19 Burst results for "Richard Evans"

"richard evans" Discussed on That Superhero Thing presents The Loki Takeover

That Superhero Thing presents The Loki Takeover

01:34 min | Last month

"richard evans" Discussed on That Superhero Thing presents The Loki Takeover

"You can contact us on any of our shows and submit thoughts and theories for next week's pod funds assemble so we won't thoughts on episode two theories on where the rest of the series go in and we would preferably like some more. What is no some of them. If you enjoyed the show please do consider written on reviewing it on apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to podcast you can leave us. It means a well to us. It really helps us out in a and discovered as you mentioned as well we will be launching. Aww patriot channel i september. We've released some pictures of a tears on twitter. There been sitting on form. We made them awhile ago from ones. So we've got sidekick superhero and god the more in the future but that's what we're going whether the moments and you gonna tell you exactly what each one entails. At this point bought we will have a llama news comment of the next couple of weeks because we are only on the day recording this twenty days away from launch and we've got some good content for as well we've got got room. What is a bad move review. Which is which is already. And that's some fun to listen to but it wasn't fun today and then we've got We've got an interview with With richard evans. Who spoke to on on this week's episode as well. I'm gonna chat with him about his. His work with direct. One involves getting scoops. Where information from really good into that. While i enjoyed that. So yeah they'll be some more information coming on that soon or that those for this week so thanks very much spezia next week guys. Bye bye bye..

apple twitter richard evans spezia
"richard evans" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

08:40 min | 6 months ago

"richard evans" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Today we wanna talk about coca truly of plan to the gods. It's often confused with coconuts or cal. But coco is a family unique to south. America typically about a meter or too high and has been in use by indigenous peoples for thousands of years The latest finds i think. Indicate use of coco coca quaid's coca. That's been chewed about eight thousand years ago of all the plans to the gods coca is a master katori. That is a plant which is chewed by people. There are two types of master qataris. There is the mechanical that is plants or plant products which are chewed purely for mechanical reasons. Essentially it's just something enjoyable. It doesn't produce physiological response. A good example of that would be The resin of the red spruce tree which traditionally chewed by indigenous peoples in new england large resin which was popular amongst the indigenous peoples of siberia. And the best known of all which is chiefly which is the source of chewing gum cheek lay is a resident of this padilla tree which also produces a very tasty indigenous edible fruit and it is best known to the western world. It has had a major impact on our history in a very unique interesting way cheek lay. As i said was native to central america it was long chewed by indigenous peoples there and the commercialization of chocolate and chewing gum got. Its start with general. Santa ana the mexican hero of the alamo by the eighteen sixties. He was actually living in exile in brooklyn he was planning his return to his native country to relieve his tensions. He chewed a pile of which she brought from home. When it lasts he left. Staten island for mexico. He left a bunch of chico behind with his host. Thomas adams who was an amateur inventor adams initially tried to vulcanized the cheek. Layla with rubber to produce waterproof shoes. This failed hot weather caused the souls of the galoshes to stick to the pavement. His neck sprains formers to market the cheek late to the dental community. As denture adhesive. This also failed. Finally adams flatten chiefly with his wife. Rolling pin added sugar. Cut it into little pieces and put it into a brooklyn candy store for sale. The results were immediately snapped up as they say leading to the birth of a multi billion dollar chewing gum industry. Now there are two species of cocoa. As i said this to inter species in the genus earth land. But there's two species that are chewed as what we know is as coca leaves or cocoa powder and this work was originally done by tim plowman. Who was a student of shelties who spent about ten years in south america. Trying to figure out the coca story so plumbing. Broken down into four varieties coca erath rocks lund coca which is bolivian coca which is typical of the highland of the central and southern andes. The second variety is earth rock slim. Cocoa variety purdue. Which is the coca powder. I'll be talking quite a bit about the other. Species was november greenwich tennessee. Which plumbing broke into two varieties. There was no greenwich tension over benintendi which is colombian coca. Which is what the kogi indians of northern colombia chew and the final variety was november. Benintendi unc which is which grown around trujillo in peru which figures into coca cola. Which i'll be getting into now coca is known best as a powerful stimulant but it has many other benefits as well it. Suppresses hunger prevent altitude sickness and pain relief and is very rich in minerals vitamins and proteins. So means the people that are chewing this or chewing this for the stimulating effects. But also it's an important part of their diet. Especially amongst very poor societies like the miners and the highest parts of the andes. The kobi's the extraordinary people from northern colombia. This is not an amazon. These living in this here in nevada. It is a snow. Capped mountain overlooking the caribbean the only snowcapped mountain overlooking the ocean. As far as i know they are prodigious chewers of coca in fact coca is so central to their way of life that when one kogi meets another the typical offering is to open his coca bag which they're never without which is a hand woven fiber sack and his friend takes leaves out of there and choose them and vice versa. So it's the ultimate bonding exercise. As i said coca has been found as far back as eight thousand years ago and remember that when you make a find it doesn't mean that's exactly when it begins what it means is. It's older than eight thousand years ago. And one of the most famous cultures in terms of coca chewing from coastal peru northern coastal prude. That's much mo c. h. e. And they were famous for many things. Perhaps the most extraordinary is the tomb the tomb lord of saipan which has been called the king tut of the new world. It is an extraordinary temple complex with the king the lord of cpap on with several of his attendants think they've found coca in the tomb as well. But it's really worth having a look at some of the pictures. They've done facial reconstructions. They've done dna analysis. It's an extraordinary story and something which really needs to be seen to be appreciated. Also another spectacular fine was the lady of cousy. Ao which is a similar story and in terms of motorway pottery it is a depiction of many aspects of daily life many of which involve coca chewing when you see the heads of the most people in the larkhall harare museum in lima. Many of them have a big quit of coca stuffed under their left cheek. The other thing that's famous about their padres it's incredibly pornographic they depict all sorts of extraordinary Sexual acts and professor schulte's remarked on this by saying if they spent as much time performing these axes they did for trying them in pottery. Perhaps they wouldn't have died out now. Coca was brought to europe in the fifteen hundreds from south america and the became extremely popular all the way up to the nineteenth century. Sigmund freud was an early proponent promoting it uses a stimulant and a potential treatment for morphine addiction. Others who were big fans of coca included. Thomas edison ulysses s grant playwright henrik gibson and even jewels burn. They were primarily a fond of what was known as coca wine. Vamp mariani this was a wine that was produced in eighteen forty four for about fifty years and it had coke in it so your net not only had all the benefits of drinking wine. You had the powerful kick of the stimulant that is the extract of the coca leaf. That was put in it. Another reason the coca leaf became popular is an eighteen eighty six and atlantan drugs named john. Pemberton came up with a concoction of coca leaves. And kola nuts from africa which he called coca cola and it relieves deposit refreshes although it doesn't refreshes much as it used to because the cocaine has been taken out of it but a drink which had cocaine and kola nuts which are very rich and caffeine. We're definitely give you a powerful kick however as it became obvious that cocaine was highly addictive and therefore very dangerous cocaine was removed from many of the tonics in which was added in story. Ville my native new orleans you'll red light district in nineteen hundreds. I was very common to use cocaine tracks as pain reliever and for a variety of other ailments but these are the kinds of things which ones people understood better. The chemistry of what was going on. That cocaine was removed from many of these products. Interestingly enough coca and cocaine is still produced in enormous quantities.

