of D, M T that we produce. That's you know, that's I guess is contained in Iowa ska. But our brain produces this, that doesn't explain how you see sneaker and a win on a window sill and another part of the hospital. No. That's right. But this is an ignoble, and this is the other thing that materialists kind of throw in our face. It's anecdotal we need. We need hard. Data is is ions conducting any sort of, you know, massive survey of that could maybe provide that kind of statistical, non anecdotal evidence. Oh, I'm going to get you to maybe respond to that when we come back, and we're going to also open up, the, the phone lines and take questions and comments, and perhaps even hopefully we'll hear a few personal ND ease from our listeners, I'm certain we'll get those as well. Now taking us into the break. Here's the great Gladys Knight. And the pips midnight train to Georgia right here on coast to coast AM stay with us. The free zone Email newsletter is sent out six days a week, and is a great way to.

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"richard feynman" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

Talk Python To Me

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"richard feynman" Discussed on Talk Python To Me

"A lot of people think of it around data science who maybe they think machine learning they think science, but it really comes from the financial industry, and it's probably got its hearts, you know, its roots. Right. From excel more or less, right? Like right near there. The exactly and if you start, you know, kind of looking around the panels there's a lot of things around time series and grouping of data that are just really like you said really kinda from the finance world, and are very applicable to allow the kind of common problems people. Use excel for in many large organizations. Yeah. So I was looking over your blog and all the articles you've written. There's a ton of resources there looks like you've been at this for for quite a while. And you said you use the Feinman learning technique as in Richard Feynman, the physicist, right? Yes. Sorry there. Yeah. Well, I certainly didn't start off doing this. But this is something I don't remember when I first learned about it. But basically, the is he takes some sort concept. You learn it and then figure out how to teach it to someone that. Doesn't know anything. Now firemen talks about teaching it to a toddler, certainly, my heart colts aren't at the toddler level. But by going through an actually writing a blog post in getting understanding it at the level of detail that you need to to write a post put it out there on the inter- internet. It really does force you to have this feedback loop. They talks about where you think you understand something. But once you try and put it in a blog post, you realize I didn't understand his wells thought I did. And so then he kind of loop back in by time. You're done actually writing a good post. What I find is. You know, I really understand the concept. Pretty well. And that's what I try and do the blog posts get it out there. So that others can learn at interesting, you see these polished blog posts or conference presentations, or even online courses in your like that person. So deeply knows this stuff that they're teaching me this that there's it's great. I got this article or this video or whatever. But I just how my ever gonna reach that level. And the reality is probably. That person who did that presentation win on that journey as part of creating this thing, right? They may have not known very much at the beginning. But they they kind of applied this technique knowingly or unknowingly to just go like, I am interested. I know a little I'm gonna just dig in and like really put it together. Absolutely. And I think the funny thing is I was actually working on a post this morning where I had written at a couple years ago, and the API pans API's changed. So I need updated. And I like had to really go back and figure out what I'd done, and I know people talked about this before about there's gotta be some name for when you have a problem in you, Google it, and it's a blog post that you wrote and forgot about I mean it happens to me all the time. I was just thinking of that. Like I've had that problem happened to me as well. Why am I gosh? I really don't remember how this works. I know I did something with a while ago. And I Google and the best answer is something that I've done. I'm like, I'll I'm all hope is lost. Yes, exactly..

Richard Feynman Google physicist
"richard feynman" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

This Is Only A Test

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"richard feynman" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

