17 Burst results for "Richard Avedon"

"richard avedon" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:46 min | 3 weeks ago

"richard avedon" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Richard Avedon for us in the Home Depot Halftime report. I still can't get over 19 different rushers for the Black Knights of arming in the opening half, but But they do second half of the AutoZone Liberty Bowl Army 14 10 over West Virginia with Brian Edwards hears J Alter Kevin try keeping track of them. No, I don't want Kevin, wait to thank you. The whole people. Halftime report. Brad Edwards Shelter with you Love that. Halftime interview with AutoZone CFO Bill Giles Auto zones commitment to the military and AutoZone Liberty Bowl sponsoring this game today. Remember that when you talk about the service academies playing a power five team Navy beat a Kansas State team a year ago in the AutoZone Liberty ball, so army with a 14 10 halftime lead on West Virginia out of the big 12. Not necessarily a surprise. No, not a surprise at all. When you look at armies track record of success they've had in the last two years against power. Five teams and we'll get to that in just a second. It first. The kickoff is we're back underway in this second half. Remember, Army gets the ball waving for a fair catch. Is a J. Howard Brad continue that thought his armies offense Army coach Jeff Monk and likes to say great players don't win games. Great teams do and there's no further proof of that needed than the last two times they played Power. Five teams. Last year against Michigan two years ago against Oklahoma Army Despite having inferior individual talent took both of those teams to overtime. And so they showed the value of the team and we're seeing it again. Here today. Just another power five opponents starting from their own 25 tie. Your Tyler takes the snap, keeps it himself straight up the middle, lowers his shoulder and tries the pound his way through. It's a gain of seven, which is a very solid game firm Army offense it only mustard 83. Total yards of the first half. Compare that to West Virginia's 184 yards more than 100 yards more than army And yet the Mountaineers trailing by 4 14 to 10 to start the second half and a great start gain of seven or so on first down, and you wouldn't guess it, considering they have the lead. But that was one of their better offensive plays of the game so far, second and three from their own 32 tire under center hand off to the big fella Anthony Adkins, pushing the pile forward for a first down. That's the best Run up the middle on the Stills brothers, Darius Stills in all American nose tackle for West Virginia. But there couldn't get the stop on Adkins and allows army to gain a first down and every team that defends this offense will tell you If they start to establish the fullback, dive, you know you're in trouble. First and foremost, you have to stop that. And for the most part today, they have all the way to the Army 38 yard line for a 1st.

Liberty Bowl Army West Virginia Army AutoZone Anthony Adkins Black Knights Alter Kevin Richard Avedon Brad Edwards Darius Stills Brian Edwards J. Howard Brad Bill Giles Mountaineers CFO Kansas Navy Jeff Monk Michigan
"richard avedon" Discussed on The Candid Frame

The Candid Frame

02:46 min | 6 months ago

"richard avedon" Discussed on The Candid Frame

"I have a category called stand and Stare Stanton stairs what they Arba Stas Nadar that did August Sander did Richard Avedon did penn did sit and stare but they're people standing and looking at her passport pictures you know those are descriptions. I knew. I knew any number of by entire lifetime I. Know Nothing about him. You know we rolls we know the role, my mother back to them the woman father played in my life. Does that mean I know? I did what Margaret was thinking when she married him and he was when he married her, you know what were they are I don wasting about anything I'm going to Paris this the a said this before the only two dollars direct experience. The guy says to the woman I love you and she thinks they're going to get married and he thinks he's going to get laid languages. Completely Iran is so anybody who claims they captured anything I've read body. This is a nineteen thirty, two random body and it's fifty eight-year-old Model I'm an old eighty-eight the recalling this year you could get spare parts for this year it's a random body. People don't question anything. They just buy the whole package. We're all prepackaged by the culture by religion. All nonsense I don't care what you think. You know do what you WANNA do. So what are the other three types architects portrait's? There's sanded stare then there's something I. Call The it's in my book read my book it's. Soon to be emotion major disaster, it's there. The other one is called the annotated portrait. Now, that's when I took a picture of my mother yet again, father and brother and I wrote under it. So that's what they look like. The text I said was very liberating said as long as I can remember, my father was said he would write me a letter when I left comedy never said the letter what it would be about. So I wondered what secret the last two of US would share what mystery blind no I'd hoped in reading a letter. I want him to tell me where he had his in hidden his affection but the never let her never came on I never found that place where he had hidden his love. So I'm annotating showing this is what they look like when I was twenty one years old in New, York and my apartment, and they were forty one or fifty. That's a fact that the facts but what I'm telling you about what did or did not happen between so suddenly upped the ante. So the thing is now I showed you what they look like an I told you my version of what it was like to be within and then I did something which I call the let's see I forgot what I called it but I did a portrait of you know Michael Richard Kramer..