africa tim plowman south america europe Staten island brooklyn mexico new england amazon nevada America henrik gibson peru Thomas adams two species Today new orleans Santa ana thousands of years northern colombia
"richard evans" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

08:32 min | 6 months ago

"richard evans" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Just a quick thanks to one of our sponsors and we'll be right back to the show. This sultry episode is brought to you by linked in sales navigators many listeners. It's podcast no. My first position was in sales after college. I thought it was important to become a dealmaker and improve very important. I was at true sin. Works long ago which was based in san jose california and i wish. I wish i had something like lincoln sales navigator when i worked there. Lincoln sales navigator on lincoln is really linked in on steroids or as the official copy puts the best version of linked in for sales professionals tap into the power of lincoln. Seven hundred million plus member network. Lincoln sales navigator gives you twenty monthly in mail messages lead recommendations unlimited searches actionable insights in news and access to free courses on linked in learning. So in my case. I was targeting. Ceo's and cto's of other companies want to know who they knew. I want to know what they were reading what they were writing etc. You get all of this in lincoln sales navigator all of that is at your fingertips target the right prospects and decision-makers unlocking fifteen percent more pipeline from source opportunities a seventeen percent lift when saving leads on sales navigator and forty two percent. Larger deal sizes. Start your sixty day free trial. That's a two month. Free trial of lincoln sales navigator today by going to lincoln dot com slash navigator. That's lincoln dot com slash navigator to start your sixty day. Free trial of lincoln navigator. Check it out. Lincoln dot com slash navigator. Everyone on mark plotkin. Dr mark plotkin amazon conservation team. I'm an ethnobotanist. A scientist who studies the uses of plants fungi and even animals from additional purposes in the rainforests of central and south america. I've been doing this for almost forty years. I amer. i was a student of the great harvard. Ethnobotanist richard of in schulte's often called the father of ethno botany. I dropped out of college after my freshman year and started working in a museum at harvard. Essentially as gopher enrolled in a night school course on the botany chemistry of hallucinogenic plants taught by professor shelties himself. And i've been hooked ever since the point of this. Podcast is to teach and to learn about the hallucinogenic empty genyk mind altering substances used by shames and other healers around the world with a heavy emphasis on the rainforest and to be able to share some of what. I've learned some of what i've seen both answers and questions with people who have an interest in this topic. Now i learned from professor. Schulte's if you want to save the rainforests you have to save the indigenous peoples of the rain forest and if you want to save the indigenous peoples of the rainforest you not only have to work in partnership with all of them you particularly have to partner with the shame in themselves. This is what we called bio cultural conservation. It's not about saving rainforests or saving. Shame it's they are intricately linked and if you look at the best rainforest left in the amazon. It tends to be not in national parks but indigenous reserves so indigenous peoples from the view of the amazon conservation team or the glue that holds the forest intact and shame or the glue that holds the indigenous cultures intact when missionaries go in the first person they attack and typically try to undercut is the shame in the medicine manner. Medicine woman who as i said is the cultural glue that holds the the tribe and the tribal culture together and it's the tribal culture that holds the rainforest in place. And we'll be talking more about that to the course of this podcast. Now as i said. I followed in the footsteps of professor. Schulte's who was a pioneer in many aspects of plan to the gods partnering with albert hoffman. The chemist who invented lsd to write the classic book plants of the gods which are highly recommend. Shelties was the first scientist to study. Iowa's go take iowa institute in place in a tribal setting and go through ceremonies many iowa ceremonies with the indigenous peoples themselves. And let me read for you. My favorite quote of shelties on iowa. There's a magic intoxicant in the northwest amazon. In which the indians believe can free soul from corporal confinement and allow it to wander free and return to the body. it will the soul. Bus untrammelled liberates. Its owner from the everyday life and introduces him or her to wondrous realms of what he considers reality and permits him or hurt to communicate with his ancestors. The kitchen term for this abbreviating drink i- awash it divine of the soul and refers to this freeing of the spirit now i oscar and many other hallucinogens. And anthea jen's are coming to the fore studies and we'll get into this and of course the podcast are now indicating that the birth of many if not most religions or rooted in these types of magical plants or other hallucinogenic properties found in fungi and in some cases even animals. There's a new book coming out. Called the immortality key that i recommend by a fellow named brian rura rescue which talks about the origins of christianity and the genetic fungi there indications. Some of the beginnings of judaism may be rooted in these mind altering substances as well. But as i said there's fodder for more discussions of this. The most significant medical development in terms of western medicine recently has been the mainstreaming of hallucinogens into our own western medicine. Hallucinogens are the shamanic medicine. Par excellence but now they're finding their way almost magically almost shimon undecly into very traditional halls of western medicine these hallucinogens in the tropical forest permit medicine men and women to investigate diagnose treat and sometimes cure ailments that have a partial emotional response basis which is why they can sometimes alleviate a medical issue unresponsive to the therapies of western physician in a sense hallucinogens or vegetable or fungal scalpels hs which allow the shame in defined analyzed treat and sometimes cure emotional issues which our own physicians cannot the recent creation of the center for psychedelic consciousness. Research at johns hopkins university supported in part by my buddy tim ferriss as well. As similar efforts underway at other prominent universities like yale and then y you sh- monica medicine is rapidly shifting from being considered unconventional Non-effective primitive to conventional. It is becoming part of conventional medicine many the initial evaluations from the western medical perspective and focused on masculine. Which is of course from mexican. Peyote we'll be talking about later. Podcast suicide simon from magic mushrooms and iowa itself these mind altering remedies have been clinically shown clinically proven to produce promising therapeutic effects in some cases of addiction. Depression and even. Ocd clinicians are equally enthused about the possibilities of experimenting with these therapies to treat ailments as diverse as anorexia early stage alzheimer's insomnia and even ptsd one of the most terrible afflictions of our troops. The late stanislav graaf a pioneer in the field of psychotherapy. I love this quote was fond of saying that psychedelics or to psychology the same way. The telescopes are to astronomy. Microscopes are to the study of bacteria this newfound interest in a hallucinogenic. Therapies is not only improving our understanding of the human mind it also driving an enhanced appreciation.