"But I I highly recommend it. So obviously it was on Twitter yesterday. Trashing Richard Feynman, not trashing throwing shade on on Richard five. It's weird to see the tension to it's weird to see people who idolize read about growing up on mediums Twitter actively that's far like Tom Brokaw on Twitter, kind of weird and using the parlance. Yeah. But as a recommendation, obviously, right stuff the bio pic, the adaptation, the film adaptation by Taylor hack furred, which is an amazing wonderful watch. There's also a complimentary documentary that's on Netflix. It's called the mercury thirteen. Oh about the women who. Who wrote train alongside who didn't didn't get to trade along side? But was into who went through the same. I guess they're all federal or if not fighter pilots pilots as well. And the war. But there was experiments see where they they went to the same testing. They were pulled from the program because NASA didn't like the optics of wins. Yeah. Yes. And it went to went to congress, and they testified and the the very men in in the mercury program testified against them and say, this is when you read nNcholas demo- shows book spacesuit about the development of the space that he talks about wolf helping to create a mythos of the perfect physical specimen yet. It's very the book is very I mean, so far it has a very patriarchal perspective. And you know, you talking. Yeah. You have to take it for what a, but it is. It is really excellent read. I read a lovely review of I man the other day. Talking about that. It's a shame. I meant didn't get any Oscar love because this is such a terrific movie. But then they pointed out that it fits perfectly between the movies, the right stuff and Apollo thirteen. And I thought that would be a really great triple feature to enjoy. That'd be seven hours. Yeah. It would be. But you'd be getting this incredible scope of the American space program. Yeah. Across all of us. Follow with space. Cowboys. Armageddon. Yeah. That's where you and with thirteen and there aren't many movies about a Paulo programs watch from the earth to the moon the documentary series. Yes. Yes. But in terms of dramatic portrayals, and yes, yeah. But I I speaking back to space program. I I agree that it's sad that I man didn't get any Oscar love to. I don't know if you saw it. I haven't really uniquely different film than the right suffer Apollo thirteen. It's a much more internal film, and it deals much more with the emotional aspects of the partnership between Neil and his wife, who's an amazing character play clarify. And also, it's the one film that kind of that really communicates. How rickety a lot of the stuff they were doing was, you know, how tiny those capsules were and how how touch and go it was I think Hollywood reporter just did a small video story on Ryan got his costume teen suit. Oh, fabulous. I'm glad there's the. Costuming seeing some recognition out these even on the Oscars. Yeah, I haven't seen. I man I for the same reasons you're talking about I really enjoyed interstellar because it's a it's a movie about the human condition and just happens to have this backdrop of of space travel. But it's it it's not a it's a space movie. But it's not just a movie about space. Yeah. I agree. I it's actually I I have huge issues with interstellar. Really? Yeah execution, but it's the central plot idea, which is that love could somehow have a quantum dimension. I love that idea that that's that's really to me. I have no problem buying that science fiction. That's that's that's that's good storytelling. Oh, do you know sorry. So there's this huge Chinese science fiction movie. That's coming out the wondering earth. Okay. It's gigantic. I spend touted in the review in the trailer. I saw as maybe the biggest Chinese produce scifi epic yet. It looks. Stunning. But it turns out that they filmed a film of the three body problem that they never release. Yeah. I I didn't know about I've seen like from the trailers of like kind of teaser trailers of that. Yeah. In china? But it's not it's not like making out now fascinate. Yeah. I think the book was so successful like some company did just made their own film. Yeah. For then. But I don't think it's the one we want. I don't think that movie that that book adapts. Well, I I. I..

Twitter Richard Feynman Oscar Ryan Tom Brokaw Netflix Taylor NASA china congress Paulo Neil Hollywood wolf reporter seven hours
"richard feynman" Discussed on Still Untitled: The Adam Savage Project

Still Untitled: The Adam Savage Project

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"richard feynman" Discussed on Still Untitled: The Adam Savage Project