Richard Avedon Stare Stanton Arba Stas Nadar Margaret Michael Richard Kramer August Sander US York Iran penn Paris
"richard avedon" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

The Indy Mogul Podcast

05:13 min | 9 months ago

"richard avedon" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

"For and I was their best tech and they're like hey. Steve You WANNA. Go showed Richard Avedon. Digital work some like yeah. He was awesome. You know I think he's like Dick. How you doing you know he was amazing. Dude? That's so passionate about image making. Capturing the essence of people and stuff, and so we did one day I showed him how there's a word that we did another day where he was shooting self portrait of himself for some ad for HP or something, and it was Super Fun, and once I got to work and see like in fashion and beauty in in product and kind of work with a bunch of different people, and that's honestly like. School was great. I learned so much just like hard knocks. And getting. Better getting paid to work for other people but then once again I told you I started shooting jobs for magazines, and so this was all kind of running like. I was assisting digital tech. I was doing some retouching for people to like Photoshop. Five or whatever it was that and you know doing all this stuff. It just always hustling, hustling hustling..

Richard Avedon Dick Steve HP Photoshop
"richard avedon" Discussed on A Beautiful Mess Podcast

A Beautiful Mess Podcast

03:57 min | 11 months ago

"richard avedon" Discussed on A Beautiful Mess Podcast

"So we're going to do. What are you looking at and Emma? What are you looking at? I started a new book. I'm always starting books I didn't finish my last one. I just didn't get into it. I liked it at first and I want to watch. The movie. Didn't get into it anyway. What was it what was it? It was call me by your name. Oh you didn't like the book. I never saw the book or the movie so saw the book. Just move on from well you do look at it with Your Eyes. Saw The book. Yeah I don't know I mean I don't WanNa dicit or anything because I know some people have loved it so I don't want to say it's like that or anything. I don't think that I just didn't get into it. I don't know maybe I'm not high class enough but I I do like the general idea behind it and I'm definitely GonNa Watch the movie very excited to trae. Wants to watch it to some kind of waiting for him to watch it to anyway. I moved on the book. I'm reading now is called the husband's secret which is by Liane Moriarty. Good I looked. I looked it up okay. So here's the thing about this author. I love this author. She wrote big little lies if you saw that series or book but she has lots of books. I've read some for other books. I love her. I believe she's Australian so I was trying to look up how to pronounce her name properly. A lot of interviews. The people interviewing her were Australian and I was like. Is this how you say it? You know sometimes like British accents people sit. They literally pronounce it differently than Rier could would so I was like Oh. There's no way no for sure honestly so. I'm sorry if I butchered her name. She's an amazing author though. I love her books so I wanted to read another one and this one. I just picked up randomly at a thrift store. I was like oh one of her books here. Rad so reading it cool. That's what I'm looking at Okay so we're moving this week and I have been very stressed Like ten out of ten. It's not a good. It's not a pleasant time for me so what I'm trying to do is just like anything self care any kind of tree. Anything that I can do to feel like a little bit better. So what so? The only thing I've been reading quote unquote reading is like my inspiration books. So I'm going to link all of these in the show notes. A beautiful mess dot com back slash podcast. So I have this book. This Richard Avedon book. I've also just been feeling this. Draw towards photography again so at anyway. This is Richard is a famous photographer through the nineteen hundreds and he I think he I think he passed kind of recently anyway. He has beautiful iconic black and white photography. You will definitely recognize it if you saw. I really want one for my home. Like a is it like in print landscapes or no. It's portrait people mostly K Yeah like think. Like vogue from the nineteen sixties like cocaine And then I have this case bad book that I loved Luca and I have the Big Tim. Walker book from the olden days and some art books that I got Used Aba Georgia. O'keefe won a Picasso went so I've just been feeling really like I need to just fill my brain up with beautiful things and not think about anything. Siri it's also the week before it when we're recording this. It's the week before Super Tuesday and the corona virus bit ally and we're moving you know it's just been a lot. Thanks so much for tuning in this league. If you have any questions about short term rentals we are always happy to answer. You can reach us at podcast at Beautiful Mass Dot Com and please remember to click subscribe on our podcast so they get updates every week..