sixty day fifteen percent albert hoffman stanislav graaf mark plotkin san jose california forty two percent two month Seven hundred million seventeen percent tim ferriss richard Ceo iowa judaism both amazon christianity Schulte lincoln
"richard evans" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

06:48 min | 6 months ago

"richard evans" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Focus this episode on my mentor. Richard evans shelties often known as the father of ethanol. Botany and anytime schulte's was addressed that way. He was quick to point out. That ethnobotanist began with an expedition launched by an egyptian pharaoh to the land of punt somalia in search of frankencense tris. And he wasn't quite that old nonetheless. He was a towering figure. In fact the towering figure in twentieth century ethnobotanist. Now it was warm september. Night in nineteen seventy four. When i entered his classroom the classroom was like an ethnographic museum. One wall was covered with huge green maps or the amazon from the rafters hung amazonian indian. Dance costumes with glistening. Black demon faces too long. Parallel display cases linked the room filled to overflowing with botanical booty from around the world. Black palm slogans from columbia chinese silver hashish pipes from india in tiny bows and arrows from the congo presiding. Over the tableau was professor. Schulte's himself tall crew cut and dressed in an immaculate white lab coat white drescher crimson tie and silver wire rim glasses as he called the class to order and began to show his slides. One picture in particular changed my life forever. A scene in which three indians in grass skirts and bark cloth masks danced at the edge of jungle clearing quote. Here you see. Three into the kuna tribe doing the sacred. Kera dance under the influence of plants to keep away the forces of darkness. The one on the left has a harvard degree next slide. Please from matt moment on. I and many many others hooked on plants. Ethanol botany indigenous peoples and the amazon rainforest. Shelters without question was not only an incredible inspiration to a students but the greatest botanical explorer of the amazon and the twentieth century he survived plane crashes boat sinkings bandits hunger dysentery and repeated bouts of malaria but always insisted he never had any adventures in the amazon shelties lived in travel with forest peoples for almost fourteen years sometimes amongst tribes. That had never seen a white man before. At one point he was gone for so long. That friends in the colombian capital of bogie tied giving them up for dead. They were in the process of arranging memorial services in his honor when he reappeared at the national herbarium frightening more than a few of his fellow. Bought us ethnobotanist taxonomic writer and photographer. Shelties is widely regarded as a great conservationist as well in december of forty one. He entered the amazon on a mission to study. How indigenous peoples us plants for medicinal ritual and practical purposes. He went on to spend so much time with these indigenous peoples that he created a relationship or relationships with them equalled by few people in the western scientific community is very focus was the northwest amazon. An area that remained largely unknown uninfluenced by the outside world isolated by the end to the west and dense jungles and impassable rapids on all other sides in this remote area shelties lived amongst low little study tribes mapped uncharted rivers and was the first ientist to explore some areas that have not been researched since his notes and photographs are some of the only existing documentation of digital cultures in the region of the amazon. On the cusp of change. And let me refer you to do. Richard schulte's storybook map on the amazon team website. Amazon team dot org. This multifaceted multimedia presentation of his life and adventures has to be seen to be appreciated. This is created by the amazon conservation team under the leadership in this case of the cartographer. Brian hitler so me talk a little bit about what schulte's was like to the people around him. Let me start with the students. In the words of dr paul cox who was an entering graduate student at harvard. Nineteen seventy seven. He was looking for thesis adviser which graduates students to somebody to study under essentially a mentor and he received some very disturbing advice. He was told by one professor. There whatever you do. Stay away from richard evans shelties. He's been a decade alone in the amazon. He's a dinosaur and he's dangerous to otherwise. Could students way davis an undergraduate at the time said to the undergraduate students. That shelties was a hero in an age without heroes and in the seventies or eighties. It was the first ethnic botanical. Congress in latin america held in mexico and much of the tenor of the discussion was how the mexicans and other latinos resented the fact that all of these gringos coming down there and doing all these studies and that the latinos should study their own plants and their own indigenous peoples and i had to smile when the proceedings were published. And here's the dedication pot richard evans. Schulte's king aprio el camino for richard shelties. Who blazed the trail so scholte's was beloved by the undergraduate students by the graduate students by many. If not most if not all of us latin colleagues but i think most important of all is how he is regarded by the indigenous peoples themselves. Now i've been to oklahoma. Were solti studied. Peyote and i've lived in oaxaca where solti studied the magic mushrooms and i have spent decades going back and forth to the northwest amazon. Were shelties did his most important fieldwork of all and where he made. The scientific discovery of iowa osco. And so let me tell you what. The indigenous peoples told me in oklahoma in mexico and in the amazon shelties was the first white person we met who not only treated us with respect but actually wanted to learn from us by our side. He dan star sacred dances..