"But I I highly recommend it. So obviously it was on Twitter yesterday. Trashing Richard Feynman, not trashing throwing shade on on Richard five. It's weird to see the tension to it's weird to see people who idolize read about growing up on mediums Twitter actively that's far like Tom Brokaw on Twitter, kind of weird and using the parlance. Yeah. But as a recommendation, obviously, right stuff the bio pic, the adaptation, the film adaptation by Taylor hack furred, which is an amazing wonderful watch. There's also a complimentary documentary that's on Netflix. It's called the mercury thirteen. Oh about the women who. Who wrote train alongside who didn't didn't get to trade along side? But was into who went through the same. I guess they're all federal or if not fighter pilots pilots as well. And the war. But there was experiments see where they they went to the same testing. They were pulled from the program because NASA didn't like the optics of wins. Yeah. Yes. And it went to went to congress, and they testified and the the very men in in the mercury program testified against them and say, this is when you read nNcholas demo- shows book spacesuit about the development of the space that he talks about wolf helping to create a mythos of the perfect physical specimen yet. It's very the book is very I mean, so far it has a very patriarchal perspective. And you know, you talking. Yeah. You have to take it for what a, but it is. It is really excellent read. I read a lovely review of I man the other day. Talking about that. It's a shame. I meant didn't get any Oscar love because this is such a terrific movie. But then they pointed out that it fits perfectly between the movies, the right stuff and Apollo thirteen. And I thought that would be a really great triple feature to enjoy. That'd be seven hours. Yeah. It would be. But you'd be getting this incredible scope of the American space program. Yeah. Across all of us. Follow with space. Cowboys. Armageddon. Yeah. That's where you and with thirteen and there aren't many movies about a Paulo programs watch from the earth to the moon the documentary series. Yes. Yes. But in terms of dramatic portrayals, and yes, yeah. But I I speaking back to space program. I I agree that it's sad that I man didn't get any Oscar love to. I don't know if you saw it. I haven't really uniquely different film than the right suffer Apollo thirteen. It's a much more internal film, and it deals much more with the emotional aspects of the partnership between Neil and his wife, who's an amazing character play clarify. And also, it's the one film that kind of that really communicates. How rickety a lot of the stuff they were doing was, you know, how tiny those capsules were and how how touch and go it was I think Hollywood reporter just did a small video story on Ryan got his costume teen suit. Oh, fabulous. I'm glad there's the. Costuming seeing some recognition out these even on the Oscars. Yeah, I haven't seen. I man I for the same reasons you're talking about I really enjoyed interstellar because it's a it's a movie about the human condition and just happens to have this backdrop of of space travel. But it's it it's not a it's a space movie. But it's not just a movie about space. Yeah. I agree. I it's actually I I have huge issues with interstellar. Really? Yeah execution, but it's the central plot idea, which is that love could somehow have a quantum dimension. I love that idea that that's that's really to me. I have no problem buying that science fiction. That's that's that's that's good storytelling. Oh, do you know sorry. So there's this huge Chinese science fiction movie. That's coming out the wondering earth. Okay. It's gigantic. I spend touted in the review in the trailer. I saw as maybe the biggest Chinese produce scifi epic yet. It looks. Stunning. But it turns out that they filmed a film of the three body problem that they never release. Yeah. I I didn't know about I've seen like from the trailers of like kind of teaser trailers of that. Yeah. In china? But it's not it's not like making out now fascinate. Yeah. I think the book was so successful like some company did just made their own film. Yeah. For then. But I don't think it's the one we want. I don't think that movie that that book adapts. Well, I I. I..

Twitter Richard Feynman Oscar Ryan Tom Brokaw Netflix Taylor NASA china congress Paulo Neil Hollywood wolf reporter seven hours
"richard feynman" Discussed on Kickass News

Kickass News

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"richard feynman" Discussed on Kickass News

"So that's that's I like to say to people it's for you to go away and of these shows this evening and make of it what you will. But, but what what I am trying to draw attention to what we know. And also give my opinion a little bit on how what we know might feed into discussions that we all have late at night when we're having a drink or something students we all sat there, and what's the meaning. Give it all I use a quote, actually from Richard Feynman at the star of the shows, which he said, you know, what is the meaning of it all the asked the question in his famous essay, the value of science, and the he says actually alternately we have to admit that we don't know. But in missing that we find the open door the open door to knowledge is to is to is the idea that we don't know everything, but we do know some things so we can start to build on. I should point out that these really are shows that you're putting on you have high resolution big screens and digital effects from the same people who did the movie interstellar great day negative. They called him there. What they called Negga double negative their graphics company. Okay. Okay. Well, that's all over the place there now as well. And that what they did for interstellar because Chris Nolan is is so obsessed with accuracy right and kit and was very heavily involved or no you. All right. Yeah. So and what they did was they coded Einsteins. Theory of general relativity, so the predictions by Stein's theory into graphics software. So when you see a black hole, and you can tell you the theory illustrate it actually solves the equations, and it Ray traces lying a distant Starbucks mazer through around the black hole. And so what you see an interstellar? When you see the black hole guy Gannett, you're is the best description of a black hole. We can come up with using Einstein's theory. So I got to use that code because they had the code how cool it so. So they've done. So as I said black holes, a very central to the story of all physics because they wear knowledge stops. Why not that's wrong? It's not a knowledge stops physicists illest. They'll get upset is where where where the known collide with the unknown. So we know a lot that we also don't know some stuff and black holes the the laboratory from one of the laboratories to test that that's so cool. So that they're the they were dent generative, ID, nag and. You bring you some of your old Rockstars static to science because the thing is astronomy spectacular. And an humbling calcium actually said a astronomy, a humbling character building experience the thought of is the scale and beauty..