Richard Avedon Beautiful Mass Dot Com Rier Emma Liane Moriarty WanNa dicit cocaine O'keefe Walker Luca Georgia Richard
"richard avedon" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"richard avedon" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"And she had done the photo session for Richard Avedon in the dress. And nobody paid that much attention. It was in vogue, and it was black and white, and all of a sudden and so we send her off. I with her to, to the met ball in both of us real looking pretty good. We were young and whatever, and people were like, oh, oh, visit photographers all of a sudden appeared just if somebody has if they if they're trying to visualize what we're talking about. It's a nude colored. But also there's quite a bit. That's visible very sheer dress, right? All beaded. And then with little little feathers vulture feathers. Everybody thinks they're all mulcher feathers stripped, vulture. And so was that address that you were particularly or not drilling is one that I did that I wanted to, to make a little bit of noise? When we when we invoke bags, Zine vote magazine layout, was interesting. It started at turn of the century and worked its way up through the through the decades to the nineteen I wasn't nineteen seventies, I guess, you know is futuristic what? Ever. Anyway, anyway, she wa-. She is what he what do you think we should wear to the to the metropolitan? And she's all my wanna wear that new dress. Well, of course it was new. It was, it was so see-through and all these kind of divas of a moment. Ribeiro. Dressed up. But not that good. Bianca jagger. Orissa Berenson's in all these ladies that were that moment in time, they were the Hutsi dot CS, and we sat down freelance table, and she had poet guarded forties movies there. And and I just had the best time that night. And of course, I had stuff in the exhibit and she got photographed by million. I mean, share every, every photographer there when omega now we can really do something. And it was in every paper the next day..

Richard Avedon Bianca jagger Orissa Berenson Zine vote magazine Ribeiro
"richard avedon" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

08:48 min | 2 years ago

"richard avedon" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"I commissioned portraits of hundreds of public figures, including world leaders such as Saint Pope, John Paul the second Saint Teresa of Calcutta Mikhail Gorbachev and Margaret Thatcher to entertainers like Ella. Fitzgerald, Mick Jagger, BB king Luchino Pavarotti. His architects of peace project is permanently exhibited at the national civil rights museum. Marquette university, the Hoover institute archives at Stanford and university in Mexico City and Santa Clara university while self taught his early mentors included Ansel Adams, and Richard Avedon. Welcome michael. And thank you for the honor of your time. Let's get started with your early interesting. Photography and your interactions with Ansel Adams and Richard Avedon. We'll Tom first of all it's a pleasure to be here with you. And when it got out of college, I went to Saint Mary's college, just like my father, and I thought I was going to go into the graphic arts field, and I had a really difficult time. Trying to find something creative creative job that would really be inspiring. And it was at that time that I saw an exhibit of Ansel Adams work at the Oakland museum that greatly inspired me. In fact, I was mesmerized by his pictures of Yosemite valley and somebody at the gallery had told me that answer lived in Carmel. So that very next Monday morning. I called four one one information up for a listing on Ansel Adams and sure enough he was listed. I made the phone call. He picked up the phone and invited me to come down. And that's how I got into photography was learning for Mansell himself. And what intrigued you at first? What was it the catcher, Pat, I think it was really the. The sense of black and white the clarity the sharpness the dramatic nature of of the pictures that he took and it was really just stunning. It was almost an epiphany moment for me to view, his photographs and certainly of Yosemite, which was always a favourite family vacation of ours. And you know, something that I was very familiar with. But to see those particular pictures, Tom was just so inspirational to me, and then to meet him was really quite extraordinary. And I really go back to those days thinking that that was really paving the road for me getting into in fact, there are some things that I learned for Mansell that still stick with me today such as the idea of provisional ization, which is almost a faith filled sort of message to visualize in my world to visualize the final picture before you even take it. But that could be applied to anything in business in a way to have that kind of conviction at your heart. Along paired with inspiration and hard work that must be a gift though. I when you talk about visualization being a part-time golfer. Visualization visualization is a big deal and coughing where you can see the ball landing on the green. And so on you hear the pro golfers talk about it a great deal. But I'm trying to imagine what it would be like to visualize a photograph before you've even put it together. And I also do a little oil painting. And I know that in whether it's a photograph or an oil painting. There's a number of problems that have to be solved one is the composition. Values curse black and white such. I've never worked in black and white or maybe talk a little bit about first of all let me stop you right there because I can totally identify with my golf game in the same way, it free virtualization doesn't translate to my golf game either. But I have to say it is almost like a faith based type of precept in terms of provincial association. I choose black and white more often than color, just because I think it strips away the distractions of color, so black and white for me is is much more powerful. In terms of going rate to the subject rate to that emotion bigger trying to translate in terms of photographing somebody, and I would say that there's always a bit of a disconnect with somebody that you meet in person that you might see on the screen or on the stage say it's an entertainer. There's always a little bit of a disconnect when you meet them face to face because their three dimensional and they look different in person. There may be some. Some characteristic that you pick up in person that you didn't notice before. So those things you take into account very quickly. And in regard to provision ation. I would say that probably most of my most favorite photographs were visualized before I even met the individual. So it may be somebody well known that for the most part is a lot of my subjects. They're very well known. So for me, it's very easy to do some research ahead of time. But I would say that I have a notion of the lighting what type of side of the face. I'm gonna light. I what side would go into shadow how I would pose that individual in a way that's going to be natural. But what's most important is really bringing across that particular emotion to make it real. I would never come into a situation with somebody and say tell me cheese or say some particular word back to me just to try to enlighten them in some way to bring across. Promotion that way. I would always want to have a conversation with them face to face with them sitting across the table is if you and I were talking even now and tried to pull out certain emotions in the face. That would be a characteristic of your personality, and how did Richard Avedon across your path will you know, after years of working with Ansel Adams. I really learned. I had a great aptitude of what it took to make a good composition and a good execution of of a photograph. In other words, a good exposure something that was well lit something wasn't underexposed or overexposed. But I realized after years of working with him. There was no way that I was going to be making a living doing nature photography. So I had always been interested in people. So I was very drawn to meet with Richard Avedon on it wasn't as easy as picking up the phone and calling Ansel Adams. It took me a couple of weeks to get a short meeting with him at a studio in New York. But that was really the epitome moment I needed to come back and to be fully immersed in being a portrait photographer. He talked to me a lot about the psychology. Gee that exist between subjects so in other words, really being face to face with that subject as I was saying earlier in terms of pulling out different types of emotions that are really true expressions of that individual as opposed to trying to manipulate the situation. Well, I know that I am an amateur photographer. Like everybody is today now with the smartphone. I guess everybody's taking pictures, but there are certain pictures take of people, I know, and when I see them I really feel good because I feel I really capture who they are. And it would seem to me that when you're doing portraiture that this intimacy emits a very intimate medium, certainly and getting to know them as extremely important to capture them on film. You just don't snap a picture. But you're from what I just heard you say, you're you've already envisioning how you want to shoot this. Maybe you can let us amateurs in a little bit more. What you do to get yourself prepared for the really good little. I always tell people that being a good photography photographer. It's much more about being a good psychologist as opposed to being somebody who's technically well versed or somebody who's going to be good at lighting all those kinds of things can come into play and enhance a picture. But if you don't have the essence of of some particular trait in an individual, then it's all for not. So I really think in terms of of exploring somebody it's a matter of being curious about that individual fortunately in my world. There's a lot of information on the people of the subjects that I photograph. So it's very easy for me to do some research. If it's somebody that I don't know I'm inherently curious about that individual, and I'll ask them questions and soon that space is sort of dispelled to the point that we're just talking face to face. That's great. And we're gonna come back and talk some more about not only the business of photography and how you've built your business. But also about some of the joys you've had along the way we need to take a break. And when we return we'll continue with Michael copy one of our nation's premier portrait,.