Richard schulte Brian hitler oaxaca mexico Richard evans dr paul cox twentieth century india Peyote Amazon oklahoma richard evans december of forty one latin america amazon One picture Schulte solti One wall Congress
"richard evans" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

06:48 min | 6 months ago

"richard evans" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"This time around. I am passing the microphone to someone else. We have a very special edition featuring not one three short episodes of the plants of the gods podcasts brand new who stood by my friend and pass podcast guest. Dr mark plotkin. I've listened to all of his episodes and chose a few favorites to share with you. Also who is mark. Mark plotkin on twitter at doc. Mark plotkin p. t. k i n. is an ethnobotanist who serves as the president of the amazon conservation team which has partnered with roughly eighty tribes in south america map and improve management and protection of roughly one hundred million acres of incestual rainforests. We've done some work together. In the past he's best known to the general public as the author of the book. Tales of a shaman's apprentice recommended. One of the most popular books ever written about the amazon rainforest. His most recent book is the amazon subtitle. What everyone needs to know you can find my interview with mark at tim blog forward slash mark plotkin. I'm excited to share with you. These episodes from plants of the gods for million reasons these specific episodes cover the adventures and skills and belief systems of the legendary ethnobotanist. Richard evans shelties an episode. On wasco. and on coca and cocaine these episodes cover a lot fascinating grounds. Many facets of plants. botany history. It goes on and on if you enjoy them and what more. Be sure to check out the plants of the gods podcast. Wherever podcasts can be found you can learn about everything from hallucinogenic snuffs to diverse formulations of sharara plant mixture which relaxes the muscles of the body including the diaphragm That leads to s fixation. Used for hunting and all sorts of other things now in modern anesthesia. Anesthesiology the heck herbs of medieval europe. And what those were used for what they are reported to have been used for and how they're depicted in artwork and much much more wind. Did you know that wine red wine specifically has particular. i believe. Anti microbial antibacterial effects. It goes on and on so you can learn a lot through this. Podcast i ripped through it. Just benched through it and a handful of days. Please enjoy this episode of the tim. Ferriss show featuring plants of the gods. This episode is brought to you by tunnel. That's t. o. N. a. l. Tonal is the world's most intelligent home gym and personal trainer. That's the tagline from their website. Folks so gives you the one sentence summary. By eliminating traditional middleweights total can deliver two hundred pounds of resistance in a device smaller than a flat screen. Tv it mounts right on your wall with no floorspace required. I've had a few months now. After a number of close friends recommended tunnel to me and it allows me to do things that i would normally need a huge gym for like cable chop lift or rotational exercises and it allows me to do other things that are nearly impossible. Otherwise like eccentric loading which. I'll talk about later. Total is precision engineered and designed to be the world's most advanced strength studio and personal trainer. It uses breakthrough technology like adaptive digital weights and learning together with the best experts in resistance training. So you can get stronger faster. One of my friends who used to be a competitive skier very high level. Competitive skier has doubled his strength in many exercises over a period of months. So what are these adaptive digital weights. Tunnels patented digital weight system makes thousands of calculations a second to deliver you a smooth weightlifting. Experience using their advanced electronic motor technology and a lot of the buttons are built right into the handles themselves into the grips. So you don't need to move around and it is extremely easy to use. Tonal lets you just the weight in one pound increments and you can do it on the fly. Something that was never possible with traditional dumbbells. It's easy to dial up and down with just the touch of a button. Tonal also has built in dynamic. Wait boats like chains eccentric and they're patent pending smart flex technology. So you can experiment with more ways to get stronger. Faster without the hassle. Extra equipment like chains and bans the e centric. Which i mentioned means that you can set a mode that allows you to say just as an example bicep curl fifteen pounds up and then lower automatically twenty twenty five pounds down and it is incredible. How much you can get done in. Just a handful of minutes and when you use this type of technology so check it out. Try tonal t o nfl. The world's smartest home gym for thirty days in your home. And if you don't love it you can return it for a full refund visit. Www dot tonal dot com t. o. n. a. l. dot com and for a limited time. Get one hundred dollars off of smart accessories when you use promo code tim. Twenty-one like i'm ready for my first drink at checkout that's www dot tonal t. o. n. a. l. dot com. Promo code. tim. Twenty one t i m twenty one. Total be your strongest. This episode is brought to you by athletic greens. I get asked all the time. What i would take if i could only take one supplement the answer is invariably athletic greens. I view it as all in one. Nutritional insurance i recommended it in fact in the four hour body. This is more than ten years ago. And i did not get paid to do so with approximately seventy five vitamins minerals and whole foods sourced ingredients. You'd be very hard pressed to find a more nutrient dense and comprehensive formula on the market. It has multivitamins multi-mineral greens complex probiotics and prebiotics for gut health and immunity formula digestive enzymes adapted jin's and much more. I usually take it once or twice a day just to make sure i've covered my bases if i miss anything. I'm not aware of. Of course i focus on nutrient dense meals to begin with. That's the basis but athletic. Greens makes it easy to get. A lot of nutrition will food art readily available from travel packets. I always have them in my bag when i'm zipping around right now athletic. Greens is giving my audience. A special offer on top of their all in one formula which is a free vitamin d supplement and five free travel packs with your first subscription purchase. Many of us are deficient in vitamin d. I found that true for myself which is usually produced in our bodies from sun exposure so adding vitamin d supplement to your daily routine is a great option for additional immune support support your immunity gut health and energy by visiting athletic greens dot com slash. Tim you'll receive up to a year supply vitamin d and five free travel pack with your subscription again.

thirty days fifteen pounds amazon Richard evans Mark plotkin south america Tim two hundred pounds mark twitter one hundred dollars mark plotkin once twenty twenty five pounds one hundred million acres Twenty-one one pound thousands of calculations first drink Tales of a shaman's apprentice
"richard evans" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:47 min | 6 months ago