Richard Feynman Chris Nolan guy Gannett Stein Einstein Ray
"richard feynman" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

The Minimalists Podcast

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"richard feynman" Discussed on The Minimalists Podcast

"Into that identity may have never written this book, and it's just like little stuff like that. And I'm reading through this book. And I'm like, oh my God. I remember tweet soon as I got a copy of the book, dude. I started tweeting some lines from it because it was it was really incredible. But the other thing too about this book is at the end of each chapter. You got little summaries. Do it's it's such a good idea because there will be like there was something I was referencing. And I forgot what chapter was in. And I was like, oh, I just go to the summaries. And sure enough like I was looking for because of the summer in. That's all right. I was a nice little touch to man. Yeah. That's cool. Thank you so much. I'm glad you enjoyed it. And yeah, I think my hope is that the ideas will be scientifically grounded, but also easy to understand. And sounds like Atlanta that way with you. And I look at people like, you know, it Richard Feynman can write about physics or Stephen hawking can write about the origin the universe and their books can be fairly easy to read. It's like nobody else has an excuse, right. Like that the job of a writer is to make it digestible and easy to use. And so I like looking at examples like that to try. Inspire me to write in a better way. I teach writing class and one of the things that I try to explain to to students is there's a difference between communicative writing and expressive writing like a calculus textbook is just communicative, and it can be all grounded and all the science, but it's also boring shit. And you don't wanna take you don't wanna take the calculus textbook to the beach or even to the airport and read it on on the plane expressive writing on the other hand, like extreme expression is a manic person running down the middle of the street. Just yelling require traffic. Yeah. Requires no audience whatsoever. Right. And and I think the beauty of blending the communication actually communicating something. But doing it in a way that is expressive makes people want to read it. And so you talked about the the identity thing Ryan you brought that up I found for me that was one of the hardest things to like go people often ask like, what was the hardest thing for you to get rid of. And they. Expecting to say, well, it was a big screen TV or my second Lexus or something. And and the honest answer is like the hardest thing to let go of was my identity, and it's the first thing we ask someone, right? What do you do? And then we have to recite like what is our job title. That's on the business car what fits on the business card that is who I am as a person, and we get so tethered to.

Ryan Richard Feynman Stephen hawking Atlanta writer
How to Take A Compliment, Learn Anything in Four Steps

Curiosity Daily

08:27 min | 2 years ago

How to Take A Compliment, Learn Anything in Four Steps

"Curiosity podcast in early twenty eighteen but today, you'll get a recap. So you can learn anything in four simple steps of government pen and paper out to take notes. Is that one of the steps it sure is sweet one down three to go. So the Feinman technique is a mental model that was coined by Nobel prize winning physicist, Richard Feynman, he was so good at explaining dense scientific topics that people actually called him the great explainer. No matter the concept Feinman believed that if you couldn't reduce it to a lesson a college freshman could understand you didn't really understand it yourself. When Feinman was a student at Princeton. He had a four step process. He used to understand everything he learned and you can do it too. I pick a topic. You want to understand and write down everything, you know, about it on a notebook page as you study at every new thing you learn to that page next. Pretended. Teach your topic to a classroom. The simpler explanation the better. Once you hit gaps in your knowledge. Go back to the books and revisit the harder concepts until you can explain them. Finally, connect the facts, you know to analogies. You're familiar with to help strengthen your understanding. And that's it. The firemen technique is perfect for learning. A new idea understanding an existing idea better remembering an idea or studying for a test. We weren't kidding when we said it was good for anything.

Feinman Richard Feynman Nobel Prize Physicist Princeton
"richard feynman" Discussed on I Love Marketing with Joe Polish and Dean Jackson

I Love Marketing with Joe Polish and Dean Jackson

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"richard feynman" Discussed on I Love Marketing with Joe Polish and Dean Jackson