Ansel Adams Richard Avedon Mansell Tom Michael Yosemite Oakland museum Mexico City Yosemite valley Saint Pope Fitzgerald Saint Mary Mick Jagger Mikhail Gorbachev Santa Clara university Marquette university Luchino Pavarotti Margaret Thatcher
"richard avedon" Discussed on I Was There Too

I Was There Too

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"richard avedon" Discussed on I Was There Too

"Didn't when you're fired a most amazing euphemisms. Yeah. So I was resting and I was. Yes, fitfully, and I was really I was really really frustrated, obviously. And I was like running and there was a gym. I lived in east London. And there was like an old fashioned boxing gym in Mr. Britain trained there. So I went there, and I started lifting weights which I was a kid. I, you know, it's kind of a tomboy, and I just got really really into it that whole subculture of bodybuilding. And I it was just fun. Wow. Yeah. That's fascinating. Now. I also read that there was a background on yours. And Drake's character, the other smart gonna write your your Powell until it's made short work of. And it's all right. I know sorry, Mark. So you guys were basically in juvenile prison, and you were recruited. Absolutely. So you weren't just regular kind of volunteers or draftees. You guys had a not much to lose to go out and find some Moore's, yeah, exactly. I mean that was the the great description and context for both of our characters that we were conscript out of juvenile prison serve. A life sentence for murder, and my I didn't know that Lyles would you be sitting? I mean, it's the future. But I I assumed you know, she was a gang, and she obviously was involved in some sort of murder. And so it was like either spend your time behind bars are spend your time, you know, with the marines. So she had nothing, you know, they had nothing to lose. Which when you have nothing to lose you become the most bad ass character in the world. I think that translates pretty well watching, and I feel like my eyes go to you every time you're on screen. You had this amazing gun. You have this amazing character, your body armor is decorated with interesting. Graffiti, can you talk a little bit about that as well? Oh, yeah. No. That was great James Cameron. It was really specific that we should all kind of find our characters, and then, you know, personalise our costumes, and because it's really bad sometimes you show up on a set, and you've got this whole idea of your character. And then the the art department is decided everything else for you. And it was completely the opposite. We got to put things on our uniforms or gun, even our lockers were our locker. So all the pictures that are in there, and we brought them. So it was great. What was in your locker? What were the decorations? Do you remember? Yeah. Absolutely. Do actually do. I have this. There's a picture of a really young girl who was a Sandinista and her hair's. Cut really short and she has her cross like in her mouth, and she sitting there. I I don't know where I found it in a magazine, and then I had this great picture from the Richard Avedon book. And it's he's this Carney guy. He's got this. Like a snake like kind of? To me. That was my brother. It was this wonderful incredible photo and Seipat both of those up in the I'm going to have to try to track them. Yeah. It's at one scene where they're kind of loading up, and they're all closing their lockers. I'm not sure you could see it in a still there's a still of me, and you can see the locker..