"richard evans" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"On Friday, there will be some sunshine poking through 46 for the high real fields in the thirties 58 degrees right now in Boston. President Joe Biden is announcing a diverse group of nominees to be federal judges. That announcement includes the filling of a high profile position that may lead to another nomination in the future. President Joe Biden has nominated U. S District Court Judge Catan Gee Brown Jackson to replace Merrick Garland on the U. S Court of Appeals for the D C circuit. Her nomination is significant because the D C circuit is often called a stepping stone to the Supreme Court. Around. Jackson is widely considered a contender for a future Supreme Court vacancy, a move that could make history and fulfill Biden's campaign promise to nominate a black woman to the nation's highest court. Every HARPER ABC NEWS Washington Retired Boston police captain has been released on personal what Congress is facing federal charges of overtime fraud. Richard Evans of Hanover was arrested as part of an ongoing overtime pay investigation into the department's evidence warehouse. The FBI's Boston offices he conspired with officers he supervised and stole over $12,000 in overtime that was not worked over a five year period of BBC's Carl Stevens tells us quick reaction to the arrest from acting Mayor Kim Jaime Mayor. Janey said the charges against retired captain Evans are in her words disturbance even more so, given the fact that he oversaw the critically important evidence control unit and she talked about The negative ripple effects of something like this. Any fraud is unacceptable. Breaks public trust. Dishonors the thousands of officers who serve our communities every day with honesty, integrity and bravery, she said. The public must have faith and trust in its local law enforcement, and that's why she's committed to rooting out any behavior by.

Richard Evans Boston Biden thirties Jackson Friday U. S Court of Appeals FBI BBC Congress Carl Stevens 46 Supreme Court Merrick Garland Janey Catan Gee Brown Jackson over $12,000 U. S District Court Washington Evans
Former Boston Police Captain Charged in Overtime Fraud Scheme

WBZ Midday News

00:48 sec | 6 months ago

Former Boston Police Captain Charged in Overtime Fraud Scheme

"Boston police officer facing investment and theft charges he's accused of logging hours. He never worked. Details from WBC's Jim Mackay. Former Boston police captain 62 year old Richard Evans of Hanover is the latest to be charged in an overtime pay scam. That was operating within the evidence control unit within the Boston Police Department. Evans is accused of logging shifts. He never worked and also overseeing other officers who were pulling the same scam. He's accused of collecting tens of thousands of dollars from 2015 to 2019. It was last year when nine other officers were charged with similar crimes by the Boston FBI office. Evans is facing charges of embezzlement, wire fraud and conspiracy to steal federal funds. He has a virtual court appearance set for later today at Boston Federal Court. Jim McKay,

Jim Mackay Boston Richard Evans WBC Boston Police Department Hanover Evans Boston Fbi Boston Federal Court Jim Mckay
"richard evans" Discussed on The Tennis Podcast

The Tennis Podcast

05:23 min | 1 year ago

"richard evans" Discussed on The Tennis Podcast

"Hello everyone and welcome to the tennis podcasts. Wimbledon relived. Not Say Manic Monday. Is Strange to think that in an alternate universe rule experiencing the busiest most hectic day, if the tennis calendar down the road, well down the road from me, and that's w nineteen and instead well I didn't know about you, but I'm something my safer why I'm dressed. I was GONNA. Say My pants spur. I'm dressed, but I'm certainly not in A. Poised and ready to. Go on the tally or anything. I mean it is a very different university living in. The the same time I still find myself trying to crowbar these matches into to be able to watch them all in time because we just watched four hours of a match for today's podcast, having recorded yesterday's show, and then we've got tomorrow's look forward to I mean look I'm having the time of my life. I'm relive I'm reliving two thousand and one and loving every single minute of it, but yeah around actually making meals for children and go into the pollock, and all that sort of thing I am struggling a bit to fit it all in hence sleep out today we spending. We're dwelling quite a while in in two thousand and one land. Aren't we today tomorrow? Yeah and it turns out that that's important. Because David didn't see two thousand one Wimbledon. Much of two thousand and one full stop you in a windowless room in the ASS. End of Germany awesome thing. Date I did I missed the entirety of the two thousand one Wimbledon until the final which we'll get onto more tomorrow when we, she watched that as one of them it because the woman doing tomorrow is the two thousand and one men's singles final between Goran, Ivanisevic and Pat, rafter today it's Pete Sampras against Roger Federer in the fourth round, but yet the time. Time I was in my fourth year working for the ACP tool I'd been communications manager for three and a half years traveling around I had informed the powers that be that I would like to have got writing and interviewing and all that sort of thing, and they said okay. Then you can go work on this new thing that we've got called a website. And it's and we produce it in Hamburg Germany. So off. You go to the office that. Germany. Not the end of anywhere I thought it was somewhere a little more. Than that. Politically, it was delightful, delightful The office was Nelson somewhere. And Anyway I'm sitting and get there and I'm like we get to the fourth round magic Monday manic Monday and I'm thinking right. There's a lot of crack matches on here. This Roger Federer against Pete Sampras Tim Henman lighter. which channel is it on here in Germany? And they said it's on premiere I said all right. Where's where's that said? We haven't got that one. So. So I was a little bit dubbed by this and frantically trying to think. How do I get out of this job? But. I've signed up for the rest of the entire week until the weekend when I would go off to Gustad for the tournament that. So anyway, that's when I discovered that actually it was available on BBC radio through their website in inverted commas I that I'd never heard of before, but anyway so I was able to listen to the BBC radio coverage throughout the rest of the week, and that's what made me decide. That I wanted to be a commentator right and that week. And he fight off emails to to the commentators he'd be listening to. You. Yeah Yeah, Inkatha. Who is the tennis correspondent? Richard Evans, very long time experienced respected journalist and reporter send the Sunday Times tennis correspondent Dana coincide of the BBC. And they brought the championships alive for me over in Germany and I mean that's what they do. That's what the job of the radio commentator is for people who can't say to try to bring it alive and. It did the job for me. It made it magical I mean I. I actually think that Wimbledon. If you think of Tim Henman's run as well and everything else that went into it, it was one of the all time. Great. Wimbledon's including the ending. And to listen to it on the radio where your mind is having to do the job for you, because you can't see it, using the words, they they describe and you conjuring images on the back of those words, it makes even more mystical and fantastical David Law. You turn not being able to watch one of the greatest of all time into a positive. Well twenty years on Haram watching it. It's awesome. Win deliveryman in solihull. She's moved on from working in tennis and not being able to watch moved into working in tennis and this year still open. You Up to in two thousand and one. We still shuffling around on your bum. Knows all my eight now right was. Please listen to yesterday's podcast to context. or.