"You can go out and try to figure stuff out on your own, get kind of beaten up in the business world when it comes to run into business. But you know, it's a lot of people learn stuff. They really don't take courses. They don't read books, they don't go to seminars. They, you know if nothing, maybe they Google something or whatever, but they're not out there really going deep with learning. Now a second way to learn something as through the experiences of other people. You write, read their books, listen to their podcasts. You go to their seminars, you educate yourself. You know, some people do it in school. You know, there's other, but there's all kinds of schools that are available. I tend to prefer, you know, the the schools that I access that are the most effective from people that have produced a result that are actually teaching you how to produce a result, not just learning stuff for the sake learning stuff in that sense. Another way to learn, and then the most effective way to learn is to teach other. People. Right? And I think you being course crater you are really forced a lack of a better word to actually really take seriously from a different angle. What is the material? What is what is someone trying to learn the most effective ways learn? So for people that are listening to this, I would like them to be in the mindset as we have this conversation that what is it in your life that you want to learn? How do you go about doing that? Yeah, that's right. And you know, one of the greatest learners of all time, in my opinion was Richard Feynman who's a physicist worked on the Manhattan project in his early twenties, accomplished musician has more, I mean, has achieved more for the field of science than probably anyone since nine Stein and Einstein even looked at his work was like as guy knows what the hell he's talking about. Just an incredibly accomplished physicist and his method. He had a methodology of learning. And it started with teaching, right, simplify it. Write it down. If you don't understand it well enough to teach it to someone else, then you don't understand it well enough interest and and there's this whole thing you can look up online. We teach it in our memory courses is Feinman technique and how to leverage the opportunity that you have as a teacher to learn something better than I also think you know, for people in the audience who were saying, I'm not a teacher or maybe I'm not the most qualified person to teach something. I believe in it. Mentor of mine taught me this. If you know something better than ninety percent of people out there, you have an obligation to teach it because the people who are for example, I'm not a neuroscientist and I don't know as much about neuroscience as probably anyone in the research field of memory by guess what everyone who's researching memory doesn't have time to sit down and answer your questions and build online courses. Right? So what I do is I interpret the research 'cause I've got plenty of time, right? I don't have a twenty million dollar grant. From Alzheimer's foundation, and I've got plenty of time to teach you and you know the same is true that the best marketers in the world oftentimes are not teaching, right? Right. Because they're making hundreds of millions of dollars and maybe you know, Frank current is an exception and stuff like that, but the best CEO's in the world, Elon Musk is not teaching leadership courses right now. He's running his business..

physicist Elon Musk Google Alzheimer Richard Feynman Frank CEO Manhattan Stein Einstein twenty million dollar ninety percent
"richard feynman" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"richard feynman" Discussed on The Unbeatable Mind Podcast with Mark Divine

"It is very easy, unfortunately, or fortunately, for survival purposes to wire in new fears, traumatic type stuff from fortunately, we have a storytelling part of our brain that can reframe those and leverage those goggles on here. Recently, like he's of had the four torching experience of working with him furlough bit on a. We had. We're on a consulting project together, and he is every bit as intense as heat costs for sure him holidays, remarkable, his intensity is remarkable could use. Recovery time, though. I, I doubt he would agree doubt degree. I'm not gonna speak for, but I read about him just burning out. He's I don't know if burnouts and burn out than to fade away. He, he's, he's remarkable, but I think that there's a so the ability to enter in new traumatic experiences is always going to be there, but there is the side. So there's never been a example that I'm aware of human mutant that is hyper plastic their entire life. So everyone who who could learn as well as they could as when they were child. And so it's unlikely be a single gene or a single brain area or something like that. If it were, we probably would have seen the mutation in this hyper learning person would be have been talked about or no. However, there are certain individuals have been discussed throughout history who have maintained an intense or a recognizable ability to change evolve themselves in ways. Now, the one that comes to mind is the one that I learned about as a child because I grew up in a family with. Scientists for father. We didn't talk about who won the Super Bowl. We talked about who won the Nobel prize. And so a Richard Feynman the famous define men was always discussed. My dad, you know, new wasn't close with them, but I heard a lot about him growing up. He was remarkably learned. He taught himself to draw in his sixties slowly, mind you, he, you know, it's not like he learned overnight and he he was into flotation tanks and he had his Nobel's. Most people don't even know what he did for his Nobel barely understand it. I think it was quantum electrodynamics or something, which I definitely don't understand, but, but what's remarkable about Feinman to me is his notion of curiosity and playing. So I've spent some time recently thinking about, like, let's put more pointed definition on what those are and why they might be useful. So curiosity to me is when you're very eager or excited to know the outcome, but you are truly unattached to the outcry. You want to know, but you don't even know what you want to know. Otherwise, it's not curiosity. Otherwise, it's something else. Curiosity. The outcome tends to like real curiosity to anchor your attention and leveraged the.