Lyles murder London boxing Seipat Richard Avedon Moore Drake James Cameron Mark Mr. Britain Powell Carney
"richard avedon" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"richard avedon" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Rare company of feminist royalty. Fearless an extraordinary Susan Falati. Carol jenkins. Opening comments by Diana Weiner of the Milford readers and writers festival. Thank you so much for that introduction. My goodness. And susan. I don't have her hats. Feel prepared that that was great. And we do have in common. Glorious on move has mentor. Both of us. And I now moody club with Gloria. And it's so fascinating the movie said she chooses. Like the slightly Phil and mama Mia. Although. She quite understood, mama Mia. Our other other member movie clever send an hour afterwards explaining why it was so fabulous. She loved it. Shares the price of the ticket. If you get to see that, I am so pleased to be in conversation with you. Susan Faludi has walked our lives since nineteen ninety one. When she wrote backlash stipulated, how our society was against us. And there were some people that didn't believe you. Well. They've come around. Around because this morning, I was on Twitter hoping to fly polluted posting their she she follows zero people. She's not there. But you still trendy because everybody was if you haven't read backlash get it read it out. So you are once again in the thick of the conversation about women and the way we're being treated so much of that has to do with what's going on in the supreme court the effort to add a new Justice. And I know that we're gonna talk about the I know that you'll have questions about that. But I wanna start with another. Fantastic story that you tell about your father and his transitioning from he says, don't forget, you know, even if I am a woman, I'm still your father. Talk to us about in the dark room because your dad was well, we'll say first and foremost, he was dead. But he was also a photographer, and that's where the title comes from. Title in the dark room has numerous levels of meaning because I grew up with a father who literally lived in the dark room. My father was a photographer, but mainly did technical work all my father called trick photography. She then he at the time. Worked for content asked. Altering the some of the most famous commercial fashion photographers of the times work with montages color conversions all predate Photoshop. With technical. So he worked on Richard Avedon Francesca. Loops are we here? Hello..

Susan Faludi mama Mia Susan Falati Diana Weiner Carol jenkins susan Richard Avedon Francesca Twitter supreme court Photoshop Phil
"richard avedon" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"richard avedon" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"The oped page and what were some of the proudest moments that you had there was with the pitch for about two and a half to three years one of those years i also did the book review section i did all the new sections that were starting because there weren't that many art directors so i worked on the proudest thing there were quite a few things first of all just being at the new york times which to me is still the most important news gathering and news telling organization in this country i did a page towards the end of the vietnam war that richard avedon did and he came and spent the entire day making me miserable mine because we used to do the paper and hot metal and engravings had to be made and you couldn't control the density of the picture and he wanted controlled a certain way so we just spent hours and hours and hours getting it done the right way but it was nice and there was a page once where it was a story about the kennedy assassination and i took the rifle that the famous picture of the rifle and i airbrushed the hands out of the rifle and just took the rifle as a rifle and leaned it against a column of type when went from the bottom of the page to the top of the page and the associate editor of the page was out that so went through when he came back he said he was really pissed he said i would never have let you do that why i don't know now but but i said okay i did it is it true that if you didn't always have budget you would make cartoons that you actually create your own cartoons but you used a pseudonym so you felt that they were good enough but you didn't want to be known for them they weren't good enough i did them anyway and i didn't want anybody to know i did them what was the again until you but i just squeezed that one in there then you went to the new york times book review and you did that for decades i did that for about thirty years and thirty years thirty years while you were there in tire for thirty three years roy and then plus seven years under contract to contract so what was it like to work on the book review every week what was it what was group who was the new york times it was the book review it was dealing with material i loved dealing with strangers that i liked giving people their first jobs i felt godlike i also feel like no by then it was just god and woody allen say you have to model yourself after somebody exactly said other things too yeah but it was wonderful experience there were a bunch of different editors each one i had to learn to get along with in different ways and it became kind of there was one editor that i really didn't like and decided to go out and look for work and realized after visiting other magazines that nothing was better than the times and i just bit the bullet until he left there was an editor woman editor who i loved we got along great there was another editor who always had this line at the end of the day another day in the long march toward death that wasn't you that will say but one of my little quirks was we would always show pages on wednesday before it went to press and we'd do them as big xerox's folded over and i would draw hitler mustaches on everybody and it got to be so that everybody in the room started drawing hitler that was giving you an enormous amount of pleasure didn't the you had an opportunity while you were at the times to begin writing books and so you have since written one hundred eighty books year in varying degrees of co authorship close stave one hundred eighty it's one hundred eighty it's amazing so what was.