tennis Hamburg Germany BBC Germany Tim Henman Roger Federer Pete Sampras David Law Nelson communications manager Richard Evans Gustad Goran Dana reporter Ivanisevic rafter Pat
Federer Comes Of Age

The Tennis Podcast

05:20 min | 1 year ago

Federer Comes Of Age

"Hello everyone and welcome to the tennis podcasts. Wimbledon relived. Not Say Manic Monday. Is Strange to think that in an alternate universe rule experiencing the busiest most hectic day, if the tennis calendar down the road, well down the road from me, and that's w nineteen and instead well I didn't know about you, but I'm something my safer why I'm dressed. I was GONNA. Say My pants spur. I'm dressed, but I'm certainly not in A. Poised and ready to. Go on the tally or anything. I mean it is a very different university living in. The the same time I still find myself trying to crowbar these matches into to be able to watch them all in time because we just watched four hours of a match for today's podcast, having recorded yesterday's show, and then we've got tomorrow's look forward to I mean look I'm having the time of my life. I'm relive I'm reliving two thousand and one and loving every single minute of it, but yeah around actually making meals for children and go into the pollock, and all that sort of thing I am struggling a bit to fit it all in hence sleep out today we spending. We're dwelling quite a while in in two thousand and one land. Aren't we today tomorrow? Yeah and it turns out that that's important. Because David didn't see two thousand one Wimbledon. Much of two thousand and one full stop you in a windowless room in the ASS. End of Germany awesome thing. Date I did I missed the entirety of the two thousand one Wimbledon until the final which we'll get onto more tomorrow when we, she watched that as one of them it because the woman doing tomorrow is the two thousand and one men's singles final between Goran, Ivanisevic and Pat, rafter today it's Pete Sampras against Roger Federer in the fourth round, but yet the time. Time I was in my fourth year working for the ACP tool I'd been communications manager for three and a half years traveling around I had informed the powers that be that I would like to have got writing and interviewing and all that sort of thing, and they said okay. Then you can go work on this new thing that we've got called a website. And it's and we produce it in Hamburg Germany. So off. You go to the office that. Germany. Not the end of anywhere I thought it was somewhere a little more. Than that. Politically, it was delightful, delightful The office was Nelson somewhere. And Anyway I'm sitting and get there and I'm like we get to the fourth round magic Monday manic Monday and I'm thinking right. There's a lot of crack matches on here. This Roger Federer against Pete Sampras Tim Henman lighter. which channel is it on here in Germany? And they said it's on premiere I said all right. Where's where's that said? We haven't got that one. So. So I was a little bit dubbed by this and frantically trying to think. How do I get out of this job? But. I've signed up for the rest of the entire week until the weekend when I would go off to Gustad for the tournament that. So anyway, that's when I discovered that actually it was available on BBC radio through their website in inverted commas I that I'd never heard of before, but anyway so I was able to listen to the BBC radio coverage throughout the rest of the week, and that's what made me decide. That I wanted to be a commentator right and that week. And he fight off emails to to the commentators he'd be listening to. You. Yeah Yeah, Inkatha. Who is the tennis correspondent? Richard Evans, very long time experienced respected journalist and reporter send the Sunday Times tennis correspondent Dana coincide of the BBC. And they brought the championships alive for me over in Germany and I mean that's what they do. That's what the job of the radio commentator is for people who can't say to try to bring it alive and. It did the job for me. It made it magical I mean I. I actually think that Wimbledon. If you think of Tim Henman's run as well and everything else that went into it, it was one of the all time. Great. Wimbledon's including the ending. And to listen to it on the radio where your mind is having to do the job for you, because you can't see it, using the words, they they describe and you conjuring images on the back of those words, it makes even more mystical and fantastical David Law. You turn not being able to watch one of the greatest of all time into a positive. Well twenty years on Haram watching it. It's awesome. Win deliveryman in solihull. She's moved on from working in tennis and not being able to watch moved into working in tennis and this year still open. You Up to in two thousand and one. We still shuffling around on your bum. Knows all my eight now right was. Please listen to yesterday's podcast to

Tennis Hamburg Germany BBC Germany Tim Henman Roger Federer Pete Sampras David Law Nelson Communications Manager Richard Evans Gustad Goran Dana Reporter Ivanisevic Rafter PAT
"richard evans" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"richard evans" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And thirty years ago it was eighteen ninety two the year Finnish composers on civilians premiered his symphonic suite Palermo based on the tragic character of the Finnish poem who realizes the same people who brought him up we're the ones who had killed his family the lesson don't trust those who take care of you was a good fit for what was about to happen to the people of at the end of the nineteenth century the city state was the fourth largest port in the world of popular jumping off point for Europeans heading to America it was run by merchant families who put trade in the economy above the welfare of its residents at the time microbiologist Robert Koch discovered the pathogen for cholera disease transmitted through excrement in water but Hamburg's leaders refused to spend money to treat its water supply instead they insisted cough was wrong cholera they claimed was spread by an invisible vapor no government could prevent but in August of that year a Russian migrant waiting to embark for America went to the bathroom in Hamburg he was sick with cholera and his excrement ended up in the river the same river the city drawn for its tap water says Evans and it was delivered to everyone out of will supply connection and ten thousand people died roughly speaking within about six weeks with an absolute catastrophe made worse by Hamburg's government it waited six days before telling anyone about the epidemic by then thousands were ill and the leaders of the city had to admit their nemesis Robert Carr was right in the only way out of this mess was to invite Kok himself to guide them Christophe robin is a medical historian at the university of Oslo in a situation of an ongoing outbreak the attention of the public focuses on the sides it's providing information he says the lesson is that health institutions have to have political support and be well funded before an epidemic hits historian Richard Evans agrees and he has a lesson for political leaders one of the restaurant we need to learn is to have proper precautions in place proper measures in reserve to rollout when I came in caves and not to try and touch it up for trying to not existence having says this lesson not only applies to today's pandemic.