Feinman Nobel prize Richard Feynman
"richard feynman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"richard feynman" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Let's calm and says that by narrowing the focus of, our questions we lose out on how they connect to the big ones and without people thinking about, the big questions there will be consequences take for example climate change so we have this absurd idea, that the scientists should figure out what's wrong with the, situation vis-a-vis the environment and then they hand it? Over to the politicians are supposed to figure out? What to do until the thinking and the action become inseparable we're not going to get where we need to get And you think about the people who discover things right the people who we depend on for information and most of those people are are. Academics researchers but then you think about the people who I'm trying to, think of the best way to, like three hundred sixty? Degree people who could really communicate a variety of ideas renaissance people in the modern age I can think of, like Richard Feynman or Stephen, Jay Gould or Neil degrasse Tyson or VERA Rubin right like they stand out because they felt like they could talk about literature and science in the cosmos in philosophy all at the same time it's. Very interesting and, one of the most, intriguing, things about that almost, all of them, are scientists and it's fascinating that we think the sciences as the most highly technical of any of the disciplines so for example we think about literature history psychology is more available but, in? Fact the great leaders who have really made some of their wisdom and their insight available to. Largest number of people are almost all scientists Einstein.

Neil degrasse Tyson Richard Feynman VERA Rubin Jay Gould Stephen
"richard feynman" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"richard feynman" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"It's stuff you wrote back in two thousand to two thousand one i read the book fabric valid in two thousand two and he's talking about the power of quantum mechanics in the potential for quantum computers and in so doing he and richard feynman both realized that a quantum computer to be fundamentally unlike anything we have in this world today in the way that quote roughly ends is that the only way to explain the power of these computers is to invoke the notion that it is sort of engaging the resources across parallel universes that if you just use the resources at one university there's so much you can do but in this case you actually are in the most poetic sense harnessing almost refracted echoes across the parallel universes to do computation in a fundamentally different way and that usually benz the mind of most scientists even physicist to the point of breaking or looking the other way in the coun response to this is i don't understand one bit of that and it had been captivated so i want to jump into a number of areas that i know not nothing about or very little about even though i might use the words occasionally people you're going to let valley are are want to do but for people who don't have the background i want to highlight a few things about you or actually one just as we're delving into some of the science so your background or a lot of your background is engineering electrical engineering bachelors and masters started to state and you're able to do so much of that partially because you've finished your undergrad and two and a half years.

richard feynman physicist one bit
"richard feynman" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"richard feynman" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"It's stuff you wrote back in two thousand to two thousand one i read the book fabric valid in two thousand two and he's talking about the power of quantum mechanics in the potential for quantum computers and in so doing he and richard feynman both realized that a quantum computer to be fundamentally unlike anything we have in this world today in the way that quote roughly ends is that the only way to explain the power of these computers is to invoke the notion that it is sort of engaging the resources across parallel universes that if you just use the resources at one university there's so much you can do but in this case you actually are in the most poetic sense harnessing almost refracted echoes across the parallel universes to do computation in a fundamentally different way and that usually benz the mind of most scientists even physicist to the point of breaking or looking the other way in the coun response to this is i don't understand one bit of that and it had been captivated so i want to jump into a number of areas that i know not nothing about or very little about even though i might use the words occasionally people you're going to let valley are are want to do but for people who don't have the background i want to highlight a few things about you or actually one just as we're delving into some of the science so your background or a lot of your background is engineering electrical engineering bachelors and masters started to state and you're able to do so much of that partially because you've finished your undergrad and two and a half years.

richard feynman physicist one bit
"richard feynman" Discussed on KHJ 930 AM

KHJ 930 AM

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"richard feynman" Discussed on KHJ 930 AM

"To to learn because when you have to learn something you read it you study it try and get a grasp of it and then when you have to communicate especially to children you have to simplify the ideas you have to be able to describe it in ways that don't just use big jargon and you know big words and complicated jargon and all of this kind of you have to actually communicate the essence of what you're trying to learn i think we all kind of intuitively understand it not only that when you have to teach something you have to fill in the gaps right you're going to realize that you don't know everything you don't have as complete of a grasp of something as you thought so you have to go back to it i'm i'm bringing this up because of a recent study that i was reading about online where people were looking at this is this is by the way this is nothing new right and even richard feynman is not novel in presenting this i think we've known teachers have known for a long time when you have to teach something your knowledge of that subject is going to increase substantially significantly because to teach something and when you teach something you're going to learn more about it you're going to understand it better right well there's a new study that's been looking at why why does this happen i mean why is it why why wouldn't we just learn when we read it learn you're trying to get that information to our head why is it then we when we have to teach it and when we do go through the process of teaching that we grasp it better and they they found this new study that was published in applied cognitive psychology a journal for psychologists shows that actually what what's happening is that when you have to retrieve some information your brain it it it makes it stronger inside of your head right when you have to so you.