thirty years thirty three years seven years three years
"richard avedon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"richard avedon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The world of fashion well from an early age i discovered fashion through the pages of folk i went to the public library durham north carolina and i was about ten years old or maybe nine and i discovered this magazine called volk and in those days it came out on the first and fifteenth of every month and the editor was and this was my scape world when i was a young boy i grew up in my grandmother's home in durham north carolina modest home as she was a maid to conversely and it was just my grandmother and myself she was an extraordinary woman she was a frugal woman and she would see watch the budget she had a bank account and a we had a wonderful life because i never knew anything but love unconditional love your nine year old boy and you're totally fascinated by these fashions that adult women are wearing so what have debated you as a nine year old boy about the world of vogue the world of vogue met more than what the women were wearing as models the issues of oh captivated me not only before the images of the fashion spreads but it was the magazine itself that turned me onto abroad that i did not know had not been exposed to it was the world of literature what was happening in the world of art what was happening in entertainment i it was my gateway to the world outside of durham north carolina it wasn't just the fashion of course i love the fashions i love the beautiful images and i related so much to the images and then the written words the captions the articles so i was living through vogue as an escape hatch but reading every single page loving every single detail i mean they had a men's column called men in vogue and that was very fascinating to me then maxine has had a cooking column that was fascinating to me then of course the main spreads they were all orchestrated by the great editor of religion and they were basic built on her fantasy but she just gave me the world i discovered truman capote i discovered the great of ballerinas from the bolshoi who defected to the west i discovered new etf in aberdeen photos new yes was nude photograph by richard avedon on all of this was just very exciting to me and it was the world that i.

north carolina editor durham maxine richard avedon truman aberdeen nine year ten years
"richard avedon" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

B&H Photography Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"richard avedon" Discussed on B&H Photography Podcast

"Present series as well in cenis amazing me she's been really helpful to me like of astor for blurb zwei books and she gives them to me like you know don't howard said his baron a wide me you know she so cool and like i'm you know i general flecked in front of the goddess amine you were you nervous when he does when the most i nerveracking should ever did was it was when i photographed her because she was so easy going to but she's kind of reserved and she's a little mysterious a now way like night in any way like mieno or difficult just you know like just normal and right leg but you know not a few serve so i was us like she's probably thinks i'm touch and eighty inner ear whatever i'm thinking you know and the bought the shares was at her choice fear toys silo i wrote that along the book okay narrowed they is i don't think i picture to her very good like i wish i could shoot again to get a better one that i've set of what i was getting on is that you know about the rubber franklin oh boy so i met frank through my professor dave heath them and lead him in francoera we're good friends so dave died about a year ago so human off rancour very good friends frank him unspoken toronto saiga introduced him at kind of invite to like cover drinks out the local bob with maybe like a half dozen of you know friends of of of heath's and some say next a franc and you know you at some point you know iif you ever nitz says what they do or whatever i selma port photographer and he starts mocking me as i go you can have me be in the snow or makes no angels are you know kind of literally making fun of what i do and what kind of pictures i make hasn't seen any my word it doesn't matter though and i look at him i'm like you can't talk to me that way not i'm not saying that they can as and argue with mike even see my pictures what are you what are you commenting on also is a picture of you with your by richard avedon.

dave heath francoera mike richard avedon howard frank professor toronto
"richard avedon" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"richard avedon" Discussed on WCTC

"Pm eastern on f s one view and one of the many reasons why i love doing the show uh is it is on audience on direct tv channel to thirty nine were dan patrick has a show before this one in mirrors that joe balk uh with his conversation show a undeniable that again has brought hole on it tonight so many great tv shows scripted shows and then all right in the middle of this boutique uh black and white interview show that is a fantastic watch every time it's some spectacular guests hosted by the man to my right away will stop talking about as if he's not sitting here a former at y gets you're still a photographer for vanity fair turned interviewer good to see you sam joan's house your heavenly whwhen did you realize you know what i'd like to get out from behind the camera and sit on camera and talk to people instead of taking their picture would you call it with that one well you know a lot of people know me as photographer but i've also directed a lot and made a few documentaries ensure i always enjoy the conversations that take place either either in the documentary format or even just the conversations that we're taking place when i was photographing people and i always came away from those jobs with a more complete picture of the personnel is working with and and those the conversations that excite me about being an artist excite me about the creative projects and and so i think that the the idea for the show started as can you make a complete portrait of an artist and really get inside their creative path from the decisions they made that led them here because for me i was always incredibly intimidated when i met one of my heroes like how did date how did they do this what do they have that i don't have or something like that was one of those people well i mean anyone from you know you take a filmmaker like how ashby your or a photographer like richard avedon on or escape border like tony hawkal or a you know a songwriter like joe stromer from the clash or something and these people were making the work that the.