Palermo America Robert Koch Hamburg cholera Robert Carr Kok Christophe robin Richard Evans university of Oslo
"richard evans" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"richard evans" Discussed on On The Media

"I went to berlin you can't really one hundred meters without seeing markers and stones had been place next to the homes of jewish families that were abducted german seem to want you to go to the holocaust memorial they were intent on changing the narrative they didn't want to be thought of as nazis and fascist forever and i just don't think we've created cultural spaces in this country that motivate people to say never again to this history of enslavement and lynching and segregation in the absence of that commitment i think has left as vulnerable and not only do we not do that we actually romanticized this era and we tell stories about how glorious wonderful the architects and defenders are slavery are and alabama confederate memorial day is a state holiday jefferson davis birthday is a state holiday we do not have martin luther king day in alabama we have martin luther king slash robbie leader stevenson has made montgomery his laborat tori and vast experiment to shift the narrative on american racism 's roots and legacy and he's taken as models similar efforts in south africa rwanda germany and especially its capital berlin where stolpa steiner literally stumbling blocks bear the names of holocaust victims swept up from nearby apartments with there's a vast holocaust memorial just south of the brandenburg gate acres of concrete slabs of various size that you cannot avoid in berlin history comes at you around every corner but the nazi viewpoint has no presence there in the spirit of never again the street names replace to what they used to be before an audience kind of power historian sir richard evans is author of the third reich in history and memory we asked him to trace germany's path to reckoning the concrete source because.

alabama stevenson montgomery tori rwanda berlin alabama confederate memorial jefferson davis martin luther africa germany brandenburg sir richard evans one hundred meters
"richard evans" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"richard evans" Discussed on What It Takes

"Old school he thought andrew wile had really gone off the deep end in his professional career but conventional medicine is still one of the tools in wiles arsenal and he still has great esteem for dr gerson then came norman's in burke a professor of psychiatry and freudian psychoanalyst at harvard who worked on the marijuana experiments with weil in nineteen sixty eight from sin berg while learn to pay attention to sitting how environment and psychological expectations influence a person's reaction to drugs and to all sorts of other things to them also in college i was lucky enough to have richard evans schulte's as my major professor he was the director of the harvard museum and actually an earlier member of the academy of chief ment he was is considered the godfather of modern ethnic botany great character spent a lot of time in the amazon really awakened in me and interest in medical botany i think probably he'd always maybe secretly wanted to be a doctor and i think it was i was the only one of his students who went on into medicine and then i was on his research for a lot of years was with them in the end on and i think my connection with the natural world that really developed through him was a very strong influence on my philosophy integrative medicine then finally when i moved out the to settle in tucson in the mid nineteen seventies i heard about this was after several years of chasing around the world looking for healers and trying to find people that i could learn things from i saw all sorts of practitioners and shamas at turned out the one that i had most to learn from had been right here in tucson all along.

andrew wile dr gerson norman burke harvard weil professor director harvard museum amazon tucson professor of psychiatry marijuana richard evans schulte
"richard evans" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"richard evans" Discussed on Talking Politics

"Maurice only in the last two three years this has been said all the time and with the election of donald trump it's become a kind of trope of public life my colleague in cambridge professor richard evans i'm sure many people read his books the great historian of the third reich in a cafo measured but serious way he has made the case that we have to recognize the parallels between the collapse of the revival republic and the election of donald trump a full of ocean that argument is another very prominent historian the twentieth century ankle timothy snyder space in the united states and he published earlier this year seriously bestselling book called on tyranny twenty lessons from the twentieth century in which he makes the case that if we do not learn the lessons of the nineteen thirties we will repeat the mistakes and he has many memorable lines in book one of which is post truth is pre fascism i'm going to argue to you that it's not john kerry delivery festival recently i just want to start looking for these things are everywhere to john kerry was recently asked what does the present moment remind you of and he said it's obvious we are reliving the nineteen thirties and then about two weeks to and amos very different kind of writer was at alliterate festival and he was asked a similar question he said i hate those trump hitler comparisons that's so wrong trump is miscellany.

Maurice donald trump professor richard evans united states writer alliterate festival cambridge timothy snyder john kerry two three years two weeks
"richard evans" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

Piano Jazz Shorts

06:56 min | 3 years ago

"richard evans" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

"Well we wanna try to see back at the chicken smack at the chicken i love that name that'd be great all right i'm going to listen to that this was really a good blues never heard that too back at the chicken check we haven't done a duet it's shouldn't we do it well how about lot of by the leaves it's good okay well suppose i'll take the million you play one then i'll play one we'll just wing it okay okay just like we played just like we were yeah that's really nice supply play with you i can't believe i'm here with you that's a good tune to funny i keep thinking about years ago in chicago and remember this bass player worked with your husband richard evans sure he was so great so yeah he's not a dedicated musician yeah and he i i wrote a to actually gonna play it for you and he wrote wonderful symphony arrangement wow wow he is a really good player i used to call him the imp he's teaching in berkeley now at berkeley with eight yeah i've got to call him up anyway i'm gonna play this too cold with you in mind found great to me all right.

chicago richard evans berkeley
"richard evans" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

Piano Jazz Shorts

03:16 min | 3 years ago

"richard evans" Discussed on Piano Jazz Shorts

"Just like we played yeah that's really nice supply play with you i can't believe i'm here with you that's a good tune to funny i keep thinking about years ago in chicago and remember this bass player worked with your husband richard evans sure sure he was so great so yeah he's another dedicated musician yeah and he i i wrote a tune actually gonna play it for you and he wrote a wonderful symphony arrangement wow wow yeah he is a really good player i used to call him the imp he's teaching in berkeley now at berkeley wiz yeah i've got to call him up anyway i'm gonna play this tune cold with you in mind found great to me all right.