richard feynman
"richard feynman" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"richard feynman" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Of some children in some remote village in in south america seeing a white person for the very first time things so that's type things that really surprise you then there is a b stomach curiosity epi stemming curiosities the release of knowledge what drives us to learn things i it's the pleasure you know or anticipation of pleasure that coming from new knowledge and that's uniquely as you as we said before that is just uniquely human everything around him except perhaps politics which was a very good thing because he leaves the time of the borjas and they basically killed anybody who got involved in politics indeed indeed and and you know we just spent some time with david mccullough not long ago and the curiosity of the wright brothers was remarkable i mean these two guys just kept going at it and they were curious and they test tested and they were curious and in their own way they were hobbyists but they were doing things that well nardo was thinking about and puzzled over himself that curiosity drove them too you're absolutely right of course you know i mean not all were he's ideas i mean it'll be fewer than the things we think we're you know there were things that wearing the air at the time but the fact that he was interested in all of those is what makes him so absolutely unique indeed indeed and very few people have that kind of mind in that level and breadth and depth of curiosity let's talk about that other person you talk about in the book richard feynman and by the way who is he for folks who may not have ever heard his name.

south america david mccullough richard feynman wright
"richard feynman" Discussed on FT Alphachat

FT Alphachat

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"richard feynman" Discussed on FT Alphachat

"Precision as we do now and efficient markets the only issue is that this is early days for the adoptive markets pompous and so we don't yet have the corpus of research that we have for officiant markets which has been around for for many decades in particular what the adoptive markets ipod this tells us to do is to actually collect different kinds of data from what we're doing now and analyze them differently in particular we have to think about financial markets more as an ecosystem rather than a mechanistic kind of system and what that means is that we have to start collecting information about the ecosystem the same way that an ecologist or volition airy biologist would we have to ask what the key species are in the ecosystem what their biomass czar how they compete how they survive and adapt all of the various different aspects of the flora and fauna of financial markets have to be measured quantified and analyzed we don't do that right now we have very different view financial markets that's really driven by this physicists perspective but in fact we don't have a physical model we really have a biological one that you have anything against all your friends in the physics department's mit but that may not be the relevant science exactly physics is a much more simple approach to modeling the world than biology because the underlying phenomenon are that much simpler you know richard feynman than great physicists said at best one year at caltech graduation in the midst of a stock market crash feinman said to his students imagine how much more complicated physics would be if electrons had feelings and i think that really captures the difference between physics and biology.

richard feynman feinman caltech one year
"richard feynman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:06 min | 3 years ago

"richard feynman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is very low it might seem that it wouldn't matter very much if we couldn't predict what comes out of leg holes there are black holes veer us but it is so matter of british if determinism suffragette ability of bricks with leg holes that good breakdown in other situations worse if determination breaks down we can't be sure of our past history either the history books and our memories the aleutians past that title says who we are without it we lose power density it was therefore very important to determine whether information really less lost in black holes or whether in principle that goodly recovered many scientists felt that information should not be lost but no one could suggest a mechanism by which it reserved the arguments lend on for years finally what i think is the answer depends on the idea of richard feynman that there isn't a single history but many different possible histories each with their own rob ability in this case there are two types of history well there is some black hole into which part of goals cantrall but her tightened there is no legged hole the point is that from the outside one can be certain whether there is so lacked hole or not so there is solely chance that there is a whole this possibility is enough to preserve reserve information but the formation is not returned in a very useful for it's like burning an encyclopedia information that's not lost if you keep all this mode connectors but it is difficult to read scientists thornton tonight had a bed with another physicist sean bristol vetted formation would be lost in black holes linda i discovered how information could be reserved conceded that i gave telling brisk an encyclopedia maybe you should have him currently the information is cinco a rice lagged hole watch this space what does this tell us about whether it is possible to fall in love hole and come out in another universe the existence of alternative history with lacked whole suggests this might be possible the whole would need alert less rotating it might add a passage to another universe but you couldn't come back to our universe so all key space flight i'm not going at right at so message of this lecture does that.

richard feynman sean bristol thornton physicist cinco