dan patrick richard avedon tony hawkal joe stromer joe balk sam joan
"richard avedon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"richard avedon" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You lift uh very fair wound up book going to the new yorker were you made changes seen uh many people objected to at the time and in retrospect they all seek made real sense and every one of those changes the chilean affect what you think there was so much initial resistance what do you think you know i was in his the change aging writes that when i took over any oca they'd never even had a photograph in that that never i mean they they didn't even have any any an index conveying hazel by law and of you buy lifezette of a contents page it was all about opaque a as it would church and so my i knew these things have to be done but of course people feared the i would suddenly put a naked pregnant demi moore on the cover which was the last thing from my mind because actually i started my life has become a literary illiterate jealous so you know i did a lot of changes i brought richard avedon to be the only photographer in the pages because i thought okay we're gonna open the windows we're going to put pictures and but very sparingly and let's have a photographer avagian mazzone one i could think of who had the incredible black and white purity that would go so beautifully with those uh the new yorker typeface and have a wonderful artists like ought spiegelman ed surround made the covers far more vital and got away from what i called the palk bench covered in autumn leaves of course i had david remnant can jeffrey toobin mock i'm glad well jane mayer wrote in some of these wonderful writers who at the time it was like who is she bringing in who are all these people they will turn out to be extremely good but after the new yorker you started a magazine called talk in 1998 with harvey weinstein lattes are you realize if that israeli hurry moved out as an uh it seems like.

new yorker demi moore richard avedon windows david remnant jeffrey toobin jane mayer harvey weinstein
"richard avedon" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"richard avedon" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Have you heard our conversation from corner office last week you heard me fess up that those interviews with ceos don't you know technically always happen in corner offices today another revelation i guess should call it the person with whom you're about the hear me talk isn't the ceo budge she is plenty powerful and influential all the same joanna kohl's is the chief content officer for hearst magazines as wire pauper's bazaar good housekeeping some of the title you will know kohl's is fresh off a run as the editor in chief of cosmopolitan i went to see her in her office when i was in new york couple of weeks ago and as i started i did as i often do with people astra her to set the scene uh this is the office of the chief content i hope that all of us it's a rather thrilling office isn't it eichel my treadmill desk which i love on which i wore calm a lot because sitting is the knees making we have a view of central park and we also have this magnificent picture of kim kardashian at sydney's stand painted from the back looking at different covers of herself it took me a minute i was going to say anything but since you brought it up that's a very kardashian esque posed than that in that portugal it is i by which i think you mean she has an enormous off in had gene well i wasn't going to say that the chore is yours companies and it's actually nine that i do if you want to point out have a wonderful picture of bob dylan walking through central part will actually down central part west by richard avedon which is the companies uh so you have the event won back i laugh to give them back when they find me and i will know that when they had of security refuses to laugh through the tail of style where i have to come every day this is probably a good moment then talking about you going fired to point out that you've only been in this job look a year or half i have some hoping for a little bit more round lightly can never say never say 'never chewbacca for a minute before we.

chief content officer kim kardashian sydney bob dylan richard avedon ceo joanna kohl hearst editor in chief new york portugal
"richard avedon" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"richard avedon" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Um but i do if you want to point out have a wonderful picture of bob dylan walking through central part will actually down central part west by richard avedon which is the companies uh so you have given one badly have to give that when they find me and i will know that when they had of security refuses to let me through the turnstiles where i have to come every day this is probably good moment than talking about you going fired to point out that you've only been in this job like a year why half i have so i'm hoping for a little bit more ramli you never say never say 'never koubek a permanent before we get to you in magazines in in media and new york you used to be a daily news journalist amine doing daily coverage i did tulsen store well i started outs the daily telegraph the daily news reporter i moved then to the guardian and then i moved to new york as the correspondent for the guardian moved to the times of london and really it was the best job you could imagine you could cover any story wanted in america i liked say there was no violent crime too violent for me to cover a no small town too small for me to visit so i had a wonderful time travelling all over america and actually it turned out to be fantastically good training four navigating stays media landscape which changes every day and anybody who tells you where it's going to be in a year is lying 'cause nobody knows only get there in a minute but one of the reasons i have read that you left dili journalism and got into magazines is because you wanted to to um have a different pace in your life.