chicago richard evans berkeley
"richard evans" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"richard evans" Discussed on Talking Politics

"More recently in the last two to three years this has been said all the time and with the election of donald trump it's become a kind of trump of all public life my colleague in cambridge professor richard evans among so many people of read his books the great historian of the third reich in a castle match it but serious way he has made the case that we have to recognize the parallels between the collapse of the weimar republic and the election of donald trump a full of ocean that argument is another very prominent historian the 20century michael timothy snyder space in the united states and he published earlier this year seriously bestselling book cooled on tyranny twenty lessons from the 20th century in which he makes the case that if we do not learn the lessons of the 1930s we will repeat the mistakes and he has many memorable lines in that book one of which is post truth is pre fascism i'm going to argue to you that it's mill john leclair a delivery festival recently i dispute once you start looking for these things are everywhere to john kerry was recently asked what does the present moment remind you off and he said it's obvious we are reliving the 1930s about two weeks later martyn amos a very different kind of writer was the delivery festival and he was asked a similar question he said i hate those trump hitler comparisons that so wrong trump is mr dini.

donald trump professor richard evans united states john leclair writer cambridge weimar michael timothy snyder john kerry three years 20century two weeks mill
"richard evans" Discussed on They Walk Among Us

They Walk Among Us

02:25 min | 4 years ago

"richard evans" Discussed on They Walk Among Us

"National appeal was launched a falling steven farah due to stevens nomadic lifestyle he was difficult to track so on february 18th two thousand twelve detective chief inspector simon crisp of behave on in somerset police appealed to the public for information he stated we need the public's help with this we do not know where he is however is a dangerous man and under no circumstances should be approached on sunday february 19th after an anonymous tip off from a member of the public steven farrow was located in folkston kent was arrested without incident at a property on blackpool road a full twenty am when officers remove stevens claes for forensic testing he said there is no way you will find anything on may i just want to find out what you think oh i've done i am buzzing of this few days like to steven farrow was charged with the murders of betty yates enjoy unsettled and ropy the initial suspect was released without charge dcr simon chris the detective leading the investigation told the press this stephen for would have murdered more people if he'd been cold there were faro as a sadistic under mostly keller so homeless tillerson his jiffy ties to any particular is a concern but the scene of his crimes he left precious few clues actually despite the nature of those drones vote within two days of his identifying was a suspects we also recognised the need to arrest in very quickly and we have substantial grounds to believe he was going to carry on commits an offence is until he was arrested on march sentence police recovered to launch rucksack bush steven from bondi beach he had any spawn on the following day on march iaaf they discovered of the roy tim's in the remnants of a former there which belong to the painters he had sold the stolen items if they jewelry to a jeweler in kidderminster walling custody steven pharaoh made one of mission to a mental health finesse richard evans who he'd been assessed by many is before regarding the murder of betty aids he said he'd not killed the person a seem to mean betty on january 1st because this was a sunday but he had killed her the following day he went on to tell the nassib.

steven farah simon crisp steven farrow folkston kent betty yates stephen faro keller bondi beach roy tim kidderminster richard evans murder somerset stevens steven pharaoh two days
"richard evans" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"richard evans" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"He said that he quote made sure that each man was arms the blackjack or brass knuckles a terrifying melee followed blackjacks brass knuckles clubs heavy buckled belts glass bottles with weapons used garin he said conley on the stage vis on his hips evans report seems like this will being played out all over germany in the early 1930s nazis made their money off these sorts of things if you want to make the alright more popular all you have to do is go out in the straits and fight them than they get to look tough they could to look like a win they gets a look like they are victims of the same time lychner fighting a defensive battle when really what they're doing is promulgating in evil ideology against richard evans okay durables made his reputation above all as regional leader of berlin his fiery speeches his incessant activity his outrageous provocations of the nazis opponents and is calculated staging of street fights and meeting hall brawls to gain the attention of the press one the party a massive new adherence young disenchanted men who have nothing better to do what their allies are looking for movements belong to and that will engage in violence and makes them feel tough it makes them feel special this is why you see now christopher account well in that in advice video talking about how many guns he carries and how it works out all the time and make themselves more ready for violence this is a thing okay in when antifur plays right into their hands not only are they doing something evil when they shutdown normal conservatives they're doing something evil when they fight these nazis in the streets with their fists can it's why we have police in this country and we're very able police in this country and the idea that we need an tifa in the streets of some sort of grand inglorious mission is really disgusting it's a way of legitimising a group that by the way as communist anarchist invites lawabiding people to not just white supremacists notches white but this is just in line.

conley richard evans antifur germany berlin christopher
"richard evans" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"richard evans" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"New temperate during a period of time which which i guess was like six years of your life going back and forth to london and facing this man in court who was hit hard for you i mean did did it take an emotional toll on you it was very difficult because every day that'd be survivors in the courtroom but it wasn't just from survivors a one day david irving listen cordoned with deniers like to do because they have to um explain how when the allies scott to the concentration camps how come they found people there who looked more like cadavers than like real people so what deniers say david irving amongst them is that they were being very well taken care of by the germans but then the allies bombed the pharmaceutical factories the food factories the roads leading to the camp and the germans couldn't take care of them so that's why they looked such terrible while he was making that claim and and richard evans was on the stand our our lead historical witness and and challenging him very strongly on it i happen to look at the gallery and there was an elderly gentleman i would say he was in his late seventies and he looked very distressed i didn't know what it was about my didn't pay too much mind and at the end of that session i saw that he was standing there and he came over to me and he said madam i was part of the british army that liberated the camps and madame it calls me to hear that man say that what we found in the camps was because the germans couldn't take care of these people he said any pause he said madam get the best her madam and he walked off and now's powerful to it just gave me a sense that there are a lot of people felt the lot was riding on this case when you think about the outcome of the trial was that it was it was done was at that point.

concentration camps richard evans british army london david irving scott madam i six years one day