bob dylan richard avedon new york reporter america tulsen
"richard avedon" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"richard avedon" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"The addition anywhere said i don't have experience instead said of course you do and that was my first grade new york lesson lie oh god and she did get the job and the pictures of models jumping in fashion editorials she started that it was her first big shoe with famed photographer richard avedon early psalm john bob in their hair go up and everything's were not going while i was trying to be vereshaka is the one who we you know the 50s your and that was terrible when in the hopes of finding something they're inspire richard avedon asked her about her childhood and she said she used to love jumping over snakes and he told the judge leap in trump in the photo and the rest was history that started the run and jump pictures because they couldn't model and that's really funny and the first guy john i know the first time you know which the first cover was for her the first time that she really felt like a supermodel she nabbed the cover of the newly born people magazine may 19th 75 real it in the headline was she's got it all and that's when i first felt like a supermodel wow and she was the first model to get a beauty contract it was all her idea until then modeling you were paid by the hour great but at news new she was a hot commodity tweed croat vershbow was doing something else gene shrimp term was acting ever own of quit i was the only one left and she got a glimpse of a new york times article about a man got a million dollar contract for his own job inch that how can i do that and he the richard avedon said pitch something new revlon in 1973 at age thirty one she signed the first ever modelling contract with revlon for four hundred thousand and she stayed for ten years she was the face of revlon forever did she ever bury your hand will answer there's he because i'm looking at all these pictures of her she's fuse if you guys look arap lauren hutton she's just she was everything growing up oh abc news everywhere absolutely she was really really.

john bob richard avedon people magazine croat vershbow revlon new york times lauren hutton million dollar ten years
"richard avedon" Discussed on Fashion Hags

Fashion Hags

04:22 min | 4 years ago

"richard avedon" Discussed on Fashion Hags

"When when Shanghai was occupied a cupid occupied by the Japanese and the she she fled to South America. I think maybe and then became a model and became like the shit like Jiangxi Balenciaga Oleg Cassini like just obsessed with this woman. There's a super famous picture of her with his big giant bouffant like beehive hairdo, and she's like tapping your cigarette with a giant thing. Just like looking again, this another one that has cheekbones you could you know, slice Alami with. And she was just like exotic and sophisticated and just like perfection and just like strangely. They just very interesting looking. But also very glamorous. And she was yeah. She was one of the first. Non white models to be in like of these magazines in the fifties. And I think it was yes, it was Richard Avedon who met her through Diane relent, one of our patron Saint standard ruined. And he worked for Harper Harper's bazaar for years and years, and he was trying to renegotiate a contract or contract was coming to an end this is alleged this is or anything, but they didn't purpose didn't wanna put her in their magazine because she was white oh said I'm not going to work for you anymore. If you don't put her in this magazine, really. And and she ended up in the magazine this is like in nineteen the late fifties. I think right. So he threw his weight around and got her in the magazine, and she was on covers and it tons of editorials and staff and put your runway shows too. And like there was she was she was in a runway show in somewhere in the states. And there's a whole bunch of buyers from the south, and they didn't buy a single look. She war. Because she was might. And it was like something some famous, of course, like super legit. She was wearing like target or something like. A nice stuff, but they wouldn't they wouldn't buy it because she was wearing it. And it was the sixties or whatever in in the states Corozzo change. She's like, she's like she had a love affair with a with a bullfighter who left her for a gardener, and like the super awesome black life story and Evans Evan swimming. Lipa water just as I b. So both fighter who left her for abour Gardner. Memoir, I feel life. I don't know if she has I would read the shade at for and make some money. Absolutely. So anyway, she was she's just studying gorgeous. And also was my research for this. There was an an issue of vogue Italia in January twenty thirteen where Chinese model face on who's fucking gorgeous Google face on. And she was shot by Steven Meisel to look like Tina Machado, and she had the big this crazy architectural hair and the makeup, and they all these like, we're in Gucci in, you know, Valentino in our money and stuff. So we'll post pictures of this photo shoot. Because it's stunning an perfection, and we'll also put pictures of China 'cause. You just look at her. And all of a sudden it's Thursday to you know, you've been looking at it for four days, and you have no idea what's going on. So that was my choice for somebody old school. Katie. Who do you got on your list? Maybe don't have anybody that old. I well. I don't. But you gotta have got some I got I don't really I modeling is not it's not something you might particularly invest a lot of time. It's a weird thing to think. Did feelings. Yeah. Sure. We just did a casting last week for some editors shootout work, and it's strange talking editorial for like, ecommerce shoots. And it's weird too strange dynamic, skin, tone and shoulder shape. And she's tall. But her, you know, her legs are muscular, so she's not super skinny so we like that. But she and then like the actual the sort of professionalism of it like she can jump into poses really quickly jazz needs under direction, and she showed up on time. And she looks nice. It looks Looks fine. clean portfolio..

Tina Machado Harper Harper Katie South America Richard Avedon Jiangxi Shanghai vogue Italia Evans Evan abour Gardner Diane relent Steven Meisel Google Gucci China Valentino four days